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Volume 125/ Issue 2

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Tuesday, Jaunary 21, 2014

CAMPUS

Phase one of SHSU building plans to be complete in 2014 HANNAH ZEDAKER Senior Reporter

Phase one of the 2020 Master Plan for the campus of Sam Houston State University is set to be completed this year. The 2020 Master Plan for SHSU was approved by the Board of Regents in August 2008 and includes three phases—the first of which was planned to take six years making 2014 its final year. In 2012, the original 2008 plan was revised and adjusted to meet the needs of the campus and its growing student population. SHSU Director of Communications Julia May said one of the biggest advantages to the master plan is that it can easily be modified to adapt to a changing campus. “The master plan is actually a fluid document that changes as our needs change,” May said. “You always have to have a road map to guide you as you’re growing and as you’re making your changes and the biggest advantage with this plan is that we’ll be able to serve our students and their needs as they arise.” According to May, due to rapid enrollment growth between the years of 2008 and 2012, many of the original plans had to be reevaluated and modified to fit the

growing population at SHSU. Over the last five years, many strides have been made in the progression and adaptation of the master plan to the SHSU campus. Some of these include the construction of Lone Star Hall and the Residential Life office as well as the construction of Old Main Market dining facility, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Gaertner Performing Arts Center. The demolition of SmithKirkley Hall and King Residence Hall resulted in the possibility for the expansion of the Lowman Student Center as well as additions to the Student Health and Counseling Center and the Events Center/Press Box at Bowers Stadium. “The administrators monitor trends on campus, such as enrollment, popular majors and workforce demands.” May said. “Then we meet to help those who are making those decisions and long term plans because a lot of thought is put into making these decisions.” In addition, facilities off of the SHSU main campus have also undergone renovations including Gibbs Ranch, the University Camp, The Woodlands Center and the future research park. The major projects still left to be completed before commencement onto phase two of the master

Kaleigh Treiber | The Houstonian

PROGRESS. Contractors continue work on the new Student Health Center next to Old Main Market on the north side of campus. The new buiilding was approved by students in October 2012 and is a key campus infrastructure upgrade featured in phase one of the 2020 Master Plan. Completion is scheduled in summer 2014.

plan is the construction of the Agricultural and Engineering Technology building, the Nursing/ Biology building, a Shared Special Instruments building and the expansion of the Communications and Central Plant. A complete list of phase one projects can be found

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

on pages 108-109 of the 2020 Campus Master Plan on the SHSU website. As always, the plan also includes meeting ecological standards and continually looking for ways to improve parking on campus as well as sidewalks for the safety of

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SHSU narrows head coach search to five JEREMY VILLANUEVA Sports Editor

Kaleigh Treiber | The Houstonian

REMEMBERANCE. (Above) Members of the Huntsville community gather to celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day at the MLK Jr. Recreation Center. The event was put on by the City of Huntsville. (Right) Bethlehem United Methodist Church pastor Rev. David Briggs delivers a speech in honor of the civil rights leader. (Left) American flags line Sam Houston Avenue. The flags are a part of a project by the Huntsville Lions Club.

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both pedestrians and bikers. Phase two is set to fan out over the next seven years and phase three is planned to begin in 2021 and continue onward. Doug Greening was unable to be reached by press time

Five finalists for the head football coaching position were announced Sunday by Sam Houston State University’s director of athletics, Bobby Williams. The list includes K. C. Keeler, Mel Tjeersdma, Scott Wachenheim, and Darrell Wyatt with Mike Canales joining the list late Sunday. “Each of these coaches meet the criteria we set out when we started our search,” Williams said. The finalists began interviewing in Huntsville with Williams Monday, and the interviews will wrap up Tuesday. Keeler served as head coach for the University of Delaware for 11 seasons between 2002 and 2012, racking up an 86-52 record, including national championship appearances in 2003, 2007 and 2010. Williams said his search for a new coach involves experience coaching in a national championship, yet he didn’t specify the level of competition he was looking for. Although Keeler has one Division I championship during his 11-year tenure at Delaware, Tjeersdma has three as head coach of Northwest Missouri State, but in Division II. Between 1994 and 2010, 67-year-old Tjeersdma turned around a winless football program to a dominant threat with six

