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WHAT’S INSIDE? Rate My Professor is misleading to students “Game of Thrones” premier crashes website Bearkat baseball finds rythym at the plate

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Volume 125/ Issue 22

Facebook.com/ TheHoustonian Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Forum gives candidates voice CAMPUS

JAY R. JORDAN Associate Editor Students submitted questions to Student Government Association executive board candidates during a student affairs committee-hosted open forum Monday. Presidential candidate Spencer Copeland, vice presidential candidates Andrew Carson and Jonathan Rodriguez, secretary candidate Tyler Livezey, treasurer candidate Samuel Iredia, and chief of staff candidates Robert

Ferguson and Isaac Ruiz spoke about their credentials and qualifications for their respective positions. The B.I.G. Bearkat ticket, comprised of presidential candidate Emmanuel Omoegbele, vice presidential candidate Brooke Hunter, secretary candidate JoAnna Moore treasurer candidate Victor Ihezukwu and chief of staff candidate Tyler Patek, declined the invitation to attend the forum. Each candidate had the chance to speak on their own accord and for the representation of their

ticket. One topic discussed was the relationship between different positions. The issue stemmed from the butting of heads between the current Student Body Vice President Kolby Flowers and Student Body President Ramiro Jaime, Jr., which eventually lead to Flowers writing a letter to the editor in The Houstonian calling for Jaime’s resignation. Rodriguez, who’s running independently, said although he’s not associated with either ticket, he would be able to uphold a

relationship with either president upon their election. “I’ve been working with [Copeland] since he joined SGA,” Rodriguez said. “He helped me with university affairs last year, and I joined university affairs again [which Copeland chairs] this year. The new candidate, I haven’t met him, and he has not contacted me to meet me, but if he was voted president, and I was voted vice president, we’d sit down.” Carson concurred and said he placed himself on the ticket with

RAVEN’S CALL

Copeland for a reason. “We have bonded on definitely a professional level but as well as a friendship level,” Carson said. “I’m a big picture kind of person. He definitely [has] helped with the detail work of ideas, and our whole ticket does.” Ruiz said he’s seen a problem at Sam Houston State University and that he’s the answer to SGA’s problems. He also brought Ferguson’s character into question. “One thing that separates me —

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CAMPUS

Student assaulted at Villas KASSIDY TURNPAUGH Assistant News Editor

Brynn Castro | The Houstonian

RAVEN’S CALL: Students and faculty gathered to remember fallen Bearkats, both students and faculty alike, at the annaul Raven’s Call hosted by Sam Houston State University Orange Keys.

Six officers responded to a scene where a Sam Houston State University student attacked an unnamed individual Thursday evening. Officer Kimberly Eikenburg took sophomore industrial technologies – construction management major Morgan McGee into custody for alleged aggravated assault, according to police logs. A call to emergency services was placed at 10:09 p.m. Thursday, requesting help at an apartment at the Villas on Sycamore. McGee is a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity and an active participant in the organization’s intramural sports teams, including their softball and football teams. If the state files charges against McGee, he could be facing a chance of two to 10 years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines in addition to any restitution awarded to the victim, according to the Texas Penal Code. Delta Tau Delta vice president Michael Rivera declined to comment on the situation. McGee said, “at this time, because this is a sensitive legal matter, I am unable to talk about details.” Follow the Houstonian as updates unfold.

STATE

Cell phones main cause in rising Texas crashes HANNAH ZEDAKER Senior Reporter The number of crashes involving distracted drivers in Texas has increased by 4 percent from 2012, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. According to the report, a total of 94,943 wrecks in 2013 were related to preoccupied Texans operating vehicles weighing anywhere from 3,000 pounds to two tons. As a result, 459 people lost their

lives. “It’s all about trying to change behaviors and we just ask people to use common sense and give the road their undivided attention,” TxDOT spokesperson David Glessner said. “Put the phone down, put it away, and just try to eliminate as many other distracting behaviors within your power when you’re driving.” April is designated as National Distracted Driving Awareness month and in addition, also begins TxDOT’s annual “Talk, Text, Crash” public education

campaign. “Throughout the month of April TxDOT will air public service announcements on the radio all over the state, place ads on billboards, gas pumps and online,” Glessner said. “The purpose is just to remind everyone that cell phones and other distracting behaviors should not take place behind the wheel. If you feel the need to answer a phone call or respond to a text we ask that you pull over to a safe location and do that somewhere other than the roadway while you’re driving.”

