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Runway Recap Natural Inspiration

artistic representations of nature and it’s beauty

SUSTAINABLY DRESSED the future of fashiuon

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OCTO 1 BER 2021


“This publication was created to be a voice for all - a link between the large and the small.” KACEY P EREZ , EDITOR IN CHEIF

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C ON T EN T S C O V E R LO O K : A N A S TA S I A’ S O W N C O L L E C T I O N J O F D E S I G N E R V I N TA G E I T E M S

October 2021

MON CHERI M M M I L A N O F E AT U R E S S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N S AT PA R I S FA S I O N W E E K

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Editor’s Letter

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Through the Lens A moment with Filbert Kung, Visual Director of The House of Perez

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Notes with Natalie Behind the scenes with The House of Perez Paris Fashion week

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Runway Recap Join our Fashion Director Connor Duszynski as we recap the SS21 runway

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Interior Perspective Choosing unique, hand made elements

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MM Milano Global Talents & Sustainable Fashion

Franky Dune Sourcing sustaibable materials for fashion designers

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A Vintage Feast Curating vintage homewares for sustainable decorating

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An Ode to Mother Earth Austrailian painter takes us through her magical momentos of the land

Sustainable Fashion Cover girl Anastasia Vakula talks sustainability in fashion

Cannelle et Vanille Aran Goyoaga launches new cookbook on gluten free baking

Georgina Preston The photographer shares collection of equestrian fashion images

Paris Florae Exhibition Artist creates colorful digital art for Van Cleef’s jewlery archives

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A New Beginning DURING THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, I spent a lot oftime observing and learning. I remember feeling completely uneasy, watching our country exchange feelings of hate. There was a period of time where I stopped watching the news altogether, as it contributed to the increase in my anxiety levels. After being sucked into many different rabbit holes, I couldn’t handle being so unproductive so I checked out. I did tune back in once voting began, and as the states turned to red or blue I decided to dig deeper. I opened each state on the web to find the obvious - rural areas were red, metropolitan areas were blue. Seeing that visually really resonated with me. There was a distinct divide between the two cultures, lifestyles and regions and it sparked a passion in me that I didn’t know existed. I’ve lived in many types of places throughout my childhood and into my adulthood, most of them being rural areas of the US and once in Canada

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in the far north in a small community. During those times, I had the pleasure of meeting some of the most motivated, creative people some of which rarely traveled outside of their hometowns. Naturally, when you’re from rural America you tend to travel to more populated area for vacation and work trips. There too I learned so much and have made lifelong creative peers. Remembering all of this and reflecting on some of the historical events that took place in 2020, I decided I wanted there to be a space where we could unify our differences and begin to understand each other better. Here is where I need to give special thanks to my dear friend and now Creative Director at Large for this magazine, Natalie Steger. We would have discussions about that crazy year and how we saw and felt the same things as a result of it. We also shared the same desire to shed some light on the topic with the goal to re-inspire us all to understand each other on a deeper level. Natalie, originally from the Washington, DC area, has lived in Wyoming near my home office for about ten years. I owe it to her for helping me decide to turn my small online presence through blogging into a larger publication to showcase the creative work coming out of every part of the US and now the world. This publication was created to be a voice for all - a link between the large and the small. Together, we connected with the rest of our tight-knit team between now and the beginning of 2021. I’ve had the pleasure of working with everyone on various creative projects we put together throughout the year, and I can’t wait to show you what’s in store as we close it out. I also have to take a moment to thank everyone for the amazing response to the first issue. I appreciate the excitement, and am humbled to know that even though I am tucked away in my little corner of the world that many of you are watching, interacting and looking forward to the future with us. Stay tuned for our November and December issues - both of which have an amazing cover story and inspiring feature stories. For now, I hope you enjoy thumbing through our first ever pages of The House of Perez.

C O V E R S TO R Y P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y T R I S TO N C O O P E R . R I G H T I M A G E B Y G E O R G I N A P R E S TO N . B OT TO M I M A G E B Y M M M I L A N O - PA R I S FA S H I O N W E E K .

