Page 1

THE RABBI SPEAKS Rabbi Baruch Pesach Mendelsohn Speaks Out Against Drinking

Jewish Community Council of

Marine Park

6-QUESTION MARKETING QUIZ By Issamar Ginzburg, Marketing Expert

A WORD FROM OUR ELECTED OFFICIAL Lew Fidler Reflects on his Political Career

CO O K

IN G

Rich n WITH ELK ’ Tasty Y ...yet WFRIEDMA N holeso me -

Issue No. 1, September 2013

Help Your Child Succeed by Rabbi Yaakov Horowitz


$5.99/day

Wireless Modem

$9.99/day

Wii connect up to 5 users

As low as

$5.99

Unlimited Calls + Text + Data

www.amigo-us.com 1-888-Amigo-US (264-4687)

an Amigo with you

$5.99/day

Own your number

Unlimited data

Call for details

$4.99/day

Medical & travel protection

www.mediguardtravel.com

Traveling to Israel? Take

Israel (072) 215-6600

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 2


WISHING YOU AND YOUR FAMILY A PROSPEROUS, HAPPY, HEALTHY AND BLESSED NEW YEAR.

  

Assemblywoman

Helene Weinstein 41st Assembly District

TO ADVERTISE, EMAIL

ADS@ THEJEWISHECHO.COM TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 3


3415 Quentin Rd.

Come see our newly renovated store with wider aisles, more checkouts and great service.

Bklyn, NY 11234 P: 718-336-1718 F: 718-336-1365 yourkdsorder@gmail.com.

September-October Savings #00011

$40 SAVINGS

#00022

Week of September 15-20

Week of September 22-27

$10 OFF

$10 OFF

Coupon must be present one coupon per family. Not valid on phone , fax or email orders

Coupon must be present one coupon per family. Not valid on phone , fax or email orders

#00033

#00044

Receive

with purchase over $100

Week of Sep. 29-Oct. 4

Receive

Receive

with purchase over $100

Week of October 6-11

Receive

$10 OFF

$10 OFF

Coupon must be present one coupon per family. Not valid on phone , fax or email orders

Coupon must be present one coupon per family. Not valid on phone , fax or email orders

with purchase over $100

with purchase over $100

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 4


Table of Contents 2076 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11234 (718) 407-1832 FAX: (718) 228-8508 ads@TheJewishEcho.com RAYLE RUBENSTEIN Editor in Chief MENDY RINKOFF Managing Editor RABBI BARUCH PESACH MENDELSON Advisor to Rabbinic Board ELKY FRIEDMAN Food Editor YITZCHAK SHTEIERMAN Interviewer CONTRIBUTORS

Chani Rubenstein • Azarya Feig • Craig Goldsith Shea Rubenstein • Yitchok Stierman • Issammar Ginsburg Victor Shine • Gil Student • Dr. Seth Lapin Rabbi Yakkov Horowitz • Elky Friedman Rebecca Wasserstrum • Alty Jakobovits

YAAKOV HERSKOVICH Art Director ADVERTISING

Editoral............................................................................. 6 JCCMP Sunday Program.................................................. 7 Think Before You Drink................................................... 8 Elected Offical.................................................................. 9 Six Question Marketing Quiz..........................................11 Skills, Skills, Skills........................................................... 12 Wine for Jews.................................................................. 13 Divorce-What to Expect................................................. 13 Elky's Recipes................................................................ 14 Help Your Preshooler Succeed In School...................... 16 A Dose Of Inspiration.................................................... 15 Stop and Smell The Sea Breeze...................................... 18 Health Corner................................................................. 19 Curing Sleep Apnea By Dr. Jaques Doueck................... 20 Land Ho.......................................................................... 22 Mini Echo/Kids Pages................................................... 24 Chol Hamoed Fun.......................................................... 26 Classifieds....................................................................... 27

Shimmy120@aol.com

Your Neighborhood

Locksmith

EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT MANAGER

Phil Brach

EXECUTIVE SALES DIRECTORS

David Lichtman Annie Mizrachi Mordechai RAYLI HOROWITZ Copy Editor CHANI RUBENSTEIN Children & Teen Editor

©The Jewish Echo Published by the JCC of Marine Park. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any form without prior written permission from the publisher is prohibited. The publisher reserves the right to edit all articles for clarity, space and editorial sensitivities. The Jewish Echo assumes no responsibility for the content of articles or advertisements in this publication, nor for the contents of books that are referred to or excerpted herein. The Jewish Echo magazine is a monthly publication that is mailed to homes the first week of every Month.

SHIMON JOSEPHS

Cell: 347-254-8120

Call for Shabbos Lock Special

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 5


EDITORIAL Dear Readers:

A new year. A new beginning. In the spirit of Tishrei I am pleased to introduce another “new:” The Jewish Echo, a project of the JCC of Marine Park. This family-friendly magazine has been created to unite our communities, promote local establishments, and provide a forum for our news and concerns. It will reach close to 10,000 readers in Marine Park, Mill Basin, and higher numbers of Flatbush, uniting our communities with relevant articles and information. It will address the themes that matter to us most: our Shuls, our schools, our political environment, and our families. Within the pages of our inaugural issue, you will hear from Rabbi Baruch Pesach Mendelson, Rav of Khillah Marine Park, as he speaks out against a silent but very real issue: excessive alcohol consumption. As a member of his congregation I can say that the measures he has taken to prevent the problems that stem from one glass too many have made a real impact on the atmosphere in Shul. As a father I am deeply grateful for his efforts. As a community member I am hopeful that others will take his words to heart and follow his example.  Speaking of community, Councilman Lew Fidler, who is reaching the culmination of a successful 12-year tenure representing the 46th District, took the time to share highlights of his career with the Jewish Echo for this month’s issue. Check out his interview to find out his pick for the upcoming mayoral election.  The articles we’ve collected for you are current and fresh. Take the time to read up on opinions, information and inspiration from our other contributors, which include famed educator Rabbi Yaakov Horowitz, marketing expert Rabbi Issamar Ginzberg, and Marine Park’s own Rabbi Gil Student. Get ready for all those Yom Tov meals with recipes from Elky Friedman, a regular food writer for Ami Living Magazine.  It is my hope that the Jewish Echo will inform, inspire, and meet the goals we established at its inception. Please take this opportunity to enjoy this publication. I welcome your feedback and opinions. Feel free to pen an article on a topic that matters to you for our next issue!  Please accept my heartfelt wishes for a Shana Tova. May the coming year bring health and success to all. 

Warm regards, Shea  Rubenstein shea@thejewishecho.com

Eli Wagshall, DDS FAAPD

Pediatric Dentistry

Sunday & After School Hours Specialized Care for Children of All Ages & Needs

2525 Nostrand Ave. 718.339.3435

• Preventive Dentistry • Interceptive & Complete Orthodontics • Digital Computerized X-ray Reduced Radiation Exposure • Board certified by The American Board of Pediatric Dentistry TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 6


JCCMP Sunday Program Enters its Fourth Year

O

ver the last several years, the JCC of Marine Park’s Sunday Program has become synonymous with fun, fitness and friendship for the girls of the greater Flatbush and Marine Park communities.  Since its inception, the critically acclaimed program has impacted the lives of over three hundred girls in our community, boosting confidence, promoting positive self-image and good, clean -- and, when appropriate, messy fun!  Now entering its most anticipated season yet, there is more excitement on tap than ever before! The JCCMP Sunday Program, directed by Mrs. Shimrit ‘Shimi’ Adar of Shimi2Jewmba fame, caters to girls ranging in age from pre-1A through the seventh grade. Best known for its warm,

caring, and energetic staff members, its out-of-the-box activities, and for instilling the values of Chesed, individuality, and community in our girls (affectionately known as “Jewmbanians”), the program has rightfully earned its reputation for being the most unique Sunday program in Brooklyn’s history.  With engaging weekly themes, including Princess Day, Dr. Seuss Day and, by popular demand, Color War, it serves as an appropriate outlet, as well as a platform for creativity and self-expression. Now, entering its fourth year, the JCCMP Sunday Program is pulling all the stops: In addition to the longstanding favorites of swim, art (taught by the lovely and talented Fraydee Mozes of  Enchantma Designs) and, of course, Jewmba (the most energizing

$669.00*

dancing in the Jewish world, lead by the one and only Mrs. Adar), this year will herald the addition of gymnastics to the schedule, as well as the debut of a brand new Jewmba song!   Registration has officially opened, and the response has been overwhelming, with slots filling up at record speed.  If you wish to register your daughter, please visit https://www.jccmp.org  or call 718-407-1832 and ask for Mendy.  The Jewish Echo is slated to have your exclusive all-access pass to the JCCMP Sunday Program all semester long!  Stay tuned for monthly articles, updates and pictures!  And, don’t forget to check us out online at jccmp.org, or Facebook. com/Jewmba.