total national championship experiences, 10 solo conference championships and two shared titles as head coach for the Bearcats adding up to a 183-43 record. He then retired from coaching and took on administrative duties as athletic director. Wachenheim is the current offensive line coach at the University of Virginia. Although he doesn’t have any head coaching experience, Wachenheim has dipped his hand into various Football Bowl Subdivision programs including Rice University, the Air Force Academy, Colorado University, Utah State and Liberty University. Wachenheim spent time in the NFL as the Washington Redskin’s tight ends coach in 2009 under head coach Jim Zorn. Wyatt could be making his return to SHSU after serving as wide receivers coach for the Bearkats between 1992 and 1994. This past season he coached under former University of Texas head coach Mac Brown as co-offensive coordinator and wide receivers coach. University of North Texas could be losing its current offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach if Canales is hired. This past season Canales led UNT’s offense to its first bowl appearance since 2005. “We look to complete this process so our new head coach can hit the ground running,” Williams said.

Be sure to check out the Houstonian Orientation Guide located around campus and the City of Huntsville! Can’t find one? Let us know and we’ll get you a copy.


Page 2

News

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 houstonianonline.com/news

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SHSU students limited in health coverage JAY R. JORDAN Associate Editor

Regulations of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have yet to change the face of health insurance offered at Sam Houston State University. SHSU’s student healthinsurance policy still has an annual dollar limit because the plan was grandfathered into exemption. However, annual dollar limits, which limit the amount of medical expenses insurers are responsible for paying each year, were

eliminated by ACA after Jan. 1. “We are fully compliant with ACA,” Academic Health Plans customer care center manager Jennifer Simpson said. “The school product is written on an academic school year. Schools generally start in August and go through the end of July. The academic policy year goes from August to August, not January to January.” Simpson said since the plan runs on an academic school year, the company has yet to see the effects of ACA. “Every university’s different,” Simpson said. The schools are the policy holders. They are the ones that drive what they want as for

which benefits to include, other than obviously the mandated benefits.” Annual plans that began before Jan. 1 are able to have limits until the plans expire, which is the case for SHSU’s student insurance plans. This means that regardless of when students pay or sign-up, they are covered only for the first $500,000 of medical expenses through Aug. 14, 2014, according to a joint publication by SHSU and BlueCross BlueShield of Texas. Health coverage for SHSU students is provided by BlueCross BlueShield of Texas and is administered by Academic Health Plans.

Students who are enrolled for at least six or more credit hours can sign up for university’s healthcare plan. One ACA-mandated benefit that is covered by the SHSU plan is free contraceptives. The cost for SHSU student health insurance is dynamic and depends on marital status and the length of plans. Currently, for an annual plan for just a student, the price is $993. An additional spouse will cost an extra $2,270 per year and each child will add another $1,131. Students may also purchase the plans in the summer or elect to pay for the plan for spring and

summer combined. A plan for spring and summer will run at $707 for students, an additional $1,639 for spouses and $823 for any children. Coverage for only the summer will cost $270, with $629 being tacked on for a spouse and $316 for each child. As mandated by ACA, every American must have health coverage starting Jan. 1. For more information, visit academichealthplans.com/shsu.

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STATE

Davis, Abbott strike big donation money BRYNN CASTRO Contributing Reporter

The money is already flowing in Texas’s 2014 gubernatorial campaigns. Frontrunners Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, and Republican Attorney General Greg Abbott have collectively raised more than $20 million from contributors around the country since each announced their candidacy. Abbott has raised more than $7,000 from donations in Huntsville while Wendy David has only raised $500, according to campaign filings. Davis raised a total of $12.2 million as of Dec. 31, while Abbott raised $11.5 million. Davis came into the national spotlight in June 2013 when she filibustered a bill that eventually closed several abortion clinics across Texas through new regulations. Three months later, in October, Davis announced she would be running for the Texas governor seat. After 13 years in office, incumbent Rick Perry announced he will not seek re-election after being the longest person in Texas history to hold the governor position. Republican favorite Greg Abbott hopes to keep the governorship red by winning votes in the upcoming election. Both candidates agree that education is their top priority.