TxDOT studies have shown that motorists who use a cell phone while driving are four times more likely to get into a crash causing a serious injury. Additionally, these crashes are highest among young adults and adults over the age of 45. In addition to the use of cell phones, other distracting activities include eating, drinking, grooming, checking emails, reading, programming a navigation system, watching videos and adjusting audio devices.

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“It’s kind of to the extent that, take speeding for example, a lot of people know it’s against the law and it’s dangerous, but these behaviors become so commonplace that we fail to separate them from the act of driving,” Glessner said. “At TxDOT, safety is out number one priority so we feel that driving should always command 100 percent of your undivided attention.” According to the National Highway Traffic Safety —

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News

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 houstonianonline.com/a-e

WORLD

Signals detected in search of Flight 370 CONNOR HYDE Editor-in-Chief Since its disappearance March 8, the search for Malaysian Flight 370 has had few promising leads. Yet, a pinger locator in the Indian Ocean detected signals that are described as consistent with the flight data recorder and voice recorder, retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston said during a press conference Sunday. According to Houston, an Australian Navy ship that’s fixed with a sophisticated U.S. pinger locator detected the signals in an area about 1,100 northwest of Perth, Australia. Houston told CNN on Monday the sounds were picked up in ocean depths close to 14,800 feet deep. The first signals lasted close to two hours with a second detection lasting only 13 minutes, CNN reported. “We are encouraged that we are very close to where we need to be,” Houston said. “We’ve got a visual indication on a screen and we’ve also got an audible signal. And the audible signal sounds to me just like an emergency locator beacon.” Although Houston is optimistic, he said it could take days before officials determine whether or not the signals came from the plane. “In very deep oceanic water, nothing happens fast,” Houston said. According to Capt. Mark Matthews, U.S. Navy’s salvage supervisor, if the signals are detected again, an underwater drone could be used to take photos for officials to determine if Flight 370 has been found. CNN reported the process could take days and possibly a week or more. Monday marks the 31st day

of the search for the plane that carried 239 passengers. “If we can locate this wreckage and salvage the important components, it’s just going to be a phenomenal event,” Matthews told CNN. “I don’t think in the history of aircraft searches we’ve ever started with such inexact information to identify where it went in the water.” According to CNN, a British navy ship, The HMS Echo, which is equipped with advanced detection gear, steered into the southern Indian Ocean Monday where a Chinese group had detected two signals. The report added The HMS Echo is expected to solidify concrete details picked up Friday and Saturday. Houston said if detectors were near a pinger, they would be able to sustain a signal for a longer period of time. Developing Details As searchers narrow in on Flight 370’s coordinates, new details have emerged regarding the flight path pilots took before going off the grid. Officials have concluded the plane steered off course and curved north of Indonesia before returning south over the southern Indian Ocean, sources of CNN said. Although there are many assumptions trying to clarify why Flight 370 steered off course, including an attempt to avoid radar detection, CNN aviation analyst Miles O’Brien said the flight path implies the pilots were experienced. “This particular route that is laid out happens to coincide with some of these named intersections,” O’Brien said. “So what it shows is an experienced pilot somewhere in the mix on this.”

CONTINUING SEARCH: (Above) Australian Defense vessel Ocean Shield tows a pinger locator during the first search for the missing flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder in the southern Indian Ocean. (Below) The map shows the locations of search vessels scanning for signs of the mission Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 .

CAMPUS

Orange Pride eyes fifth title

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from my [opponent] is I have an extremely good work ethic,” Ruiz said. “I can preach to you all day about my candidacy and work ethic. I plan on coming in and working extremely hard for this organization.” Ferguson brought his 12-year’s military experience, refuting the claim that anybody up for the chief of staff position has a better work ethic than him. “My work ethic is definitely not something that’s to be brought into question,” Ferguson said. “I’m in the SGA office daily, sometimes three or four times a day working on stuff for the students as well as all over this campus.”

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Administration, at any moment, approximately 660,000 drivers across America are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving. In addition, five seconds is the average time your eyes are off the road while texting; traveling at 55 mph, that’s enough time to cover the length of a football field blindfolded. Despite advances in technology, like Bluetooth, Glessner said hands-free communication is still a danger to those on the road. “There’s an assumption out there that hands-free equals less dangerous and I don’t think that we can safely say that,” Glessner said. “Your attention is still diverted away from the road whether you’re actually manually operating the device or doing so through verbal communication. It’s much the same as having a conversation with another person in the car, if your mind is on the conversation, that’s another one of your senses that’s not fully dedicated to driving.” Glessner said he hopes with the

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progression of future technology and awareness programs, the increasing trend of distracted driver-related crashes will decline. “It’s probably easier to think of it in terms of what you should be doing rather than what you shouldn’t be doing, and what you should be doing is giving driving your 100 percent undivided attention, anything else can wait,” Glessner said.