Letter from the Editor


Editor in Chief KACEY PEREZ Creative Director at Large NATALIE STEGER Editor at Large AIDA M. TORO Executive Fashion Director CONNOR DUSZYNSKI Visual Director FILBERT KUNG Visual Editor JANA SCHUESSLER

YEARNING K AT I E D A N I E L S , O I L O N L I N E N , AU S T R A L I A N H A R D W O O D F R A M E 4 1 X 3 6 C M , S A I N T C LO C H E G A L L E R Y

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THE HOUSE OF PEREZ WEDDINGS

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COMING SOON The latest place for luxury wedding inspiration. Follow along for the latest trends in wedding fashion, design, beauty and tips and tricks from the best in the industry.

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Through the Lens

Introducing Filbert Kung, celebrity photographer and visual director at The House of Perez WRITT EN BY: AIDA M. TO RO PHOTO GRA PHY COURT ESY OF: FILBERT KUNG

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WE ARE PROUD OF OUR FIRST ISSUE, and also exceptionally excited about the team we have curated to bring this magazine to life. We are thrilled to introduce celebrity editorial photographer, Filbert Kung, as Visual Director of The House of Perez. Originally from the Philippines, Kung has been a photographer for 16 years and has resided in a variety of places in the states, such as New York and Los Angeles, which he currently lives in. “I grew up knowing all about cameras and photography as it lingered in my home, said Kung. “I learned and was inspired by watching my father take photos because he was a photographer as well.” Therefore, Kung was naturally drawn to the craft and learned to shoot the way his father did. His father was his inspiration throughout his early years, as he’s duplicated much of his style of shooting. For Kung, holding a camera in his hands felt natural, as if it was an extension of himself. He is self taught, which resulted in all things photography arriving organically to him. The pandemic, however, was a major challenge for Kung and his creativity. Not being able to connect with humanity or to feel, see, hear, smell nature through the salty ocean or the fresh pine scent of evergreens was a challenge, since these are key ingredients for his creativity. Throughout this pandemic, social distancing was enforced, which was a bonus for many who are more on the reserved side. As Kung considers himself an introvert, he still loves being around good people and even social settings, however, without having to be overly social as he just enjoys positive energy from anyone that surrounds him. Kung said, “Human connection and being in nature is important

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for creatives. As things opened up little by little, I was able to work again when and wherever we were allowed to do so with all the safety precautions in place...for that, I am grateful.” As many created the time to chat with friends via phone and forms of video call chatting such as FaceTime and Zoom, needless to say, Kung spent a lot of time on social media, which led him towards finding a glimmer of peace because he realized he was not alone in the early months of the pandemic. A little over a year into this pandemic, he decided to expand his horizons by traveling to Wyoming, which was truly fate. Kung needed space to feel free after the pandemic and to simply reopen that creative block. During his visit he connected with Kacey Perez, editor in chief, and Natalie Steger, creative director at large at The House of Perez, and from there they started conceptual-

izing the idea of a magazine. Aside from the nature, mountains, and cooler weather, the kindness of the people that reside in Wyoming sparked Kung’s interest, as they truly made him feel welcomed. For him, It was refreshing to meet people who just had a kind energy, especially because he came to Wyoming to reset, restore, and gain inspiration...and that is exactly what happened. Kung was able to create some of my best creative editorial work to date. As the world begins to open up, you can find Kung back traveling and doing what he does best creating art through the lens. Most recently, he did several editorial shoots in Paris and attended Fashion Week. His next ventures include Art Basel in Miami, Spain, Dubai and Saudi Arabia. These are just few places he will be going for future creative projects, and along the way he will continue to add more swoon-worthy visual stories for our readers at the House of Perez. To view Kung’s latest, follow him on Instagram: @filbert_kung. For booking, visit his website at https://www.filbertkung.com/contact.