Abbott said he will improve Texas education by fighting against federal curriculum known as CSCOPE/Common Core. In an interview with Bob Price of Texas GOP Vote, Abbott said he doesn’t think Texas needs to look far from home when educating our children. “I know that principals, teachers, parents here in the state of Texas know far more how to educate our students than do these bureaucrats in Washington, D.C.,” Abbott said. Davis recently unveiled a plan for Texas education by helping school districts create programs that encourage students to go into a teaching profession and said she’s the person to do it. In an education roundtable at University of Texas in Arlington, Davis said she has her own plans for education by putting more teachers in classrooms across Texas. “Texas leadership hasn’t really provided the focus and the priority on education that it demands and that it deserves,” Davis said. Another hot topic between the two candidates is the voter I.D. law that passed in 2013. Now, voters are required to present matching state issued photo IDs and their voter registration card. Before the law was passed, Texas voters only needed to present their registration card. According to Abbott’s website, he believes because of voter fraud throughout Texas and the country that voter restrictions should be

AP Photo/LM Otero

PRIORITY. Texas Sen. Wendy Davis reads her education proposals to reporters after a meeting in Arlington, Texas, Jan. 9. Davis, the presumptive Democratic nominee for Texas governor, unveiled education proposals at the North Texas roundtable meeting.

stricter. Davis said the voter I.D. law will shy constituents away from voting. Davis gained first-hand experience of the new voter I.D. law after she was asked to sign an affidavit because the name on her registration card didn’t match the name on her I.D. In an interview with KERA News, Davis said she was concerned for woman who changed their name due to marriage or divorce and would be turned away at the polls because not all of their documentation was consistent. “Women will show up to vote and they’ll be turned away because they don’t have that documentation,” Davis said. “Women will be disenfranchised

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as a consequence of the interpretation of the voter I.D. law as it’s been applied.” This isn’t the first voting battle in which Davis entangled herself. In 2011, Davis and the League of United Latin American Citizens sued Texas Republicans for attempting to pass a redistricting plan would reduce the numbers of minorities in areas of North Texas. Davis won the case and the defendants were ordered to pay her back for the almost $600,000 that she spent on legal fees. The Texas Attorney General, who is coincidentally her opponent Abbott, is responsible for the reimbursement. State elections are Nov. 4.

DAVIS CORRECTED KASSIDY TURNPAUGH Assistant News Editor Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis has admitted to bending the truth about her life and history, according to the Dallas Morning News. Davis is noted in her biography as a divorced teen mother. Her story become blurred when it comes to her time living in a Fort Worth trailer park and earning her way to Harvard University. She neglected to clarify that her first divorce did not take place until she was 21, debunking her identity as a single teen mom, according to the interview. After moving out of the trailer park, Davis married Jeff Davis and finished her attendance to Texas Christian University and went to attend Harvard Law School. It was during this time, Davis’s website claimed, scholarships and loans were the leading financial support for the candidate’s time at Harvard University. “With the help of academic scholarships and student loans, Wendy not only became the first person in her family to earn a bachelor’s degree but graduated first in her class and was accepted to Harvard Law School.” The reality, according to USA Today, is that “Jeff Davis helped pay for her last two years at Texas Christian University and her law school tuition at Harvard.” Wendy has gone on to defend her biography and in an interview with the Dallas Morning News, claimed her biggest fault was a need for tighter phrasing.

CAMPUS

Adobe Cloud could save students money Key piece of equipment to expand molecular research ASHLEE SYMANK Contributing Reporter

Adobe Creative Cloud could change the way Sam Houston State University students use the company’s popular software products such as Photoshop. Students will be able to use any of Adobe’s programs they need without having to pay the full price for each individual application via a “highly discounted” service for students, according to the company. The company now offers the option of paying a month-bymonth usage fee as well as yearly subscriptions. Students who only need a program for a semester or two may find monthly payments worth their money, while some students needing the programs for longer terms have found it to be equally beneficial. “It was worth paying the monthly fee,” SHSU computer animation major David Grant said. “We used a lot of Photoshop and Flash, but it was cheaper [than

buying the software] and you also got to use the other programs.” The Creative Cloud can be purchased for individual, university or corporate use, and each membership has different payment options for different membership lengths. There are options for student discounts, but Adobe requires cooperation with the institution, which has yet to happen at SHSU. “It is something we are investigating for use at Sam Houston,” said Mateo Zuniga, asset management coordinator for IT@Sam. “The way we would license it is a little different than say, by a professor or student for personal use. [Students] would have access to it without the monthly fee.” For a short time frame, such as a semester, it is more cost effective for students to pay the discounted $29.99 per month ($49.99 per month without student discount) versus paying close to $600 for a single program or $2,600 for Adobe’s Creative Suite 6.

For long-term use, such as several semesters or for a career after college, it is cheaper to purchase a regular version of whichever software you need. However, Adobe doesn’t plan on releasing future versions of its software application without a subscription. According to the technology magazine Wired, many customers have complained that they will no longer be able to have their own current version of the software and that the subscription model benefits Adobe more than its customers. SHSU offers no student discount for Adobe products, although the entire Adobe Suite CS6 is available to students on on-campus computers. According to the SHSU website, students, faculty and staff may take copies of the software home via the Adobe Home Use Program. Available for distribution are Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver and more.