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Orange Pride, Sam Houston State University’s dance squad, is packing up and heading to Daytona Beach, Fla. to defend their title as National Dance Alliance champions this week. The squad has held the title for four consecutive years, however Orange Pride dance coach Courtney Sutton is stepping in for her first year. And she’s looking to bring home a fifth title. Since 2010, Orange Pride has maintained national prominence in the spotlight of one of the second largest dance divisions in NDA. According to Sutton, this year’s competition holds additional pressure, not only to bring home another championship, but because of the squad’s youth. “I only have second years on the team,” Sutton said. “It’s a lot of pressure to uphold. I don’t want to let the alumni down. I don’t want to let the team down because I am new.” Sophomore team captain Natalie Nunez said although there is added pressure the team’s preparation for nationals will

compensate for the team’s youth. “We have so many new girls that we’ve had to mold into being an Orange Pride dancer,” she said. “As long as we perform the dance well and execute it correctly, we’ll hopefully come home with another win.” SHSU’s Orange Pride is competing in Open Division I against 21 other teams. In this division, the routines are free for interpretation as there aren’t style restrictions. The Bearkats’ style of choice? Jazz. “This routine is a little different,” Sutton said. “It’s a little more contemporary than a traditional jazz routine. So we’re hoping to bring something different and the judges will like it.” Only four members on the current roster have previously competed at the NDA national championships, but according to Sutton, youth has motivated her team throughout the year. “I feel like they have worked hard because they have something to prove,” she said. “We’re coming back with a championship.” The preliminary competition will kick off Thursday with finals on Friday and will be aired on CBS Sports Network.

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Viewpoints

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

WORLD

Lessons in life, work in Beirut trip

CONNOR HYDE Editor-in-Chief We landed in the Beirut airport Tuesday as the sun was peeking behind the Mediterranean Sea. As we exited the plane and approached customs, I was unexpectedly at ease walking through an airport 7,000 miles from home. I haven’t flown much before, much less had left the south. Yet, I was content. The taxi driver was hunched over the guard rail separating impatient children from their traveled fathers. A young girl escaped through an eight-inch break between rails and ran around each member of our group as our driver combed his finger nails through his balding hair and met us at the doors leading to cab. As I crossed the street with the Beirut skyline casting a shadow, the Moon hung in a familiar apathetic sigh that seemed to dangle from a frayed string. I remember sitting in my parents’ living room in Cypress the Sunday before we departed. “Son, why Lebanon?” I couldn’t give an answer to justify or slightly ease the tension and worry. Mom responded with longer hugs and extra errands to keep me in town a few minutes longer. “There’s nothing to worry about.” Google didn’t help. Yet as our driver navigated through the 7 p.m. traffic, maintaining inches between the car and those surrounding us, I thought of South Houston. Bustling crowds of friends inching

their way across the highway, deafening local music echoed from parked cars along the Mediterranean boardwalk and groups of runners checked their watches as they finished their night run. If only my parents could see Beirut as I was seeing it. As the cab turned into the Beirut Riviera, I unhitched my stomach and stretched my legs out. My first step on foreign soil, one big step. At the hotel, we were met by Ayman Mhanna. He’s the director of the organization that joined forces with SHSU to host the arts and culture conference. He was truly amazing; a walking encyclopedia. The preceding Saturday, I sipped beer at Lucky’s Pub with some friends. In between the jokes and academic discussions about governmental debates about policies we didn’t fully understand, there were some tense moments. Lebanon, the Paris of the Middle East, remains associated with war and conflict in the states. I was headed there. As I woke up the next morning in my hotel room, the sky was the same color blue. The Mediterranean Sea glistened as the wakes hugged the shoreline Wednesday morning as we ate breakfast at the hotel. As I cleaned the plate of the remaining dollop of hummus I squinted through the morning fog to see the rising mountains sprinkled with apartments and buildings. It’s an overwhelming feeling when you’re only familiar with the flat and barren Texas landscape. The conference didn’t start until Thursday and Mhanna had set aside some time for us to experience Beirut. As we drove through the city, and I’m stuffed within the front seat slamming on the invisible brake pedal, Mhanna talked about reconstruction following the Lebanese Civil War from 1975 through 1990. I stared out the car window remembering