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Notes from Natalie IMAGES A N D WRIT IN G BY: NATALIE STEGER

PARIS STOLE MY HEART. It isn’t sugarcoated that my team and I will be returning very soon. Throughout my time in Paris, it became crystal clear why people come to this beauty of a city, and that thought is: to be inspired. I was inspired and looking forward my return to Paris for both work and pleasure. Before I continue with my quick overview, allow me to state that I am filled with gratitude to both our Paris and stateside teams whom all truly worked tirelessly to meet our deadlines, last minute requests in order to bring the gold home this past Paris Fashion Week (PFW). Also, I am extremely humbled to have met each person I encountered

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and look forward to meeting with them again the future. Below, you’ll find a recap of my favorite moments, places we had the pleasure of creating in, areas offering the best of the best meals and stays, and so much more. MY FAVORITE MOMENTS: Picking up the beautiful Tyrone Susman for his shoot with darling Adam aka Prince Eric, who I can say smelled absolutely delicious. Followed up by low key trying on all the beautiful Rick Owen pieces where I experienced the cut and how each piece falls on the body is divine.


THE AREAS AND LOCATIONS WE HAD THE MOST FUN IN: Lunches that became dinners at Cafe Charlot with the most amazing minds and people. Best vibe and spot to mingle along with the occasional eye candy was Plaza Athenee followed by plenty of tequila and champagne. ASPIC - the most divine set course menu paired with wine by Chef Quentin Giroud. Watching our makeup artist Joel bump into Anna Wintour out at the Ritz where they both pardoned themselves for the collision was a moment to nearly die for. Seeing Jared Leto stroll past me and looking perfect on the streets of Marais while location scouting. All my middle school crush dreams came true at that moment because he is more stunning in person. THE PLACES WE HAD THE PLEASURE TO WORK AND CREATE IN: Ritz Paris, Shangri-La Paris, all over the streets of Paris from the streets of Monamarte to the vibranwalls of Marais District, Palace, Eiffel Tower and the Champs Elyssee.

MY FAVORITE PLACE TO PEOPLE WATCH: The Marais district. I will be likely staying in this area for my future visits. Thank you to the beautiful Nathalie Bernier for the recommendation. After four shoots, two full productions, one mini campaign along with a ton of BTS, here are my final takeaways: consist of being grateful for myself and my firm to be part of House of Perez Magazine and to be able to bring Paris to our readers and show that even mothers and just women in general can chase their dreams while being a present mother too. This trip taught me that I can slow down and enjoy the moment, but also embrace all the opportunities and conversations with old and new friends. With that, I offer you a quote, which in a nutshell defines our time for Paris Fashion Week. “I had forgotten how gently time passes in Paris. As lively as the city is, there’s a stillness to it, a peace that lures you in. In Paris, with a glass of wine in your hand, you can just be.” -Kristin Hannah, The Nightingale.

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Runway Recap OUR STYL E D IR E CTO R, CO NNO R D USZYNSK I, RE VI E WS

T HE RUN WAY SH OWS F RO M PARI S AND SH ARE S H I S TAKEAWAYS

I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F LO U I S V U I T TO N , S C H I A PA R A E L L I A N D G I V E N C H Y.

W R I T T E N BY: C O N N O R D U S Z Y N S K I

I M A G E C O U R T E S Y O F S C H I A PA R E L L I

IF THERE’S ONE THING WE LEARNED FROM PARIS SS22, it’s that fashion is increasingly subjective. I mean that in the best way possible. The recent collections from Paris prove that contemporary fashion is shifting away from the status quo, instead embracing sexuality, individuality, elements of entertainment and performance art, and Gen Z demands of self-expression and individuality. What did we see from Paris? We saw lightheartedness, non-traditional silhouettes, and an embracing of bright, bold colors, and much more androgynous fashion - a clear indication that the fashion landscape is changing. Both well-established and up-and-coming fashion houses shared this mission of providing critics and fashion fanatics alike with whimsical and elevated looks. There’s no doubt that fashion is shaped by the world around us. This season, the world demanded more free-spirited, welcoming, and open-minded representations of fashion, and that’s exactly what we got. I’m personally grateful to the houses who embraced this challenge, stepping outside the box in presentation, materials, and inspirations. With sustainable and socially-responsible fashions from Chloe to jaw-dropping

