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Dedicated to the Spanish and Portuguese Horse

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"Piaffer Bleu" Original watercolor by Beatrice Bulteau The PSL Commission of IALHA proudly supports the APSL and the Lusitano

A Joint Publication of

The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse and the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association


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ISSUE 2 | 2017

D e d i c at e d

to the

S pa n i s h

ON THE

COVER DeDicateD to the SpaniSh anD portugueSe horSe

Portuguese Horse

and

I S S U E 2 | 2 017

"Piaffer Bleu" Original watercolor by Beatrice Bulteau The PSL Commission of IALHA proudly supports the APSL and the Lusitano

CONTENTS

departments

A Joint PublicAtion of

the foundAtion for the Pure SPAniSh horSe And the internAtionAl AndAluSiAn And luSitAno horSe ASSociAtion

Artist Beatrice Bulteau created the original watercolor entitled "Piaffer Bleu." Bulteau explains, "The beauty, energy and lightness of the Lusitano horses have fascinated me for more than 35 years, and they still remain one of my favorite subjects. This is a love story ... of nature, of life, of freedom." She reveals, "The painting was born in my imagination, and I hope it will grow in yours!" The PSL (Puro Sangre Lusitano) Commission of IALHA proudly supports the APSL (Associação Portuguesa de Criadores do Cavalo Puro Sangue Lusitano) and the Lusitano. The APSL is the only Lusitano studbook in the world and the PSL Commission is the U.S./Canada affiliate with the protocol of the APSL. www.beatricebulteau.com https://ialha.org/apsl-forms-anddocuments/ www.cavalo-lusitano.com

6 IALHA PRESIDENT’S LETTER

66 STALLION LISTINGS

10 FPSH PRESIDENT'S LETTER

68 BUSINESS CARDS

30 WHERE WE HAVE BEEN SEEN

69 PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS

features 12

USEF Lettering Program Celebrates Young Riders’ Equestrian Involvement IALHA Youth Member Amy Sager explains why the USEF Lettering Program is a great opportunity for all young riders.

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The Science of Movement: An Interview with Coach and Instructor Ginny Elder By Dr. Jan DeLipsey and Ginny Elder Ginny Elder discusses equine biomechanics and collection in this informative interview.

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2017 JuneFest: A Youth’s Perspective By Abigale Godfrey

A youth member reveals why she loves this FPSH show.

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The Tradition and Art of Making Saddles: The Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art Saddlery By Diane E. Barber

Fine craftmanship is the hallmark of the Royal School’s Saddlery.

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A Pura Raza Española (P.R.E.) Match Made in Heaven By Diane E. Barber

Dressage Olympian Rafael Soto trains U.S. Arabian Youth National Champion and Stanford Equestrian Team member on a P.R.E. stallion in Spain.

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Capturing the Beauty of the P.R.E. Horse in Equine Models By Erica Peet

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Breyer Animal Creations, the five-star manufacturer of model equines, introduces new models of interest for Iberian horse lovers.

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Avoiding Trouble with Stallions By JP Giacomini

Educating yourself and your horse to a higher level of self-control is the benchmark of safety that is indispensable around breeding animals.

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Competitors’ Thoughts: Experience the IALHA National Championship Show A mother/daughter team who will be competing for the first time at Nationals and a competitor who has participated in Nationals for decades share their thoughts about the show.

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The Show is Back in Town, the Show is Back in Town! The 2017 IALHA National Championship Horse Show is back in Texas and will be here before you know it! Issue 2 | 2017

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IALHA President’s Letter Dedicated to the Spanish and Portuguese Horse

By Janita Smith

THE IBERIAN HORSE MAGAZINE IS A JOINT PUBLICATION OF FPSH & IALHA

Become Involved in the IALHA Hello to our members and readers, and greetings to you all as the summer wanes and fall approaches. It seems to me that time flies faster and faster each year and that I try to fit more into each day than can ever be accomplished. As president of the IALHA it seems like there is always more IALHA business to do than there is time to do it. It’s exciting to see things changing and moving forward, but it does take time and effort. I do love the organization – promoting our horses, meeting members, attending shows, answering questions – all are part of the job, and best of all, they center on our beautiful horses. The IALHA elections are underway. At the time of this writing we are in the nomination process. I am truly hoping to see new members step up and become active. We have several board of directors positions that are open, and I’d love to see new faces on the board. New ideas, insights and helping hands are always welcome. Nominations will be closed when you read this, but please, when the election email arrives in your email box, take a few minutes and vote! We need the organization to represent our members, and if you are not active, it makes our job as directors more difficult. I love to hear from members, and while we cannot always meet requests, we do try to be responsive to your ideas, criticisms and encouragement. Please send your thoughts and ideas to president@ialha.org; all are welcome. Please also consider when you get in touch that it would be great to have you

IALHA PRESIDENT Janita Smith

IALHA PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE

Erica Peet, Chair Jan DeLipsey

Julie Alonzo Janita Smith

IALHA REGISTRY & MEMBERSHIP OFFICE 101 Carnoustie, North, #200, Birmingham, AL 35242 Tel: (205) 995-8900 | Fax: (205) 995-8966 Email: office@ialha.org | www.IALHA.org **Only issues, statements, declarations and decisions discussed and agreed upon by vote of the Board of Directors or the membership shall be considered official Association Policy. Any and all other issues, statements, declarations and decisions expressed in any publication, letter, video, speech, discussion or any other communication displaying or not displaying the name of the IALHA or expressed by any Officer, Director, employee or member shall be considered personal opinion and shall not be deemed in any way to be policy of this Association or its members, Officers, Directors or employees. The use of the Association name, letterhead and or logo or any other representation of the IALHA in any media shall not constitute recognition and/or agreement with the contents of such.

FPSH CHAIR

Barbara Currie

FPSH PRESIDENT Cameron English

FPSH PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Barbara Clark Coty Dr. Celia Stenfors-Dacre

FPSH FOUNDATION STAFF Executive Director: Barbara Clark Accounting Services: Joanne Gayer Membership Services: Ana Escobar Treasurer: Al Rotter

FPSH

INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER FOR THE P.R.E. HORSE 115 Elm St. N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87102 Tel: 505.294.0800 | Fax: 505.294.0812 Email: info@prehorse.org | www.prehorse.org PREA (Pura Raza Española Association) PREA is the subsidiary of The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse association and is the manager of the P.R.E. Mundial registry and the Spanish Heritage Horse Registry (SHHR). This subsidiary was formed in compliance with IRS regulations to ensure the nonprofit 501 (c)3 status of The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse association. PREA is also a not-for-profit organization however it is a 501(c)5 and any contributions to it are not deductible from federal income tax as a charitable contribution. PREA Administrators Ph: 505.323.4413 | Fax: 505.294.0812 Margarita Smith Esther Conway (Enrolled Agent) Jolisa Anderson (Enrolled Agent) POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: IALHA, 101 Carnoustie, North, #200, Birmingham, AL 35242. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process without prior written permission of the publisher. COPYRIGHT © 2017 THE IBERIAN HORSE

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IALHA President’s Letter Dedicated to the Spanish and Portuguese Horse

IALHA President’s Letter continued from p. 6

PUBLISHING OFFICE Lionheart Publishing, Inc.

volunteer for one of our committees; it’s a great way to get your feet wet and get involved with your organization. This second issue of The Iberian Horse for 2017 should be reaching your home with just a few days left to enter the 2017 IALHA National Show. The show will be held Oct. 10-15 at the Great Southwest Equestrian Center in Katy, Texas. The board of directors and the show committee have been working hard to make this a truly great experience. We hope that many of you will come and join us, whether this is your first Nationals adventure, a return after a few years away or an every year experience, we plan on making it a great one. See the news on the website for entry information and forms, and also for sponsorship, patron, banner or vendor applications. Lastly, I want to report again on several of the great programs we have introduced for youth and adult amateurs. The USEF has again given the IALHA grant monies which the board has chosen to use to sponsor youths at clinics and exhibitions, youths at shows and adult amateurs in their first show adventures. If any of these are you, please check out our website and/or Facebook page for links to the applications. Most of these grants will be allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis until the funds are gone. They are here for you … so please apply. Have ideas for next year’s grants? Send me a note; I’d love to hear them. Hope this finds you all enjoying your horses. If you see me at a show, exhibition, clinic or maybe just out and about, please stop me … I’d love to visit. vTIH Blessings, Janita Smith IALHA President

1635 Old​41 Hwy, Suite 112-361 Kennesaw, GA 30152​ Tel: (770) 431-0867 Toll Free: (888) 303-5639 Fax: (770) 432-6969 Web: www.lionheartpub.com

President John Llewellyn E-mail: llewellyn@lionhrtpub.com (888) 303-5639, ext. 209

Publishing Editor Donna B. Brooks

Assistant Editor Lisbeth Hencke

2017 Publications Committee

Erica Peet, chair Jan DeLipsey Janita Smith Julie Alonzo Barb Clark

Advertising Sales Lisbeth Hencke E-mail: lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com Office: (361) 774-3957 Fax: (888) 802-1249 www.the-iberian-horse.com Senior Art Director Alan Brubaker E-mail: albrubaker@lionhrtpub.com (888) 303-5639, ext. 218 Art Director Leslie Proctor E-mail: leslie@lionhrtpub.com (888) 303-5639, ext. 228 O nline Projects/FTP Manager Patton McGinley E-mail: patton@lionhrtpub.com (888) 303-5639, ext. 214 Reprints & Non-member Kelly Millwood Subscriptions E-mail: kelly@lionhrtpub.com (888) 303-5639, ext. 215

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

IALHA & FPSH members: Included with membership

Non-IALHA & FPSH members: $30 per year Mail Subscription requests to: Kelly Millwood Lionheart Publishing, Inc. 1635 Old​41 Hwy, Suite 112-361 Kennesaw, GA 30152​ Phone: (888) 303-5639, ext. 215

Save the Date!

2017 IALHA NATIONAL SHOW Oct. 10-15 Great Southwest Equestrian Center Katy, Texas

The Iberian Horse magazine (ISSN # 2151-5190) is a joint publication of The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse and the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:

IALHA, 101 Carnoustie, North, #200, Birmingham, AL 35242. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process without prior written permission of the publisher. COPYRIGHT © 2017 THE IBERIAN HORSE All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

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By Cameron English

Promoting the P.R.E. I n m y t r a ve l s abroad I often have the opportunity to discuss horses with a wide variety of people. It is always heartwarming to se e dif fe re nt cultures and their love of their region’s horse breeds. On a recent trip to Edinburgh, Scotland, attending the Royal Highlands Show, I had a wonderful time watching the Scottish Clydesdale heavy draft horse competitions. I was so impressed to see these 30+ competitors in different classes, ages and genders stand for more than an hour without a single incident of bad behavior. What a wonderful horse! Watching these Clydesdales made me think again about our beloved P.R.E. I know that our breed demonstrates amazing character. As a breed, I am convinced the P.R.E. has more personality and is more gentle than most I have seen. This combination of high-personality drive and gentleness of character is what originally attracted me to the Spanish horse. I have owned some very “hot” Spanish stallions in the past; however, I have never had a single one of my horses demonstrate an ounce of “meanness” in them. This blend of spirit and character make for a beautiful display of athleticism and an expressive dressage partner! The other aspect of our breed that becomes readily apparent as you travel is that we still have a long way to go before the balance of the equine world outside of Spain is familiar with the P.R.E horse. I do believe progress has been made in the growing awareness of 10 |

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“No hour of life is lost that is spent in the saddle.” – Winston Churchill

FPSH President’s Letter

the P.R.E in North America and the world. Nevertheless, I still find myself explaining to people what the P.R.E horse is all about – a reminder that the Spanish horse is not yet nearly as well recognized as other breeds. The FPSH puts promotion of the P.R.E. as our top priority. As the P.R.E. horse gains greater acceptance in North America, it is equally important to educate and maintain the quality of the Breed Standard. At The FPSH, our commitment to the qualification process of Revision within our Studbook, and our commitment to the highest standards of the combination of morphology and performance, character and temperament continue to be our guideposts. Your support of the association you participate in as you promote the P.R.E. horse means more than just the individual event or activity you are involved in. Every step forward with the P.R.E. horse will be a result of your participation in working equitation, dressage or any other event. This grass roots exposure becomes an opportunity to educate the equine world about the amazing P.R.E. horse! So, I would conclude by encouraging you to get up on your horse and ride! Take your horse to the open USDF shows, working equitation, trail rides, parades and any venue that will get your beautiful horse seen. Not only will you be having a blast with all the attention you get, you also will be promoting the breed. Come and visit The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse at www.prehorse.org. If you are involved with any event where you can promote the Spanish horse, please contact our office for help. The Foundation can be reached at (505) 294-0800. We would welcome the opportunity to provide resource materials, magazines and collateral. We are happy to support your efforts. vTIH Cameron English FPSH President

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USEF Lettering Program

USEF Lettering Program Celebrates Young Riders’ Equestrian Involvement (ABOVE) USEF Lettering Patch

(BELOW)

The USEF Lettering Pins for each year the program is completed. Photos courtesy of USEF.