and reminding myself we’re spoiled in the United States. Our wars are fought in other backyards. And although the Beirut I was seeing reflected calmness, conflicts still tremble Lebanon. With the Syrian civil war next door, refugees immigrating to Lebanon has stressed the country’s economy and social stability. We climbed through the mountains and the hidden crevasses where local street merchants teased passing cars to enter their stores. Our first stop was at the Jeita Grotto, a system of interconnected limestone caves in the Nahr al-Kalb valley just north of Beirut. Despite the staggering beauty of the natural landscape and stalagmite and stalactite sculptures population, the sense of normalcy was sobering. As a country that neighbors Syria and is currently fighting internal governmental struggles, the days pass without thought. There’s no constant threat of war that overwhelms the city and scares locals into their apartments. They live. We finished the tour of the cavern with a tranquil boat ride through the spring that carves through the caverns. And as we finished up lunch a few hours later, we walked the market streets of Byblos. Byblos is believed to have been established between 8,800 and 7,000 B.C.; a stark difference from the Alamo in San Antonio. Local fishermen reeled their poles taut and worked the currents for the evening catch, and we marveled the mere stones we stepped upon. We finished the night with a few drinks in the local night life. I enjoyed the local brew, Almaza – a pilsner craft beer – and the different interpretation of the Beatles “I am the Walrus.” Thursday was time for work. The hotel convention room filled with local reporters and journalists from at least seven

countries. There were former Newsweek writers, a Washington Post reporter, and representatives from several embassies. As the panel discussion kicked off the conference, I noticed a trend. Although thousands of miles may separate the headquarters of these media groups, they all share a similar problem. We, as journalists, share similar problems. The rise of social media as trusted news sources has hindered news organizations as there’s a tug-of-war to maintain journalism traditions and adapt to new technology and values. The conference discussed these issues through the lens of arts and culture reporting. Although I’ve only been a reporter for three years, listening to these veterans of the craft deliberate different techniques to combat the incremental decline of viewers to their websites was not only concerning but uplifting. As the editor-in-chief for the Houstonian at Sam Houston State University – a newspaper of only six pages – we experience the same struggle. I learned many important lessons; how to look at covering a beat from various angles, and how to ethically deal with PR firms. The most important lesson I learned was that I could use the camera I already owned to shoot video as a freelance journalist. During my time at SHSU I had been convinced a camera like a JVC GY-100 – worth $1,345 – was the only option. I was happy to hear it, and a bit annoyed. I wish I had learned that in school. The conference closed, our hotel keys were turned in, and we returned to the marathon of connecting flights and crossing the Atlantic. As the flight from Frankfurt to Houston took off, I was stretching my jaw to pop my ears. My lens had to be opened. The exposure is set for a lifetime. This article was originally written for SHSU’S GCJD.

PAWS UP

PAWS UP to UCONN: Jim Calwho?

PAWS UP to Game of Thrones: Season 4 premiered Sunday and took us all back to Westeros. Also, there’s no debate, Arya Stark is the most badass character in the show.

PAWS UP to Free Asian food on the mall: So what if it was gone within an hour? Anyone giving out free food in a heavily trafficked area gets a paws up.

PAWS DOWN

PAWS DOWN to SHSU password resets: INANE! INANE! INANE!

TECH

Professor ratings misleading COLIN HARRIS Columnist RateMyProfessors.com started in 1999 and currently boasts more than 1 million different reviews. Users of the site know that reviews are either glowing endorsements

or nasty diatribes with little in between. The inherent self-selection bias of the website make the site a poor way to evaluate professors. However it’s a great way to evaluate the poor habits of past students! One of the most common complaints is mandatory attendance. Here’s a review of Marketing Professor Irfan Ahmed: “HATED THIS MAN! had him for undergraduate and graduate classes. His lectures have nothing to do with what he teaches over. He discriminates against students who miss any classes. and most importantly his grading is VERY

VERY VERY SUBJECTIVE!!! there is no rhythm or reason to it. DO NOT TAKE HIM” Dr. Ahmed, you may have met your match. The student doesn’t stop at simply declaring you a very, very, very bad man for requiring students to show up to a class in which they’re enrolled, he goes so far as to suggest you’re guilty of wholesale discrimination against the presence-challenged. Unfortunately, docking points from those who don’t show up to class isn’t discriminatory nor is it even unethical. It’s a right professors have when designing their courses and some departments have even begun to impose attendance requirements.