*AIR CONDITIONERS* *BBQ GRILLS* *MICROWAVES* *VACUUMS* *RANGES* *HOODS*

*REFRIGERATORS* *DISHWASHER* *DISPOSERS* *STOVES* *WASHERS* *DRYERS*

GE 30" Freestanding Gas Range, 5 Sealed Burners, Simmer Burner, 5.0 cu. ft. Self-Clean Oven, Certified Sabbath mode, Delay Bake Option & Storage Drawer: White or Black

Rebecca Wasserstrum

Whirlpool

27" Top-Load Washer, 3.4 cu. ft. Capacity, 8 Cycles, 4 Temperatures, 700 RPM Max Spin Speed, Xtra Roll Action Plus Agitator, Fabric Sense Wash System & Quiet Spin Technology

$329.00*

Frigidaire

Hotpoint

21.0 cu. ft. Top Freezer Refrigerator, 2 Glass Shelves, Full Width Freezer Shelf, Clear Dairy Compartment, 2 Humidity Crispers & Reversible Door: White

15.6 cu. ft. Top-Freezer Refrigerator, 2 Adjustable Shelves, Dairy Compartment, 2 Clear Drawers and Never Clean Condenser: White/black/bisq

$549.00*

$429.00*

*FREE IN HOUSE DELIVERY

(WALK UP EXTRA) N.J. FUEL SURCHARGE APPLY.

Thousands of Major Appliances “in-stock” ready to ship! Lowest Prices, Shop with confidence knowing you’re getting the best deal! Friendly and knowledgeable staff ready to serve you, just give us a call today!

Call now! 718-513-1808

Mon-Thurs 9-5pm, Fri 9-1pm, Sat, Sun-closed TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 7


THINK BEFORE YOU DRINK Rabbi Mendelson Speaks Out Against Alcohol Consumption

An interview with Rabbi Baruch Pesach Mendelsohn, Rav of Khila Marine Park Conducted & Written by Yitzchak Shteierman ith summer relegated to the "An oft-quoted phrase is ‘Ein Simcha past, Shuls are once again filled Ela B’Basar V’Yayin’ (Pesachim 109a) – that with congregants eager to rejoin their there could be no rejoicing but with meat communities after time spent away on and wine, in regard to rejoicing during a vacation. Along with the inspiration of festival. The Rambam, however, clarifies uplifting Tefillah comes some concern that this does not mean Holelus - frivoover the weekly post-Davening fixture lousness.” in many congregations: the Shabbos "Our children are watching, and takKiddush. Hot Chulent and Kugel are al- ing note of our every move,” warns the ways welcome after several hours of in- Rav. “If they witness fathers behaving like tense prayer, but the alcoholic drinks that children [and far worse] as a result of inesometimes accompany the fare can be briation, what message are we passing on cause for concern. Rabbi Baruch Pesach to them?” Rabbi Mendelson cites comMendelson, Rav of Khillah Marine Park, petition over who can provide the most shares his thoughts on the dangers of alcohol consumption, and its effects on the wholesome, harmony-filled home that is the ideal of every Jewish family.

W

"Historically speaking, alcohol consumption in Shul most likely has its roots in the Prohibition Era,” begins Rabbi Mendelson. “While alcohol was prohibited in the general population during this period, religious institutions had an exemption, which allowed the consumption of alcohol religious purposes. Today, alcohol is legal, but Shul is a place where you can get it for free – which can contribute to a growing problem.

“Our children are watching and taking note of our every move.”

high-end liquor or consume the greatest quantity as unfortunate scenarios that do take place, leading to out-of-control behavior. The Shabbos Kiddush isn’t the only potential time of trouble. Simchas Torah, he says, is a common time for alcohol abuse. "Why do we need alcohol to be happy on this special day?" he asks. "There are Shuls where wives have to pull their husbands off the floor and drag them home.

"The Chilul Hashem, including the calls to Hatzolah and the NYPD for people who have passed out in the streets of Flatbush, is an additional, very painful part of this saga." Rabbi Mendelson suggests concrete proposals for guidelines that the community can implement so that alcohol, when consumed, is done with maturity and responsibly. "In our Shul, for example, we have established rules which I rigorously enforce. Alcohol is only served with food, even on Simchas Torah, as consumption without food significantly increases its negative effects. It is served only at a rate of one bottle per 20 people.” As with all community matters, Rabbi Mendelson feels that it is up the Rabbanim and community leaders to address the alcohol issue. “If Shuls, through their Rabbanim, make themselves heard on the proper perspective on this matter, we will hopefully see a positive change in this area. If we will display the courage to take on the issue at this crucial time, we will have done a great service to our fellow neighbors, and most importantly to our children and spouses for whom we want the absolute best.”

YOUR ONE STOP FOR:

• BODY WORK • 3M CLEAR BUMPER GUARDS • PAINTLESS DENT REMOVAL • TIRE & REPAIR

• CAR ALARMS • KEY REPLACEMENT • REMOTE START • NAVIGATION

10% OFF PARTS & LABOR MECHANICAL ONLY

718.377.4300 • 718.633.1980

1800 Coney Island Ave. Bet. N & O

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 8


An interview with our

Elected Official

An Interview with Outgoing NYC Councilman Lew Fidler Y.Shteierman

As he nears the end of his 12-year term in the NYC Council, Councilman Lew Fidler shares his thoughts with the Jewish Echo, reflecting upon his term serving the Marine Park neighborhood, what he has sought to bring to the community, and what he feels they may still seek to accomplish as a community. ccording to CM Fidler, leadership and involvement in community matters has been in his blood since a very young age. "I grew up believing that a neighborhood is a better place when we all work to make it that way." he says. “During my youth, my mother was the president of every parent association where I went to school and my father was the president of many community organizations.” The Councilman’s belief in community, fostered by his parents’ achievements, paved the way for his successful political career, which began when he was a young law school graduate. During his stint as Councilman for the 46th District, which began in 2002, Fidler witnessed the rebirth that the Marine Park Jewish community has experienced. "I grew up in the Jewish community in East Flatbush; that community virtually disappeared. I watched as Shuls and institutions, including the Shul at which I was Bar Mitzvahed, closed. I was therefore very heartened to see the new growth in this neighborhood.”

A

As an elected official, he says he has “accepted it as my mission to nurture this growth.” Fidler dedicated his energies into helping the Jewish community integrate into the greater, general community – which was sometimes less than smooth. He cites the lack of familiarity with Jewish customs and way of life as contributing towards some of the challenges they faced. "In the beginning, my office was getting hysterical calls about the Lag BaOmer fires, for example. Construction on residential streets on major Jewish holidays was another source of conflict.” It took time to get all sides – the general population, government agencies – working together. “It’s all about mutual understanding and respect for each other’s traditions,” surmises the Councilman. Asked about the zoning issue, which is very much on the mind of Marine Park residents who need living space for their young and growing families, CM Fidler says, "This goes right back to mutual understanding between all Marine Park residents.”While the exact answer to the zoning problem eludes him the Councilman is quite sure he knows what the answer is not. "What I don't recommend is the status quo which creates a war between neighbors over the smallest addition. People shouldn't have to go to war to add a bedroom, but at the same time, we don't want to encroach upon the residents who would like to retain the character of the neighborhood. We need to find a balance between the reason people came to the neighborhood in the first place and the people who want to see a situation where 'anything goes’. I don't think anyone in either community wants this to be like a crowded street in Boro Park; we would need to reach an accommodation.” Reflecting on his role at City Council, Fidler shares, "To me as a Councilman, a large part of my efforts have been focused on bringing back resources to the Marine Park community, with the help of community agencies like the JCC. A large amount of taxes are paid here. It's only right that the kids of our community should benefit from these resources.”