The United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) offers an Equestrian Athlete Lettering Program to recognize the accomplishments of youths involved with equestrian sport. In this issue, we share the story of Amy Sager, an IALHA youth member who is involved with the program.

M

y name is Amy Sager, and I am currently training with Lauren LaVine at LaVine Equestrian in Santa Clarita, Calif. I have been riding since I was three, and my passion for the sport has grown from there. I have gained experience and confidence as an equestrian by owning my own Pony of America for the past six years. With the skills my 27-year-old pony, Mr. Pete, has taught me over the years, I have advanced into the hunter/jumper and equitation ring. I have ridden in both Western and English disciplines, as I have barrel raced, evented and even competed in hunt seat equitation on the flat and hunters over fences in regionally rated USEF shows. I also have gained my riding skills from competing on various breeds such as ponies, mustangs and Arabians, and now I am currently riding a Half-Andalusian mare. I have just started to learn and train in dressage, and I am planning to compete in the dressage ring within the next couple of months.

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I decided to become involved in the USEF Lettering Program after I found out about it while signing up for my USEF membership card. I saw this program as a great opportunity to become recognized for my riding achievements and as a way to provide opportunities for me in my path to pursuing horseback riding at the collegiate level. The USEF Lettering Program is a great way to track your progress as an equestrian athlete, and it allows students to become recognized for their equestrian athletic achievements throughout their high school years. The program requires students to record 100 hours of riding or equestrian activity during the year as well as provide verification of participation at three competitions. With these requirements met for each school year, students receive a varsity letterman patch and pin in addition to other perks. Students have to pay a fee each year they are a part of the program along with their current www.the-iberian-horse.com


USEF membership dues. Despite that, I believe it is a great program to become involved in as a young equestrian athlete. I started the program my freshman year of high school, and I plan to finish and complete it through my senior year, earning the accomplishment of a four-year high school equestrian athlete. To achieve the letter, I have had to constantly keep track of all the equestrian activities in which I participate and how many hours I spend in the saddle. I kept my equestrian activities organized on the USEF 100-hour log and submitted it at the end of each program year, which runs from June 1 to May 31. Keeping track of my riding activities has really opened my eyes to how many hours I spend in the saddle, and although 100 hours seems like a bit much, it is not hard to achieve if you have a strong passion for the sport of horseback riding, as I do. Also throughout the program year, USEF keeps a record of all the USEF-certified shows students have attended, and they can use those as a form of show verification. Students also are allowed to send in confirmation of other schooling shows or events that are not USEF-certified competitions. Once everything is submitted and the requirements for the program are met, an email confirmation is sent back. Within this email is a certificate of completion, and the steps students need to take in order to access the lettering program perks on the merchandise website, where they can order and receive their free USEF lettering patch and pin. Overall, I would say that the USEF Lettering Program has helped me to become a more responsible, organized and dedicated rider, as I am receiving credit and recognition for what I love to do. I would say that the program is great for high school students who look to become equestrian athletes in their college years or who wish to pursue an equestrian job in the future. vTIH — Amy Sager 17 years old Santa Clarita, Calif. Student of LaVine Equestrian

(ABOVE) Amy and Dreamy. Photo courtesy of Sydney Croasmun.

USEF Equestrian Athlete Lettering Program

“The USEF created the Equestrian Athlete Lettering Program to recognize the accomplishments of young equestrians and encourage their future involvement in equestrian sport. This program is open to students who are currently enrolled in grades 5-12. Students may apply retroactively for previous years if they are still in grades 5-12, and can provide verification for each year. Seniors must submit all documentation by June 15 of their graduating year”. — USEF For more information regarding this program: Email: lettering@usef.org Phone: (859) 258-2472 Lettering Website: https://www.usef.org/start-riding/youth-programs/lettering Hour Log: https://files.usef.org/assets/BlMc7BUMTcY/lettering-log.pdf Issue 2 | 2017

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QA

EQUINE BIOMECHANICS & Collection

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THE SCIENCE OF MOVEMENT AN INTERVIEW WITH COACH AND INSTRUCTOR GINNY ELDER Co-authored by Dr. Jan DeLipsey and Ginny Elder

Want the latest in equine biomechanics and collection? Read this interview with Ginny Elder, nationally known coach and instructor, and Dr. Jan DeLipsey, research psychologist and The Iberian Horse magazine committee member. 14 |

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r. DeLipsey: Ginny, I know our readers want to hear your thoughts about “authentic collection” and by that I mean the “real deal” versus the “look of the real deal” in terms of the biomechanics as well as the mental part of collection for both the rider and the Iberian horse. That is the general topic for this interview, but let us start with the basics – how do you define collection and see it through the lens of biomechanics specific to the Iberian horse versus, let’s say, a warmblood? Elder: First let’s ask, “What is collection?” Is it a bowed and arched neck with minced steps that bring oohs and aahs out of smoke and mirrors to the uneducated eye? As you first stated in the introduction, the real deal is complex involving the physical and mental presentation of both the horse and rider. Collection, classically defined, is a form of movement universal to all breed types and conformation.

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(IMAGE 1) Collection at liberty.

We c a n l o o k b a c k i n t h e e v o l u t i o n a r y development of the horse to find the answer to this question of classic, i.e., authentic collection. In the simplest words, collection is when the horse carries more weight on the hind legs than the front legs. In nature, the horse prepares or collects by compacting its body into a coiled spring readying to go into a fight or flight response. True collection is recycled and contained energy. In the wild, it is used to survive a perceived threat or in play. In other words, it is of a fleeting nature rather than a sustained nature (Image 1). On the other hand, collection under saddle is developed in varying degrees of strength and physicality needed to work, perform and sustain such movements. Degrees of collection develop over time with systematic and sustained training for strength, balance and suppleness. Training can be in-hand and/or under saddle with the weight of a rider learning to shift the weight to the hindquarters and preparing for the next requested movement.

The most striking difference between collection in nature and that under the direction of the human is the added weight of the rider and the longer time collection is sustained by the horse. Shifting weight to the hindquarters is the gateway to all movement across all disciplines. This requires careful sustained training to build the horse’s body and mental tolerance. All too often these steps are skipped and sustained collection is forced, thereby risking physical and emotional damage to the horse. Looking at the photo (Image 2), you can see how the horse’s engaged hindquarters lift the back, as well as the withers, with energy and thrust from behind, i.e., a rounded concave concept versus a convex one. The rounded posture protects the horse biomechanically. Conversely, we do not want a horse heav y on the forehand with a dropped back that is d r a g gin g fo r wa r d. S u s t a in e d wo r k in thi s posture is associated with problems we will be talking about through the interview. Issue 2 | 2017

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EQUINE BIOMECHANICS & Collection

(IMAGE 2) Charlotte Dujardin using an allowing hand.

Iberians have a “prepackaged” conformation asset – what I call the “right stuff” for collection. The Iberian’s signature conformation of a shorter back, higher set neck and powerful musculature lends itself to a natural ability for collection and upward movement. The Iberian’s natural tendency to collection is a double-edged sword. The naturally arched neck of the Iberian often gives the illusion of collection; however, an arched neck is NOT collection. It is not unusual for an uninformed rider to feel collection is achieved when the neck is arched. In truth, their Iberian is athletic, balanced and skilled enough to give the illusion of such. An untrained eye sees an arched neck and whopping action in the legs and thereby mistakes this movement for the real deal. The trained eye will note a hollowed back, mincing steps behind, a “bubble butt” (high croup), the bouncing up and down of the hindquarters, or exaggerated movement side to side without having the weight shifted back and the back raised. Using a warmblood as a contrasting conformation ex a m p l e , t h i s b r e e d has a longer back, 16 |

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lighter muscling, lengthier propor tion of limbs to b o dy, str a ight s houl de r and lower neck set which c r e a te s a n “a b i l i t y ” fo r large, swinging, groundcovering movement. Unlike the Iberian, it is more difficult for this breed to look collected when in fact they are not. Never theless, both conformation types require systematic training to develop strength and balance to maintain sustained proper collection.

Ginny, tell us a little about the evidence that sustained training with this incorrect forced frame is harmful. Sustained incorrect movements, riding behind the ver tical and with a hollowed back, will likely break down a horse’s body and are also associated with emotional stress during training. Held in the vice-like grip of the rider, whose pushing and pulling and with unrelenting force contorts the horse’s body into an unnatural frame. This assertion is not without argument. For me, the leading figure in the modernday controversy is Dr. Gerd Hueschmann, a German veterinarian who turned the dressage world upside down about 10 years ago with his concerns, what some felt were accusations, regarding the poor biomechanics of training and showing all the way up to the Olympic level. Interestingly, though critical of much of the dressage world at that time, he held and still holds the “riders of Iberian horses from Portugal” in high esteem because they did not engage in such practices [1]. The difference between this oldschool argument and the argument now is that technological advances in science have changed it from just a theoretical discussion. The evidence www.the-iberian-horse.com


has weighed in on Dr. Heuschmann’s side. Without getting into the weeds about pe r for ma nce ideals spe cific to Ibe rians versus other horses and some judges' lack of understanding about that, Hueschmann holds that losing suppleness sets the stage for damage of all kinds. The key issue in good equine biomechanics is building the back and helping the two strong muscles there stay relaxed because stiffness leads to long-term, irreversible damage. Think of the back as a bridge enabling the hindquarter's power to flow to an independent forehand. Sustained training in a hollowed posture risks damage to the neck, spinal cord compression, ata xia , neurological proble ms, lame ne s s, degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis, joint damage and chronic inflammation which opens a Pandora’s box of other problems too lengthy to go into for this article [2]. We now have “proof” that these problems are associated with poor training practice through advanced technological research findings in MRIs, x-rays, ultrasound, motion analysis and autopsies. For the reader wanting to delve into this scientific world, start with Heuschmann and Clayton, equine research veterinarians. We have provided some good references for you at the end of this article [3]. As I said earlier, the biggest issue is the back, i.e., avoiding spinal cord and peripheral nerve compression. Not only does this break down a horse physically, it also keeps a horse from competing in the most successful way as well as

(IMAGE 3) An example of a horse being overflexed.

leads to stress, which interferes with training and performance. With the biomechanics of the horse in mind, correct training preserves and enhances the soundness of a horse’s body and mental health. The general takeaway here is the importance of training and riding in a correctly collected frame and posture. I’ll end this answer with a quote from another equine biomechanical researcher, Dr. Angela McLeod: Biomechanics is the science of movement of a living body, including how muscles, bones, tendons and ligaments work together to produce movement. Biomechanics explains the negative impacts upon a horse’s body caused by incorrect riding and training methods, such as Rolkur. It is important for riders to understand the physical effect that their aids have directly on the horse’s body as a whole, and realise that incorrect aids (such as backwards use of the hand) can make it impossible for the horse to become supple through the back and able to work correctly and also that long-term use of such aids can lead to serious lameness and behavioural problems [4]. Issue 2 | 2017

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EQUINE BIOMECHANICS & Collection I know that horse and rider are ultimately a single entity – what are you looking to see when assessing this authentic collection? There are many variables and factors to consider when looking at a horse through the lens of equine biomechanics. I want to caution the reader that we must also factor in the rider biomechanics and the influence they have on the hor se’s way of going. There are many layers here and this is just the visual mechanical part of the story. The interaction of emotional and mental factors of the equation has a huge influence on the performance of, partnership with, and health of the horse as well. When I assess, I get an overall first impression of the correctness of the horse’s way of going. ࡟࡟Is the nose slightly ahead of vertical? ࡟࡟Is the back lifted, soft and supple? ࡟࡟Is the tail flowing softly behind? (As opposed to clamped and wringing around like a helicopter?) ࡟࡟Are the footfalls of the gaits rhythmic? ࡟࡟Is there a picture of relaxed partnership versus visible tension or stress? (Grinding teeth, a widened eye, pinned ears, displaced or other reactive behavior?) Our photo (Image 3) demonstrates forced overflexion, it is not as uncommon as I would hope. When I do not see “YES” answers to my checklist above, more times than not, unwanted symptoms can be resolved with proper collection. The trick is though – collection is a partnership, so we need to consider both the horse and rider when improving the way of going. Well, let’s talk about the rider then. The horse is only half of the equation as rider biomechanics and skill level directly helps or hinders the horse. As a “career in the trenches riding instructor,” I have observed that often the problems in a horse’s way of going and stress level are a direct reflection of the rider’s abilities. 18 |