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looks from the likes of Saint Laurent, Rick Owens, and Schiaparelli to everything in-between, with SS22 collections from Chanel, Stella McCartney, Valentino, and Balenciaga blurring the line between formalwear and casualwear, the diversity in looks this season was undeniable. As we look forward to future collections, namely Haute Couture and Men’s Fashion Weeks in January/February 2022, it is my hope that these houses and others will continue to elevate and bring their fashions and presentation into the 21st century. With Balenciaga and Mugler’s presentations, which embraced performance art, storytelling, social media integration, and the power of celebrity, it is clear that major well-established brands are acknowledging the importance of investing in effective viral and social media integration, ensuring the success of their houses for the current and future generations of fashion-lovers. Please enjoy my takeaways from Paris SS22. I am honored to be your Style Director for this very first Issue of The House of Perez, and am thrilled to report on the latest fashions for many more issues to come.


Casual High-Fashion Louis Vuitton brings back maximalism by combining elements of casual wear with highfashion materials, silhouettes, and extravagant accessories.

I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F LO U I S V U I T TO N

IMAGES COUR TESY OF A Z FA C TO R Y

Modern Classics Chanel reimagined itself; utilizing its rich history and legacy in the fashion world, Chanel reinvents classic looks from the house while balancing modernized, elevated looks - few of which are a nod to Chanel’s classic looks and silhouettes. Chanel continued this balance and elevation in their swimwear, formalwear, and streetwear.

Individuality Sexuality, expression, individuality, graphic designs, exaggerated silhouettes. AZ Factory pretty much single-handedly embodied all that this season aimed to showcase! Obsessed!

IMAGES COUR TESY OF CHANEL

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Self Expression

Movement

For Comme de Garcons, Rei Kawakubo explored self-expression, drifting away from “traditional” take on fashion as a means to convey a cohesive, clear concept, but rather as a means to express her feelings, emotions, and as a vehicle to share progressive and personal experiences with her audience.

Margiela tells a story; there’s a sort of charm or innocence to the presentation of the collection, with the fishing rods, life rafts, paper hats, and child-like elements of the presentation. Even the oversized yellow rain boots play into this theme. The intentionally mismatched and disjointed looks further drive this storytelling element home. Margiela utilizes motion, movement, and emotion to showcase collection.

IMAGES COUR TESY OF COMME DE GARCONS

IMAGES COUR TESY OF MARGIELA

Exaggerated Silhouettes Schiaparelli is perhaps singlehandedly responisble to the exaggerated silhouettes we saw in Paris SS22. The house has been experiencing quite a boom in popularity over the past two years or so, becoming a staple of the red carpets, personal favorite of the world's biggest celebrities, and capitalizing on the shift towards more extravagant, unique, and more expressive fashion. Other fashion houses have been taking note, and we saw that in Paris SS22. Their show solidified Schiaparelli as today's "it brand," with its Salvador Dali-esque pieces and accessories which are aimed at adorning and celebrating the human form, shape, and body parts.

I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F S C H I A PA R E L L I

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Outside the Box In addition to Margiela, Balenciaga understands the importance of stepping outside the box, a piece of advice I would give to many other fashion houses and shows. Balenciaga presents their SS22 collection like a movie premiere, effectively playing on the hype of celebrities, their vast social media presence, and designer Demna Gvasalia's want to provide his viewers and critics with real entertainment.

Paris Fashion Week

IMAGES COUR TESY OF BALENCIAGA

Formal Street Givenchy, similarly to Chanel, combines elements of formalwear and streetwear in nearly all of their looks; from layered blazers and tops to layered skirts, pants, etc. tucked into thigh-high boots, Givenchy plays on mixing textures, color schemes, and themes. Givenchy is also a great example of one the houses, similarly to Stella McCartney and Chloe, which effectively utilized more organic cut-outs and silhouettes

IMAGES COUR TESY OF GIVENCHY

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SS22 Runway Recap Sustainably Luxe Chloe did not disappoint. While some might trade comfort and sustainability for luxe, interesting, and over-the-top pieces, Chloe does it all. Making a statement on sustainable and responsible fashion, Chloe's collection showcases high-fashion pieces with organic silhouettes, organic cutouts, and a free-spirited approach to fashion.