Speaking of the JCC, the Councilman says, “The JCC has done a great job in both bridging gaps between communities within Marine Park and representing the interests of the Jewish community.” Councilman Fidler is proud of his record on taxes. “When I was elected, after 9/11, it was absolutely necessary to raise property taxes. We had a big problem. However, since that time I actually voted for a rate decrease.” He continues: “I saw the mortgage crisis coming, and worked with Bloomberg to take measures to soften the blow. How can we possibly acknowledge that there is a mortgage problem and still raise taxes, pushing these people closer to the brink? I don't see any reason for this.” With regard to the way Mayor Bloomberg has led the city, “I'm widely considered a Bloomberg opponent— and I say that respectfully. We have to weigh people's civil liberties against the general welfare. It can probably be said that most of his initiatives come from the right place, but a ban on 32 oz. sodas, and salt – that’s just silly. His motivation is accepted; his approach is not.” The next mayor, he says, may be more inclined to “legislate rather than regulate,” which many people feel has been Bloomberg’s approach. His pick for the upcoming mayoral election? The Councilman answers unequivocally, enthusiastically endorsing Bill Thompson. “In dealing with the Jewish community, the word ‘ Mentch’ is often overused – but this term absolutely describes Bill Thompson. I have known him for 30 years. He is levelheaded, and possesses an understanding of communities other than his own. I would really like to see him win.”  “We all want the same things for our neighborhoods,” concludes Councilman Fidler. “Nice parks, good shopping, a safe environment, and clean streets. I hope to continue to watch the renaissance of this community, and the achievement of these common values, hopefully within a leadership role— helping the various communities in Marine Park join together to make us stronger.”

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 9


TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 10


Six Question Marketing Quiz Rabbi Issamar Ginzberg

1: True or false? “Three out of 100 people will always buy what you are selling.”

for your customers, based on how you have educated them about what to expect from you.”

False! This is one of those famous calculations people make, only to be so disappointed. They go to trade shows and tell themselves, If there are 1,000 people at the show and only three out of a hundred buy from me, I’ll make millions. This is an amateur mistake. If the offer is unattractive to the proper audience, you many not sell even a single dongle. (Imagine if three out of every 100 people that passed a Ferrari dealership bought a Ferrari.)

4: True or false? “You have satisfied clients, degrees, and prestigious awards, and therefore the client knows you are the best.”

2: True or false? “You should spend your advertising budget as slowly as possible, so it lasts the full year.” False. Marketing should be based on what it costs you to acquire a new customer. As long as your acquisition costs are exceeded by new profits, there should be no cap on spending. You turn on the sink and let a trickle of water come out. If it is successful, you open the faucet wider and wider, growing your business as quickly as you can while keeping clients happy and not outgrowing your ability to provide good service and product. 3: True or false? “Emailing your customer list once a week is way too often.” Well, it depends on conditioning. If they are used to getting one email a week, they will not mind at all. If however, you email once a month and then suddenly barrage them with emails once a week, you really will be harassing them! So think about how to condition your clients best. The right answer is: “Whatever schedule works best

I’ve spoken for Google, the JNF, The Jerusalem Post and at many other prestigious places. But how did you know that? Probably because you read about it somewhere in an interview with me. If you don’t tell your clients about your recognition, then quite frankly, they don’t know about it. And when you do show them, you keep them happier (because people enjoy working with people they know are very successful), and they are more sold going forward on working with you and referring you other business. In fact, here’s a tidbit: Google didn’t pay me. They don’t pay anybody who comes to speak there because they have tremendous demand and they hardly let anyone in. They came

“If you don’t tell your clients about your recognition, then quite frankly they don’t know about it”

to me via a referral which is how I ended up there. But do you think I was disappointed not to get paid? Absolutely not. I was happy to be there, develop personal connections there, and have a money-can’tbuy recognition via that association which has done well for me in my own business. It was worth way more than the money I would have gotten for a paid talk. But shhh! This is one of the secrets that marketers don’t like to share unless you are paying them really well. Sometimes it’s not about the money but the cachet.

5: True or false? “Social Media works/ doesn’t work.” My favorite expression about social media is: “Social media is only free if time has no value.” Social media is one of my favorite speaking topics because it is a miracle tool— it is free, easy to use, and has a seemingly gentle learning curve. The truth is that social media can work magic, even miracles at times; but not the way most people are using it. You can tweet to the millions out there, but unless you’re speaking their language, and I mean the language of social media, you probably won’t see worthwhile returns. It’s about leveraging the platform to get to specific people that will move your business to the next level, not the people who might buy a new pair of goggles if they happen to see your post about the sale. 6: True or false? “Always advertise where it is cheapest, based on the distribution.” False. Advertising is not about what’s the cheapest. It’s about the right medium for your message to get to your market. If you were trying to raise awareness about a local event, then advertising in a Staten Island paper, even if it were only a third of the price of a Brooklyn publication, would be a bad idea. Think about the positioning your clients see from their very first contact with you. As in a phone call, it’s the one who initiates the call that usually dominates the conversation. Be the one who sets the pace, and you’ll be the one who sets the price. Rabbi Issamar Ginzberg is an award-winning entrepreneur, marketing expert and well-known columnist and speaker who has been featured in over 150 publications. You can visit his website at www.issamar.com.

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 11


Skills, Skills, Skills

Help Your Children Succeed in Judaic Studies by Providing Them with Hebrew Language Skills Rabbi Yakov Horowitz More than ninety percent of all words that appear in Chumash are variations of only 270 root words! There are 26 verbs (ex. Yatza, Holach) and 38 nouns (ex. Lechem, Makom) that appear in Chumash more than 500 times each! If we were to give children a rudimentary understanding of Lashon Hakodesh – teach them the Shoroshim and Shimushim (‘root words’, prefix, suffix, etc.) – before or as soon as they start learning Chumash, we would be providing them with the Chinuch ‘training wheels’ they need to succeed. hese lines were culled from a February 2007 op-ed essay in Mishpacha Magazine titled “Training Wheels,” making the case for the need to teach our children critical skills during their entry-level to new topics such as Chumash and Gemarah. Permit me to explain: There are basically two ways to teach Chumash to beginners (the same concept applies to Gemarah, albeit with modifications for ‘Gemarah terms’ and phraseology). One approach is to teach by memory/rote. In this method, when a ‘new’ Pasuk is taught, each word is translated to the child. The children then repeat the Pasuk in the timeless, singsong tune passed down through the generations. This is primarily a memory-based exercise, where the children retain the words they are taught – all the while building a growing vocabulary of words that they have already memorized. The other approach is a skill-based one. This method is based on the notion that children ought to first (or simultaneously) be taught the basic structure of Lashon Hakodesh by introducing them to the meaning and usage of the main Shorashim (root words) and Shimushim (prefixes/suffixes) that are used to conjugate the root words. If you are a regular reader of my writings, you know by now that I am a very strong proponent of the slow-and-steady skillbased method, as I feel that this is the proverbial concept of ‘teaching a child how to fish.’ Investing the time to teach our sons and daughters the skills that they will need to succeed is the greatest gift we can afford them. For a skill-based approach to Chinuch

T

results in independent learners who have the tools to enjoy the exploration of the various Limudim they engage in. Rote learning on the other hand, requires an enormous amount of memorization and only works well for children for whom committing large amounts of material to memory comes very easily. Additionally, the rote process is often difficult for creative children, for visual learners, and for restless/distractible children. Finally, it leaves many children – and adults – with a great volume of knowledge, but not necessarily the ability to connect the dots and form an understanding of the Hebrew language that will allow them to open a Chumash and read a Ramban with ease. Why is that so? Well, please permit me to share an analogy with you. Think of the last time that you attended a family wedding. There, you may have been introduced to a distant relative for the umpteenth time. Somewhere in the recesses of your mind, you know that he is related to you somehow. The only problem is that you just not quite sure how that connection is made. (Your father’s brother’s cousin through marriage? Or was it your father’s cousin’s brother-inlaw?) It may be exceedingly frustrating for you not to be able to figure this out, but you

You know by now that I am a very strong proponent of the slow-and-steady skillbased method just can’t seem to get your hands around it no matter how hard you concentrate and/or how many times you have gone through this frustrating exercise. Well, my dear reader, that is what it is like for a child (or adult) who learned Chumash by rote to try and figure out the connection between Vayomer, Vatomer, Amarti, Leimor, Imri, Vayomru, Amru, Amar, Amarnu, … you get the picture. They know that these words are interlinked somehow, (all derive from the root word ‘Amar, to say’), but they just don’t know exactly how the lego

pieces of Hebrew language click together. So, rather than memorizing several hundred Shorashim, the rote learner must memorize many thousands of the cousins, uncles and aunts of these root words. Some are under the impression that children will pick up the language as they continue to learn and memorize more words. But that is not the way complex languages are taught. Just think back to your school days and all those color-coded posters in your classrooms charting the creation of blended words – “can + not = cannot or can’t”. Those charts, the lessons you were taught, and all the exercises in your grammar workbooks gave you a mental map of how those words were formed. If this is the case in the English language, it is all the more so with Lashon Hakodesh where root words and the almost infinite permutations they form with the various prefixes and suffixes are the very core of how it all pulls together. Thirty-two years in Jewish education; as an eighth-grade Rebbi and later as a Yeshiva Principal and Director of Project YES have led me to the inescapable conclusion that the lack of appropriate Hebrew language skills (an Aramaic skills for gemara learners) is an extraordinarily high risk factor for having kids drop out of school. If you are the parents of school-age children, please, please invest the time to give them the language skills that will have them succeed in school and develop a lifelong love for learning. © 2013 Rabbi Yakov Horowitz, all rights reserved Rabbi Horowitz is the Dean of Yeshiva Darchei Noam of Monsey and the Director of Project YES. He has recently published the first two volumes of The Bright Beginnings Chumash Workbook series, designed to give children the Hebrew language skills referenced above. Visit www.bbchumash. com to review samples of the 2 books and to view promotional videos explaining the workbook series and the educational philosophy that drove its creation.

