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WHAT’S INSIDE? Social media changes face of engagement Three professors that waste your time, money Bearkat soccer ends two-game losing streak

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TOMORROW’S FORECAST

HI: LOW:

SHSU BEATS LAMAR IN HOMECOMING GAME

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Volume 124/ Issue 14

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

CAMPUS

Alumni awarded ‘highest honor’ KASSIDY TURNPAUGH Staff Reporter

Five Sam Houston State University alumni were honored Friday at the Distinguished Alumni Gala for their exceptional contributions to the university and world. The honorees were introduced and welcomed by about 350 alumni, students, faculty and guests including Susan Lenamon, Ph.D., president of the SHSU Alumni Association, and university President Dana Gibson, Ph.D. The Distinguished Alumni Award recipient and founder and owner of several restaurants Damian Mandola has established a name as one of the foremost authorities on Italian cuisine in the Southwest. Mandola graduated in 1977 with a degree in radio and television but pursued his passion for food by opening his first restaurant, Damian’s Fine Italian Food in Huntsville, during his final year at SHSU. Over the years, Mandola has expanded his cooking empire

Health Center breaks ground

to include major chains such as Carrabba’s Italian Grill and used his influence to earn more than $400,000 for the Burke Center Home for Boys. He also hosted numerous fundraisers for the Ronald McDonald House and other charities. Mandola credits his success to his parents, Sicilian immigrants who used their entire life savings to send him and his brother to college. Jenna Jackson was recognized as the Outstanding Young Alumnus of 2013 for being “an exceptional investigative reporter and overall superb television news producer,” according to Dan Rather, another SHSU alumnus. After graduating in 1997 with a B.S. in both journalism and political science, Jackson began working for CBS in New York City. From 1997 until 2011, she received numerous media awards including an Emmy. In 2011 Jackson returned to Texas and founded P&R Productions. She has gone on to work with numerous charity and community organizations in addition to sponsoring several SHSU events, such as “Bearkats in

Elizabeth Lawrence | The Houstonian

PRESTIGE. From left: W. Sam Monroe, Damian Mandola, President Dana Gibson, Trisha Pollard, Jenna Jackson and Wilfred Dietrich hold their awards after the Distinguished Alumni Gala.

Business”. Sam Monroe was also honored as a Distinguished Alumni for his dedication and work in the higher education system. Monroe graduated from SHSU in 1965 with a B.B.A. and went on to earn a master of education and

an honorary doctor of law from Lamar University. He served on Lamar’s Board of Regents for five years before he became the longest serving president of an institute of higher education. According to Brian McCall, chancellor of the Texas State

University System, Sam Monroe is almost single-handedly responsible for making Lamar State College the university it is today instead of the technical institute it started as. Trisha Pollard was also — GALA, page 2

Bearkat royalty crowned

MOLLY WADDELL Associate Editor The new Student Health and Counseling Center broke ground Saturday at 10 a.m. “The ground breaking ceremony was an exciting moment,” Andrew Miller, director of the counseling center, said. “It’s taken two years of hard work from more people than I can count to get us to this point. The ceremony was a way of celebrating all of that effort.” Students passed a referendum in fall 2012 to raise the student health fee to pay for the building. The referendum raised the fee $37, from $38 to $75. The fee increase went into place in spring 2013. The new building will offer new services to students such as sameday appointments, a 24-hour nursing and counseling hotline and an expanded pharmacy. The new 28,000 square-foot building will house health services and the counseling center that were previously in separate facilities. “The fact that we’ve broken ground means that our respective staff members can begin planning for all of the new services that we’ll be able to provide in the building, and it gives them something to look forward to,” Miller said. The building is expected to be ready for students to be able to use fall 2014.

Alex Broussard | The Houstonian

ROYALTY: President Dana Gibson, Ph.D., crowned Elizabeth Opera, left, and Keenan Jones, right, King and Queen of this years homecoming. Opera is a senior psychology major and president of the African Student Association. Jones is a junior mass communication major and is a part of the new student orientation team and a visitor’s center ambassador.