I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F C H LO E

Cut-Outs Stella McCartney earned the title, Queen of cut-outs, on this runway - further mixing of formalwear and streetwear (large blazers over croptops, bodysuits, athletic wear). Bold pops of color, small accessories, androgynous looks.

IMAGES COUR TESY OFSTELLA MCCAR TNEY

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For the Z Generation Young people want to feel sexy. Valentino is actively listening to Gen Z, taking note of more organic, looser-fitting silhouettes which have movement and make a statement. The materials are not restrictive. Organic cutouts, large overcoats/ blazers over short dresses, skirts, shorts. Lots of skin showing, androgynous looks, bright colors, more individuality in fashion.

I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F VA L E N T I N O

Equestrian Call-Out For a house so heavily-influenced by the equestrian world, it is no surprise that Hermes played-up their equestrian ties. After a boom in Western and equestrian couture and style, Hermes capitalized off recent trends while providing a sensible, comfortable, and practicle collection.

SS22 Takeaways

Big themes of Paris SS22: sexuality, individuality, orgininality, light, bright, bold. I was overall thoroughly impressed with the splash made by up-and-coming designers and fashion houses, as well as the reinvention of more well-established brands. IMAGES COUR TESY OF HERMES

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Mixing Global Talents & Sustainable Fashion MM Milano designer making a stance in the industry

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MM Milano is a Sustainable Brand from Milan, Italy, creating fashion that brings together beautiful dresses, music & film production, and global talents at unforgettable events around the world. A vital part of this is the Brand’s sustainable High-end Fashion designed by Founder and Chief Designer Chona Bacaoco. In her designs she combines traditional practices & natural organic materials from local handweaving Filipino communities,with individual modern designs and innovative & upcycled materials from Italy. Her work already was recognized several times on international stages as “Best International Designer”

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and “Designer of the Year”, and showcased on the world’s biggest runways, including the Eifel Tower in Paris, the fashion capitals Milan, New York, Dubai, London, and Bucharest. Under MM Milano’s own in-house Talent Agency & Consultancy, Chona and her team develop global talents in different fields like showcasing, singing, acting, designing and dancing. This is done by offering unique projects and opportunities, and introducing the talents to the world of sustainable fashion, diversity and social responsibility, e.g. by holding joint workshops. Several of MM Milano’s talents already appeared on big international stages, including the participation of MM Milano Talents |

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and Chona herself in a top Netflix movie with Adam Sandler and Jennifer Anniston, and the Disney Channel. Furthermore, MM Milano created a talent development program called “I AM” through which they support their Talents in their professional & personal development. One recent project is a collaboration between MM Milano’s Talent Agency and its Fashion Brand where Chief Designer Chona worked together with MM Talent Pluto Ernsberger to create the futuristic, genderless & sustainable PLUTO Line made from upcycled and innovative materials from Europe and the Philippines. It was an honor for the brand and its Talent, to present this line at Paris Fashion Week


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“I got to who I am today because of my mother, one of the oldest dressmakers in my home town, and my father, a conscious man advocating for sustainable living practices his entire life. I am using this inspiration in my everyday designs.” C H O N A B ACAO C O this month, side by side with Chona Bacaoco’s friend, the Celebrity-Designer Michael Cinco who already dressed stars like Lady Gaga, Jennifer Lopez, and Beyonce. A big achievement for MM Milano is the lately announced collaboration with Michael Cinco who created his first-ever Kids and Teens collection, presented by MM Milano Talents. Another great partner the brand is developing joint projects with is the incredible Tony-Award and Grammy winning producer Jhett Tolentino. 2021 & 2022 will be special years for the whole MM Milano community as their journey will be accompanied by a high professional production team turning MM Milano events in European fashion capitals, the Middle East, New York, Singapore, the Philippines and more, into an exciting documentary which will shed light on the inspiring story of Founder and Chief-Designer Chona Bacaoco, and her kind and conscious Talent Community. With its own Music & Film production, MM Milano is one of the first brands to produce and play its very own runway music, composed by music artist Andréas Volkmar, at its fashion events. To further ensure compliance with environmental, social and governance (ESG-) criteria, all related internal processes are constantly supervised by Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) Martin Volkmar.