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I believe it is unfair to put “correctness” all on the horse. It should be the other way around. Put the responsibility on the rider as well because without rider accountability, the horse does not stand a chance. No matter how correctly a horse is trained, a rider will soon take the horse to his or her own level of riding. In the ride r, I look for compas sion and understanding of the nature of the horse or at least the openness to learn about it. Horses, like people, are all different and horsemanship is a lifetime journey of learning. It is on us to understand the horse, and it is done through education. A horse already knows how to be a horse. Thinking this through in terms of a checklist, here are some of my questions when I study the rider’s “way of going”: ࡟࡟Does the rider sit balanced and in alignment with the horse? ࡟࡟Is there a quiet composure and confidence that allows the rider to “think”? ࡟࡟Is the rider proactive (versus reactive) in leading the dance of suppleness? ࡟࡟Is there a working partnership or is the horse merely a prisoner to the aids? ࡟࡟Does the rider communicate with the horse both in body and in awareness? ࡟࡟Are there moments of lightness and “allowing” the horse to move and then conveying to the horse – “Yes, that’s right!" (Image 4) Nuno Oliveria well demonstrated balanced a li g nm e nt. He in s tin c tive ly k new a b ou t suppleness and authentic collection that modern science is now confirming. Ginny, we’ve talked about your questions when evaluating a horse and a rider’s “way of going.” Can you just sum up and share what a horse and rider might look like who is off the mark in terms of authentic collection? www.the-iberian-horse.com


When I see conflict between the horse and rider, it often shows in subtle indicators of the flight/fight response. Examples would be a high head, tight mouth, clamped or wringing tail, wide eyes, hollow contracted back and short, quick steps. When I see these, I know that there is a problem of authenticity in training. When brute strength being applied to the horse and unyielding intense demands that result in a conflicted horse, it’s clear I’m not witnessing “authentic collection” or even acceptable equine training, for that matter. When a horse is presented with a problem for which he or she can find no solution, there is conflict, i.e., displaced behavior. Horses always communicate; we have to learn to listen and observe. Yo u c a n n o t h ave h a r m o ny, l e a r n i n g o r partnership in a conflicted horse. I know you often

quote Jack Brainard, who is famous for saying, “You cannot train a worried horse,” and I fundamentally know this is a universal truth of training. When we pile training onto an already stressed horse, we begin to see shades of “learned helplessness” that gravely affect a horse’s emotional and mental health. For our readers, “Learned helplessness” is a term used to describe a set of learned behaviors wherein an animal or person actually “learns” to give up trying to learn. It was empirically established in social science research in the early 1970s and has received broad empirical research support since then [5]. How do you see this helplessness manifest in the horse? (IMAGE 4) A well-engaged horse.

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EQUINE BIOMECHANICS & Collection

Horses have an innate ability to withdraw and turn their worry into numbness to the world. They give up and “take it” and somehow survive incredibly harsh training. The horse has an evolutionary tendency to hide vulnerabilities and because of their stoic nature, often trainers and riders miss the subtle signs of conflict and stress. Centuries of careful breeding of the Iberian make this breed particularly vulnerable to entering this helplessness state. Iberians are sophisticated in their aim to please and are vulnerable to apathy when no answer can relieve painful circumstances. My training partner Tim McGaffic and I have worked on a project using specialized heart rate monitors to reflect the emotionality and conflict in horses. Their heart rates do not lie even if the body isn’t showing visible signs of stress, something Iberians are good at disguising. We have used this biofeedback for developing training programs that maximize learning by avoiding training in the stress zone. This type of monitoring helps us assess stress that is difficult to see. I remember that you and I had a heart monitor on one of your Iberian geldings who visually looked the same under saddle as he did inhand. We were all surprised to see that he had a disturbingly high heart rate in-hand but was within normal limits under saddle, opposite from what anyone would have expected. This finding helped you focus more on building back strength, increasing suppleness in-hand and training in smaller increments with mental rest in between sessions. This brings me full circle to talking about the many zones of stress on the road to achieving collection. The end goal is reached through sympathetic systematic training of both horse and rider. Authentic collection, a s you put it, doe s not 20 |

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come about without partnership. There is a huge difference between a partnership of communication and a forced circus act of movement. Ginny, as we wrap up this first part of our interview, could you please give the reader some practical tips on “authentic collection” – ideas to keep in the forefront of one’s mind? The best advice I can give any rider to achieve their goal of collection (or any equestrian goal) is to educate you beyond “the look” and beyond the show ring flash. Education and knowledge will lead you on a successful journey if you can handle the truth! Watch yourself ride. It takes courage to see yourself on video. Pictures are worth a thousand words. I would advise a selfassessment or assessment by someone who understands the difference between collection in a partnership and that which is forced. Becoming a good horseman and talented rider requires dedication, self-discipline and understanding of yourself, your horse and the uniqueness of the “us,” meaning rider and horse working together. Every reader who rides will understand what I mean about the “us” because it is, of course, different from horse to horse. There are many compassionate and talented horsemen to align with, but no amount of training or education will be helpful unless the rider is willing to engage in objective, critical thinking skills and self-analysis. As my friend and mentor, Charles de Kunffy says, The sensitivity and awareness of beauty, and the desire for it, cannot be taught, merely inspired in other s. There are those who understand and seek harmony and live by its ethics, and they naturally gravitate towards those efforts in riding that lead to total harmony, and thus the art of horsemanship [6]. www.the-iberian-horse.com


Become a rider with an allowing hand, which engages the collection f r o m i m p u l s i o n i n t h e h o r s e’s hindquar ters. The key words here are “allowing hand.” A “correct” head carriage is particular to each specific horse in that it depends on the interplay of conformation, conditioning and strength. There is no one size that fits all. Sadly, all too often an arched neck behind the vertical “look” is enough for some riders. Biomechanically, it is harmful, stresses the horse and forces rather than allows – so why go there? T h e l a s t c o m p o n e n t wo u l d b e training within an optimum learning zone. Allowing hands are not hands that stress. If you find yourself in the stress zone, which will happen when you test limits, back off. Taking your time with training here will ultimately save time and stress in the long run. Be patient. If a reader wants to see everything wo r k “r i g ht in ac ti o n” l o ok up the joyo u s performance of Valargo and his rider Charlotte Dujardin, this year’s Olympic Gold Medalist. They really bring to heart the power of possibilities with an allowing hand. I encourage any student of horsemanship, whether amateur or professional competitor, to find some one who re sonate s with your philosophy and training ideals. Hopefully, those aspirations are doing what is right for the horse and the person alike. Then, prepare yourself for a lifelong journey of learning and the reward of knowing you did it the “authentic” way with compassion for your partner “the horse.” vTIH

Ginny Elder on King. REFERENCES 1. Hector, Chris. Interview with Gerd Heuschmann. “Gerd Heuschmann – The Dressage War,” The Horse Magazine, Horsemagazine.com, August 2009. 2. Sellers, Mark & Sellers, Flossie. “Horse Health Matters” EquiMed Press: Morgan Hill, Calif., August 2009. 3. Heuschmann, Gerd. “Tug of War: Classical Versus “Modern” Dressage: Why Classical Training Works and How Incorrect “Modern” Riding Negatively Affects Horses’ Health, Trafalgar Square Books, 2007. Also see “If Horses Could Speak” DVD and YouTube videos based on this book. Leste-Lasserre, Christa. “The Incredible Equine Neck,” The Horse: Your Guide to Equine Health Care, 2016 (Interview with Dr. Hilary Clayton). http://www.thehorse.com/articles/35123/the-incredible-equine-neck Clayton, Hilary & Flood, P.F. “Clinical Anatomy of the Horse,” Elsevier Health Sciences: Amsterdam, 2005. Mendez, Manolo, Dean, Ysabella and Larrouilh, Caroline. “Balance & Rhythm in the Young Horse: Essential to Forward and Self Carriage. 2014. http://docplayer.net/31567225-Balance-rhythm-in-the-younghorse-essential-to-forward-in-self-carriage.html Bell, Robin. “Why is Lameness So Common in Dressage Horses?” The Horse Magazine, Horsemagazine.com, August 2014. 4. McLeod, Angela. “Why is an Understanding of Biomechanics Important?” The Horse Magazine, Horsemagazine.com, Oct. 30, 2012. 5. Seligman, Martin. “Helplessness: On Depression, Development, and Death. W.H. Freemen: New York, Oct. 30, 2012. 6. DeKunffy, Charles. Personal correspondence, Jan. 30, 2017. Issue 2 | 2017

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Old Stonehouse Farm Pre s e n ce , Pe r s ona l i t y & Pu re Ex t r a v a g a nc e

Breeding ~ Training ~ Sales ~ Showing ~ Lessons

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934 Sunrise Boulevard, Mount Bethel, PA 18343 www.oldstonehousefarm.com 570.897.6895 Sarah Gately-Wilson www.the-iberian-horse.com Issue 2 | 2017


THE BRIDLE SHOP

Decorating your life with art and beauty! Tack, Paintings, Horses!!

Farm Stays

Getaway and relax in the country on our small working farm!

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THE FPSH JuneFest

2017 June

A

(FEATURED)

Jennifer Stewart instructing students during Howard Peet's Driving seminar.

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Fest:

Youth’s Perspective

By Abigale Godfrey

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THE FPSH JuneFest

(LEFT) Abigale Godfrey participating in the Halter clinic. Photo courtesy of PE Photo. (BELOW) Howard Peet instructing Genoka Thomassy on proper rein contact while driving. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

H

ave you ever been to a horse show where the judge takes the time to personally walk you through a pattern and give you one-on-one instruction during your class? No? Well you should go to JuneFest, sponsored by The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse (The FPSH) and hosted by Rancho del Lago! Every year Walter and Judy Henslee open their ranch to the public to host the annual schooling show for The FPSH, a nonprofit organization founded to benefit the Pure Spanish horse. The Foundation organizes shows and trips to Spain, assists in horse rescue and gives grants to dedicated riders of the Pure Spanish horses. The profits from JuneFest go to support its mission of protecting and promoting the Pure Spanish horse. This year's JuneFest was Rancho del Lago’s 13th annual schooling show and was a fun and relaxing event for all. The three-day event began on Friday, June 2. Howard Peet gave halter and driving lessons. Michael Vermaas gave riding and working equitation lessons to individuals as well as to groups. On Saturday morning, Jody Sydow welcomed everyone and gave an update on The Foundation. She also relayed that longtime Executive Director Barb Clark has retired, and there are several positions open for anyone 26 |

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(LEFT) Michael Vermaas on Dardanos RDL during the Working Equitation clinic. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

wishing to work with The Foundation. Howard Peet talked about the IALHA National Show, and he announced that there will be a Wine Walk during the show’s barn party to spotlight sale horses and breeding stallions. After Howard’s update, Michael Vermaas kicked off the day with a talk on working equitation, starting with the dressage phase. Michael stressed the importance of precision and an active, attentive horse. He explained, “The horse needs to be ready to get out of the way of a charging bull in a millisecond.” Michael then took the class outside to give a demonstration of the ease of handling

ABOVE) Michael Vermaas speaking about the key points of working equitation. Photo courtesy of PE Photo. (LEFT) Jody Sydow, FPSH representative, addressing JuneFest attendees. Photo courtesy of Walter Henslee.

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THE FPSH JuneFest and speed phase on the breathtaking, grey stallion, Dardanos RDL, owned by Rancho del Lago. Michael made a point of telling the riders to take their time with obstacles their horses were not familiar with. “In the ease of handling phase you should look like you are taking a ride in the park,� he said. After Michael's demonstration, Walter Henslee and Ruperto Vasquez gave a demonstration on how to safely collect a stallion from the ground with Magico VI. They also demonstrated how to collect a stallion using the mount, with Saltador ORO. Walter explained the whole procedure from the temperature of the AV to how a stallion safely approaches the mount. He then gave an in-depth demonstration of how to extend, centrifuge and prepare a collection for shipping. Next, Howard, with the help of Jennifer Stewart and her mare Falconera, gave a lovely Introduction to Driving seminar. Students drove with Jennifer to get first-hand experience while Howard discussed with the onlookers what was being done, along with other important driving facts. (BELOW) Walter Henslee collecting Saltador ORO during the Breeding seminar. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

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(ABOVE) Abigale Godfrey participating in the Dressage Suitability class during the Schooling Show. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

Lunch was a delicious potluck, with wonderful food, where competitors, guests, judges and trainers visited prior to the beginning of the schooling show. JuneFest offered a nice selection of classes including an In-Hand class, a Dressage Sport Horse In-Hand class and a Dressage Suitability class. Mares, stallions and geldings were shown separately in the in-hand classes, and the judge gave meaningful one-on-one instruction to the competitors. The Working Equitation class, with its three phases of dressage, ease of handling and speed was the last class of the day. This portion of the show was the largest attraction, and competition was fierce in the novice division, which boasted the largest number of entries. The spectators gathered in lawn chairs to watch as the competitors worked their way through the obstacle course. The www.the-iberian-horse.com


(BELOW) Prissy Rumel, on her Half-Andalusian, competing in the dressage phase of the Working Equitation Schooling Show. Photo courtesy of Kellee Campbell.