CAMPUS

New forensic science program addresses national concern DANA PRICE Staff Reporter Sam Houston State University’s new doctoral forensic science program offered by the College of Criminal Justice is up for approval by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Forensic laboratories and services are important components of criminal investigation, the administration of justice and are requested by a variety of agencies. Publicly funded laboratories provide

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examination, reporting and testimony on physical evidence in criminal matters for state, county, municipal, and federal jurisdictions, according to new program documents submitted to the TSUS and THECB. Dean of the College for Criminal Justice Vincent Webb, Ph.D., concurs with the need for more education in forensic science at the doctoral level. “There has been a national commission, and other groups have stated that there is an important need to develop and improve forensic science

education and forensic science itself,” Webb said. “We are developing this program in response to that need.” According to Webb, the program will not only improve the education of forensic science, but it will also provide education for future instructors of forensic science as well. “This program is to train high level forensic scientists,” Webb said. “These will be the people who actually do the research to improve forensic science. They will be the people who will go on to educate students in forensic

science as well.” According to the most recent Census of Publicly Funded Crime Laboratories from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, there is a real need for qualified personnel to perform critical functions. Webb said that the new degree program will increase the number of doctoral students at SHSU and that the school will be able to meet the need for forensic scientists. “If you look it at the doctorial programs that are offered on this campus, it is an important increase in number in doctoral students,” Webb said. “Our

mission is to meet the needs for the state of Texas and of course the nation. There is a profound need for more forensic scientists, and we are going to be able to meet that need.” The degree is among the last that the THECB has direct powers to approve or deny after the Texas Legislature passed laws limiting their ability over the summer, Dean of Graduate Studies Kandi Tayebi, Ph.D., said in a previous article. She expects to hear from the board about approval within the month.

Be sure to check out the Houstonian Orientation Guide located around campus and the City of Huntsville! Can’t find one? Let us know and we’ll get you a copy.


Page 2

News

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 houstonianonline.com/news

HOMECOMING

T

Elizabeth Lancaster | The Houstonian

he orange and white crowd came out in the thousands for Homecoming Weekend despite the intense heat. (Top left) Four-year-old Taylor Stewart came to the game with her two parents - both cheerleading alumni. (Top right) One woman holds up a sign of a football player at Saturday’s game against Lamar University. (Bottom left) The Bearkat Marching Band peps bystanders at the Homecoming Parade on Thursday. (Left) Sammy the Bearkat rides on a segway through the homecoming parade, greeting his fans with his signiture cocky aire.

TECH

Hackers use Mac OS X’s encryption system to create malware CHRISTIAN VAZQUEZ Staff Reporter For years, there was a common belief that Macs are much safer than PCs. But in today’s wired society, there’s always a new way to crack the iron curtain of security features. Hackers have found a way to use Mac OS X’s own encryption system to create undetectable malware, according to thehackernews.com.

Malware is short for malicious software and is used by hackers to disrupt computer operation, gather sensitive information or gain access to private computer systems. Daniel Pistelli, a reverse engineer, explained the details behind the technique he used to create the invisible malware. Pistelli said Apple uses an internal encryption method to protect its execution apps. That same encryption is used to create malware. In other words, the same technique used to protect

Mac software can also be used to harm it. Anti-malware detection systems can’t identify the malware because of its own encryption. Senior computer science majors Aaron Mayo and Nick Lee weren’t surprised, and both said that this form of hacking can be prevented if users know what they’re doing. “I’m not surprised at all,” Mayo said. “When you have something secure, someone is going to try to break it. It’s a power thing [for hackers]. It doesn’t matter if it’s Mac or not. It’s kind of like being a

super hero; you’ll want to exercise your powers.” Lee advised users in general to be aware of what they’re doing online and to remember that nothing is truly safe. “In OS X, you can set it up to allow only installs from the app store, so you can worry less about what goes onto your Mac,” Lee said. “People should be aware of what they’re doing online. Whether you use OS X, Windows, or even Linux. Everything has its faults.”

The encryption mechanism can be used on malwares that are already detected by anti-malware systems. This means that malware can potentially fly completely under the radar on Mac OS X because the same anti-malware software can’t understand that its encrypted. To fight against this problem, Pistelli says that anti-malware should choose to work with Apple’s own encryption system by trusting only Apple-signed encrypted executable files.

TECH

Social media change age people get engaged HANNAH ZEDAKER Staff Reporter Social media pressures couples to get engaged young Getting engaged means much more than it did a decade ago with the rise of social media, according to experts. When a relationship status changes from “in a relationship” to “engaged” on Facebook, the new bride-to-be can now begin actually using her “wedding board” on Pinterest, posting to HowHeAsked.com and uploading pictures to Instagram of the shiny new rock that now holds a residency on her left hand. LaChrystal Ricke, Ph.D., assistant professor of mass communication, said she thinks social media, television and peer pressure affects students’ decisions to get married at earlier ages. “I think that social media, coupled with what has been popularized on television through shows about weddings and specials about weddings, can make students focus on the fun part of the wedding and planning and not on the actualities of what