Another typical and completely banal complaint is when professors refuse to round someone’s grade up to a higher letter than they earned. Here’s one about Sociology Professor Jin Young Choi: “She was a good teacher, had a little funny side, but will hurt your feelings. I was doing average for her class (without reading the book, which you don’t really need), and ended up with a D (69.52) because of different circumstances and refused to round to C! This was class I needed to graduated. Thanks.” For the full version of this article; visit houstonianonline.com

PAWS DOWN to HBO Go: First they screwed up the True Detective finale, now it’s Game of Thrones premiere. NEWS FLASH – your content is popular. Fix the back end.

PAWS DOWN to NCAA: Always fighting tooth-and-nail for the rights of universities to trample the rights of student athletes. The latest battlefront is unionization.

The Houstonian Editorial

The Houstonian was named in the top 100 college newspapers for journalism students by JournalismDegree.org. Members of Associated Collegiate Press and Texas Intercolligiate Press Association.

EDITOR’S NOTE Articles, letters and cartoons by Houstonian staff members or others in this paper are their own and not the opinion of the Houstonian, unless it is noted as such. Submissions and letters to the editor are welcome. Please send submissions to viewpoints@houstonianonline.com. Articles may be edited for grammar and spelling at discretion of editor. Unsolicited oppinions should be 150 words or under. Please contact us if you wish to submit anything longer. Deadline for submission is by 5 p.m. on Mondays or Wednesdays.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Connor Hyde ........................................................................................................................................936-294-1505 FACULTY ADVISER Robin Johnson..................................................................................................................................936-294-1499 STAFF Jay R. Jordan .................................................................................................................................Associate Editor Colin Harris...................................................................................................................................Viewpoints Editor Jeremy Villanueva..................................................................................................................................Sports Editor Kizzie Frank.............................................................................................................................Entertainment Editor Stephen Green...........................................................................................................................................Web Editor Kassidy Turnpaugh.............................................................................................................. Assistant News Editor Dharmesh Patel.........................................................................................................Assistant Entertainment Editor Marissa Hill........................................................................................................................................Sports Reporter Hannah Zedeker.................................................................................................................................Senior Reporter Steven Snook.............................................................................................................................Multimedia Reporter Samantha Zambrano.............................................................................................................................Layout Editor Lillie Muyskens..............................................................................................................................Graphic Designer Staff Reporter(s)..................................................................................................... Kaleigh Treiber, Alex Broussard

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Arts&Entertainment

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 houstonianonline.com/a-e

TELEVISION

GOT premier shuts down HBO Go MICHELLE WULFSON Contributing Reporter

The Associated Press

DETHRONED. Charles Dance portrays Tywin Lannister in the HBO production “Game of Thrones.” During the season four premier Sunday, the traffic to HBO’s online streaming service crashed after too many users attempted to watch the show all at once. “Game of Thrones,” is aired every Sunday on HBO at 9 p.m.

After a television show ends on the biggest cliffhanger of the series, waiting a year to watch the conclusion in the new season can be agonizing. Notorious for its unpredictable storyline, “Game of Thrones” finally returned Sunday on HBO but left many fans out in the cold winter as many were not able to immediately tune into the season four premiere. Fans everywhere were outraged when HBO GO, an online HBO subscription website, crashed for little over an hour during the season premiere. Desperate to catch up with their favorite characters, angry fans took to social media in response to the dreaded “Fatal Error” message, even after it had been corrected. “HBO Go crashes under ‘Game of Thrones’ demand: Winter was coming, but for many HBO Go users, it didn’t arrive...,“ Twitter user Twitter user @milwaukee_ buzz tweeted. In a war beginning with five kings, HBO’s acclaimed fantasydrama, “Game of Thrones”, returns for season 4 with three left in the game. This season will be based off of the second half of George R. R. Martin’s third book of the series “A Song of Fire and Ice”, but even dedicated readers

will be in for some surprises. “People like to say no one is safe in my books, which is true, but people are even less safe on the TV series,” Martin said in a CBS News interview. The series has been known to be cut-throat with characters and to not dance around a happily-everafter ending, and the new season, “All Men Must Die”, implies that it will be no exception. Similar to past seasons, the usual battles, sex and manipulative power games can all be expected. No spoilers here, but two new things fans can be sure to see is the rise of a new character, Lannister, Prince Oberyn Martell - the Red Viper of Dorne, and the wedding of King Joffrey and Margaery Tyrell. The premier will pick up where it left off in season four with the Lannisters having reunited while House Stark and Jon Snow are drifting even further apart from each other. Daenerys Targaryen, portrayed by Emilia Clarke, continues to grow as a leader, freeing slaves as she heads for the iron throne. Game of Thrones season 4 premiered Sunday, April 6 and can be viewed Sundays at 9 p.m. on HBO.