(ABOVE) Kiki Pantaze competing in the speed phase of the Working Equitation Schooling Show. Photo courtesy of Kellee Campbell.

horses entered were primarily various Iberian horses, but there were a few Quarter Horses, an Azteca, a Warlander and two Australian Stock Horses as well. There was a concern that the show would be rained out, but aside from a brief sprinkle, the show was unaffected. The youngest attendees stayed in the swimming pool until dark, only emerging when told that fajitas were ready for dinner. The judges had a good time scoring tests and ribbing each other over wine and dinner. One of the judges, Michael Vermaas, had a birthday and so everyone gathered around to sing happy birthday. Alas, the children had gotten into the cake and so the judge was presented with a partial sheetcake with the candles placed backwards, to his amusement and our chagrin. After dinner, ribbons and trophies were handed out in the living room with smiles, laughter and many pictures. One of the judges told the competitors how proud she was to have judged a show where no one was disqualified. As a youth member, I love the FPSH show at Rancho del Lago because of the trainers, judges and knowledgeable horse people that are willing to interact with you. They are happy to give advice and instruction or lend a hand if you are struggling

with something. They are a fountain of knowledge on any horse-related topic. And most are all too happy to pin your number on or retrieve your hat. The competitors aren’t mean to each other. They talk before, during and after the show, giving each other advice and tips on how to improve. Another thing I love is that professionals come to compete with the amateurs. It really challenges me to do my best and gives me a more realistic perspective of how well my mount and I perform. My very first show was The FPSH schooling show in 2012. Since then, through friends made, I have gone on to ride at the IALHA Nationals on someone else’s horse. I rode at the Haras Cup on my own horse and have attended several other shows. If you have never experienced the annual FSPH JuneFest and schooling show at Rancho Del Lago, I would wholeheartedly encourage you to attend. Whether it’s your first show or a test run for a larger show down the road, stop by to watch and learn about the spectacular Iberian breed. vTIH Issue 2 | 2017

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WHERE WE Have Been Seen

IALHA & FPSH

Members Share Accomplishments

A

ndalusians and Lusitanos are amazingly versatile! The IALHA and The FPSH are proud to share the accomplishments and special events that our members are participating in outside of our breed shows. The following is a compilation of what some members have shared with us for this issue of The Iberian Horse.

Youth Member Plans and Experiences Carly Orenstein, along with her Andalusian gelding, Dornillo, has been schooling to compete in the upcoming 2017/2018 dressage season and plans to attend a few breed shows, including the Southeast Baroque Horse Show to be held in Florida this fall. Carly loves the breed and is always looking for ways to promote it. She is thrilled to be a youth member of the IALHA and hopes to be a positive representation. Carly and Dornillo (Neo for short) are truly bonding, building a partnership and becoming the team to beat. Carly and Dornillo proudly achieved Grand Champion for ages 14-18 in WTC Pleasure/Equitation at the 2016 Palm Beach County Mounted Posse Super Show, held just outside of Wellington, Fla.

Dressage: Rider Earns the IALHA High Point Ribbon Alix James attended the Maryland Dressage Association USDF-licensed show, Dressage at Heavenly Waters, held on May 27-28, 2017. Riding on her Lusitano, Virote, they scored 62.22 for Fourth Level, Test 3, earning them the IALHA High Point Ribbon that was offered at this open show. * If you are interested in having the IALHA High Point Ribbons available at an open show, download the application at ialha.org/ribbons/. 30 |

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Carly Orenstein and her Andalusian, Dornillo I.

Alix James and her Lusitano, Virote.

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WHERE WE Have Been Seen

We are always looking for more member stories! And IALHA youth members, don't forget to show of f your IALHA pride! Send us your photos with the IALHA saddle pad! Submit your experience to ialhapub @gmail.com.

Driving: Our Horses Look Absolutely Beautiful Pulling Carriages! Tilley Andalusians recently took five horses to the 2017 Pleasure Days Driving Competition held on June 3-4, 2017. One of those horses, Amici BB, with Nadine Tilley as whip and showing a beautifully restored trap, won the Antique Carriage Class and the John Morgan Memorial Antique Carriage Award.

Working Equitation: Talk about Versatility! Amanda Latta attended the Working Equitation show at Creek Hollow Ranch in Ramona, Calif., this May with her Andalusian mare Afrodita. It was Afrodita’s third WE show after attending two days of the Nuno Matos clinic. Amanda started WE last year with Afro as a change of scenery from the show ring, where she competed and won in every division from halter, driving, hunt, Western, dressage, Western dressage, dressage hack and show hack. vTIH

Amanda Latta and her Andalusian mare, Afrodita.

(LEFT)

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Tradition Art

SADDLERY

The

and

of Making Saddles

The Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art Saddlery

By Diane E. Barber

Photos by Haley Harrington

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(PICTURED) Spanish traditional costume tack alongside newly made headstalls at the Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art saddlery.

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SADDLERY

T

he saddlery (or la guarnicionería) at the Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art in Jerez, Spain, pays homage to tradition and the fine leather craftsmanship that Spain is world-renowned for. The charming red brick building perched just steps from the outdoor arena across from the palace boasts distinctly unique architecture that readily sparks the curiosity of onlookers. Upon stepping through the front door of the saddlery, visitors are greeted by the sweet smell of leather in an impeccable and quaint studio-style workshop that is filled with natural light and the inviting warmth of master saddlemaker, Florencio Ruiz Castellano. Florencio took the saddlery management reins in 1989 upon the retirement of his godfather (the official saddlemaker when the school began more than 40 years ago). Like his apprentices, Florencio also completed the school’s intensive training program (ABOVE) An apprentice hand-sewing part of a Spanish saddle.

(BELOW) Lesson board for students to learn about the parts of tack before leather-cutting.

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(BELOW) A headstall in progress in the workshop.

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(ABOVE) The tools of the trade.

(ABOVE) Embossing the Royal School's logo on leather parts.

(BELOW) Apprentices carefully at work crafting new headstalls.

decades ago. The curriculum for today’s three-year program is very similar. Many months of the first year are strictly spent on theoretical training that includes studying the history of horses and carriages, leather, tools and the parts of tack before students begin cutting leather to make goods for the gift shops (typically six to seven months into the course). The second year is focused on crafting harnesses and headstalls, and during the final year students move up to making saddles. “My students finish the program with the professional skills necessary to start working. Many have their own workshops,” says Florencio with a smile. All of the leather used at the saddlery is from Spain and comes from two suppliers – one that is located in Seville and the other in Antequera – and is dyed on campus. In addition to specialty items to sell in the shops, the saddlery produces harnesses, headstalls Issue 2 | 2017

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SADDLERY and the doma vaquera (country dressage or Spanish cowboy) saddles used by the school. According to Florencio, the headstalls take two to four days to complete, while the saddles require approximately two weeks of fully dedicated time from start to finish. The time for harnesses varies depending upon the detailing. The dressage saddles used by the riders are not made there, though they are modified by the saddlery to give them a specific style. Last but not least, regular repairs are done for the school’s riding and carriage tack. When visiting the Royal School, the saddlery is a “must see” to witness an age-old craft firsthand and to meet a new generation of proud Spanish artisans passionately at work. Doing so provides a special meaning to handcrafted leather pieces that are stamped “Hecho en España” (made in Spain). For more information go to www.realescuela.org. vTIH (ABOVE) Master saddlemaker Florencio Ruiz Castellano at work in the saddlery. (BELOW) Florencio Ruiz Castallano repairing a training saddle for one of the school's riders while former student Nastasia Manan assists.

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Diane E. Barber lives in Los Angeles and is a lifestyle writer, interior designer and equestrian with an affinity for Spain and P.R.E.s. Curiosity about her horse’s lineage led her to Andalusia and to the Royal School where she has trained under the tutelage of Rafael Soto and has enjoyed time in the saddlery.

(ABOVE) Samples of leather used at the Royal School's saddlery. IALHA 2017 - Issue-2 - Aug-Sep-Oct - 20170717OL.pdf

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Fit is Everything.

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DRESSAGE

A

Pura Raza Española (P.R.E.) Match Made in HEAVEN

(PICTURED) The hacienda at Epona Equestrian Center in Carmona, Spain.

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Dressage Olympian Rafael Soto trains U.S. Arabian Youth National Champion and Stanford Equestrian Team member on a P.R.E. stallion in Spain

Written and photographed by Diane E. Barber

Diane E. Barber lives in Los Angeles and is a freelance lifestyle writer and interior designer. She is a dressage enthusiast with an affinity for Spain and a passion for Spanish horses. She travels to Spain frequently to attend SICAB and to train with Rafael Soto and his protĂŠgĂŠ, Vivi Garcia, at Epona. Issue Issue 22 || 2017 2017

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DRESSAGE

(ABOVE) Rafael Soto instructing Haley Harrington with P.R.E. stallion Galante during a morning dressage training session at Epona.

S

ometimes magic happens when an instructor, a student and a special horse come together. Such was the case for Olympic medalist, Rafael Soto, an accomplished young American rider and a magnificent P.R.E. stallion named Galante at Epona Equestrian Center in Carmona, Spain, near Seville. When I was making arrangements last fall for my annual trip to Spain for dressage training with Rafael and his protégé, Vivi Garcia, I had an aha moment and thought it would be wonderful if a young equestrian friend of mine, Haley Harrington (a U.S. Arabian Sport Horse Youth National Champion and former Stanford University Equestrian Team member) could join me to train with P.R.E.s and Rafael for the first time. I have known Haley since she was 5 years old when her love affair with horses was blossoming in California, and I knew she would be game if circumstances would allow her to go. At the time, she was in Berlin doing a post-Stanford internship, so geography was on our side. When I contacted her, she was ecstatic about the idea of going, and her mom jumped in to lend financial 42 |

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support to make it happen. Having trained with Rafael on numerous occasions over the past 13 years (both at Epona Equestrian Center and the Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art), I knew that Haley had a lifealtering experience ahead of her. Upon arrival at Epona in the serene olive grovecarpeted Andalusian countryside, an immediate and mutual fascination was casually sparked in the stables between Vivi’s beloved horse Galante and Haley. What began with the stallion’s animated response to Haley’s affectionate neck scratches, with Haley’s joyful laughter egging him on, soon became a special human-equine bond that everyone at the school soon recognized. Much to Haley’s delight, Vivi surprised her and brilliantly paired the duo and began to prepare them for the upcoming intensive clinic with Rafael later in the week. My instinctive invitation to have Haley come along to experience my “Spanish family” and my horse world in Spain was right on point. During one of her training sessions, a beaming Rafael turned to Vivi’s father, Fernando, and said, “There is magic in the way she rides!” www.the-iberian-horse.com


A Conversation with Rafael Soto and Haley Harrington Diane Barber: Rafael, what most impressed you about Haley’s riding capabilities, particularly given that she did not have any High School ("Alta Escuela") level dressage training before she trained with you and Galante? And, Haley, what dressage experience did you have before you came to Epona Equestrian Center in Spain to train with Rafael? Rafael Soto: What impressed me most was that Haley could adapt very quickly. She instinctively learned minuteto-minute from Galante, and she listened very carefully to my instruction, which helped her feel the adjustments necessary for the High School movements. This comes from a solid equitation education and her natural ability. Haley Harrington: I showed First Level dressage, trained Second Level tests and did some Third Level movements. I was lucky to be exposed to non-dressage trainers who believed that mastering basic dressage was crucial to a horse and a rider’s development. The first time I was exposed to the basics of traditional dressage was in Pony Club when I was 13, which was eventing dressage. At Stanford, I showed equitation the first three years, and then in 2015 I became a part of the dressage team in my senior year.

RS: Of course! Galante was extremely well-trained by Vivi, and he is a super horse. He is very young and sensitive, and he requires a rider with the sensitivity that Haley has to get the best out of him. It was a pleasure to teach and watch them. DB: Before Galante, had you ever ridden a stallion before, and how did your training in the U.S. prepare you for riding a High School level dressage stallion? HH: No. I never rode a stallion consistently before. I jumped with one briefly. I think the most important thing that prepared me for riding Galante with Rafael was that I have been lucky to have trainers who have taught me the importance of coming to every ride prepared to learn and that mistakes usually have to do with miscommunication on the rider’s part. I use my mistakes as opportunities to figure out how to communicate better. (BELOW) A mid-training stirrup adjustment.

DB: You mentioned that Haley was one of the best students you have ever had? Why? RS: Haley is one of the better students I have experienced during many years of teaching because of the combination of her disposition, her ability to follow direction and her sensitivity with horses. She learned and improved very quickly! DB: What do you attribute to your successful rides and learning so quickly? HH: Rafael gave me space to experiment and find my balance with the horse without ever letting me feel like I had failed. I think he does a remarkable job of keeping tabs on the mind-set of both the horse and rider so that the lesson can continue to be productive. DB: Do you think pairing Haley and Galante was a great match? Why? Issue 2 | 2017

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DRESSAGE DB: How did Haley's lessons with Vivi prepare her for her lessons with you? RS: Without Vivi's previous preparation with all my students at Epona, it would never work. Vivi's teaching and training ability is indispensable for me to come and teach the clinics. The students are prepared and understand my training method and also how the horses are trained.