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STACY HOOD Contributing Reporter Sam Houston State University’s chemistry department is taking a step to enrich research at the university by purchasing a muchneeded piece of equipment. In an effort to enhance the knowledge of molecular structures of complex ionic substances, Richard Norman, Ph.D., of the department of chemistry has been approved to purchase a singlecrystal X-ray diffractometer. Since coming on as faculty at SHSU, Norman said he has continuously requested the diffractometer for the past nine years. “It is a fundamental, necessary technique that we have not had the equipment available to us here,” Norman said. The diffractometer is used to determine the atomic or molecular structure of a crystal, Norman said. This method was fundamental in the determination of the structure of DNA. While the diffractometer is

not new technology, it has been vital to the advancement of medicine and DNA research. The technology was crucial in solving the structure of penicillin, vitamin B12, and insulin, all of which have helped advance modern medicine, according to Nobelprize.org. According to Norman, whose dissertation work involved X-ray crystallography, it is important to understand how atoms are connected to understand the structure and identity of materials being researched. Bids to sell the equipment to SHSU are set to end Wednesday. According to Norman, the department is hoping to receive the diffractometer before the end of the semester. According to the bid invitation document, bids of more than $100,000 are expected. The equipment will be used to further structure determination with graduate and undergraduate research at the university. Eventually, it could be used in the advanced integrated laboratory.


Page 3

Viewpoints

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 houstonianonline.com/viewpoints

CAMPUS

University’s blunders unacceptable COLIN HARRIS Viewpoints Editor Dead Man’s Curve, it’s no place to play. Dead Man’s Curve, you best keep away. Jan and Dean released the tragic surf ballad “Dead Man’s Curve” fifty years ago describing a fatal street-racing crash on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles. Though the events of the song were fictional, the stretch of road was all too real, and it took a series of automobile accidents to spur the City of Los Angeles to restructure the road and remedy

the deathtrap. The intersection of Avenue I and Bowers Boulevard may not have the traffic or fame of the Angelino bend, but the precarious crossing claimed the lives of three students a month ago. College shouldn’t be a place where students come to die. Unfortunately on Dec. 14, this wasn’t the case for Blanca Espinal, Eric Torres and Alfanso Mata, as the trio were killed in an oncampus car crash the morning of graduation. In the wake of any preventable tragedy, finger pointing abounds, and much of the blame casting is centered on the university’s botched response in the aftermath. A tersely morbid Facebook post included the words “graduation ceremonies and ACT Testing will take place as scheduled,” signaling business as usual in the perfectly tone-deaf manner apropos of

bureaucratic entities. Of course the most obvious flub was using shoddy police work to ID the victims. One of the cardinal rules of crisis management is to not misidentify the bereaved. Unfortunately for the parents of Roberto Rodriguez Guerra, the university failed to pass this breathtakingly low benchmark by earnestly and publicly stating that Guerra was among the victims, when he was actually alive. That sort of mistake leaves an institution open to lawsuits. According to a report in The Houstonian, the police misidentified Guerra, because an iPod of his was found at the scene. Leaving aside the privacy implications of an officer thumbing through the treasure trove of data contained within an iPod without a warrant, using that data as the exclusive basis

for identifying a victim doesn’t scream Hercule Poirot or even Scooby-Doo. Policy changes to curtail these errors would certainly be a step in the right direction, but getting the names of the deceased right won’t bring anyone back from the grave. Admittedly, fixing an intersection comprised of two 90 degree turns in quick succession isn’t going to bring anyone back either, but altering the clusterfark at Avenue I and Bowers Boulevard could very well prevent another tragedy. According to the SHSU Master Plan, the university will eventually limit the intersection to pedestrian traffic, but why wait? Spend a couple of weeks letting the public know that vehicles will be prohibited and close it by the end of January. The university has no need for any more students who don’t come back from Dead Man’s Curve.