For a list of the most-commonly-used words, visit our website at www.kosherjewishparenting.com To review 2 Mishpacha columns on the critical need to teach children language skills, simply Google my name and the titles, “It Doesn’t Start in Tenth Grade” and “Training Wheels.” TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 12


Wine for Jews

Rabbi Gil Student

I

have studiously avoided developing a taste for wine, but not for the obvious reason. Rav Mordechai Willig often exhorts his listeners to avoid alcohol other than the bare minimum necessary for religious requirements. Like the nazirite of old, we who see so much promiscuity must also foreswear liquor (see Rashi to Bamidbar 6:1). I cannot live up to Rav Willig’s standard but attempt to follow it in spirit, sticking to a one-drink limit. However, despite being raised by wine lovers, I have consciously avoided appreciating fine wine for even my single drink. The reason is simple: I can’t afford the expensive habit. I prefer to spend what little discretional income I have on books rather than delicacies, expanding my mind rather than my palate. Instead I stick to one or two cheap wines and drinks that I know and try not to learn too much about the qualities and differences of drinks. But, not only does my careful balance fail R. Willig’s concerns, it also leaves me bereft of the spiritual benefits of wine appreciation.

Irving Langer’s The Kosher Grapevine: Exploring the World of Fine Wine (Gefen, 2012) is a charming guide to the history of and Jewish attitudes to kosher winemaking, as well as the nuances of different wines. Langer’s humor and clarity allow even an ignoramus like me to learn about wine and his spiritual mindset provides a Jewish context to all his teachings. His meticulous research of Jewish texts provides fascinating historical and Halachic background. This short and easy-to-read book covers a lot of ground.

The Kuzari (3:17) explains that the requirement of a blessing increases the enjoyment Langer’s passion for wine demonstrates not only a love for the beverage but an appreciation of it. The Kuzari (3:17) explains that the requirement of a blessing increases the enjoyment. When you stop to think about what you are eating—its main ingredients and its differences from other foods—you enjoy it more. I understand this to mean that we differentiate between foods with regard to blessings—what grows in the ground, on trees, etc. —in order to make

the eating more pleasurable. The more you understand fine food, the more you enjoy it (as opposed to salami, in which case you enjoy it less). The Sages instituted detailed blessings on food in order to increase the understanding, joy and appreciation for it. Conversely, the less you know about what you put into your body, the less you enjoy and appreciate it. If you want to be truly grateful to G-d for the food, you should learn about it—what it consists of, how it is produced, how it differs from other food. You will not only marvel at the wonders of food development and production and enjoy the food more, you will also gain greater appreciation for the divine gift. In addition to the many Jewish concepts of wine, Langer’s book will also teach you about the differences between wines. This book will allow you to differentiate, enjoy and ultimately praise G-d for the incredible gifts of wines. The joys of wine are holy. The only question is whether they are appropriate for our unusual place in history. Rabbi Gil Student writes frequently on Jewish issues and runs TorahMusings.com

Divorce-What to Expect

Craig Goldsmith, Esq.

ivorce is an individual’s start on the road to a new beginning. D It is important that you plan accordingly before going on any journey. Securing the proper guidance of a qualified attorney to navigate you through the many legal aspects involved in a divorce is just as important as seeking the assistance of an appropriate therapist to manage your mental health while travelling on this emotional highway. A qualified family law attorney will explain this complicated process, negotiate and appear in court on your behalf if necessary. However, your attorney should also manage your expectations and present you with options so that you may make an informed decision regarding your future. Preparation is crucial to a successful resolution. Gather copies of all financial documents relating to your marriage including loans, bank statements, investment portfolios, retirement plan statements, tax returns, credit card statements and any other financial documents relating to income or expenses. These documents will assist your lawyer in obtaining a favorable outcome for you without court intervention. However, if an agreement cannot be reached then those same documents will be needed for court.

piano lessons. Where domestic violence is an issue, court filings, police reports, hospital records, emergency room and ambulance call reports as well as any photographs relevant to the allegation of abuse will be needed. Fear and the stigma attached to being divorced are what often keep a person locked into a bad marriage. Disappointment to sense of failure, sadness to fear, anger to hate and all shades of emotions in between are some of the experiences you may feel while on this emotional roller coaster. The first step in maintaining your emotional health during this time is to seek out the right therapist but equally important to your future is securing the services of a qualified family law practitioner who will navigate you through the legal maze. Craig Goldsmith is a Family Law attorney whose office is located Brooklyn. Mr. Goldsmith is a Board member of the JCCMP and was President of Cong. Adath Yeshurun for four (4) consecutive terms. suemyspouse@gmail.com

Where children are involved you must be able to identify and articulate the facts and circumstances that have or may impact on them in the future. “The Best Interest of the Child(ren)” is the standard that NY Courts and attorneys look to in determining how custody and visitation should be resolved. Your attorney will need all the facts pertaining to your case in order to do a proper analysis; e.g. a special needs child may require specific therapeutic services or a child with exceptional musical ability may require TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 13


Elky’s RECIPES Cooking... Rich n’ Tasty… Yet Wholesome

Many of you may know me already from my articles in other magazines, but for those of you who do not, I would like to familiarize you with my style of cooking. Like most of you, I love tasty food, food that is full of flavor, but I also prefer my dishes to be healthful! Therefore, my specialty is taking normal recipes that may be full of calories and fat and working to find a more healthful version of that recipe. I have had success while experimenting over and over again! I love utilizing fresh produce, whole grains, and protein in my cooking. Of course, I also try to lighten the dish as much as possible. But I always keep the flavor - lots and lots of flavor! There are so many ways to add flavor to food, even without adding calories. There are lots of wonderful spices, herbs and condiments that can bring out the tastiness of a dish. This Yom Tov season, many of us are searching for new recipes since we have so many meals to cook for. It can be daunting and we may feel overwhelmed at times, but keep in mind we all pull through. I would love to make it easier for you. So here I include some easy, light, yet very tasty dishes that will appeal to almost everyone. Have a wonderful wholesome Yom Tov! Elky Friedman

Crisp Salad with Tangy Creamy Vinaigrette There are lots of salads to choose from out there, but I’m always on the lookout for another one! I figured my readers would be too. I created this one for the people in my family who like to a bit of sweetness, enjoy a good crunch, and also want to get in their protein at the same time...hence the craisins, cashews, and avocado. This salad adds a lot to any meal, yet it’s easy to throw together! Plus an added bonus...the dressing is so fantastic! Keep it in your fridge all the time...it’ll entice you to throw together a fresh salad...whenever.

Dressing: 2/3 cup light mayonnaise ¼ cup olive oil 2 tbsp vinegar 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp water 2 tbsp orange juice 2 ½ tbsp sugar 1 tsp salt 1 tsp mustard 3 cloves garlic ½ tsp pepper

Ingredients: 1 8-10 oz bag of lettuce 1 yellow pepper, diced 1 avocado, diced 3/4 cup of cashews ½ cup of craisins

1) In a salad bowl, combine the lettuce, yellow pepper, and avocado 2) In a container, combine the mayonnaise, oil, vinegar, balsamic vinegar, water, orange juice, sugar, salt, mustard, garlic and pepper. Using an immersion blender, blend until smooth and creamy. 3) Pour dressing over salad. Toss with vegetables. Top with cashews and craisins. Serve. Yields: 6 servings

Wholesome Apple Crisp Most of us crave something sweet at the end our Yom Tov meal. Here’s a great choice that is lighter than most other desserts….and absolutely heaven! This is hands down a family favorite. By incorporating whole wheat flour and oil (margarine is never on my shopping list) this is a lower calorie version of the usual apple crisp. You can even serve this as a side dish....I do...almost every single shabbos!