(ABOVE) Rafael presents Haley with her diploma for completion of the intensive dressage training course at Epona.

DB: Haley said that her best teacher at home was her spirited and strong-minded Arabian pony, Benito, that she won her Arabian Sport Horse Youth National Championship with. How did her journey with her pony prepare her for riding such a grand P.R.E. like Galante? RS: Because ponies are small they typically do not have thorough training by adults but are instead trained by the children who ride them. The capacity for adaptability, which is apparent in Haley, likely comes from the unpredictability of her Arabian pony. That gave her the feeling she needed to ride a horse like Galante.

DB: How was riding Galante different than any other horse you had ever ridden? HH: I have never been on a horse of his size that had the bright intellect and the readiness to use his enormous power. He is huge and at no moment was his sheer strength far from my mind. But, what struck me most was that he was very forgiving and graceful. As a 6-year-old, there were definitely moments when he had something to say about my unclear requests, though I never once felt like he was working contrary to me. He just wanted to perform well as much as I did and that was incredible. (BELOW) Rafael instructs Haley on leg position for better communication with Galante.

DB: You grew up with Arabians. How does the breed compare with P.R.E.s based on your experience with Galante at Epona? HH: The biggest difference is obviously the size, though I do not normally dwell on the size of the horse I am riding because whether 1,500 pounds or 900 pounds that is still much bigger than me. The greatest similarity and the reason I love both breeds so much is their minds. Both are very smart and they think a lot, which is evident when communicating with them, especially for high-level movements. 44 |

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(ABOVE) Haley and Galante bonding during a welldeserved neck scratch in the stables at Epona.

DB: Is there anything in particular that stands out about your experience with Haley? What movements do you think she did exceptionally well? RS: She excelled in the collected movements with Galante. He is a young horse and needs a capable rider like her to help him execute these movements correctly. DB: What was your ultimate experience in the arena with Rafael and Galante? HH: In one of my lessons we had trouble with canter departs the first way. Rafael talked me through it, and I took a breath and focused on feeling the horse under me. I barely had to think the cue and when all of Galante’s power rushed up and we moved forward together, it felt like we were one! His desire to find what I was looking for during my rides, no matter how unclear my communication, speaks volumes about him and his training. DB: What was your favorite high school dressage movement on Galante and why? HH: Definitely passage. His power and levity combined with the sense that we could explode forward or be suddenly completely still at any moment was amazing. DB: What was it like to train under the tutelage of a dressage master and Olympic medalist? HH: It was a dream come true! Rafael is a very kind man who has the ability to explain things better than most people.

(ABOVE) Rafael, Haley and Galante with Epona's master trainer, Vivi Garcia.

My favorite thing about training with him was how far he pushed me. But, he always did it with the proper preparation so that in the end it didn’t really feel like pushing at all. Plus, he never said anything negative and was always very positive. DB: Haley has an incredible amount of selfdiscipline, she is very competitive and she connects emotionally with every horse she rides. If she had the opportunity to train full-time in dressage and she had the right horse, do you think she could become a top competitor and why? RS: Self-discipline is paramount in any sport. A serious professional rider must develop that and the other merits you mentioned. This is what makes them stand out from the amateurs. I am sure that Haley could be a top competitor if that is what she chose to do. She definitely has all the necessary fundamental qualities to succeed. For more information and to train with Rafael Soto at Epona Equestrian Center in Spain visit: www.eponaspain.com. vTIH Issue 2 | 2017

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!

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OUR SHINING STARS

Stanhfield, MN | 651.503.2549 | info@MorningStarAndalusians.com THE IBERIAN HORSE

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Come see us at IALHA Nationals!

OUR RISING STARS

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EQUINE Models

Creations

Breyer Animal

CAPTURING THE BEAUTY OF THE P.R.E. HORSE IN EQUINE MODELS

(PICTURED) Novelisto D

By Erica Peet

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Photo courtesy of Breyer.

(LEFT) Fantasia and Gozosa Photo courtesy of Breyer.

F

or many, the words love, hope and dreams are synonymous with horses. For me, they were the “stuff” of my childhood fantasies and delights. Their companionship and beauty make them wonderful partners for people of all ages. For those who cannot own the real thing themselves, a Breyer model horse unleashes the childhood (and oldhood!) imagination. Breyer Animal Creations, the five-star manufacturer of model equines, has been making its captivating lines of resin and porcelain model horses and accessories for decades. Whether it be for play, a collection or a reminder of a beloved partner now gone, Breyer model horses truly are for all, young and old. Because Breyer is promoting a new model of interest to Iberian lovers, I spoke with company vice president of communication, Kathleen Fallon, to learn a little more about its history and products. It all began in 1950 with a special order for a western horse to adorn a mantelpiece clock. This model, now known as #57 Western Horse, became Breyer’s first horse model. Once people saw it, the requests began pouring in. “By accepting that one order,” Fallon explained, “the Breyer Modeling

Company changed the focus of its business and company direction forever.” Though Breyer produced many breeds of model horses throughout the years, the first Breyer Traditional Andalusian model, a 1:9 scale figure, was sculpted in 1979 by Chris Hess. The Legionario III mold is the portrait model of the champion Andalusian stallion Legionario III of Garrison Ranch. “Breyer likes to represent the world of horses and many different breeds,” said Fallon. “It is no surprise that Breyer was delighted to add the beauty and variety of the Andalusian and Lusitano breeds to its line.” Since then, Breyer has created six other traditional Andalusian/ Lusitano models: Nobel II, the Andalusian stallion of Cortijo ValMoor; Templado, the Lusitano stallion of the show Cavalia; Alborozo, the Andalusian stallion of Kilimanjaro Ranch; Kripton Seni II, the Andalusian stallion of Amandalusian Farm; and Andalusian stallion Novelisto D and Lusitano gelding Diablo DC, both of Waller Farms. How does Breyer select these wonder ful representatives to become models? “We are always looking for good candidates for models,” Fallon said. “In general, we evaluate Issue 2 | 2017

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EQUINE Models the overall line and decide what breeds are either under- or over-represented, look at what molds we have available and then star t our research. We look for champions, excellent breed representatives, good stories, willing owners, horses that are competing currently, horses that are marketable and more. Once we have some broad ideas, then we do more research and come up with a slate of possibilities. After we’ve done that, then we review against the line as a whole and start fine-tuning our list. It’s a long process and our final decisions are affected by many variables. We wish we could make all the great horses that we see out there, but sometimes it just isn’t possible!” Being selected to be featured as a model is only half the story. The final step is BreyerFest. This fun event has been held annually at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Ky., since 1990. What started out as a gathering of about a thousand people has grown to a three-day celebration that hosts more than 10,000! “BreyerFest started as both a tribute to the real horses that inspire our models as well as to create

a national gathering for our fans. We call them ‘portrait models’ because they are a ‘portrait’ of the real horse. People love to meet the real horses and their owners and enjoy learning about the horse and its life. It makes the model even more special to them. We try to bring as many of the real horses to BreyerFest as we can each year. This year is very rich with portrait models!” Fallon gushed, “We will be featuring nine horses that all have been honored as Breyer portrait models. Our fans will be so excited to meet them all.” Nobel II, Alborozo, Kripton Seni II, Novelisto D and Diablo DC have each attended BreyerFest in the year they were introduced. This July, the world will be introduced to this year's portrait models. And believe it or not, Breyer has chosen another Andalusian to join the Breyer collection. What is really special about this year’s representative is that this is the first time that a mare has been chosen to represent the Andalusian as a portrait model. To top it off, Breyer decided to do a mare and foal model. So, congratulations are in order to Fantasia Del C and her filly Gozosa of Origin P.R.E., owned by Sarah Shechner!

(ABOVE) Legionario III (LEFT) Diablo DC (RIGHT) Kripton Seni II 50 |

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I took some time to talk with Sarah about this fun and amazing experience. Q: Did you have Breyer models as a kid? A: Did I? I still have them all! I’ve had a few of them with me in Los Angeles, but most of them were in my mom’s basement in Ithaca, N.Y., until about four years ago, when she moved out west. I probably have 100 Breyer horses now that my entire collection is here at my house! Q: With one new special addition I am guessing! Did you know that Fantasia was up for consideration? A: No! Not until Breyer called me. They called to tell me that Fantasia had been nominated and that they were specifically looking for a P.R.E. mare who was a good representative of the breed. Q: Once you were informed, what did you have to do to get the process rolling? A: Breyer wanted to be sure Fantasia was the best representative possible for her breed. I sent them numerous photos and links to photos of her online. They loved her look. They were extremely interested in her show record. They loved that she had been Champion of the Breed for all three organizations (some on multiple occasions), that she is Qualified by ANCCE and The FPSH, and that she had been the IALHA Andalusian Horse of the Year as well. Breyer also loved that she was a wonderful riding horse and was the IALHA Reserve Champion of Versatility, from competing in a combination of sport horse in-hand, halter, Spanish specialty, under saddle rail classes and dressage. Q: Do you know what it was that made B r eye r c h o o s e Fa n t a s i a ove r t h e ot h e r candidates? A: I think it was the combination of her classic looks, show record, personality and her recognition by people involved in the breed. I know that Breyer called a number of people to ask about Fantasia and everyone said yes, she’s definitely the mare you want. Q; Once she was chosen, were you a part of the model creation process? Can you tell us about it?

(ABOVE) Alborozo

(ABOVE) Nobel II

(ABOVE) Templado. Issue 2 | 2017

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EQUINE Models

(ABOVE) Fantasia. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

A: The model came out great! There were moments, though, when I wasn’t so sure. I wish they had given me a little more insight into the process ahead of time. Once the model is pressed, they don’t make changes to the mold. When I first saw pictures of the model, it didn't quite look like my horse. Thankfully, Breyer has some VERY talented painters, and they were able to get the look just right using careful shading. There is one major oops though: They made the model with full mane and tail, not understanding the traditional Spanish mare clip at all. We compromised, and the model is displayed in the box on the side with no mane, so she at least looks like a Spanish-clipped mare in the box. Pull her out though, and if you’re a P.R.E. enthusiast, you’ll think she’s a stallion. Ha! Q: Breyer included a model of Fantasia's filly, Gozosa. Was that a part of the model plan from the beginning? 52 |

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A : Ye p , t h e y w e r e specifically looking for a mare and foal! Thankfully, I had a bunch of photos of Gozosa as a baby at mom’s side, so they were able to match her pretty closely. Q: Do you and Fantasia have plans for attending BreyerFest? Can you tell us about it? A: Yes! We are featured horses at BreyerFest 2017 Gateway to India! I’m bringing both Fantasia and Gozosa! I’m already so incredibly excited! BreyerFest is July 14-16, and the horses will do a short performance each day, plus do a fun meet-andgreet session each day where kids can take photos and get their Breyer horses or boxes signed. Hopefully the kids will understand that Gozosa is no longer an itty-bitty foal, but a grown-up 5-year-old mare. Q: How does it feel to have your mare as a model, representing the Andalusian/P.R.E.? A: It’s something I always dreamed about as a kid. As Fantasia’s show record grew more impressive, it became something in the back of my mind that was possible, but I had heard it was extremely difficult to get nominated. Everyone wants a Breyer model made from their horse! I think what finally made it a reality was that Fantasia has a lot of fans in every organization. Once you meet her in person, you’re just kind of SOLD. Fantasia is that horse at the shows that everyone comes over to meet, and she LOVES every drop of attention. You can scratch her just about anywhere, and she’s immediately your BEST friend. For that reason, she’s a fantastic ambassador of the P.R.E./Andalusian breeds. Q: Other fun thoughts, comments or insights that you would like to add? www.the-iberian-horse.com


(ABOVE) Sarah Shechner with Fantasia. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

A: As relaxed and sweet as Fantasia is with her fans and in the stable, boy can she turn it ON in the arena! She can be dozing on the rail at a show one minute, but the moment she’s asked to move, she turns into this consummate show horse. She NEVER runs out of energy. You have to remember to take breaks, otherwise she’ll just keep going, keep showing off. Her daughter Gozosa (joyful in Spanish) has that same quality. Thankfully that energy is generally focused and translates into two horses who enjoy their work. This is an absolutely INCREDIBLE honor, and I couldn't be more thrilled. This is something you dream about as a child but never expect to actually happen! I'm hopeful some of my East Coast friends will be able to come see us, as this might be the only time I bring the mares all the way to the East Coast. Come meet the mares in the flesh! Friends with horse-crazy kids, this is SO the event for YOU! Extra huge thank you and CONGRATULATIONS to Barbara Currie for breeding Fantasia del C, my oncein-a-lifetime-now-a-Breyer-model mare. Thank you to everyone who has helped us reach our goals year after year. It takes a VILLAGE to take a horse

to the levels that Fantasia has reached: from help at the various associations with Inscriptions, Revisions, Qualified Tribunals and shows; trainers past a n d p r e s e n t; f a r r i e r s; veterinarians; grooms; helpers; photographers; P.R.E. experts; dressage experts; clinicians; facility owners; and the help of so many incredible friends. YOU have all made this dream so very possible, and I thank you all from the bottom of my heart. There are too many of you to try to name everyone, but you all know who you are! Thank you, Sarah, for sharing! (BELOW) Sarah Shechner riding Fantasia. Photo courtesy of PE Photo.