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Cyclist awareness critical for their safety

MONTY SLOAN Columnist As a competitive cyclist, I spend my weekends racing bicycles on a track with up to nine other riders, traveling 30 to 40 miles an hour, without brakes. Bicycle crashes are an inescapable part of my reality. My campus commute however, shouldn’t be the most dangerous cycling tour I complete. In December, I had my first, but probably not my last, accident on the streets surrounding our campus. Leaving the College of

Humanities and Social Sciences Building and crossing through Bowers Blvd. on Ave J, I proceeded through the intersection during a green light. A car traveling the other way on Ave J took a left turn without yielding to oncoming traffic - me. Before I knew it, I was sidelined on the pavement with my bike two feet to my left. Fortunately I only suffered scrapes and bruises, but the fact that I could be struck so directly at an intersection in the middle of campus left me shaken. Written in 1968, international law (1) mandates that cyclists are vehicles like their motorized cousins and are not only allowed on the road, but are required to use motorways and not sidewalks. They are also subject to all rules of the road that cars must follow. That day, I followed the rule of law. The driver who hit me did

not. Unfortunately due to our choice of vehicles, I still lost the fight. Bicycles are an economic, healthy and environmentally responsible choice of transportation for college students in a small town like Huntsville. Whether you choose to take advantage of bicycle transportation or not, it’s important to be aware and alert of their presence. The Texas Department of Transportation’s Share the Road campaign (2) aims to inform drivers and cyclists of their individual duties to safety when navigating the roads of Texas. The campaign’s website notes that between 2007 and 2012 accidents between cars and bicycles resulted in 297 deaths in the state. Unfortunately SHSU hasn’t done its cyclists, pedestrians or

motorists the due diligence of bringing education and safety to the forefront of discussion about safety. The school’s Master Plan notes that biking should be encouraged on campus, and plans for the addition of bike lanes, but doesn’t mention any educational campaigns to inform students and faculty of their rights and responsibilities. The Master Plan also won’t be fully implemented until 2020. Safety on campus is an issue today, not something to be looked into down the line. Even if the Master Plan is followed to the letter and bike lanes are added around campus, the school will need a plan to inform people on the rules that govern the new paths. As a community we need to be better informed and more alert so that we can all share the roads of Huntsville and feel safe.

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Two years later, SHSU on right track with dean searches

Stephen Green Web Editor Sam Houston State University rebounded well two years after botching a dean search in 2011. They have hired or are in the process of hiring search firms for both the College of Humanities and Social Science and College of Education dean searches, which haven’t yet announced finalists. Roberta Sloan, dean of the

newly-created College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication, stepped down Feb. 16, 2012, after serving only seven months supposedly due to health concerns. But, sources deep within SHSU administration told The Houstonian that Sloan was given an ultimatum after basically continually making bad decisions within the college – especially with regard to curriculum. An anonymous source at The University of Central Florida, Sloan’s previous institution, pointed me in the direction of several lawsuits and her employment history that should’ve thrown up red flags, at minimum, for the search committee at SHSU that was headed by College of Business Administration Dean

Mitchell Muesham. This included faculty grievances, police reports, and two anti-Sloan Facebook pages – one of which is no longer active. At the time, SHSU performed dean searches by accepting applications and letting a group of SHSU faculty comb through the application materials. Unfortunately there was no attempt on their part to analyze her past or even ask around of her reputation, which to be fair was mixed of good and bad reviews. I was told by members of the committee that they took everything given to them – including for other candidates – before letting them tour the campus. In performing the interviews for the original stories, I don’t

necessarily blame the individual search committee members, including Muesham, for plucking a bad apple. The university administration should have had more rigorous and thorough searching process. The university has made a policy change that insofar appears to be fruitful. They now hire outside search firms to seek candidates that fit the needs of SHSU before shipping over the candidates to the local committee. From there the finalists are selected and brought to campus. The university chose Ron Shields to permanently replace Sloan. If he is the type of candidate the university would’ve gotten in the first place, the more than $77,000 we paid the search firm was well worth it.

PAWS UP

PAWS UP to RICHARD SHERMAN: YOU GAVE THE SINGLE GREATEST POSTGAME INTERVIEW IN THE HISTORY OF SPORTS, BRO! BART SCOTT’S “CAN’T WAIT” IS A SORRY SOUNDBITE!

PAWS UP to five finalists for the head football coaching job. All are eminently qualified. In Bobby Williams, we trust.

PAWS UP to three-day weeks followed by four-day weeks. Has school even started yet?

PAWS DOWN

PAWS DOWN to Bieber: Don’t care if you blow down or get sloppy on lean, but you should stop egging people’s houses. You’re a millionaire, man, stick to pissing in mop buckets.

PAWS DOWN to Burger King not being open in the LSC. Everybody is sick of chicken sandwiches already and school started less than a week ago.

