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Four-sided infinity ABOVE: Infinity London will be the first 360-degree skyscraper infinity pool. Images: Compass Pools UK

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ools on the roofs of hotels and residential buildings are the new way to make an architectural statement. You only need to think of the stunning pool at Marina Bay Sands that straddles three towers and has become the iconic symbol of Singapore. Other examples nearer to home include the SPASA National Commercial Pool of the Year 2018, Surfside Pools’ infinity pool at the Darling Hotel overlooking Surfers Paradise. Now there is a new entrant in the most spectacular infinity pool in the world. While Infinity London hasn’t been built yet, the plans from Compass Pools UK to construct a 360-degree infinity pool on top of an elongated 55-storey pyramid are remarkable.

“When we designed the pool, we wanted an uninterrupted view, both above and below the water.” The square pool has 1.4 metre see-through walls, made from cast acrylic rather than glass, as this material transmits light at a similar wavelength to water so that the pool will look perfectly clear. The floor of the pool is also transparent, allowing visitors to see the swimmers and sky above. When constructed, this 600,000-litre design will be the world’s first highrise 360-degree infinity pool. The 24 SPLASH! June/July 2019

plans have garnered a great deal of publicity, despite the fact the specific location of the five-star hotel is yet to be decided.

Computer controlled

Compass Pools UK is the distributor, designer and installer of ceramic composite swimming pools in the United Kingdom, and while their main business is the residential market, they also have a commercial division. Their swimming pool designer and technical director is Alex Kemsley, who is the former president of the British Swimming Pool Federation and chairman of the British and Irish Spa and Hot Tub Association. “The project started in 2017 as a proof of concept and an engineering project,” says Kemsley. It quickly gained interest and they started talks with a “superlux” hotel chain and have gained prospects in both London and Dubai. One of the questions to surface about this pool is how to keep the water from flowing over the edges and onto the street, 200 metres below. There are two features that stop that from happening. The first is that the water level is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC) which receives a signal from an anemometer on the roof which monitors wind speed. Kemsley says the PLC is similar to units on control lifts, roller coasters and other safety critical machine controls. The PLC in turn uses an algorithm to control the variable speed pump which will reduce the flow and drop the water level relative to the wind speed.

Profile for The Intermedia Group

SPLASH June-July 2019  

SPLASH! is the leading trade publication for the Australasian “wet industry”, incorporating the swimming pool, spa and aquatics industries....

SPLASH June-July 2019  

SPLASH! is the leading trade publication for the Australasian “wet industry”, incorporating the swimming pool, spa and aquatics industries....