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EQUINE Models

(LEFT) Fantasia and Baby Gozosa. Photo courtesy of Sarah Shechner. BELOW) Close up of Fantasia and Gozosa. Photo courtesy of Breyer.

Many of us had our first experiences with horses through Breyer models and our imaginations. These models remain a favorite with most owners today. The models that are featured at the Breyer Celebration event are limited editions and hold or increase their value throughout the years. The P.R.E horse featured at the 2008 Breyer Celebration was the stallion owned by Avi Cohen named Alborozo. Today, the Alborozo model is valued at about $250, but some of the enhanced ones on eBay are selling for more than $600 because the mold was “broken� and this model can no longer be made. The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse has a limited number of these models, and they would like to give one away to a lucky member of either the IALHA or The FPSH. All you have to do is be a current member of either organization in good standing and send an email with an answer to the question on the right, expressing your interest to enter for the drawing, to info@prehorse.org. We will then place all the names in a container and draw the winner. Please send us your emails by Nov. 1, 2017. The winner will be announced in the next magazine. It pays to support your breed and be a member of The FPSH or the IALHA! Good luck! vTIH 54 |

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QUESTION FOR GIVEAWAY ENTRY: What event is The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse sponsoring during the IALHA National Championship Show? The answer can be found within this issue of The Iberian Horse.

www.the-iberian-horse.com


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STALLION Management

Avoiding TROUBLE with STALLIONS By JP Giacomini Note: This article is adapted from Warmbloods Today magazine, November/December 2016.

(ABOVE) JP Zen enjoying turn out time. (BELOW) Piaffe is the control of the activity of the horse’s feet. Horse shown is the late Veiga Andrade Istoso. Photo courtesy of Shelley Giacomini.

A TRAGIC STALLION ATTACK A few years ago, I read with sadness a terrible story in which a stallion savagely attacked his handler during a public display at a horse fair. The horse then proceeded to attack the two people who tried to get him under control, with dreadful consequences for all involved. All three people were hurt badly, and the horse was euthanized. Tragedies such as this are fortunately rare, yet when they happen, it is without much warning. For the victims, the horse and his owner, stallion attacks are a matter of life and death, notwithstanding a huge liability, which merit some deep reflection. EMOTIONAL OPINIONS All my life, I have ridden and trained a large number of stallions, and I currently own more than a dozen of them, ranging from 2 years old to 28 years old. I also take in stallions for training, such as the Oldenburg Toti Hit (By Totilas, Sandro Hit), who has been at our farm since he was 2 and a half. “Toti’s Education” has been the subject of an ongoing column in www.Warmbloodstoday.com magazine, from which this article is adapted. My experiences handling stallions have exposed me to an ongoing stream of opinions on this emotional subject, easily divided into two categories. First, the “stallion haters,” who feel justified in their

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fear by occasional horror stories that they like to repeat to put repulsion in the mind of their listeners. Second, are the “stallion lovers,” who treat them like big pussycats and tell you that there is nothing to worry about. If something bad eventually happens, they never see it as the horse’s fault, only as a result of human error that requires a change from the human, which is true, but not from the horse (that part is untrue). I think both of these opposing viewpoints are gross exaggerations. The problem with stallion haters is that they either refuse to have stallions in their barn, or they end up creating isolated life conditions that result in complete alienation for the male of the species from the rest of the world. Those horses have no relationship with other horses and become harder and harder to handle until they eventually “flip out.” The problem with stallion lovers is that they neglect to establish an unquestionable “lead stallion” position for themselves because they have decided that their stallion is never going to do anything wrong (for now, anyway!). Everything is OK for a while, but even nice stallions progressively challenge their owner, until a “breeding situation” or a change in the hierarchy is perceived by the horse and somebody gets hurt, usually badly. This is how the whole monster stallion legend perpetuates itself: The nonsensical lax behavior of stallion lovers creates situations that justify the nonsensical condemning opinions of stallion haters. COMMON SENSE MANAGEMENT Here are a few rules to make stallion management easier (keeping in mind the obvious issues of facility safety): ࡟࡟ The first rule needed to maintain a stallion’s sanity is to give him the best social life possible within his daily environment. Stallions are extremely sensitive emotionally and therein lies the source of the trouble. They spend their life concerned with rank and relationships because the future of the genetic package they carry is dependent upon their social position at breeding times (which may well be anytime). ࡟࡟ If there is only one stallion on the farm, he will be less anxious if he has direct contact with the mares (even share a paddock). Count on the girls to teach him how to behave! I once worked with a stallion who became obsessed with his mares because they were separated from him, yet he could see them all day

(ABOVE) Hipogrifo, a pure Veiga stallion, is safely ridden in any company. Photo courtesy of Shelley Giacomini.

over the fence. As a result, he refused to go in his stall to eat and behaved like a nut on a trailer or at any destination he was taken to. It took a lot of work to re-create a relationship between the stallion and any human because he obsessed on the mares he could see but couldn’t be with. There is no in-between: Either a breeding stallion can be with his mares, or he shouldn’t see them at all. Pasture breeding stallions are frequent on extensive stud farms where the whole herd of mares will be bred by the same stallion, and he will be with them from January to May or June. Very few stallions can be turned out in sight of mares without pacing the fence, which is the number one source of lameness in stallions as well as loss of weight and mental suffering. ࡟࡟ If there are several stallions kept together and they are not the very quiet types, avoid unnecessary sight or smell contact with mares in heat to prevent competition among the stallions. House the mares and the stallions at opposite ends of the farm and always do the breeding or collecting at the same place, walking there through the same route. This system prepares the horses mentally to the job at hand and can prove very useful to get stallions in the mood when they are about to be collected (especially if you don’t have a mare in heat on the day to provide stimulation). Remember, any horses encountered on the walk to the mares will be regarded as potential competitors by the stallion because they live closer to what he sees as his mares. We make sure that other stallions are brought in Issue 2 | 2017

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STALLION Management from their paddocks and returned to their stalls before one of them goes to breed. ࡟࡟ Stallions should be able to relate to each other through see-through dividers and touch noses as well as witness the entire barn activity, so they get used to it and feel they are “controlling traffic” as they are genetically predisposed to do. We have three grooming bays with cross ties and separation walls. JP Zen has learned, like all of our stallions, to be next to other stallions as well as next to geldings and mares, and to be quiet and patient while there. ࡟࡟ Stallions who do not live in a natural herd and breed regularly think they are the alpha guy, as the hierarchy has never been established between them and other horses. The stronger ones may tend to challenge the others in the barn, so handling must be done carefully when passing by each other’s stalls. As long as the handler has established himself as the dominant, protective partner, the stallion will feel safe in the proximity of other stallions and stay calm. There must never be a vacuum of authority in the human/stallion relationship. With young horses like JP Zen, I often repeat a drill of “good neighborliness” to make him stand near another stall (of a non-threatening horse) and remain quiet and silent, not scared, but relaxing in the safety zone I create. ࡟࡟ House your stallions near their best friends, so they can have comforting company while pretending to ignore their rival across the aisle. JP Zen has a neighbor called JP Zabacaxi, and they talk to each other all day and nuzzle through the divider when they come back to their stalls. ࡟࡟ The relative position of horses in the barn requires much thought and some trial and error. Don’t judge the situation by the first 10 minutes of screaming, but rather by the evolving eating patterns over the next few days (appetite is inversely proportional to anxiety) and by the disruption to the bedding. My old guys Hipogrifo and Istoso hated each other with a passion and were stalled at opposite ends of the barn when Istoso was still alive. He was very happy with a mare next to him, even in heat or with a baby. He also calmed down weanlings when first separated from their dam. 58 |

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࡟࡟ Be a friend to your stallions, as they don’t have many. Friendship is indispensable to nearly all living creatures. Horses don’t necessarily need other horses and can be friends with goats, sheep, cats, but humans are still the best for them because we are the dominant, protective partners and hence the most important being in their life. Orion is very possessive of me and has fits of jealousy if I ignore him or lead out my other riding horses, Zhivago and Zuperstar, past his stall, though they could care less. I have to make sure I talk to Orion first thing in the morning, scratching his neck through his door bars. He also must be turned out first in the day. ࡟࡟ As a rule, turn stallions out every day as much as possible or just for a little bit if they start pacing. When possible, let them go out in pairs in adjoining paddocks, for the purpose of “safe play,” with a WORKING electric fence divider between the paddocks. One of the two can be a gelding or another stallion. I find that some horses stress more when they are out all the time because they start to run the fence line and forget to eat. ࡟࡟ When working with studs, always make sure that each one believes he is the “chosen one,” as to alleviate the effects of jealousy, particularly at breeding time. This precaution, well managed, somewhat limits the potential for attacks between them. Here are some examples of how I have managed some stallions in my care: ࡟࡟ My Palomino Fabuloso was turned out with an Arabian gelding who kept him company but offered absolutely no challenge. ࡟࡟ Lusiadas was turned out with Orion when he was a yearling colt and provided his young friend with an education in good manners. The pastures were big and shaped with round corners, as to provide escape in case of any trouble developing between them. ࡟࡟ Hipogrifo lived in a small paddock very close to his two favorite geldings, and they could talk to each other all day. ࡟࡟ Istoso was just too preoccupied with the farm to be left outside without supervision for very long, as he would pace his legs into stumps if given the chance. When I wanted him to have fun, I turned him out when I could spare the time to be with him in the paddock. www.the-iberian-horse.com


He would then run, kick his heels and eventually graze as long as I was there to keep him company. I took my cell phone and did office work in the middle of the field for an hour or so and he stayed calm because he related to me and forgot everybody else on the farm. My presence as “leading stallion” got him “off duty” from thinking about his genetically programmed job. ATTACK PREVENTION Remember that even the most c oddle d st a llion c a n be c ome dangerous without any specific abuse, when the wrong situation is created or when the hormone level rises. Studies have shown that testosterone levels in leading stallions are always much higher than in “bachelor stallions” and are what makes them ready to fight, not just breed. A stallion who is well dominated by his handler (holds second place in the hierarchy) will always have a lower testosterone level and will be a lot less inclined to pick a fight with another horse in the presence of his handler or disregard it when the handler stands in his way. Accidents happen between horses and people when the people don’t matter in the horse’s mind, or matter less than the other horse. The main cause of an attack is usually that the stallion becomes aware of a potential mating with a mare and suddenly starts to see everyone as another rival “stud,” including his handler (if hierarchy is not properly established). For stallions, sex = competition = aggression. That is a fact of nature! The handler’s dominance actually translates for the horse as giving you “first mating rights,” meaning that he sees you as the leading stallion, and he has to wait for your permission to approach the mare. Young bachelors behave similarly in wild herds and breed quietly, in secret

from the lead stallion. There is only one valid prevention of attacks: Train the horse to ABSOLUTELY respect the handler (zero tolerance policy), including when a hot mare is present, even when the handler holds only a “symbolic” means of control, such as a regular halter. Establish this control in increments, first with the horse and you alone, then in company, then in new places.

(ABOVE) JP Zen, Approved Lusitano stallion by Lusiadas USA, is working on a “good neighborliness” drill. Photo courtesy of Kim Taylor. (BELOW) JP Zorro, JP Zen and JP Zeus are learning to be quiet and patient with each other. Photo courtesy of Kim Taylor.