PAWS DOWN to almost all of campus closed on MLK day. Some of us had a newspaper to put together; it would have been nice to get food somewhere besides Old Main.

The Houstonian Editorial

The Houstonian was named in the top 100 college newspapers for journalism students by JournalismDegree.org. Members of Associated Collegiate Press and Texas Intercolligiate Press Association.

EDITOR’S NOTE Articles, letters and cartoons by Houstonian staff members or others in this paper are their own and not the opinion of the Houstonian, unless it is noted as such. Submissions and letters to the editor are welcome. Please send submissions to viewpoints@houstonianonline.com. Articles may be edited for grammar and spelling at discretion of editor. Unsolicited oppinions should be 150 words or under. Please contact us if you wish to submit anything longer. Deadline for submission is by 5 p.m. on Mondays or Wednesdays.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Connor Hyde ........................................................................................................................................936-294-1505 FACULTY ADVISER Robin Johnson..................................................................................................................................936-294-1499 STAFF Jay R. Jordan .................................................................................................................................Associate Editor Colin Harris...................................................................................................................................Viewpoints Editor Jeremy Villanueva..................................................................................................................................Sports Editor Kizzie Frank.............................................................................................................................Entertainment Editor Stephen Green...........................................................................................................................................Web Editor Kassidy Turnpaugh.............................................................................................................. Assistant News Editor Dharmesh Patel.........................................................................................................Assistant Entertainment Editor Marissa Hill........................................................................................................................................Sports Reporter Hannah Zedeker.................................................................................................................................Senior Reporter Steven Snook.............................................................................................................................Multimedia Reporter Samantha Zambrano.............................................................................................................................Layout Editor Lillie Muyskens..............................................................................................................................Graphic Designer Staff Reporter(s)..................................................................................................... Kaleigh Treiber, Alex Broussard

Advertising

BUSINESS MANAGER Paty Mason......................................................................................................................................936-294-1500 ADVERTISING MANAGER Stacy Hood.........................................................................................................................................936-294-1495 STAFF Cristina Tazado.............................................................................................................................Delivery Manager

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Tuesday’s Issue............... Friday at 2:00 p.m. Thursday’s Issue........... Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. Call for pricing.


Page 4

Arts&Entertainment

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 houstonianonline.com/a-e

FASHION

Latest fashion trends rekindle grunge look DHARMESH PATEL Assistant A&E Editor

Kizzie Frank | The Houstonian

STRIKING A POSE. Senior Sam Houston State University student Corey Chenier combines his button-up and blue jeans with a plaid flannel. He tops it off with a neutral colored Polo Ralph Lauren hat and Tommy Hilfiger boots to contrast with his flannel.

The early 90s were a time of rebellious rock music and ripped jeans and no ensemble would be complete without a wrinkled plaid button-up tied around the waist in homage to Kurt Cobain and the grunge music scene. The male and female youth of the 90s embraced “anti-fashion movement” where structured shoulder pads and bold colors from the 80s faded into baggy blacks and grays. The first appearance of 90s grunge appeared at New York fashion week where top designers including DKNY, Rodarte and Alexander Wang all showed designs draped in plaids from skirts to dresses and even buttonups. Whether most are on a tight budget or are having trouble getting two nickels to rub together, plaid can be found anywhere and is a staple must have item for 2014 and can be easily obtained in every day shopping. From the less practical $275 plaid button down at Nordstrom to the gently used racks at the local Goodwill, plaid can be obtained on any budget. Plaid can be worn with a feminine or masculine twist. Different textures and prints give every day people the chance to spice things up. In Paris fashion week for men, plaids, prints and “untraditional” were a focal point for designer Thom Browne. Extravagancy in accessories have also been paired with bright colors. A prime example: men’s designer Walter Van Beirendonck. “I love plaid. You can pile plaid on plaid, plaid on floral; it’s eccentric,” said SHSU graduating senior and public relations major Corey Chenier. “Plaid is the epitome of masculinity, but I do like to see women wear it as well.” According to Vibe Magazine, the late Aaliyah’s now infamous