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The Vintage Queen

A chat with Eleanor Brooks, master curator of vintage homewares WRITT EN BY: K ACEY PEREZ PHOTO G RA PHY COURT ESY OF: FEAST VINTAGE

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It’s one thing to experience an antique shop with treasures that were made for you, but Feast Vintage provides a next-level shopping experience in the world of vintage boutiques. Eleanor Brooks is a master curator, knows her shoppers like family and finds irresistable homewares - all available online in her Esty shop. Here, she walks us through her entrepreneurial journey and a peak inside her creative process. Let’s talk about how you got started- tell me about your career, your transitions, and what specifically led you to start Feast Vintage. Retail has been in my blood almost my whole life. When I was 15, my first job was at a clothing store. After high school, I began managing retail stores and was working as a district manager in women’s apparel retail in 2013 when I first got the idea to start selling vintage. I had been a die hard thrifter/lover of secondhand goods since I was a kid and would ride my bike to garage sales in our neighborhood on Saturday mornings. I would always find things while out thrifting that were amazing but didn’t fit into my home or my aesthetic. I knew deep down inside someone would love that item or I recognized the value in it and it killed me to leave those kind of finds behind. With my retail background,

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I thought why not try to sell these things online? So I launched an Etsy shop in July of 2013 called Ballyhoo & Bedbugs ( a nod to my favorite band Echo & The Bunnymen) and sold all sorts of housewares. About a year in, I found myself growing tired of having some shop merchandise clogging up space in my house and realized that the things I never grew tired of and even had a tough time parting with were the items that revolved around cooking, dining & entertaining. I began to hone down my inventory to only specialize in all things tabletop related. It was a solid business decision because I was buying what I truly loved ~ not things I thought other people would think were cool. By 2016 I was starting to think that a shop name that included “Bedbugs” was not ideal for gathering around the table. I wanted a name that evoked gatherings but also abundance and Feast came to mind almost instantly. There is something so special about sharing meals with people we love; and I wanted my shop to inspire people to want to do just that. Make memories around the table. Who were some of your “cheerleaders and mentors” that helped push you to begin the FV journey. My husband supported me from the beginning by encouraging me and helping me wherever he could. In fact, he packed and shipped every order for 6 months during our relocation from New Jersey to Tennessee. I took a job in Nashville in 2015 and was there for 6 months before my husband arrived in TN. The business would have


had to shut down during that time if he hadn’t taken over that critical piece for me. My girlfriend Sarah Winchester has been a huge support of my vintage business since day one. She is a professional interiors photographer in New England (with a keen eye and impeccable taste) so her support is not only hea warming but a confidence booster to. Another huge inspiration to me is Chuck Williams the founder of Williams Sonoma. Reading his biography The Merchant of Sonoma was life changing. He did not start that company until his late 30’s and that left such an impression on me. What is your approach to running your business and how did it come about? Much of the journey I have sorted out myself by always keeping a student mindset. There is always something to learn, a way to be better and more efficient. Successful retail is a constant evolution. My background in that field has taught me that it is ALL about the customer. I will always try to do the right thing for the customer because without them, I do not have a business. One important aspect of selling vintage is to be clear and concise communicating condition. We live in a time where new things are mass produced to look vintage but there is a big difference in actually buying something that is 100 years old or something that was made 6 months ago to look like it. It is important for any vintage seller in the online marketplace to ensure their customer knows exactly what they are buying. Tell me about the FV aesthetic. How did you go about developing this and what do you think it does for your brand? I find it hard to label the Feast Vintage aesthetic because it is truly just me. I sell things I fall in love with. My studio space and stockroom are here in my home and I decorated the studio just as I decorated the other rooms in this house. I love a gathered style ~ objects that are carefully curated and found over time always make the coziest spaces. I find that same principle works for the tabletop as well. What part of the FV story does your audience and customer fall in love with? Answering this question made me realize I don’t often share a lot of the personal side of Feast Vintage! I think people are drawn to the shop for many reasons beyond aesthetics. These items tell stories. Some of those stories may involve childhood memories and times with loved ones that