2 cups white whole wheat flour ½ cup sugar 1/3 cup brown sugar 2 tbsp vanilla sugar ½ cup oil 4 yellow or fuji apples 2 tbsp orange juice 2 tsp cinnamon 1) In a bowl, combine white whole wheat flour, sugar, brown sugar, vanilla sugar and oil. This will create the crumb. 2) Peel and thinly slice the apples. 3) Place 1/3 of the crumb at the bottom of a 9” or 10” baking pan (or in individual ramekens as seen in photo) Then place the sliced apples over the crumb. 4) Drizzle the orange juice over the apples. Then sprinkle the cinnamon on top of the apples too. 5) Put the rest of the crumb on top. 6) Bake for 40-45 minutes uncovered. For individual minis, bake only 25-30 minutes. Yields: 10 servings

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 14


A Dose of Inspiration A

Kallah in the tiny Shtetl of Govorovo, Poland, received a small silver Kiddush cup as a wedding present from one of her neighbors. The joy of her wedding, however, was soon overshadowed by the dark clouds of war. Precious few were able to escape. Those who did get out built new families on different shores.

Many years later, in 1990, in Brooklyn, New York, there was a different Kallah, whose maternal grandmother had grown up in Govorovo. This new Kallah was a cousin of the first Kallah in our story. As it happened, the maternal grandmother of the new Chosson also grew up in Govorovo. These two grandmothers were overcome with joy to be reunited in such a meaningful way with each other, each having found her long lost childhood friend. Although the original Kallah did not survive the war, her tiny Kiddush cup was smuggled out. It was gifted to the new Kalla, who happens to be my own wife. We named our daughter Shifra for that original Kallah who was killed by the Nazis.

Our families, and our nation as a whole, continue to grow and thrive with the help of Hashem, in spite of those who wish to eliminate us. We are part of something much greater than any individual person, yet every person is cherished. Every single one of us has his or her unique purpose.

Whatever the challenge, whatever the setback, Jews know in their core that everything comes from Hashem. His greatest gift may be our ability to choose to be happy, even in the face of adversity. To do that, we must recognize that He makes everything happen.  We therefore must trust that whatever happens is for our ultimate benefit. If we truly believe this, it empowers us with a sense of confidence and purpose. This allows us to have peace of mind, and it enables us to experience true joy.

Pinchas Shine

Everyone has challenges which are custom designed to help them grow closer to Hashem. When you are privileged to see something in your own life that at first seemed to be darkness, and it turns out that it is actually goodness and light that had been hidden from you, I encourage you to share your story at pinchosshine@gmail. com. Remember, these are the good ol' days, so keep smiling!

Choosing to be happy is not only a good idea, it is a commandment in the Torah, in Devarim (26:11): "And you shall rejoice in all the good given to you by Hashem, your G-d".

718-799-5602

Pinchus@cheininsurance.com TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 15


Help Your Preschooler Succeed in School

Tips from a Preschool Teacher By: Alty Jakobovits

I

t is that time of year again when parents everywhere are rushing around getting ready, not only for the Yomim Naroim, but also for the start of the new school year. For parents of first time students, or preschoolers, this year is even more daunting as their child embarks on a journey of immeasurable learning experiences that will continue for numerous years and impact their future. There are measures that you, the parent, can take to foster a happy and productive school experience for your child, and to help to ensure that his classroom runs smoothly. As a teacher I am always grateful to parents who take the following tips into account. They really do make the difference – for your child, for his teacher, and for his class.

Show interest in what your child does. Do homework with him and

encourage him to do the work. Ask about his day. Praise his efforts. Hang up his projects. Never toss a project or school paper in the trash in front of him! If his schoolwork is important to you, it will be important to him.

Early morning & Evening hours to accommodate all your needs

Talk to us. Think of us, the parents and the teacher, as a team working together to bring out the best in your child. Good communication is key to this. Keep us informed of any concerns about your child, medical issues, upcoming trips or Simchas, new siblings… or anything that may impact your child’s behavior in school. We really do care. Make sure she is well prepared.

Prepare a Mitzvah note and Tzedakah each night. Make sure your child has all the school supplies requested. A well prepared child has a better chance at succeeding – and will have more confidence as well.

Please clean out your child's backpack and lunch bag everyday.

Smushed papers and moldy apples will make it hard for your child to find what he needs when rummaging through his knapsack. A young child’s organizational skills are usually not developed enough to allow him to organize his belongings thoroughly. Cleaning these items out regularly will allow you to discover urgent notes that he may have forgotten to show you and will give you an idea of whether or not he has been eating the food you’ve prepared.

Reuven Lapin RPA–C Pediatric and Adult Visits

* All Sick Visits * Ear Infections * Throat cultures * Flu Shots available * Pre-employment Physicals

PARKING IN DRIVEWAY

* Bronchitis

* Laceration Repairs (Stitches)

* PPD * Urinary Tract Infection * HTN (Blood Pressure Checks)

Hours: Mon - Thur: 6:00 - 10:30 PM • Motzei Shabbos & Sunday • By Appt.

1339 E 21st ST (L & M) left side entrance

718-645-6471

917-848-9388

MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 16


Help Your Preschooler Succeed in School (cont.) Inform her of her transporta- Send in lunches and snacks Please send in a change of tion plans. The strain of not know- that your child will enjoy and clothes even though your ing how she’ll be getting home makes a eat. But don't go overboard with nosh! child "never has an accident." child nervous. If you are in a carpool, make sure your child knows who the other drivers are before school starts and that the child understands that you cannot do carpool everyday. If you are picking up your child alone please be on time.

Set an appropriate bedtime – and stick with it. A good night’s

sleep is a must! Proper sleep is essential for a child to function optimally in the classroom. 3 to 5 year-olds need eleven to thirteen hours of sleep, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

A healthy breakfast is a great way to start the day. You don’t have to work hard to make sure your child has a full stomach when she arrives at school in the morning. A bowl of cereal and some orange juice can make the difference in jumpstarting her day.

And make sure to send enough food so that your child does not beg others to share their snacks.

There are other scenarios that might necessitate a change of clothes, like falling into mud, nosebleeds. Make sure Label all his or her belongings. your child will have what to wear if his Children don't always recognize what's clothing becomes soiled to spare him theirs. Labels help. embarrassment. You would not believe how many sweaters, coats, scarves, etc. get left Last of all, on a humorous note: If behind in school and are then given you don't want the world to know away. Labeling will also prevent of upcoming exciting events in your confusion over whose smock was left family, don't tell your child too in the cubby. early! Don't send in toys unless it is for show and tell. Many toys tend to get Just as we Daven for health and good lost or damaged. It also causes much years, we Daven that our children’s unnecessary heartache when not all journey will be a wonderful one, and children are invited to play by the with Hashem's help, it will be. I wish owner of the toy. everyone a Shana Tova and a beautiful Pay attention to any food start in the school year. allergies in the class so as not to send in any questionable food. Not letting Mrs. Alty Jakobovits has been teaching a child eat the snack because another preschool-age children for nearly two decades. child might be allergic to it sometimes causes upset to the child bringing it.