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recognized as a Distinguished Alumnus after serving on the TSUS Board of Regents. “I am thrilled,” Pollard said. “This is the pinnacle of a student’s life, to rise to this honor. It’s all very exciting.” In 1974, Pollard graduated from SHSU with a B.B.A. and a major in business education. She later received a juris doctorate from South Texas College of Law. Pollard spent nearly 30 years in the oil and gas industry where she was chair of the Houston Bar

marriage should be about,” Ricke said. Ricke said it is easy to forget what weddings are supposed to symbolize in a society where marriage is easily disposable. “I think there is a lot of excitement that surrounds an engagement and a wedding that can sometimes leave people forgetting what the long-term point of the wedding is about,” Ricke said. “I do think that some people can get caught up in the thought of weddings and marriages without thinking as much about the life-long commitment.” Junior psychology major Carissa Wolfe said she believes the exposure to social media at a young age influences the desire to get married at a younger age. “Kids are getting on social media at younger ages now,” Wolfe said. “Especially on Pinterest, they see love quotes and pretty wedding dresses so they think that getting married at a young age is the social norm for being happy.” Ricke said that divorce is more easily accepted in students who come from divorced households. National trends show that one

in every two marriages in the United States will end in divorce, according to the CDC’s National Vital Statistics System. It also shows that marriage rates have continually declined for the last 20 years. “I think it is somewhat difficult to change this mindset especially when we see so much in the media of super short marriages of famous people,” Ricke said. “This can lead individuals to believe that this is commonplace. As someone who was married later in life, Ricke said she couldn’t fathom getting married any earlier. In addition to social media endorsing a wedding-crazed society, she said, television and other sources of communication are culprits as well. TLC (The Learning Channel) has an entire day devoted just to weddings with shows like “Say Yes to the Dress,” “Four Weddings” and “Something Borrowed, Something New.” Not to mention WE’s (Women’s Entertainment) show “Bridezillas” that uses the bride-to-be status as an excuse for acting completely irrational. Ricke said the challenge is that

many viewers confuse these shows with reality. These shows focus on the extravagant wedding planning and not on the purpose, or the financial realities.

Association Oil and Gas Section, before Gov. Rick Perry appointed her to the Texas One-Call Board . Gibson agreed with Pollard, saying how high of an honor the award is for all of the recognized. “This is the highest honor we as a university can bestow upon you,” Gibson said. “You have brought honor and distinguish to this grand old university.” The program awarded Wilfred Dietrich for his work in the Texas education system and community with the 2013 Service Award. “All the confidence I have in people today came from [SHSU],

Blinn and East Texas State University,” Dietrich said. Dietrich graduated from SHSU in 1948 with a B.A. and M.A. in history and English. He then spent the next 42 years as a professor and department chair at Blinn College, where he also earned a reputation of being a student favorite. Dietrich went on to found the Brenham Heritage Museum and donate to many more community improvement programs throughout Washington County and established several scholarship endowments across the state of Texas.

Ricke said although marrying at a young age can make surviving marriage more difficult, it can work with commitment.

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Page 3

Viewpoints

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 houstonianonline.com/viewpoints

PAWS UP

PAWS UP to Season 4 of “The Walking Dead,” which premiered Sunday. It isn’t enough that college already makes us zombies, but now we’re getting addicted to a show about them again. Kassidy Turnpaugh | The Houstonian

It’s time to act on domestic abuse

Over the past few weeks, I have had the opportunity to speak to several organizations at Sam Houston State University about preventing domestic violence. Even though I am thankful for the small percentage of students who are having conversations about preventing domestic violence, there is a lot more that could be done. According to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, the highest rates of intimate partner violence occur between the ages of 16-24 and the Department of Justice narrows that down to the ages of 20-24. When you say that domestic violence doesn’t happen in small towns, or to young adults then maybe you don’t understand what domestic violence truly is. Domestic violence, also known as family violence, is a pattern of behaviors that one person uses to exert power and control over an intimate partner or a family member. These behaviors often take the form of physical violence, emotional abuse, manipulation and financial control. The majority of people know someone who has been a victim of domestic violence but have failed