are no longer with us. Some people are replacing items that have been lost over time and they want that nostalgia back. There is nothing more heart warming than getting an email after someone receives their package sharing how that item brought them back to a place in time they will always cherish. It is a powerful thing and one I am honored to be a part of. Tell me about your process. Everything seems so carefully curated in your shop. How do you select each piece to add to your store? It is really all about the merchandise! When I see something I know within 5 seconds if I am taking it home with me. If I have to think about it, then I generally walk away. Of course, there are exceptions to that rule but I realized quite a few years ago that if I love it, someone else will too. The more inventory I kept in the shop, the more consistent my business was on a daily basis. Maintaining stock of replacement china and glassware has also been key to regular sales. I specifically list new items in color order to present aesthetically well. I am a visual merchant at heart so it is challenging to have your product only shown online in more of catalog format. I still dream of having a brick & mortar store someday to execute incredible visual merchandising. All of these seemingly small decisions added up and in 2018 enabled me to trade in my crazy corporate career and work for a small family owned business in town. This move has afforded me a whole new quality of life. What is your favorite part of running FV? The hunt for new merchandise is definitely the most thrilling part. Being the visual person that I am, I get an idea for how things will present in my head first, so I am inspired when I find a treasure. A simple plate can get my wheels turning and the next thing I know I have a whole table designed around that single item. Seeing those ideas come to fruition is so fulfilling. What has frustrated you most throughout the process of running your business? I am in a season where time constraints can be frustrating if I don’t keep control of my thoughts. Staying positive in seasons where we may not be able to execute all of our ideas and dreams is key to not being overrun by frustration. I see so much potential for Feast but it is all a matter of having more time to make that happen. Is it easy for you to build relationships with your customers as an owner of an online shop? What has been your favorite way to >

“A simple plate can get my wheels turning and the next thing I know I have a whole table designed around that single item. Seeing those ideas come to fuition is so fulfilling.”

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connect? Instagram has been an amazing vehicle for connecting with customers both existing and new. There is something special about finding kindred spirits on a social media platform because these connections are made over common interest, not circumstance. So many relationships in our real lives are developed because of circumstance and not sought out over commonality. There is a lot to that. Tell us your favorite moment during the ownership of FV. One of my favorite moments was when a very well known celebrity chef ordered something from the shop and had me ship it to his 3 Michelin Star restaurant in NYC. It was a pinch me moment for sure! How long has FV been open? How do you feel about your growth since then? What are your short and long-term goals from this point forward? This month was the 8th birthday of Feast Vintage. I started this business with the original thought that it would be part of my retirement plan; that I would do this to keep busy and bring in additional income. I am at a place where it could become my full time within the next year or two. This summer I hired my first employee. My daughter is now packing and shipping orders to free up my time to bring more of my ideas to fruition. We are also talking about converting our barn into a studio space equipped with a kitchen and stockroom. Everything Feast related would move there and that space would also give me the ability to do pop up shops, farm to table dinners etc. The possibilities are endless! Your Instagram feed and product listings are so well branded and really tell the FV story. Do any muses come to mind when it comes to your design process? I am constantly inspired by other creatives and brands that tell stories with compelling imagery and styling. When you keep the posture of a student, I think you are always keenly aware of what others are doing well and then translating what inspires you into your own aesthetic. Did your business model have to make any shifts during the COVID months? Last year was unprecedented in every way. Covid impacted the online community because everything was closed and people had no where to shop but online. I think people were searching for distractions. People wanted to be surrounded by pretty things to help them get through such a