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 17


Stop and Smell the Sea Breeze Yitti Berkovic

T

he first time I watched the sun come up in Miami, I think I forgot to breathe. Still sleepy-eyed, I sat on my porch swing, and as I was rocked by the gentle wind blowing through the palm trees, the morning sun melted into the inky sky. Reds, pinks, oranges, and violets – every hue and shade – spilled out into a sky that stretched out in front of me like an endless canvas. I was completely mesmerized. Though it sounds hopelessly clichéd, I couldn’t help but pinch myself. I am a Brooklyn girl, for crying out loud. I grew up with the sights and sounds of the concrete jungle, where the square patch of greenish lawn in front of my house was the closest I got to paradise. As a child, when I looked out my bedroom window, my view was obstructed by my neighbors’ attic. Forget glorious sunsets - the magnificent vista that greeted me each morning was a bird’s eye view of the neighbors’ overstuffed storage closet. And then pretty soon after I got married, I moved to Montreal. Sure, the summer months brought beautiful weather, but the summer “months” are limited to one month – July. By the time August rolls around, the winter blues are already whispering at the window. And when winter eventually storms through without apology, the world becomes depressingly monochromatic – first white, and then a dreary gray. Knee-deep in snow on an average day, I could not have been further from the tropics. Palm trees belonged on post cards other people sent me - far, far away from my own reality. Then, after more than five years in Montreal, I pulled up to my new home in North

Miami Beach. The first thing I said was, “I cannot believe this is my front yard.” My neighborhood was miles from the nearest beach, and the homes in the area were old and not particularly beautiful. My house was far from picturesque, and I worried that I didn’t have enough closet space. But I had never dreamed that I would live somewhere where my yard would have trees that grew guava (I had never even heard of guava!) and avocados. I had never imagined that I would wake up almost every morning embraced by cloudless skies and teased with salty sea breezes. And the majestic palm trees that towered above my lawn, with their wide fronds and seemingly limitless supply of coconuts? They were my own private paradise. The old-time Floridians laughed as I waxed rhapsodic about my new home. They smiled patiently as I insisted that the novelty would never wear off. They glanced knowingly at each other when I promised that I would forever be entranced by Miami’s brand of magic. Let them laugh, I thought. They didn’t spend five years in the frozen tundra of Montreal. They don’t know how to appreciate a brilliant sunset or a delicious breeze. And for a long time, I was right. I walked around in a cloud of bliss, savoring the sunlight like it was delectable dish. But it happened today, more than two years since we moved to Florida. This morning, like most mornings, I didn’t have time to sit on my swing to watch the sun come up. I overslept by only five minutes, but my morning rhythm was entirely thrown off. Lunches needed to be made and packed away, homework sheets needed to be signed, outfits needed to be selected, and

breakfast needed to be served. Oh, and of course my kids had decided to sleep in for the first morning all month. In panic mode, I grabbed them out of bed, rushed them from room to room, put on socks, tied shoes, buttoned collars, brushed hair, and poured milk. In a haze, I matched each homework sheet to the right knapsack and each lunch box to the right child. Somehow, I managed to get everyone ready and we collapsed on the lawn to wait for buses and carpools. It was a glorious morning – not a cloud in the endless, azure sky. But when I had ushered off my last child, I was too tired to be grateful that I hadn’t needed to dress my kids in coats, scarves, hats, gloves, and boots.

The first thing I said was, “I cannot believe this is my front yard.” I was too distracted to pay attention to the golden morning sun peering down at me questioningly. I probably wouldn’t have noticed the palm tree had it bent down to whisper in my ear. And my beloved coconuts? They were almost a nuisance now, rolling into my driveway and wedging themselves between my car’s tires. When I pulled myself together to drive to work and cleared the coconuts from my path, I didn’t even crane my neck to catch a glimpse of the ocean. My eyes were focused only on the ticking clock, my mind focused only on getting to work on time. Only when the security guard greeted me by saying, “It’s a beautiful day, isn’t it?” did

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 18


I realize that I hadn’t even noticed. How had I missed it? Clearly, the bloom is off the roses. The novelty has finally worn off, and it made me feel a little sick to my stomach. It’s only natural – I know that. But it still makes me feel a little ashamed. It reminds me of when I toured Niagara Falls for the first time. I stood, mouth agape, at one of Creator’s great wonders of the world; I couldn’t pull my eyes away from the majestic waterfalls, the dazzling prisms that reflected in every direction, or the salty mist that cloaked the entire area. But the waterfalls straddle the border between the United States and Canada and play host to a busy border crossing, where thousands of people drive every day, their eyes trained on the road in front of them and their minds miles away. I couldn’t understand it: How could they not stop short in awe at the sound of the thunderous rush of water? How could their eyes simply ignore a sight as breathtaking as the three waterfalls? Now I understand it. Our lives are really a sequence of novelties, a chain of magical moments that somehow seem less magical when the scenes begin to repeat themselves. I think back to one of my first mornings waking up as a married woman, when I surveyed an apartment that I was able to call my own, when I giddily unpacked my brand new pots and pans and began to prepare my very first dinner for my husband. Now, I groan just thinking about making supper, and I too often eschew my pots and pans for quick fixes or the microwave. The magic simply disappeared over time. I think back on the first time my oldest son smiled at me, the first time his tiny fingers clutched mine, the first time he said, “Mommy.” Now he nearly reaches my shoulders, and though I love his smile, I don’t grab a camera every time he grins. And when he calls my name, there are times I can’t help but think, “What does he want now?” I’m not proud of it, but it’s true. It may be unrealistic to expect to savor every moment, but it is disheartening to consider that we sometimes forget to savor any moment. We’re all busy, we’re all distracted, we’re all so focused on taking care of everything and everyone, that we sometimes forget to celebrate the sweet joys that are right under our noses. Tomorrow morning, no matter the chaos, I am penciling in a moment to stop and smell the sea breeze. And though those of you in Brooklyn are a little further from the beaches, I hope you get a chance to do the same.

Many people develop colon cancer in the United States.

However, Colon Cancer is preventable in many patients by looking and removing colonpolyps. Colon polyps are growth that occur in the lining of the colon. Polyps develop in most people around age fifty . That is why medical societies advise an endoscopic screening of the colon in all persons at age fifty. The procdeure is perfromed after drinking a solution to clean the colon. A flexible tube is inserted in the rectum and advanced through the entire colon.

BORO PARK • FLATBUSH • LONG ISLAND • LAKEWOOD

Anesthesia is given, so that patients are comfortable during the procedure. Any growths found during colonscopy are usually removed at the time. The procdeure is safe although rare risks can occur such as bleeding or a tear in the colon. During the last decade colon cancer has decreased in the N.Y. area due to colonoscopy and removal of the polyps. Patients should see their doctor for more information regarding colon cancer screening.

Dr Seth Lapin is board certified in internal medicine and Gastroenterology. He is involved in teaching fellows and residents at Maimonides Medical Center. His office is located at 1523 45th street brooklyn NY 11219. Phone # is 1-718-972-1840 ,email seth@drlapin.com.

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 19


TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 20


TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 21


Land Ho T

BS”D

Sara Deblin

his was not a film. And it was definitely not a dream. But driving the Belt Parkway on an early Monday morning, there it was cresting the waves, like Captain Hook’s Jolly Roger in all its ragged glory, parting the curtain of gray mist draping the Hudson. I blinked and looked away and when I turned back, it was gone. That was the first day. The second day was clear, the water sparkling cheerfully up at a blue sky. This time there could be no mistake. Bobbing gently on the river, rode an old time sailing ship, triple masted, canvas sails unfurled to catch the wind. On the third day, there were two ships. And just like that, our 8 o’clock carpool to work along the Belt and over the Verrazano Bridge became a 20 minute foray into fantasy-land, where pirates and treasure and mutinies and undiscovered islands crowded into our ordinary lives. More ships appeared each day of the week, and so our morning adventure continued. Our list of outlandish explanations included, among the least peculiar, that they were shooting a movie, or transporting the boats to a museum. As it turned out, the ships were sailing for Fleet Week, an annual United States Navy exhibition hosted in New York City’s harbor. A perfectly plausible reason, but that original double-take, that first moment of disbelief and wonder, still lingers. Thousands of people drove by that week as they always do. I wonder how many thought twice. It’s so easy to pass things by when the daily tasks of job and home are all- consuming. What a shame, when it is also so simple to look out and beyond, and appreciate the unexpected things that make life more interesting. By the middle of the week, four full-rigged ships and two schooners had appeared on the Hudson, proud flags fluttering in the salty wind. (There was not a single skull-and-crossbones among them,

Thousands of people drove by that week as they always do. I wonder how many thought twice. to our dismay.) Farther into the week, the ships glided beneath the bridge, and from there they receded into the distant New York City skyline. It was a short story, but it was a great scenario for a story and it made me wonder how many other scenarios I had dismissed. Like that time on our biking trip, when we came upon a vast empty lot, overgrown with weeds, but the perfect place for three old men to fly their remote-control airplanes. That time, on the subway platform at Broadway-Lafayette, when a black girl and a Chinese girl asked us for directions to the Lubavitcher Rebbe’s Ohel. That time I walked by a public school entrance at 10:30 at night, where three young policemen were standing outside, and I overheard one say, “So how hard do you think I’d need to throw this thing in order to break a window?” All are just stimuli, little opportunities to smile. Or think. Or laugh. As long as we keep our eyes alert and our minds open to appreciate them. I can still visualize the first sailing ship emerging from the fog that day, and the tinge of disappointment when the last of them disappeared down the distance of the river. Two weeks later though, they were back, sailing smoothly up the Hudson, returning to wherever they had come from. So no worries. After all, stories are constantly happening all around us.

