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CONTENTS


TY POG RA PHY \tahy-pog-ruh-fee\

N: The art or process of printing with type, the work of setting and arranging type and the general character or appearance of printed mater.


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Ascender Spine

Crossbar

Terminal

Stem

Final

Serif

Ear

Decender

Tail

Counter

Bowl Loop/Lobe

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TYPE CLASSIFICATION

A basic system for classifying typefaces was devised in the nineteenth century, when printers sought to identify a heritage for their own craft analogous to that of art history. Humanist letterforms are closely connected to calligraphy and the movement of the hand. Transitional and modern typefaces are more abstract and less organic. These three main groups correspond roughly to the Renaissance, Baroque, and Enlightenment periods in art and literature. Historians and critics of typography have since proposed more finely grained schemes that attempt to better capture the diversity of letterforms. Designers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have continued to create new typefaces based on historic characteristics.

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CHAPTER 1: LETTERS

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TYPE FAMILIES In the sixteeenth century, printers began organizing roman and italic typefaces into matched families. The concept was formalized in the early twentieth century to include styles such as bold, semibold, and small caps.

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CHAPTER 1: LETTERS

The roman form, also called plain or regular, is the standard upright version of a typeface. It is typically conceived as the parent of a larger family.

The italic form is used to create emphasis. Especially among serif faces, it often employs shapes and strokes distinct from its roman counterpart. Note the difference between the roman and the itallic.

Small caps (Capitals) are designed to integrate with a line of text, where full size capitals would stand out awkwardly. Small capitals are slightly taller than the x-height of lowercase letters.

Bold versions of traditional text fonts were added in the twentieth century to meet the need for emphatic forms. Sans-serif families often include a broad range of weights (thin, bold, black, etc.).

The typeface designer tries to make the two bold versions feel similar in comparison to the roman, without making the overall form too heavy. The counters need to stay clear and open at small sizes. Many designers prefer not to use bold and semi-bold versions of traditional typefaces such as Garamond, because these weights are alien to the historic families.

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Therese therese

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GUTTER

CREEP

BLEED

The inside margins or blank space between two facing pages is the gutter. The gutter space is that extra space allowance used to accommodate the binding in books and magazines. The amount of gutter needed varies depending on the binding method.

In a saddle stitched booklet the bulk of the paper causes the inner pages to creep further out then the outer pages when folded. When trimmed the inner pages are narrower than the outer pages, counteracting the creep.

When any image or element on a page touches the edge of the page, extending beyond the trim edge, leaving no margin it is said to bleed.

Gutter is sometimes used to refer to the alley or space between columns of text in a page layout.

CROP MARKS Crossed lines placed at the corners of an image or a page to indicate where to trim it are known as crop marks.

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SPREAD TRIM The final size of a printed page after excess edges have been cut off is the trim size. Crop marks indicating where to cut are printed at the edges of the paper. These are trimmed after printing.

Refers to facing or adjacent pages in a layout or adjacent pages laid out for printing in a multipage document.

MARGIN A usually empty space between the trim and the live printing area.


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