CITY

Grad brings ‘paint and sip’ to Huntsville SEAN SMITH Staff Reporter

Anna Bennett had been to ‘paint and sip’ parties at art studios all across southeast Texas while attending Sam Houston State University. However, the thought of driving an hour or more to these parties to drink and paint was losing its appeal. After visiting a party in Austin with some friends, Bennett decided to look into the cost of opening a ‘paint and sip’ studio a little closer to home. Things fell into place and Party Palette was born, giving Huntsville its very own art studio with a twist. Bennett and her husband, Andy Bennett, opened Party Palette’s doors in July 2013 with ambitions of bringing ‘paint and sip’ parties to Huntsville. The two person business, with occasional help from Bennett’s mother-in-law, hosts private parties, classical art lessons, venue rentals, art supply sales, after-school art programs, and daily bring-your-own-bottle ‘paint and sip’ parties. At ‘paint and sip’ parties patrons can learn to paint, create their own work of art that they get to take home, and they get to have a

few drinks in the process. While attendees supply the drinks, Party Palette provides the supplies and the teacher. The lessons are taught by Bennett herself, a SHSU class of 2012 Alumni with a bachelor of arts in studio art. While Bennett attended SHSU, she traveled to ‘paint and sip’ parties in College Station, The Woodlands and Conroe. She said she felt that Huntsville needed something similar to keep students from having to drive too far. “The idea of driving an hour each direction, and hopefully drinking something while you’re there, was just not something I was interested in doing,” she said. Bennett, a native of Fort-Worth, had attended the University of Houston for a few years before coming to SHSU to pursue her degree in art. Her time as an undergrad was filled late nights and long classes. After graduating, Bennett decided that staying in Huntsville was her only option. “My husband works for the university so leaving Huntsville was not something that was going to happen,” Bennett said. “Finding your place in Huntsville is something that needs to happen.” Andy Bennett is the director of the Center of Excellence in

Digital Forensics at SHSU, said that starting Party Palette was not always easy. “It took a lot of time, some of the good old-fashioned sweat equity with blood, sweat and tears, and it took teamwork,” he said. “It was definitely a joint venture.” Party Palette saw similar problems many small-businesses face during the early stages of development, according to Andy Bennett. “The roadblocks were predictable for any small business —funds, space, time-availability, keeping the bills paid at home while getting the business open” he said. “I was very happy and proud to be able to support [my wife] and do anything I could to help her get her vision and dream off the ground.” Anna Bennett said finding time to run every aspect of the business is one of the more difficult parts of owning Party Palette. “You think, sure I can do all these paintings, but it also involves a lot of accounting and number crunching and advertising,” she said. Despite offering various painting lessons, Party Palette has made its presence in the community known. They have donated supplies to the Wynne

Home Summer Art Program for children and has been involved with donations to the Chamber of Commerce and the Walker County SHSU Alumni Group; as well as hosting an after school art program for local children. Party Palette is also involved in helping local student groups and charitable organizations in fundraising efforts. “We will sell our services at a severe discount and then they’re permitted to resell them at an inflated rate so that they can bring in a lot of money,” Anna Bennett said. Forrest Self, sophomore mass communications major and Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society sergeant of arms, said he has looked into doing an event at Party Palette. “I have never been there myself, but after seeing the deals they offer I would definitely consider taking my organization there,” he said. Along with painting, Party Palette provides a studio to cater to both student and professional artist in the area. “Occasionally we host local artist’s work here because I want this to be a place where local artists feel like they have input and can use it to further

‘Stonewater Rapture’ elevates audience With all the religious movies coming out, a borderline raunchy stage play, “The Stonewater Rapture” countered the trend by bringing a sexually frustrated teenage, bible thumping cast to Sam Houston State University. With the warning “contains adult languages and mature themes” printed on the program cover, the production premiered in the University Theatre Center Showcase Theatre Tuesday, continued on various days throughout the week, and closed out with a 2 p.m. showing on Saturday. “The Stonewater Rapture” takes place in a small-minded Texas town in the 1950s that is all about God and football. What the program refers to as “Whitney’s house in a small Texas Town” sums up the entire

set: a white picketed fence lined the background. Although there was no wall division between different rooms or the outdoors, the precision in the lighting helped to separate each room from the other. The play was written by Pulitzer Prize winning, American playwright Doug Wright. The show at SHSU, directed by SHSU student, Adriana Dominguez held true to the original script. Raised by deeply religious families, two teenagers struggle with their physical desires while enduring pressure from their parents, friends, and each other. Despite the fact that there were only two people on stage, the room was filled in with commanding voices and crisp acoustics. The cast, Adrienne Whitaker (Carlyle) and Mason Butler (Whitney) groped, kissed and fought each other in front of dozens of unsuspecting students and parents.