Proudly Presents

SUNDA Y PROGRA M FOR GIR LS WERE BACK FOR OUR FOURTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR OF

GYMNASTICS • ART • SWIM • JEWMBA

First Session Begins

October 13th, 2013

ONLY $299 A SESSION! SNACKS INCLUDED Kingsway Jewish Center 2810 Nostrand Avenue

Tel 718.407.1832 • Mendy: 718.412.3541 SundayProgram@jccmp.org

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG For additional discounts of 10% and 20% off visit our website at jccmp.org/membership

This Chol Hamoed start your trip at AllCar. Wherever you’re going, you’ll have an easy time getting there.

Mention Code:

OL CHires: Exp October 1, 2013

CARS

MINI VANS

a day *

a day*

$39.99 $69.99

1-800-697-2227 www.allcarrentacar.com

BROOKLYN LOCATIONS 1941 Utica Avenue (Bet. Avenues K & L) 1204 Coney Island Avenue (Bet. Avenues H & I) ask for Bentzi 347-226-6932 3475 Fort Hamilton Pkwy (Bet. 36th St. & Chester Ave) ask for Moshe 347-226-6934 ...and many more throughout NYC

* Normal rental qualifications apply. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Renter is responsible for sales tax, cost recovery fee, underage fees, additional driver fees and optional refueling fees and protection coverage. Please be aware that your credit card or personal auto policy may provide coverage for damage to the rental vehicle. Check before purchasing our coverage.

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 22


Zmanim

See next issue for a comprehensive list of Shul Zmanim for Marine Park, Mill Basin & the 30’s

Mazel Tov!

Simchas in the Community

Mazel Tovs for month of August /2013

Boys and Girls

8/30 - Mazel Tov to Mr. & Mrs. Chaim Schultz on the birth of a boy!

Friedman and Mr. & Mrs. Binyoman Friedman upon the birth of twin boys/ grandsons, respectively!

8/25 - Mazel Tov to Mr. & Mrs. Shmuel Silberstein upon the birth of their daughter!

Aufruf/Wedding

8/15 - Mazel Tov to Mr. & Mrs. Nachum Schoenfeld on the birth of a girl!

8/23 - R' Simcha Scheiner on making a siyum on Mesechtas Brachos!

8/23 - Mazel Tov to Mr. & Mrs. Yoeli Klien and Mr. & Mrs. Yehuda Salomon on the birth of their son/grandson, respectively! 8/14 - Mazel Tov to Mr. & Mrs. Shloime

8/16 - Mazel Tov to Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Szanzer on the Aufruf and Wedding of their son Yekusiel.

Siyum

Letters to the Editor COMING NEXT MONTH We want to hear your views please write to us: editor@thejewishecho.com

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 23


miEcho ni

The

!

J OKES

Chani Rubenstein

?

Q: What do you call

RIDDLES

a sheep covered in chocolate A: A Hershey baaaaar.

1) What Pasuk has the first 15 words all starting with the letter Vav? (Hint: it’s in davening.) 2) If someone forgets to add Yaaleh V’yavo in Shemonah Esrei on A: Rosh Chodesh, or B: Yom Tov, does he have to repeat it? Send us the answers to mini@thejewishecho.com and you’ll be entered into a raffle to win a pie of pizza from the new Palace Café!

Q: What has four legs but can’t walk? A: A chair Q: What do bunnies like to play A: Hop scotch. Q: Where can you find an ocean with no water? A: On a map Q: What has a head, a tail, but no body? A: A coin

Instructions: Help Moshe decide in which Shul to Daven on Rosh Hashanah! He needs to find out who the Rav is in each Shul, what time Tekiyas Shofar is, and what Nusach they Daven! Use the following clues for help. Clues: 1) The Agudah doesn’t Daven at 11:15. 2) R’ Greene’s shul Davens Nusach Sefard. 3) The Yeshiva is the first shul to blow Shofar. 4) The Rav of the Big Shul’s last name is a color. 5) R’ Katz’s Shul blows Shofar at 11:15.

6) R’ Berg’s Shul Davens Nusach Ashkenaz, but he’s not the Rav of the Knesset. 7) The Knesset Davens Nusach Sefaradi. 8) R’ Brown is the Rav in the Agudah 9) The Big Shul Davens at 11:30.

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 24


Across 3. Bee product 4. What we ask our friends and family for 7. What we got from the Ayal (ram)

A Rosh Hashanah Story

Down 1. What Hashem is on Rosh Hashanah 2. Our greatest weapon 5. The day Yom Kippur falls out on this year 6. what we will all IY”H get this year, like tzaddikim get

Now take the words that were used in the puzzle above, and find them in the following word search: N

C

C

B

S

Y

P

W

H

U

A

Z

K

S

Q

I

E

U

D

Y

R

U

U

G

C

W

T

E

F

I

L

J

S

Q

Y

K

U

H

H

J

H

O

V

R

V

X

N

A

F

N

B

A

B

Q

E

N

F

Q

V

L

A

Z

A

B

X

E

X

G

U

V

A

Y

N

Z

S

T

O

V

E

W

S

J

D

K

H

C

I

E

L

N

D

A

Z

E

Q

N

Z

C

J

D

W

P

S

A

E

Q

N

V

M

K

X

T

Q

B

V

U

X

T

H

D

A

I

W

O

J

I

B

C

J

S

T

S

J

V

N

C

K

G

H

N

O

Y

H

R

T

N

E

H

C

G

R

O

E

O

H

S

O

V

D

L A

R

T

N

O

N

M

L

F

B

S

F

F

E

F

T

T

P

I

Y

E

U

S

R

F

Y

B

G

R

P

N

N

H

X

E I

L M

A

S E

R S

M R

R

A

K

J

W

G

D

U

J

G

V

A

Z

R

Y R

D

A

I

I

It was Rosh Hashanah in the town of Berditchev. The people of the city were gathered in the Shul, about to hear Unesaneh Tokef. Suddenly, a man stood up and began to speak. R’ Levi Yitzchak, the renowned Tzaddik, said: “Hashem! Today is Rosh Hashanah, when everyone passes before You, and their judgment is decided. There are two books in front of You: a book of life, Chaim, and a book of death, Maves. Tzaddikim are written down for life, and Reshaim are written down for death. But this year, Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbos. And isn’t it an Aveirah to write on Shabbos? But we know that you are allowed to write in order to save someone’s life. So therefore, Hashem, please write us all down for a year of life!” And so the crowd began their moving Unesaneh Tokef.

HEY KIDS!

Send us your jokes, riddles, or stories, and have them published! All entries will also be entered into a raffle for a

$25 GIFT CERTIFICATE to JUDAICA PLACE!

Answers: 1) Judge 2) Tefillah 3) Honey 4) Forgiveness 5) Shabbos 6) Life 7) Shofar TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 25


Chol Hamoed Fun for the Whole Family in our Community

I

n a partnership of Yeshiva R’tzahd, the youth of the Stars of Israel and the PacPlex, the Chol Hamoed Extravaganza festival is focused on bringing an all-inclusive, price fixed, family friendly celebration at a reasonable price to all Jewish families in the metropolitan area. With a Sukkah for Davening and Learning and another Sukkah for families to bring their own food (Glatt Kosher food and snacks will be available), PacPlex and Yeshiva R’tzahd are striving to make the holiday both enjoyment and inexpensive. PacPlex (formerly the Paerdegat Athletic Club), Brooklyn’s largest sports, recreational and entertainment complex is having its first Chol Hamoed celebration in the 35+ year history of the Club. With 4 outdoor and 2 indoor swimming pools, 3 basketball courts, an indoor soccer field, 4 racquetball courts, rides, carnival and video games, entertainment, skating and so much more, southern Brooklyn has never seen such an extravaganza.