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STALLION Management Recently we had to work with a Thoroughbred stallion that had become dangerous and ran over a couple of handlers when brought in from the paddock on his big breeding farm. I worked with him for a few days and the behavior changed completely with me and every other person who bothered to establish their own relationship with the horse. The one person who did not – who assumed that he would be OK with her because he was OK with others – got run over and bitten (fortunately not badly). This incident worked as a valuable lesson to never take such a horse for granted and to follow proper procedure. All relationships with horses evolve daily as the horse acts on your behavior of the day, not the one from last week when everything was fine. Training is transmissible, but dominance is not. The simplest way I know to make the establishment of dominance easier for both horse and handler is to use the Endotapping™ method I have invented. It changes the emotional content of any situation and can be used to induce a stallion to separate physical contact (push) from sexual intention and sexual intention from overt aggression. It is the correct "emotional solution" to conflicts because it converts anxiety/aggression into relaxation, rather than inhibits and represses it. Excessive discipline can be as bad as the lack of it: too much may create resentment later on and the horse can turn bad one day out of the blue, or quit breeding enough and you have an ongoing, unresolved conflict from lack of proper hierarchy. Love and discipline are compatible: You can feed treats to your stallion while also demanding perfect behavior at all times. JP Zen has become very good at minding people on the ground, even when he is interested in other horses. This now has to transfer into the under saddle work, and this is why the piaffe is so important. A horse about to misbehave will plant his feet on the ground in order to push himself in one direction or the other (including up in the air). Piaffe is the control of the activity of the horse’s feet: It starts by the movement of the seat, and it stops by the light, steady squeeze of the legs. When JP Zen knows how to do that reliably, he will be very safe to ride in any company. If you are witnessing an attack from a horse that doesn’t know you and you want to help, do not try to appease him and calm him down. Rather, jump up and down waiving a stick and screaming to convince him you are seven-feet-tall to establish immediate respect. It is a situation comparable to a bear entering your camp 60 |

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to steal your food: You wouldn’t go pet him, right? If you are sensible, you would either run away or get your gun (even if only to shoot into the air!) and try to scare the bear more than he is scaring you. It is hard to do, but it works because horses, though they don’t know how big they are, can sure judge your level of determination. THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT It is unreasonable to expect that a stallion is going to remain nice all his life just because "he has been pretty good so far." Thorough training must be used to shape their behavior when they reach maturity – and reshape it from time to time. Aggression is the expression of basic survival and sexual instincts that govern the life of stallion; however, it is not appropriate in domesticated surroundings. If you don’t shape behavior thoroughly, plan to suffer from instant changes, going from pleasant to aggressive when the wrong conditions occur. It won't take very much to trigger it, and it will result in potentially dire consequences. Aggression is predictable if you are very experienced, yet even a few experienced handlers have lost fingers, shoulders or arms when proper training has been neglected. After 50 years of handling stallions, I have suffered a couple of kicks and a few bites that have reminded me to never take stallions for granted. Thanks to what the most magnificent representatives of the equine species have taught me, I have learned a lot about behavior modification and applied it to the easier horses: If it works with studs, it works with any horse. If you really want to own a stallion, avoid indulging into wishful thinking: Decide if you have the guts for the higher responsibility implied with their stewardship and the right living environment to house them. Furthermore, commit to educating yourself and your horse to the higher level of self-control that must be the benchmark of safety that is indispensable around breeding animals. Too many people keep stallions that should not be bred and risk creating a potentially dangerous animal if in the hands of amateurs. Promoting a stallion who is not of superior quality is like buying a lottery ticket: The odds are against you, and the breed you proclaim to love will lose quality as the result of your choices. Yet, I freely admit that stallion handling has given a whole new and wonderful meaning to my study of horsemanship, and I would not give it up for anything in the world! vTIH www.the-iberian-horse.com


IALHA Nationals

COMPETITORS’ THOUGHTS: Experience the IALHA National Championship Show

T

he IALHA National Championship Show is an unforgettable experience. In this issue of The Iberian Horse, we share some thoughts on the show from a mother/daughter team who will be competing this year at Nationals for the first time and also from a competitor who has participated regularly for decades. Jessica and Meredith Daniel, mother and daughter show partners, are taking their relationship to a new level by approaching Nationals with a shared vision beyond trophies or ribbons. For them, it is about gaining knowledge, confidence and time together. Through preparing for the show, Jessica is creating opportunities for her daughter to grow and thrive through problem-solving, reaching outside her comfort zone, learning that her voice counts and, best yet, spending time together pursuing a common passion. “Attending the National Championship show this year for the first time as an adult amateur competitor is a dream come true for me,” explained Jessica. “I have loved horses for as long as I can remember, but it was not until April 2014 that I was able to purchase my very first Andalusian. What remarkable horses these are! My 7-year-old mare, Gitana, is so special to me, and she truly is my heart horse. I have almost entirely self-trained her in halter, sport horse in-hand, hunter/jumper and dressage. We both have worked exceedingly hard to get to the level that we are now by attending clinics, schooling shows, rated shows and taking lessons in dressage as often as possible. I am so proud of her and what we have accomplished together, and I am supremely grateful for her willing and generous attitude toward learning new things.” Jessica said that she wants to compete with Gitana at Nationals because “I love my horse and I want others to see what a wonderful, kind and talented mare she is. Competing at Nationals is also a huge confidence builder for me. The way I see it, if I can do this, I can do anything,” she said. “Nationals is the best learning experience possible for anyone who is interested in Andalusians and Lusitanos. Even if we do not win anything, I know that I will come away from this experience with a wealth of knowledge, confidence and self-respect that I did not have before and that, to me, is worth more than any ribbon or trophy.” Jessica’s 9-year-old daughter Meredith is also looking forward to the show. “This year is the first year that I will be showing my horse, Gitana,

(TOP TO BOTTOM) Jessica, Meredith, Nadine

IALHA Competitors' Thoughts continued on p. 72 Issue 2 | 2017

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IALHA Nationals

The

SHOW

is Back in

The

SHOW

is Back in

T

he 2017 IALHA National Championship Horse Show is back in Texas and will be here before you know it! But what many of you may not know is that the show committee has worked hard to come up with new opportunities to involve more of the IALHA membership. We realize that showing is not everyone's cup of tea; however, you may be a breeder with a stallion to promote, perhaps you are a member with a horse for sale or maybe you just like to have fun exhibiting your wonderful equine partner. We now have a place for you! The show committee is pleased to announce the IALHA Iberian Fair! The Iberian Fair will consist of the following; STALLION AND SALE HORSE STALLS AND EXHIBITION HORSES: With your stall fee, you get a stall in the main barn, with an official Iberian Fair Horse banner that signifies your stallion at stud or sale horse. On Friday night during the Barn Party, the IALHA, along with The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse, will be hosting a Wine Walk. During this Wine Walk, a guide will take participants through the barn and introduce the stallions and sale horses. In addition, you can take advantage of a Mini-Exhibition. Show off your horse in a fun way or present it to possible buyers. You will get to perform a short exhibition during a specified break-out in the exhibition arena. Enter one of the exhibition time slots when you check in at the show. Horses that are entered to compete in the show can be a part of the Iberian Fair 62 |

THE IBERIAN HORSE

Issue 2 | 2017

TOWN ,

TOWN !

too! Request forms to be an Iberian Fair horse will be available soon at www.ialha.org. BARN PARTY AND WINE WALK: Come socialize with your fellow Iberian horse lovers! It’s a great time to make new friends, speak with breeders and trainers, and see all the horses! Celebrate with everyone as we honor the person selected for the 2017 show dedication. Join the Wine Walk and view the lovely stallions and sale horses as you sip on a glass of wine (you must be 21 to receive wine). The Barn Party will be held Friday, Oct. 13, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. For those of you who do enjoy the competition ring, we are also happy to announce some fun new opportunity class experiences offered at the National Championship Show for the first time: MUSICAL FREESTYLE JACKPOT: Open to a single horse or team (up to two horses). Music MUST be provided at check-in. Horse and rider are given three minutes to perform. Open to any style or type of presentation (i.e., dressage, saddle seat, driving, long lining, pas de deux, Western, reining, hunt country, pleasure, liberty, bailando/dancing, doma vaquera, etc.). We want to see you shine! Performances will take place in between classes during the evening session throughout the week. Please see Show Premium for more class specifications. Winnings will be awarded to the top five exhibitors, with 1st place = 30 percent of entry fees, 2nd place = 20 percent of entry fees, 3rd-5th places = 10 percent of entry fees. www.the-iberian-horse.com


FANTASY/HERITAGE COSTUME DRIVING: Open to horses, 3 years and over. Costumes should be made of durable material and securely attached, such that no part of the costume falls off during the class. We encourage free expression of imagination and creativity. Competitors will show at walk and trot and be judged on creativity, authenticity to period, suitability of costume to horse and driver, and manners. Please see Show Premium for more class specifications. DRESSAGE SEAT EQUITATION: Open to amateurs of any age, to be judged on rider's position, seat, hands and correct use of the aids. Dressage tack and attire are required. Horses may be of any level of competition, gender or movement type. HALTER CLASSES UNDER INTERNATIONAL JUDGES. The IALHA is happy to provide our members the chance to show their horses in front of the international judges. This year we have: ࡟࡟ ANCCE-sanctioned horse show: New for this year we are holding an ANCCE SHOW! ANCCE classes are specifically and exclusively for P.R.E. horses registered with ANCCE. The IALHA will be running the ANCCE-sanctioned horse show on Sunday, Oct. 15, in conjunction with the IALHA National Championship Show. These classes will be run in accordance with the rules and regulations of ANCCE. (Please see www.ancce.es for further information. Note: you can click “translation” to translate the website information from Spanish to English} ࡟࡟APLS-sanctioned classes: As always, we are offering APLS-sanctioned classes for Lusitano horses that have an APSL LN or LA number indicating that the horse is registered with the APSL. Please see the Show Premium for Lusitano Class specifications. These classes also will be held on Sunday, Oct. 15. The IALHA 2017 National Championship Horse Show will be held Oct.10-15, at the Great Southwest Equestrian Center in Katy, Texas. Find the Show Premium at www. ialha.org. We want to take the time to thank the sponsors who have already stepped up at this time to help make our National Championship Show a success! vTIH

CLASS SPONSORS: HALF AMATEUR WESTERN PLEASURE HORSE Robert Chapeski: Championship USEF Training Level – Test 3 - Open Championship USEF First Level – Test 3 - Open George Domb: Championship FEI Prix St. Georges Janita Smith: Grand Championship Andalusian Senior Geldings, 4 Years & Over Championship Andalusian Dressage Suitability, Open Kim Pittman: Championship Andalusian Western Pleasure, Jr. Exhibitor 17 & Under Championship Andalusian English Pleasure Hunt Seat, Jr. Exhibitor 17 & Under Colleen Wright: Championship Half-Andalusian English Pleasure Hunt Seat, Open Nicole Grous: Championship USEF Second Level – Test 3 - Adult Amateur Champion Working Equitation Level 2 Lisa & Gary Camp: Grand Championship Half-Andalusian Fillies, 2Years-Old & Under Championship Half-Andalusian English Pleasure Vintage Riders, 45 & Over - Amateur *Interested in sponsoring a National Championship class? Find the sponsorship form at www.ialha.org.

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IALHA Nationals

SHOW SPONSORS: The following Show Sponsors Awards were made possible by:

JRPR PUBLIC RELATIONS “No Good Steed Shall Go Unpublished� Lifelong equestrian and USDF Gold Medalist Johnny Robb combined her passion for equestrian sports with more than 25 years of hands-on regional, national and international marketing and public relations experience to form the highly successful equestrian-focused marketing firm, JRPR Public Relations, Inc. and the doit-yourself equine PR website, EquineNewsRoom.com. Over the past decade, JRPR has had the opportunity to work on PR and marketing strategies for a variety of clients, including many of the companies contributing to the 2017 National Championship Show. As an owner and competitor of Lusitano horses, Johnny saw an opportunity to build a mutually beneficially introduction and PR opportunity between many of the clients her firm represents and the IALHA competitors. Thank you, Johnny, for all you have done!

CUSTOM SADDLERY MOST VALUABLE DRESSAGE RIDER AWARD Presented to a dressage rider who has an excellent for ward-moving ride, solid scores, exemplar y horsemanship and good sports conduct and enhances the show through enthusiastic participation.

VITA FLEX VICTORY PASS AWARD Presented to the winner of a selected class.

64 |

PREMIER EQUESTRIAN AWARD

NEUE SCHULE BITS BEST HANDS AWARD

Presented to the rider who displays a positive attitude as well as appropriate consideration, understanding and fair benevolence toward their horse.

Presented to a rider who demonstrates a thoughtful and effective use of light hands in conjunction with the bit.

THE IBERIAN HORSE

Issue 2 | 2017

www.the-iberian-horse.com


THERAPLATE PEAK PERFORMANCE AWARD Awarded to a horse who is selected for his or her outstanding and effortless-appearing performance. TheraPlate is the Official Therapy Plate of the United States Equestrian Team.

THE TRIPLE CROWN EXCELLENCE AWARD Awa r d e d to a h o r s e w h o s e p e r f o r m a n c e i s outstanding in any one or several divisions such as working equitation, driving, dressage and any performance division.

OMEGA ALPHA HEALTHY HORSE AWARD Presented to a horse that exudes mental and physical health and well-being.

VETROLIN GROOMING AWARD Presented to a horse with outstanding physical presentation denoting exceptional grooming and turnout.

THE HORSE OF COURSE HIGH SCORE Presented to the highest scoring dressage horse of the show.

THE JACKSONVILLE EQUESTRIAN CENTER GOOD SPORTS AWARD THE CORTA-FLX SPORT HORSE OF THE WEEK Presented to an outstanding horse that exemplifies exceptional fitness and soundness.

Presented to one competitor who displays exemplary fair, generous and benevolent sports conduct during the competition. Issue 2 | 2017

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STALLION LI S T I N GS

SPECIALTY ADVERTISING

Andiamo 2005 LUSITANO HEIGHT: 16.0H COLOR: Buckskin SIRE/DAM: Odin x Renee D’Ora STUD FEE: Private Treaty

Andiamo is a stunningly beautiful golden buckskin. Grandson of the talented Umbaba, National Champion of Portugal, and Nostradamus, a gorgeous buckskin stallion imported from Brazil. Andiamo’s bloodlines combine the best of the Veiga and Andrade breeding. He is 2016 IALHA National Dressage Champion (Prix St. Georges), 2016 USDF/IALHA Adequan All-Breeds Top Iberian Stallion and 2016 National Champion Working Equitation (Advanced).