Tommy Hilfiger ensemble complete with logos emblazoned on her jacket, shirt and even boxers peeking through her baggy jeans is now widely recognized as a style moment of the 90s. The sporty logos have once again arrived and have been plastered over everything. According to Harper’s Bazaar, the sporty look was seen on runways ranging from Prada to Gucci. Designers stitched, embroidered, screened and tagged their designs in every which way. It was not the most preferred portion of 90s fashion. Some feel that overly including logos are a bit unnecessary. “Logos being all over clothing just seems a bit tacky to me,” said SHSU junior interior design major, Samantha Smith. Another popular look making a comeback is the crop top. Stars in the 90s from Gwen Stefani to Destiny’s Child all sported this midriff-baring trend, and it has already been seen on Hollywood’s most familiar stars in 2014. Even Christian Dior showcased glittered, tight-fitting crop tops this year. “I really like the crop top trend. It can be worn tastefully without seeming like you’re showing too much. It all depends on what you pair it with,” Smith said. Miley Cyrus attended the premiere of Britney Spears’ Las Vegas show debut in a vintage Calvin Klein crop top and a pregnant Kerry Washington walked the red carpet at the 2014 SAG Awards in a custom pink Prada midriff baring one. Crop tops are already available at fast trend shops including Forever 21 and H&M. This timeless trend, like many others, may repeat itself again. Even though it may seem like it, emulating the style is accessible to the masses, including students of SHSU. Style em’ up Kats!

STATE

Houston Rodeo releases 2014 performance lineup KATE SAUTER Contributing Reporter The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo will kick off in March with a lineup of artists that are making their first appearance in concert for the annual event. The lineup of the 2014 performing artists was released Jan. 13, highlighting a variety of talented bands and performers including Usher, Selena Gomez, REO Speedway, Maroon 5 and Robin Thicke. A lineup traditionally stocked with country artists, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo President Joel Cowley said this year’s schedule will highlight a more diverse group of performers. “The range of talented artists illustrates the show’s diversity,”

Cowley said. “We are welcoming new, upcoming artists as well as celebrating timeless legends.” For artists Eastin Corbin and Usher, this will be their first Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo performance. “[Leroy] Shafer is particularly excited for first-timer Usher, who he says Rodeo Houston has been trying to secure for ‘the last four years,’” chron.com blogger Joey Guerra said. “The Voice” judge Usher will headline Black Heritage Day on March 7. Recent chart topper, Robin Thicke will perform his controversial song “Blurred Lines” among others. The country artists chosen all have prominence in the music industry and are at prominent point of their careers. Returning

Lillie Muyskens | The Houstonian

artist, Brad Paisley will be the first to perform followed by the Eli Young Band. Reba McEntire, returning artist of more than 20 years, will make an appearance on the third day of performances. American Idol judge and longtime country singer Keith Urban will grace the stage on the March 14. Luke Bryan will be on stage for St. Patrick’s Day. Blake Shelton and country groups The Band Perry and Zac Brown band will be the last few to perform. Originating more than 80 years ago, the rodeo has become a celebrated Houston tradition. Before the concert, rides including La Grande Wheel (the western hemisphere’s largest portable ferris wheel), the Sky Ride across Reliant Park continue to attract return and first-time visitors.

Associated Press

BIG STARS IN SPACE CITY. Robin Thicke is among the big-name artists coming to Houston for the Livestock and Rodeo in March.

Tickets to the Livestock Show and Rodeo range from $18 to $86 plus handling charges.

Performances will begin March 4 and end on the 23rd at Reliant Stadium.


Page 5

Sports

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 houstonianonline.com/sports

BASKETBALL

Bearkats win three straight in SLC play MARISSA HILL Sports Reporter The midnight oil was burning again as Sam Houston State’s women’s basketball team stole an overtime thriller Thursday in Hammond, La. The Bearkats were trailing the Southeastern Louisiana Lions 7572 with 26 seconds remaining in regulation – similar to their tight tangle with Nicholls State the Saturday before. After the clock whittled down to four seconds, senior guard Jasmine Johnson sank the gamesaving three, sending the contest into overtime. “That’s what seniors are supposed to do,” head coach Brenda Nichols said. “We definitely got the ball into the right hands.” Johnson went 9-of-20 from the field, shooting 3-of-9 behind the 3-point line. Along with Johnson’s 26-point showcase, junior post Angela Beadle knocked down 34 points for the night, just four points shy of tying a school record set in 1990. Beadle’s impressive night led her to being named Southland Conference Player of the Week.