The chemistry between Whitaker and Butler was strong from the beginning. Whitaker seamlessly played the delusional Carlyle, unable to tell the difference between reality and her vision of angels. In the second act, Carlyle tells Whitney of her encounter at a party with “naked and beautiful angels”, who were actually violent football players. Whitaker’s tone captured Carlyle’s denial of her being assaulted with a shaky yet hopeful voice. Butler plays it gentle yet straight forward role toward Whitaker, whose parents are always absent. Butler’s ability to show concern for Whitaker solidified their characters’ love interest. The low-lit stage of the UTC Showcase Theatre created a personal environment for the audience. Some of the audience members were taken out of their comfort

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CAMPUS

KIZZIE FRANK A&E Editor

themselves,” said Anna Bennett. While Party Palette has been open for just under a year, Anna Bennett said that expansion to a franchise and more in the future is something she has thought about. “We would love to do a combination coffee shop and maybe get a beer-wine license,” she said. “In the state of Texas, you can have a beer-wine licenses and sell it and still be BYOB.” Party Palette hosts parties most nights and on Sunday afternoons. For more information on party times, visit their website www. partypalettetx.com.

zone by the closeness of the cast. Communications studies major Shelby Warren found herself blushing during some parts of the show. “I kept thinking, ’Is this really happening right now?’” she said. “But it was really funny. I think they did a good job of embodying people from that time period.” According to Dominguez, she chose to direct the play when she realized that strict upbringing in the church often causes individuals to question God and life. “Living a sheltered life whether it’s through religion, rules, or parents….I think it’s something that everyone can relate to,” she said. “Having to push through and [realize]…you have to be your own person in the end.”

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Page 5

Sports

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 houstonianonline.com/sports

SOFTBALL

SHSU downs Demons, climbs SLC MARISSA HILL Sports Reporter Bats rang in Natchitoches, La., as Sam Houston State softball took the doubleheader against Northwestern State Saturday afternoon 7-5 and 6-3, respectively. Leading the surge for the Bearkats were the Castillo sisters, Tiffany and Cecilia, along with Hillary Adams. The three Bearkats combined for 13 of SHSU’s 26 hits. The Bearkats are now 9-5 in Southland Conference play, moving them into third place and only two games out of league leader McNeese State. With only four conference matchups remaining in the season, junior shortstop Tayler Gray believes that the team is peaking at the correct time. “I think we are finally playing like we have all expected,” she said. “And everyone is accepting their role.” SHSU stole the opening game in nine innings, but held a 4-0 advantage until the bottom of the fourth inning. NSU got on the board with Cassandra Barefield connecting for a two-run home run. The Demons managed to score one more run during their time at the plate, making it a 4-3 affair. However, SHSU’s lineup had an answer for NSU’s mid-game momentum. In the fifth inning, freshman

Alex Broussard | The Houstonian

DOUBLE TAKE. Junior shortstop Tayler Gray sends a ball to first in Southland Conference match earlier in the season against Nicholls State. The Bearkats’ softball has reasserted themselves as a threat in the SLC, sliding into third place in conference.

Hannah Marino walked with the bases loaded to add insurance to SHSU’s one run lead.

However, it wasn’t enough as the Demons rallied to tie the match 5-5 in the fifth and sixth

innings. Tiffany Castillo and Adams laced the game up with back-to-

back home runs to regain a tworun cushion in extra innings to eventually take the 7-5 win. The Castillo sisters continued their energy into the second game as Cecilia Castillo doubled to left center followed by an Adams’ walk. Tiffany Castillo followed Adams with a single to right field, driving in her sister to pick up the first run for SHSU. The Demons sparked with early momentum to hold a 2-1 lead to close the first inning. SHSU acquired two more runs in the second inning, while holding NSU scoreless they evened the board 3-3 at the end of the fifth inning. Once again it was SHSU’s lineup that resurged the Bearkats. An RBI single from freshman Tori Koerselman and a two-run homer from Tiffany Castillo gave the Bearkats enough momentum and leverage to fend off the Demons 6-3. As SHSU approaches the end of the conference schedule, Gray said they can do more. “We feel great,” she said. “But we are ready to do more damage.” Due to the rain, the Bearkats did not play the third and final game of the NSU series. SHSU will return to the road this week as they take on Houston Baptist Saturday.