GEORGE DOMB Reading, CA • www.facebook.com/george.domb 530.242.5600 • domb530@gmail.com

Fetichin ANDALUSIAN HEIGHT: 16.1H COLOR: Black SIRE/DAM: Revoltoso XXIV x Diestra VI STUD FEE: $1,800 Purebred $1,100 Cross

This absolutely stunning 2001 black P.R.E. stallion was imported from Spain and has shown very successfully at Prix St. Georges dressage as well as at breed shows where he holds national and reserve champion titles. He is presently showing Intermediare I. Fetichin was the COPA USPRE 2014 Reserve Champion at PSG I! He is known for passing on outstanding movement to his offspring!

PAM NELSON OF HIDDEN POND FARM New Richmond, OH • http://hiddenpondfarm.com 513.519.9454 • p.m.nelson@worldnet.att.net

GORRION CXXXIX P.R.E. HEIGHT: 17.3H COLOR: Black SIRE/DAM: Capitan XLIV x Guirnalda MJ STUD FEE: $2,500 Purebred $2,500 Cross

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Recently imported from Spain, Gorrion is an impressively tall stallion with lots of bone but very baroque. He is an ideal match for small- or medium-size mares, if looking to breed for size, presence and movement. ANCCE Revised, Gorrion features excellent conformation with powerful athleticism and his color is amazing! He has a wonderful temperament and shows a great willingness to learn. LFG included in breeding agreement.

THE IBERIAN HORSE

Issue 2 | 2017

RODRIGO CUNHA OF BLUEBERRY FARM Williston, FL • www.blueberryfarm.horse 407.219.9167 • info@blueberryfarm.horse www.the-iberian-horse.com


Ultimo RRL LUSITANO HEIGHT: 16.0H COLOR: Cremello SIRE/DAM: Modico x Nespera STUD FEE: $1,000 Purebred $750 Cross

Ultimo RRL is a gorgeous purebred Lusitano and a true cremello, guaranteed to produce color. He passes on agility, stamina and intelligence to his offspring. Ultimo is a delight under saddle with a willing heart.

ALI LEON OF RANCHO DE COLORES Menifee, CA • www.ranchodecolores.com 951.238.0845 • info@ranchodecolores.com

Verso Do Retiro LUSITANO HEIGHT: 16.3H COLOR: Buckskin SIRE/DAM: Othelo Do Retiro x Harpa V STUD FEE: $1,500 Lusitanos $1,000 Cross

Verso is a tall, flashy, athletic stallion approved for breeding in Brazil and Portugal. Highly rated on his stallion testing, scoring a nine on head and neck! Verso is easy to handle, a joy to ride and has a kind, playful temperament. Most importantly, Verso produces gorgeous babies!

TRACY UNDERWOOD OF SANTA ROSA EQUESTRIAN CENTER Santa Rosa Equestrian Center • www.srequestrian.com 707.975.2097 • tracy@srequestrian.com

Include your stallion HERE! $175 (3 issues) To include your stallion listing in three consecutive issues of The Iberian Horse

EMAIL HORSE’S INFORMATION: Name of Stallion/Breed/Height/Color/Sire x Dam/Stud Fees Stallion Bio (40 words or less of text) One Print-Optimized Color Image (300dpi) Preferred Contact Info. (Owner, Farm, City, State, Website, Phone, Email)

YOUR STALLION’S PHOTO HERE

CONTACT: Lisbeth Hencke 361.774.3957 • lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com www.the-iberian-horse.com

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B U S I N ES S CA R D S

SPECIALTY ADVERTISING

BILL & DIANE CALDERON

Spanish and Portuguese Equestrian E q u i p m e n t

623.465.7276 623.465.7284 fax www.iberianconnection.com bd@iberianconnection.com

T o I nclude

your business card

ad in each issue of

$175 C ontact

L i s b e th H e n c k e

(3 Issues)

O ffice : 361.774.3957 lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com www.the-iberian-horse.com

68 |

THE IBERIAN HORSE

Issue 2 | 2017

Issue 2 | 2017

www.the-iberian-horse.com THE IBERIAN HORSE | 68


SPECIALTY ADVERTISING

PHOTO CL ASS IFIEDS

Bravada De Milagro REG. PUREBRED S/P ANDALUSIAN FILLY Born May 4, 2014, Bravada is out of my beautiful buckskin mare Cosecha de Paraiso, 15.3 hands. Sire is Justicero XXV, 16.1 hands and grandsire is Saphiro! This special filly has nice movement, and a great heart and mind! Bravada is willing, expressive, gentle, and has good ground manners. Lots of potential! She has a very pretty head with a white star! Standing 15.1 hands and still growing! Email, text or call Janet for more info. and/or more photos. Price: $8,500 Milagro Ranch of Cave Creek, AZ jsimkel@aol.com 602.803.0590

Lily Marlena RB Lily Marlena RB is a 14-year-old Spanish Portuguese Andalusian IALHA #5311(S/P) with outstanding bloodlines. A gentle family mare from Aberdeen Farms, trained & shown by Bruce Howard, ‘03 IALHA Futurity Winner. Shown saddle seat, country pleasure. Mature rider for her championship presence. Healthy, eager - real deal! Price: $6,000

Mary Sabo msaboheart4@aol.com 505.270.0351

Include your photo classified HERE! $55 (per issue) To include your classified in an issue of The Iberian Horse

EMAIL INFORMATION: • • • •

50 words or less of text one- to three-word title one color print-optimized image (300dpi) contact info. (name, phone, email, website)

YOUR PHOTO

CLASSIFIED HERE

CONTACT: Lisbeth Hencke 361.774.3957 • lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com www.the-iberian-horse.com

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THE IBERIAN HORSE

Issue 2 | 2017

www.the-iberian-horse.com


The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse Invites You to Join Today! Join us in supporting the Pure Spanish Horse (P.R.E.)! We’re a non-profit public benefit, 501 C (3) corporation whose mandate is to develop, perpetuate, & foster an appreciation & understanding of The P.R.E. Horse. Membership in our clubs is tax deductible to the full extent of the law. Members receive recognition as a club member in The Online Directory, an income tax donation receipt, annual subscription to The Iberian Horse magazine, a membership card, FPS Book of Merit nominations, FREE DVD rentals (only pay $10 S&H fee), access to FPSH library materials, unlimited FREE text-only classified website ads, & member discounts for horseshows, advertising in Online Directory & The Iberian Horse magazine, & P.R.E. Mundial services. Members can also share their P.R.E. ranch news in our monthly email newsletter.

Join today and Start Benefiting!

CLUBS

ADDITIONAL BENEFITS

COST

CLUBS

YOUTH CLUB

Basic benefits as listed above and 18 & Younger) 1 Spanish Horse Poster

$40.00/yr

COURBETTE CLUB* Basic Benefits plus Five copies of the Comprehensive Buyers Guide Member Voting Rights FREE Farm AD in Online Directory 25% discount to audit all Foundation seminars/lectures/clinics Banner space at all Foundation shows

$100/Month or $1200/yr

LIFETIME CLUB* Basic benefits plus Member Voting Rights FREE Farm AD in Online Directory 15% discount to audit all Foundation seminars/lectures/clinics Discounted Banner space at all Foundation shows Frameable Lifetime Membership Certificate/ ”Lifetime of P.R.E Pride”

$2500.00 One Time Fee

PASSAGE CLUB Basic benefits PIAFFE CLUB*

$12/Month or $144/yr

Basic benefits plus $24/Month or One Comprehensive Buyers Guide to the P.R.E. $288/yr Member Voting Rights FREE Farm AD in Online Directory

LEVADE CLUB* Basic benefits plus $50/Month or One Comprehensive Buyers Guide to the P.R.E. $600/yr Member Voting Rights FREE Farm AD in Online Directory 10% discount to audit all Foundation seminars/lectures/clinics

ADDITIONAL BENEFITS

COST

*ALL PIAFFE & ABOVE members receive benefits through the Equine Journal (EJ) Affiliate Program, which includes FREE (EJ) subscription, FREE classified ads, event exposure, 10% discount on purchases at www.horsecity.com & much more! See www.prehorse.org/store/membership.lasso for full details. (2.8.13) YES! I want to join the Club (Please Print Clearly) My Membership is Recommended by_________________________________ Name_________________________________ Breeders Codigo#___________________ Do you own? ( ) Stallion ( ) Mare ( ) Gelding ( ) P.R.E. ( ) S.H.H.R. Birth Date _________________ Farm/Ranch: ________________________________ Billing & Mailing address (optional) _________________________________________________________________ City_______________________ State__________ Zip___________ Email____________________________________________________ Website_________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________ Fax_____________________________________ Cell____________________________________ Facebook Contact _______________________________________ ‘Friend’ The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Instagram! Parent/Guardian Permission Signature_____________________________________ Parent/Guardian Printed Name_________________________________ Select Payment: ( ) Please charge my account $_____ each month for the life of the membership. Automatic annual membership renewal unless written cancellation received 30 days prior to expiration. ( ) Please charge my account for the entire year at once in the amount of $ - OR ( ) My check is enclosed for a lump sum payment of ___________________ ( ) YES! I’ll give $5 extra per month for The Building Improvement Fund! Credit Card Number__________________________________________________ (All major cards accepted) Name as it appears on the credit card: _________________________________ Expiration Date ________ V Code _________(Three or four digit code on back or front of card) Signature_______________________________________________________________ Please make checks payable and send to:

The Foundation for the Pure Spanish Horse 115 Elm St. N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87102

QUESTIONS about Membership? See www.prehorse.org, or Call us at (505) 294-0800 / Fax (505) 294-0812 or e-mail ana@prehorse.org THANK YOU! Issue Issue 22 | | 2017 2017

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IALHA Nationals Competitors' Thoughts continued from p. 61

at the National Championships in the Junior Showmanship class,” she exclaimed. “I am so excited! I love my horse because she is very smart, sweet and incredibly loveable. She does special tricks, she gives me kisses and she even scratches my back when I scratch hers! Gitana is always very gentle with me and treats me like she loves me too.” Meredith said that she loves going to horse shows. “When I am there I always get to meet new people, make new friends and pet lots of new horses,” she said. “It makes me feel good about myself when I show Gitana because I am usually the youngest person in my class and showing with the bigger, more experienced kids gives me confidence. I feel proud of myself and Gitana because we have learned showmanship together, and we are doing a good job.” Meredith went on to explain, “I especially love going to shows with my mom because we get to spend time together with Gitana. We brush her and groom her together and practice a lot too. Horse shows are a great way to spend time with family, friends and horses. I always learn something new every time I show, and I always have fun. I can’t wait to see all of my friends at Nationals and make some new ones too!” Jessica and Meredith are not the only ones looking forward to the week-long festivities. Nadine Tilley, who has been showing at the IALHA National Championships for many years, was happy to share with us her thoughts about the event. “My story began almost 40 years ago when my husband purchased my first Andalusian horse for me as a Christmas gift. Now, as a longtime owner of many Andalusian horses, I have developed a deep never-ending love for this magnificent breed. I cannot imagine my life would be as full without them in it,” said Nadine. “That leads me to why the IALHA National Horse Show is so important to me. Over the years, traveling near and far for this competition has brought not only me, but to my trainers, staff and horses a vote of excellence in achieving numerous National Grand Champion or National Performance Champion titles,” Nadine explained. “Without support for this 2017 National show, the Andalusian breed will have a lesser chance of becoming better known across the country. I feel that this would be a great disservice to our beloved horses.” Nadine encourages all who can to attend this year’s show. “I will look forward to seeing you all this year, in October in Katy, Texas, at the Great Southwest Equestrian Center,” she said, “Be there or be square!” vTIH 72 |

THE IBERIAN HORSE

Issue 2 | 2017

Index to

advertisers

Pg#

Client

C4, 66

C3

Asmohr Stables

66

Blueberry Farm

68

Cheri Prill Photography & Design

68

Coudelaria Quinta Oliveira

66

Hidden Pond Farm

11 IALHA

69

46, 47

Morning Star Andalusians

22, 23

Old Stonehouse Farm

9

68

C1, 7

67

Rancho De Colores

68

Rancho Del Lago

69 Sabo

67

Santa Rosa Equestrian Center

39

Schleese Saddlery Service, Ltd.

55

SF Andalusians

C2

Silver Spur Stables

33

The FPSH

68

The Iberian Connection

68

There Be Dragons Farm

2, 3

1

68

Andiamo

Milagro Farms

Peet Equestrian Phillips Performance Horses PSL Commission

Tilley Andalusians Viva Ibérica Yeguada Amanecer

www.the-iberian-horse.com


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The Iberian Horse - Issue #2 2017  
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