Despite a 60-point tandem between Johnson and Beadle, SHSU had a slow start defensively. The Bearkats trailed by 11 points midway through the first half. The Bearkats steadily chipped away at the Lions’ lead, finally cutting it down to four points, 3430, at intermission. SHSU’s resolve continued into the second half as they had an answer for each of SELA’s scores, including an early three-point dagger from sophomore guard Amanda Barnes. However, with just under eight minutes remaining in the second half, the Lions’ offense took control of the game. With 7:01 on the clock, SHSU found itself in a 17-point deficit, but the offense started churning off of a Beadle lay-up. The Bearkats ran with the spark, going on a 2912 scoring spree to even the match at 75-75 at the end of regulation. SHSU clung to a little life in the overtime period as they never held more than a three-point lead over SELA. With the contest tied at 85-85, a late foul from SELA put Johnson on the charity stripe with 0.6 seconds remaining. She drained the first one, giving the Bearkats another thrilling, lategame victory.

However, it was a completely different type of game when SHSU faced the University of New Orleans Saturday. The Bearkats routed the Privateers 78-47 with Beadle posting 15 points and eight rebounds to lead the way. SHSU controlled the floor early in the first half, taking a 20-8 advantage with 8:24 on the clock. New Orleans struggled to get any offense rolling as they only managed to score six additional points by the end of the first half, leaving the score at 32-14. The Bearkats didn’t ease off of the gas pedal in the second half. They rendered New Orleans scoreless for 18 minutes. The Privateers didn’t hit a shot until four minutes into the second half. SHSU capitalized on their scoring momentum, extending their 18-point advantage to 31 points by the close of the game. “Our girls played well today,” Nichols said. “We played more man defense today and the girls really believed in it.” The Bearkats will continue their road tour as they visit San Antonio to matchup with the University of the Incarnate Word on Thursday evening.

Courtesy GoBearkats

GETTING ON TRACK. Freshman guard Kristina Smith posts up for a shot during a game against McNeese State Jan. 9. Since falling 55-59 against the Cowgirls, the Bearkats have ignited by going on a three-game conference winning streak.

TRACK

Men and women track and field finish second overall ROBERT SANDOVAL Contributing Reporter Sam Houston State University’s track and field team finished second overall in both the men and women’s division Friday at the

Texas A&M 12-team Invitational in College Station. The men tallied 103 points, two-points shy of winner Stephen F. Austin State, while the women scored 108 points. The SHSU women had a strong outing with two top-three finishers in the field

Courtesy GoBearkats

FRONT RUNNER. Junior Lygia Foreman outruns atheletes from Oral Roberts and Stephen F. Austin in the 400-meter dash. Foreman finished the race in first with a time of 56.38, just 1.65 seconds shy of her personal and school record of 54.73.

events and on the track. Lauren Nwegbo took home the gold in the triple jump and Katelyn Wynn finished second in pole vault. Nwegbo also gave SHSU points by taking second in the 100-meter. Elizabeth Ene came in third in the 200-meter while Lygia Foreman finished first in the 400-meter. Briana McCall added in a second place effort in the 800-meter. Sabrina Starr and Danielle Demas came in first and second in the 60-meter hurdles, respectively. The women’s 4x400 team finished second. SHSU’s men’s team tacked on a strong performance with three athletes claiming third place or better in the field. The men’s track runners finished shy of first place overall. Brek Christensen and Trevor Sealy placed second and third in the men’s weight throw and Garrett Larson vaulted his way into third in the men’s pole vault. Christenson’s second place finish felt like first because he set a new personal record, he said. “It feels good to [set a personal record] this early in the year, and it gives me and the team momentum moving forward into the season,” he said. Kristen Mitchell finished second in the

60-meter and took third in the 200-meter. Matthew Viverette finished second in the 60-meter hurdles while De’quad Binder finished second in the 800-meter. Jarrick Wright finished right behind Kristen Mitchell in the 60-meter and Southland Conference Track and Field Athlete of the Week Rodney Jones had a photo finish in the 400 meter final but came across the finishing line in second. “The team is progressing well and [we are] going to learn from the positive and negatives of today,” distance runner Patrick Pitts said. “We are going to hit [our] stride at the right time when it is time to.” Although SHSU finished in second, the Bearkats had a chance to scope out the SLC competition that they will face later down the road. The invitational was also a good meet to get ready for the SLC championship which is ran on a similar course, assistant coach Jesse Parker said. “The familiarity is going to help us out,” Parker said. “[Also,] getting our freshmen and sophomores experience is going to do us a lot of good.” SHSU will be idle for this weekend before traveling to Houston Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 to compete at the Howie Ryan Invitational. Kyle Kelly contributed to this story.

Be sure to follow @HoustonianSport on Twitter for the latest updates on the search for Sam Houston State’s new head football coach.


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