BASEBALL

Bearkats find rhythm against ORU KYLE KELLY Staff Reporter

The promising season for Sam Houston State’s baseball team had a shaky and

uncertain road for the Bearkats going into their weekend series with Oral Roberts after dropping the previous two Southland Conference series. Friday night, it looked like woes were continuing for the Bearkats. SHSU dropped the Friday opener of the three-game series to ORU in a 7-4 loss. Junior right hand pitcher Tyler Eppler took the mound for the Bearkats and only gave up two runs through six innings before the Golden Eagles unraveled in the seventh inning, adding five runs off of Eppler and the Bearkat bullpen for ORU to secure the victory. In the second game of the series on Saturday, senior Jason Simms received the starting nod. This was only Simms’s third start in a Bearkat uniform and Simms delivered, hurling a complete game from the rubber and only surrendering one earned run. Third baseman Carter Burgess was the major offensive weapon for the Bearkats on Saturday. The junior got things going in the seventh with a leadoff double and was later driven in on a pinch hit single by Ryan Farney. Burgess then connected on his second double of the game in the

top of the ninth and was knocked in by designated hitter Dylan Ebbs scoring the go-ahead run that would seal the victory for the Bearkats. The third game of the series showed the Bearkats going back to some of their methods from earlier in the season by rallying late in the game to put the game out of reach for their opponents in fast order. The Bearkats struck in the sixth inning as center fielder Travis Lee got the rally started with an infield single. With the help of a pitcher error, Lee ended up at third base. Catcher Anthony Azar added run support on a seventh inning blast for his seventh homerun of the season. Azar later drove in another run on a groundout for his second RBI of the game. Freshman Sam Odom came in the third inning and pitched the remaining seven innings of the game, yielding two runs off a Golden Eagle late inning homerun, but was still able to receive the win for the Bearkats in a 7-4 offensive showing. The Bearkats will play host to Baylor Bears Tuesday at Don Sanders’ Stadium at 7 p.m. SHSU is 2-1 against Big 12 opponents this season.

TRACK AND FIELD

Kats dominate at Islander Relays MORGAN JENKINS Contributing Reporter

Despite inclement weather, Sam Houston State’s men’s and women’s track teams managed to take the Country Inn and Suites Islander Dash by storm capturing 41 top three finishes. The Bearkats’ men’s team swept all meter dashes and relay with Adrienne Quillin capturing a school and facility record in the women’s hammer throw. In the men’s 4x100 meter relay, Justin Jenkins, Kristen Mitchell, Rodney Jones and Jarrick Wright took first with a final time of 41.69. Wright also captured first in 100-meter dash with Jones taking the 200-meter dash. On the field, Garret Larson grabbed gold in pole vault and Jonathan Andrews placed first in javelin throw. Junior Karl Schreiber annihilated competition in the 3000-meter steeplechase, achieving a personal best while finishing 25 seconds ahead of the rest of the competition. Senior Ammaad McCarthy improved to a second place finish in hammer throw, after placing third last week. According to McCarthy, the change in his training in the preceding week helped him improve to move higher on the winners’podium. “The difference between last week and this week was the change in my training I did leading up to this past meet,” McCarthy said. “I ended up throwing

eight feet farther than the week before and setting new career PR.” With a little over a month until the Southland Conference Outdoor Championship, McCarthy hopes to continue to keep his team in shape for a SLC title after a close finish in the Indoor Championship in February. “I do feel we have what it takes to be victorious this outdoor season,” McCarthy said. “In order for us to be successful, we have to push ourselves harder than ever before, but continue to take care of our bodies in the process.” The women’s team echoed the same success as the men’s. Sabrina Starr, Elizabeth Ene, Danielle Demas and Lygia Foreman finished first in the 4x100 relays, just edging out the Bearkats’ ‘B’ team. Starr continued on her dominating season with another first place finish in the 100-meter hurdles while Ruth Amaku took first in the 400-meter hurdles. In her first collegiate start in the 3000-meter steeplechase, freshman Ana Moreno completed the men’s and women’s first place sweep. Kara Whitson, Ashley Thompson, and Katelyn Wynn placed first, second, and third in pole vault. Kaylnne Wright took first in triple jump and Elizabeth Lyssy threw for first in javelin. The Bearkats will travel to compete at the San Angelo University Relays Thursday before heading out to Abilene for the Wes Kittley Invitational on Saturday.


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