ANTHONY ORMSBEE Guest Columnist to recognize the signs. On average, 24 people per minute are victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States – more than 12 million people a year. Many of these crimes take place in small towns like Huntsville and college campuses just like SHSU. We all know that one person in our lives who just can’t seem to leave their abusive relationship. And too often, I hear people say, “Well if it was really as bad as they say then he/she would just leave!” And that is easy for those of us who have never experienced abuse to say. On average, it takes a survivor nine times to leave an abusive relationship. The batterer has done their job well before that in

terms of degrading the survivor and making them feel worthless. It takes strength and courage to leave an abusive relationship, and we should all show our support and encourage survivors. We should never make assumptions and we should never judge. From the moment we all set foot on campus, the motto “The Measure of a Life is its Service” is drilled into our heads. Huntsville is home to SAAFE House, a nonprofit family violence and sexual assault shelter and crisis intervention agency. This organization assists with counseling, legal support and hospital support as well as provides opportunities for students to volunteer at various levels. We all have special skills that could be put to use, and I encourage you to find out how you can support the important work that SAAFE House does. For more information you can visit www.saafehouse.org. Across the country, domestic violence programs are finding that they must operate with less money and more clients as the federal government continues to slash budgets across the nation. The sequester hit programs hard

with a five-percent cut to shelter and other services. Contact your representatives and let them know that the Violence Against Women Act, Victims of Crime Act, and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act need to be fully funded by the government because we as a society have an obligation to care for those in need and work to eliminate violence in our country. These bills are essential to the work that advocates across the country do. This is an opportunity for social change that does not require much from you. Have a conversation with friends and family about domestic violence because this is something that affects people regardless of social classifications. You can be white, black, Asian, gay, transgender, male or female and still be a victim of domestic violence. Use your gifts and talents to find out how you can be an advocate for victims, even if that means that you provide transportation from a shelter to a job interview or you go through the training to be a victim advocate. I invite you all to stand with me and say that enough is enough and now is the time to act.

PAWS UP to the new and final generation of Pokémon being released. With midterms coming up, who needs time to study anyway?

PAWS DOWN

PAWS DOWN to Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz for leading a march protesting the government shutdown after being one of the leading causes for its occurrence. You can’t defund your cake and eat it too.

Three types of professors who waste students’ time

You spend an average of $20 an hour per class at SHSU once fees and tuition are taken into account. More than money, however, classes cost time. Students are responsible for doing homework and reading for class, but professors are responsible for making sure not to waste our time. Time could be spent sleeping, learning a trade you love, traveling the world or actually being educated since we’re paying for college after all. Every time you go to a class where a professor reads blithely off the slides or tells personal anecdotes about their chinchilla, they are wasting away money and hours of your life you can never have back. There are three major types of professors who are getting in the way of our education: the “PowerPointer,” the “messiah” and the “best friend.” The PowerPointer is pretty self-explanatory. You can’t

MOLLY SHOVE Viewpoints Editor remember anything about this teacher because they are utterly unremarkable. All that ever happens in class is the professor gets up in front of the room and reads from the PowerPoint. It’s fine if they supplement a PowerPoint with useful, engaging information, but too many professors forgo teaching in favor of easy, pre-packaged curricula. The idea of a professor should be that they’re experts in a field

and students should be learning from their experiences, not regurgitated information. In addition, they should be engaging and getting students excited about learning, not stereotypically BenSteining them to death. At the point a professor relies upon presentations or reading from a book to teach, they are no longer needed. The “messiah” earns this title because they believe that their teachings are the only teachings that matter. They like to believe you live in a vacuum – with only their class and spare time. While it’s wonderful to find a teacher who cares about his class, those who take it too far can jeopardize your other classes and, therefore, your academic success. Additionally, SHSU has a large population of students that work part-time while in school. Between work and school, students don’t have time to read

800 pages as week that in an ideal world they could handle. Professors should assign enough work to truly educate students on the most important components of the class, rather than swaths of information that students wouldn’t retain or appreciate. The “Best Friend” professor seems good on face but is actually nefarious to the learning environment. They like to go on about their personal life, their pets and not about their subject. They usually supplement this habit by giving very easy tests. This is fun, they probably are popular on RateMyProfessor.com, but ultimately they don’t give you the education you pay for. Whether or not these professors are giving you A’s, you should be concerned. While good (or passing) grades are useful, college is about more than that. You give your time and money to the college in exchange for an education. This

means acquiring problem-solving skills, expanding your worldview and becoming a competent citizen capable of making informed decisions regardless of the end GPA. Professors who aren’t hard enough may be popular, but in the end waste their students’ time and money. The good news is that we can fix this in three meaningful ways: First, give lazy and bad teachers low ratings on RateMyProfessor. com and their IDEA forms at the end of the year. They won’t get as many students. The university will notice. The second thing you can do is give teachers who are seemingly hard a chance. Although they require a lot from you, it could be in your best interest. Get as much as you can from professors who focus on principle ideas you should take away. Take charge of your education and learn more on your own.

The Houstonian Editorial

The Houstonian was named in the top 100 college newspapers for journalism students by JournalismDegree.org. Members of Associated Collegiate Press and Texas Intercolligiate Press Association.