Yeshiva R'tzahd is a kiruv yeshiva that combines both years of experience and cutting edge approaches to education. Established over 30 years ago in the Canarsie section of Brooklyn, it is the oldest kiruv yeshiva currently operating in Brooklyn. Under the leadership of Rabbi Baruch Grossman and Dovid Lapp, the the yeshiva has brought back thousands of students to Yiddishkeit. Included among the alumni are many talmidei chachamim, rabbis, educators and other prominent people in the Jewish community. While the yeshiva has focused on the students in the school, it is also working with parents to help them come closer to their heritage. Rabbi Yisroel Pearl had this concept in mind when he established the R'tzahd's high school. It was named Mesivta Lev Bonim in reference to the pasuk in Malachi about the hearts of parents becoming united in their service of Hashem. The rebbeim put their lev and nefesh (hearts and souls) into their students with shabbatons, trips and

other extracurricular activities. A new middle school, Stars of Israel, has been recently established under the leadership of Rabbi Yehuda Leib Schwartzberg. By offering a top quality secular education with all the amenities of Yeshiva R'tzahd, the school has been able to attract many children who never would have considered a yeshiva education as an option. Stars of Israel is proud to announce Rabbi Baruch Gotersman is joining the staff as principal. The Chol Hamoed Extravaganza is conveniently located at PacPlex, right off the Belt Parkway at Exit 13, and with ample on-site parking and acres of outside and inside lounging and relaxing areas. Chol Hamoed at the PacPlex is organized to provide an enjoyable, peaceful day with your family without the difficulty, distance travel and long lines that are found at many other Chol Hamoed celebrations. For more information, please call 718-209-1010 ext 132.

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 26


Classifieds

JOBS

D & n Security ; Alaram, Telephone , Intercom , closed Circuit Tv installations & service. Electrical Work, Cable networking , 24 Hour Central Station Monitoring. T: 718-951-8477 c: 917-416-5224 Right Choice Pest Control, Ants, roaches, mice , water bugs, Bed bug specialist. Commercial and residential . Call Shabsy Now : 917-370-7900 Help Wanted : Outside Sales Person commission only. Must be Fearless and Aggressive promoting and selling our services. Email resume to stocklossrecovery@verizon.net Help wanted male / female:

Bookeeper,f/t Exper'd with account recivables . Located in L.I.C ,Queens Call 718-4826666 or fax resume 718-4827660

Bookkeeper, Quickbooks , F/T .Computer lit,good phone manner 718-663-0901 or office@ kinderstuffdc.com

BOYS WANTED TO BIND LULAVIM DAYS: 718-258-5032 Driver: RELIABLE DRIVER WANTED TO DRIVE A TRUCK FOR SUCCOS.718-375-7664

Exec Assist : Excel & Microsoft Word a must , knowl of order enrty .Exp nec .Queens area .Fax 718-274-7397

Executive Administrator: F/T with experience wanted to startup girls H.S. In Bkyln .Immed hire. Email resue/refs .2014opening@ gmail.com GROWNING HANDYMAN CO. In Bkyln, seeks great workers w/ lots of experience . Email:handymanwanted24@ gmail.com

Medical Biller F/T : Detail oriented, multi tasker. Must have Exper in computerized medical billing . eClinical a plus . Email brooklynmed@gmail.com

RES HAB : Caring, mature indivual needed to work with a young girl w /Down Syndrome 5-7 Mon-Thurs. Ave P/E . E.22 Special Care 718-2523365 x102

AD

TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFED AD, PLEASE EMAIL ADS@TEHJEWISHECHO.COM OR CALL 718-407-1832

Stock Boy needed for Flatbush Liquor store . Must be hard working . Please email: atkdigital@gmail.com

PA/ Np Inernal Med : Exper with hospital & or nursing homes .Competitive salary / benefits. Email : brookylnmed@gmail.com F/T Comm Habb Suervisor : Must have excel comm, org & computer skills. Knowledge of OPWDD P&P exp with special needs & deg required . Email shanie@otsar.org

Ahava Medical , an article 28 facility is hiring family practice internist , PT, OT, SPT and all specialties. P/T F/T 718-9518800 x 2165 leboitsg@gmail.com Admin Assistant, F/T R.E Managment Office Kings Hway. Email Resume : officebklyn@ gmail.com

Construction Manager F/T wanted for established construction company in Bkyln . 7:45 am - 5:30 pm . Must be handy, efficent & well organized . Please email: morrisjsb@gmail. com

REAL ESTATE

Marine Park: Fully Detached

1 Family Corner Property W/ Detached 2 Car Garage!3 Bedroom Duplex w/ 1 Full Bath & 2 Half Baths! Sun Room w/ Vaulted Kitchen Plus Additional Family Room ! Full Furnished Basment W/ Large Family Room, Wet Bar , Half Bath & Laundry ! Private Backyard! Excellent Condition !Asking $629k. Ref#2662 Madison: Huge two family detached home on great block $ 875,000

Marine Park : 1 family detached $ 639,000 Steinmetz R.E 718-627-1000

Office Exclusive! Charming 1 Family Solid Brick Tudor Home In Great Condtion !This Home offers Very Large Rooms w/ Ample Closet Space &Plenty Of Natural Light ! A 3 bedroom ,1.5 bath Duplex w/ Large LR,FDR&Updated Eat- in Kitchen Plus A Full Furnished Basment w/ Full Bath & Summer Kitchen . This Home Featuers Many upgrades Including A New Boiler &Hot Water ,Heater, Windows, Roof &Kitchen . Asking $570k

Offic Exclusive ! To This Fully Det 1 Fam Beauty ! Bright & Airy / anOpen Flr on 1st Flr! Beautiful Ceramic Tile Floor ! Dr w/ Sliders to Huge Rear 2 Tier Deck& Grassed Yard! 2 BR Duplex ! MB w/ Cathedral Ceilings & Lots Of Closets !Beautiful New Ceramic Bathroom ! Full Bsmt w /2YR Old Boiler & Hot Water Heater ! Community Drive 2 Spots ! Asking $479k Ref 2 2669

Lovely 1 Family Semi- Detached Duplex! Many Updates Make This A Beauty ! New Sliding Doors , Hardwood Floors, Ceramic Tile , Stainless Steel Appliances ,Carpet & Central Alarm System !FLR FDR , Updated Large Eat- In Kitchen & 1/2 Bath ! 3 Bedrooms, Full Bath ,New Closets ! Full Finished Basment w/ 3/4 Bath ! New Boiler & Water Heater ! New Carport ! 1 YR Homeowners Warranty ! Asking $529k REF# 2633 Legal 2 Family Semi- Detached Brick Home ! 22x53 !3 Bedrooms over 2 Bedroom Walk- In! 2 Porches, Large Yard, Private Drive & Garage !Needs Work ,Great Oppurtunity ! Asking $599k Ref #2640

We Give Full Service

This Chol Hamoed start your trip at AllCar. Wherever you’re going, you’ll have an easy time getting there.

Mention Code:

30 $ Haircut (Under 10 years old) .................................... 10 $ With Regular Facial - Eyebrow or Lip, Free.... 45 Haircut & Blow-Dryer .....................................

L CHO res: Expi October 1, 2013

CARS

MINI VANS

a day *

a day*

$39.99 $69.99

BROOKLYN LOCATIONS 1941 Utica Avenue (Bet. Avenues K & L) 1204 Coney Island Avenue (Bet. Avenues H & I) ask for Bentzi 347-226-6932 3475 Fort Hamilton Pkwy (Bet. 36th St. & Chester Ave) ask for Moshe 347-226-6934 ...and many more throughout NYC

$

Super Whitening Facial $ (Sundays & Thursdays) ....................................

10 OFF

Anything above $20

25 OFF you receive

1-800-697-2227 www.allcarrentacar.com

* Normal rental qualifications apply. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Renter is responsible for sales tax, cost recovery fee, underage fees, additional driver fees and optional refueling fees and protection coverage. Please be aware that your credit card or personal auto policy may provide coverage for damage to the rental vehicle. Check before purchasing our coverage.

%

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 27


The Jewish Echo 2076 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11234

THE SOURCE FOR THE LOWEST FARES

We meet or beat advertised rates to most destinations

Lowest Hotel & Car Rental Rates

WINTER EARLY BIRD SPECIAL

968

$

NON STOP

INCLUDING TAXES & FUEL

OCTOBER BUSINESS CLASS SPECIAL

$

3995 EL AL

INCLUDING TAXES & FUEL

1800-FLY 2 ISRAEL 1212-953-3300

E-mail: reservations@bdtravel.com www.bdtravel.com

TO RECEIVE THIS MAGAZINE BY MAIL, SIGN UP AT WWW.JCCMP.ORG • TO ADVERTISE IN THIS PUBLICATION PLEASE CALL 718.407.1832 • PAGE 28

The Jewish Echo Magazine /Sept 2013 E-edition  

The Jewish Echo magazine is a monthly publication mailed to the Marine park,Mill Basin and East 30s communities of Brooklyn

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you