EDITOR’S NOTE Articles, letters and cartoons by Houstonian staff members or others in this paper are their own and not the opinion of the Houstonian, unless it is noted as such. Submissions and letters to the editor are welcome. Please send submissions to viewpoints@houstonianonline.com. Articles may be edited for grammar and spelling at discretion of editor. Unsolicited oppinions should be 150 words or under. Please contact us if you wish to submit anything longer. Deadline for submission is by 5 p.m. on Mondays or Wednesdays.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephen Green....................................................................................................................................936-294-1505 FACULTY ADVISER Robin Johnson..................................................................................................................................936-294-1499 STAFF Molly Waddell.............................................................................................................................Associate Editor Molly Shove.................................................................................................................................Viewpoints Editor Connor Hyde......................................................................................................................................Sports Editor Joseph Redd...........................................................................................................................Entertainment Editor Monty Sloan.............................................................................................................................................Web Editor Jay R. Jordan......................................................................................................................... Assistant News Editor Kizzie Frank..............................................................................................................Assistant Entertainment Editor Jeremy Villanueva.................................................................................................................Assistant Sports Editor Alexa Grigsby..............................................................................................................Assistant Viewpoints Editor Marissa Hill.....................................................................................................................................Sports Reporter TBA...................................................................................................................................................Senior Reporter Miranda Landsman................................................................................................................Multimedia Reporter Samantha Zambrano.............................................................................................................................Layout Editor Kassidy Turnpaugh.....................................................................................................................Graphic Designer Staff Reporter...............................Dana Price, Christian Vazquez, Robert Sandoval, Samantha Gallindo, Kaleigh Treiber, Hannah Zedaker, Colin Harris

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Arts&Entertainment

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 houstonianonline.com/a-e

REVIEW

“Horror Story” delivers in season premiere DHARMESH PATEL Contributing Reporter *This article contains spoilers.* October just wouldn’t be the same without all of the things that go bump in the night. We get all of these and much more with “Bitchcraft,” the season premiere of “American Horror Story: Coven.” The first episode offers a more cohesive and improved storyline when compared to past seasons. What seem to be common themes throughout the series are female demonization and sexuality heavily influences nearly every scene of the premiere. This season, like the last two, is a self-contained story about witchcraft set back in the times of witch-hunts as well as the modern day. Audiences were again unsurprised by the regular cast members returning in different roles. New to AHS is the use of a narrator to lay out the main story line and helps tie together the numerous character arcs that are introduced in the premiere. Similar to the first two seasons, the episode begins with gross shock in the form of a flashback that will affect the events in the present. It is revealed by the end of the episode Courtesy FX that the present and past worlds HORROR: (Above) Four young witches - Madison Montgomery (Emma Roberts), Nan (Jamie Brewer), Zoe will coexist throughout the season. The present is introduced with Benson (Talissa Farmiga), and Queeny (Gabourey Sidibe) - are led by matron-witch Fiona Goode (Jessica Lange) Zoe Benson (Talissa Farmiga), as a part of Miss Robichaux’s Academy. The witches all have different powers like being a human voodoo doll. a young teen witch attending a

violent and dirty school for misfit young witches. There, she learns that she descends from a long line of witches. Kathy Bates does not disappoint in her sadistic portrayal of Madam LaLaurie, a soulless slave owner who harvests the organs of her captives and slaves to be used in a youth serum. It’s even a little scary how convincing she is. Her character is definitely one to watch this season. Another standout performance comes from Angela Bassett, whose character doesn’t have much airtime but sets up a doomed love story with a man who is becoming a minotaur. As crazy and sadistic as that sounds, it gets even more graphic and downright deplorable. Enter character Emma Roberts – a rightfully damaged and mentally disturbed young woman. Her character is violently gang raped with the episode ending in her killing her rapists with her magical powers of killing people by having sex with people. Yes, a killer vagina. At the seedy faux Hogwarts, Miss Robichaux’s Academy, there is human voodoo doll, a telekinetic, a clairvoyant and – don’t forget killer vagina. This band of acolytes is led by headmistress Cordelia (Sarah Paulson). The first episode seemed to promise viewers all their American Horror Story needs. Hopefully, the next episode will prove to be just as compelling, or better than the first.

COLUMN

“50 Shades” movie is popularity move

Raven Films readies first film CAITLIN ADAMCIK Contributing Reporter Raven Films is about to release its first film of the semester called “Quiet in the Library.” Raven Films, the official student filmmaking organization at Sam Houston State University, explores the medium of digital film by engaging in hands-on independent productions, according to the organization’s mission. Different students from around the university work together as a team to create films. Fariha Alam, president of Raven Films, said the production for “Quiet in the Library” has been a light-hearted and an eye-opening experience. “Not only for me, but also the crew that was involved,” Alam said. “It was a way to wet the feet of incoming members to the work flow of a film production and to hopefully pick up and apply several helpful notes and methods that can be applied to the future productions they may choose to be a part of. It was exciting to see new faces learning and enjoying the process of working as a team.” Alam was the head producer for the upcoming film. “Due to the nature of the project, I played the role of more of a facilitator so I could allow members with an interest in producing to take the reins and do the bulk of the work themselves,” Alam said. Jared Ball, a sophomore musical theater major, played an unnamed character in the

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film that simply goes by “boy.” Ball said the “studious and intelligent” character becomes interested in a girl he meets in the library while studying. “I have experience on stage with musicals, plays and even operas, but I’ve always been interested in doing film,” Ball said. “Last February I did a callback for the feature film ‘Sacrifice’ (that) is being directed by Michael Cohn, and I just was hooked.” Although this is not Ball’s first acting role, “Quiet in the Library” is his first in a Raven film. Ball described the filming experience as long but worth it. “Only two days, but just being there for hours on end and sometimes not even being in a scene makes you kind of bored,” Ball said. “Overall, I loved it. They’re good people.” Alam said getting new Raven Films participants like Ball is part of a shift in the organization’s goal. “A lot can be expected from Raven Films this year,” Alam said. “We’ve changed gears a bit from previous years and are focusing on exposing and including new talent.” Raven Films meets every Tuesday at 5 p.m. in the Dan Rather Communication Building in Room 125. The group is currently looking for people to work in future projects both as talent and crew. Raven Films expects to complete “Quiet in the Library” by the end of October. For more information on the organization, visit the Raven Films Facebook page.

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film much more successfully than any big budget Hollywood flick ever can: ever hear of pornography?

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screen and foreplay leads to NC 17 ratings that tend to kill blockbusters. Furthermore, there is an industry that already handles sexual stimulation in

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The hugely popular book “50 Shades of Grey” is being adapted for the silver screen. Greeaaaaaat. For those of you who have been blindfolded for the last few years, “50 Shades of Grey” is a novel depicting the titillating relationship between Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele. Complete with romance, light bondage and helicopters, it’s helped many a woman spice up her Friday night alone. At best, the book is mildly interesting smut, and at worst it’s a how-to on highly dysfunctional relationships. I don’t take issue with the depiction of bondage. My problems stem from the lack of communication, disrespect of personal boundaries and obsessive irrational behavior displayed by both major characters. So why take the time and money to turn this into a movie? Profit. Despite, or

perhaps because of, its controversial subject matter, it is the best-selling novel of all time and the third best-selling series of all time (following “Harry Potter” and “The Da Vinci Code”). Unfortunately, the movie is bound to break box office records. Outside of the sex, there isn’t much going on. Most of the events that “happen” are creepy when taken out of context of Anastasia’s obsessive thoughts. It’s not even creepy in a sexy way. He buys out the company she works for, flies across the country to follow her when she says she wants space, and then gets a government background check on her before he even discusses a romantic relationship. That is not romance. That is dysfunctional, and I doubt the filmmakers will be able glaze that over even with a mammoth budget at their disposal. Will it be worth seeing? Chances are, no. The book owes its success largely to foreplay and the internal monologue of Anastasia Steele. This is bad news for the film, as internal monologues are boring to watch on

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Page 5

Sports

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 houstonianonline.com/sports

FOOTBALL

Black Swarm holds off Lamar, 14-3 CONNOR HYDE Sports Editor

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Kassidy Turnpaugh | The Houstonian

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To initiate their Frisco or Bust campaign, the Bearkats commenced Southland Conference play shy of domination, but managed to remain out of trouble against Lamar University. Senior quarterback Brian Bell led the Bearkat effort while senior running back Timothy Flanders embraced a lesser role in their 14-3 victory Saturday at Bowers Stadium. The Cardinal defensive line stunned Sam Houston State’s (5-1) running game and kept Flanders relatively ineffective. Bell scored the game’s only touchdowns. Lamar smothered Flanders and stifled the all-time Southland Conference rusher to a mere 83 yards – his lowest production since the August home opener against Houston Baptist. Flanders showcased his ability to pocket protect and allow Bell to work the backfield to connect with sophomore receiver Stephen Williams for an 18-yard touchdown in the third quarter to add insurance to the Bearkats’ second half lead. Bell assumed SHSU’s sole offensive production early in the second quarter with a 45-yard touchdown run to compensate a scoreless first quarter. However, SHSU’s offensive efficiency struggled to kick-start, recording one productive drive in four trips to the red zone. “We had a chance to put the ball in the end zone and it didn’t happen,” Flanders said. “We could have came out and scored faster than we did.” Senior receiver and return specialist Torrance Williams situated the offensive unit with ideal field position. Williams’ 138-

Alex Broussard | The Houstonian

STILL ON TOP. Running back Timothy Flanders scans for open field against Lamar University Saturday at Bowers Stadium. The All-American was held to 83 yards against the Cardinals defense as SHSU escaped with a 14-3 victory. They will play again Saturday at Lake Charles, La., against McNeese State.

yard punt return effort earned the SLC special teams player of the week. SHSU head coach Willie Fritz said the offensive effort boiled down to adjusting to the defensive looks from Lamar. “We didn’t play great offensively and a lot of that has to do with Lamar,” he said. “We feel like we’ve got a great football team. You got to win two thirds of the war each time you go out there, and today we won the defensive battle and special teams battle.”

Despite offensive struggles, linebackers Tanner Brock and Eric Fieilo derailed the Cardinals’ potent run scheme to hold them to 90 yards. “Defensively, I thought we played outstanding,” Fritz said. “Even though we weren’t getting points, there’s a long period of time when we were playing on our side of the field instead of (Lamar) crossing the 50-yard line.” Cardinals’ running backs Kade Harrington’s and Payton Ploch’s joint effort averaged 2.6

yards per attempt against SHSU’s front seven. Strong tackling coupled with maintained leverage thwarted Lamar’s efforts to break into Bearkat territory. Fritz attributed the defensive performance with quick adjustments to the Cardinals’ playbook. “You don’t know what the formula will be until you get out there and start playing,” he said. “You got to find different ways to win games.” Lighting delayed Saturday’s

matchup for the second consecutive week with the Bearkats looming on closing out the conference victory. After an hour-and-a-half weather delay, with 4:30 left on the clock, SHSU’s defense held off desperate passes from junior Cardinal quarterback Caleb Berry. Saturday’s win keeps SHSU ranked No. 2 in the FCS behind North Dakota State. SHSU travels to Lake Charles, La., to square off against McNeese State (5-1) Saturday at 7 p.m.

SOCCER

Connor Hyde | The Houstonian

WINNING AGAIN. Sophomore forward Shelby McDaniel dribbles through Lamar University defenders Friday at Pritchett Field. She connected for a goal in the 12th minute for the 5-2 win.

Bearkats snap two-game losing streak against Lamar JEREMY VILLANUEVA Assistant Sports Editor Goals were not in short supply for the Bearkats as they snapped their two-game losing streak with a 5-2 win over Lamar University Friday night at Pritchett Field. Sam Houston State jumped out early against the Cardinals with two first-half goals on Cardinal goalkeeper Zooey Stephenson. “Everyone came out to win,” sophomore goalkeeper Kylie Hambleton said. “[We] wanted to control the pace of the game. We played our game and made Lamar adapt to us.” Junior forward Emily Edenstorm started off the goal-scoring clinic for the Bearkats with a shot from the top of the box that curved to the bottom right off a pass from sophomore forward Ashley Alonzo. The goal was Edenstorm’s first of the season after missing last season with an injury. The Bearkats continued their success on set pieces when sophomore midfielder Shelby McDaniel capitalized off a free kick five minutes after SHSU’s opening goal. McDaniel’s shot from 23 yards out curved over the wall and to the bottom corner of the goal. After giving up 21 shots to Stephen F. Austin on Oct. 6, SHSU’s defense limited the Cardinal attack to only eight shots. The Bearkats held a shutout until the 38th minute when sophomore defender Colby Glover slipped while defending Lamar’s

Jannet Hernandez, which gave Hernandez an open shot on goal that passed Hambleton. In SHSU’s next match against Central Arkansas, Hambleton hopes to come away with the shutout, but players will need to take responsibility for each of their assignments, she said. “We will need to have a little better communication in the back,” she said. “We need our backs organizing early and making sure we have each attacker marked up, especially runs from the midfield.” SHSU recovered and found the key in their offense that was missing from their SFA match. During the match against the Lumberjacks, the Bearkats worked the ball to the outside for a cross that would fail to connect on the receiving end. Against the Cardinals, sophomore Mariah Titus found the back of the net while sending a ball intended for Edenstorm’s back-post run. In the 78th-minute, freshman Allie Johnson’s cross connected to freshman Jacey Hamilton’s head for the Bearkats’ fifth goal. “I thought we did a very good job of trying to set an attacking mentality tonight,” head coach Tom Brown said. “Our passing had improved and our mobility up front had improved. For us, the last piece was getting the goals, and [Friday], they came plenty.” The win keeps SHSU in a three-way tie for seventh place in the Southland Conference. The Bearkats will continue their home stretch hosting Central Arkansas Friday at 7 p.m. at Pritchett Field.


Page 6 Tuesday, October 15, 2013 houstonianonline.com/

NATION

SHSU professor explains Affordable Care Act SAMANTHA GALINDO Staff Reporter Open enrollment for health insurance plans that are available on state exchanges began accepting people on Oct. 1 as a key part of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. Americans now have the ability to shop for a health plan if they choose to change from their current one or gain for the firsttime access to a medical health care plan. As the beginning of the government’s fiscal year began, Americans can go to healthcare. gov to browse different available health plans, or exchanges, including health and dental coverage. The plans provide options for qualified low-income based plans through Medicare as well as the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) and Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) coverage plans. In the state of Texas, coverage plans are

available through Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas and Cigna among others, which are all available to view at healthcare.gov. Sam Houston State University political science assistant professor Heather Evans, Ph.D., said Americans without insurance are afraid to go to a doctor for regular checkups due to the price. “The ACA will help cover many that are currently uninsured, which will lead to those Americans actually seeing their doctors and will increase their quality of life,” Evans said. The ACA created state-based and federal exchanges for people who are uninsured. Or people can get insurance through individual insurers. Families with certain income levels will receive discounts on health premiums. The online application process factors in a family’s income to determine eligibility. Individual health insurance plans in Walker County for single persons age 49 or younger,

which provide coverage for 60 percent of the average estimated yearly cost of medical insurance, currently start at $133 per month in premiums. “The first big thing [Americans] should know is that they have to have health insurance,” Evans said “Most students, however, can remain on their parents’ plans until they are 26 even if they are married.” Unless exempt, Americans will be required by law to have health insurance by Jan. 1, 2014. Individuals who receive insurance from their jobs or are a part of group plans would be exempt from enrolling in the plans. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is a leader in the fight against the implementation of the policy. He took to the Senate floor to filibuster an amendment to the funding bill that would fund the law. Republicans have voted en-bloc more than 43 times to defund or overturn the law. Some of their reasons for

Mel Evans | Associated Press

Louis Peters fills out papers at the Henry J. Austin Health Center in Trenton, N.J., to sign up for new plans through a health insurance exchange.

criticizing the law include the penalty for individuals and businesses who choose not to have insurance, as well as the forced insurance enrollment for businesses with 50 or more employees. Speaker of the House of

Representatives John Boehner and Tea Party Republicans hava adamantly refused to compromise on passing a “clean” Continuing Resolution that would fund the government entirely, including the ACA.

CAMPUS

SAM Center director awarded for leadership, program implementation ASHLEE SYMANK Staff Reporter

William Flemming, executive director of the SAM Center, received two awards from the National Academic Advising Association. Flemming was chosen from among 8,000 other advisors to receive the prestigious Gail Rola Award and Outstanding Advising Administrator awards. Flemming was selected as the executive director to oversee the

implementation and management of the new centralized advising center in 2002 by former SHSU President James Gaertner and the approval of the Student Government Association. Previously, students were having trouble getting advised because it was unorganized. “Advising has become so much better this way,” Flemming said. “Students can come to one place and they can see an advisor and it’s a lot simpler.” Flemming has been employed by Sam Houston State University for 40 years. Prior to transferring to the SAM Center, he was involved

in the English department and the Faculty Senate. Both awards are given to recognize individuals who display a passion for advising. Winners of the awards must exhibit the ability to engage in, promote and support advising grounded in sound theory, educational practice and research and demonstrated these specific attributes through their leadership and program implementation, according to the organization’s website. Under Flemming’s leadership the SAM Center has grown from 12 faculty advisors and three full-time advisors to 18 faculty

advisors and six full-time advisors. The SAM Center also has a growing number of mentoring programs available for students. According to Flemming, since the SAM Center opened, graduation rates and student retention have increased. “Even though I don’t think we’re completely responsible for those increases, I think that we have a lot to do with it because the programs that we have for students, the mentoring side in particular, shows students that somebody cares and somebody’s willing to help them,” Flemming said. The mentoring services available

include a study skill workshop, the first alert program, Sam Houston ELITE, GRE prep sessions, voluntary intervention program and a probation elimination program. Flemming enjoys helping students through these programs and hopes to build upon them in the coming years. “That’s a great feeling to have,” Flemming said. “To know that you’re helping people like that.” The advising center and mentoring centers are located on the first floor of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences building.

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10-15-13  

The 10-15-13 issue of the Houstonian.

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