trying time. While business was on fire, my sources of finding vintage were closed like everything else and that proposed a problem. Fortunately, I have some hoarding tendencies and had ample merchandise on hand to keep up with demand. How did you adapt to COVID as a business owner and as a person? What will you hold on to after going through those months? As a business owner, I wanted my customers to feel how appreciative I was of their business during such an unprecedented time. I include a hand written thank you note in every order and just acknowledging what we were all living through really struck a chord with most people. I received so much feedback about those little notes and how much they were appreciated. While we were all at home, we only had social media platforms as a source of connection with the outside world as a whole and it deepened connections on so many levels. It gave us a window into what others were going through and I know for me, it put a lot of things into perspective. It made me count my blessings in a new way. What was the most positive personal outcome for you as a result of COVID? Empathy and acknowledgment of what someone else is going through is so important to the human connection. The events of the past year and a half have permanently incorporated both into my life on a whole different level. Nothing is perfect but it is all about the lens through which we view our circumstances that dictate how we will handle them. Why vintage products? What fuels the passion behind sourcing the product and reselling it to customers? Vintage items possess something that is unparalleled by mass produced stuff. So many vintage pieces are relevant to and can seamlessly meld into a modern lifestyle. They can be reincarnated as heirlooms for your family. It constantly blows my mind to find a piece of china with a pattern that looks like it could have been made today. Is there a sustainability factor/mission as part of your business? The vintage business is ALL about sustainability. Giving new life to no longer wanted and loved things is sustainability at its finest. Our world has such a disposable mindset. >

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An Inside Perspective

Nadia Rossi talks handmade tile and bringing old world charm into modern spaces WRITT EN BY: NADIA ROSSI PHOTOGRA PHED BY: K AYLA FLETCHER

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I recently completed my modern country kitchen renovation with a touch of English style charm. I am completely over the moon with the results and obsessed with how it turned out. As anyone who has ever renovated an old house knows, you can look forward too many challenges. First, you will likely deal with structural changes if you reconfigure and open the space, then unforeseeable repairs, long backorder delays due to COVID and surprises I can’t tell you about or they wouldn’t be surprises. I want to take a moment to visit the backsplash selection process. I was on a mission to recreate a look from the past with an organic, earthy feel with lots of movement and texture to flow with the house. Selecting cabinetry finish and countertops was a breeze, but pulling the whole look together is truly an art. My biggest challenge was complementing the bold countertop, an earthy honed Italian Blue soapstone. I wanted the perfect “imperfect” tile. After many considerations, I decided to go with a handmade tile. The search for the right handmade tile and where to source it was completely worth the effort. After schlepping around and mocking up numerous tile samples on my

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way to finding the perfect imperfect tile, I had an oh-la-la! tile moment. The perfect imperfect handmade tile turned out to be something called Zellige (pronounced “zee-LEEJE”). Once I received the tile sample I immediately fell in love, but I could see that most installers would balk at working with this quirky tile. What is zellige? Zellige tiles hail from Morocco, a place steeped in old-world charm and renowned for its trade and craftsmanship. When most people think of Moroccan tile, they think busy and bold, in intricate shapes that fit together like puzzle pieces. These glazed terracotta tiles are not patterned in that sense. They offer subtle, sophisticated variations in colors that make them a wonderful choice for almost any style |

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home in this country. But that doesn’t mean you cannot create an intricate mosaic pattern by using colors, shapes and various laying techniques. These tiles are created by hand from unique, non-refined clays at a local factory in the Fez region. Their ancient glazing and firing process can cause some crazing, edge chipping, cracks and color variations. Far from being undesirable, these gave me the very imperfections I needed to create an old-world feel in my kitchen. Given all these variables, you really need an experienced tile installer, and one who has dealt with handmade materials. I was lucky to have found a local master craftsman. The installation was tedious because every tile was different. I selected a four-inch square size in natural white color and ordered 15 percent overage. With loads of shade variations, the standard white glaze can read whites, greys, warmer and cooler tones on the color spectrum. Since no two tiles are alike, I recommend mixing tiles from a few boxes to get a cohesive look. We stacked the tiles and mitered open-wall ends to create a nice edge for a border. Selecting the right grout is also key with this tile, as any colored grout can potentially cause discoloration of the tiles’ surface. We selected alabaster grout for a finished look. It blends well


with the tile and it helps to smooth excessive imperfections. We also sealed the tile behind the stove wall to protect it. My tile was sourced from Riad Tile, based in Texas. They offer an installation guideline with all the specifications and feature an extraordinary collection of authentic Zellige. Being an imported handcrafted artisan tile, they are a bit on the pricy side. I say these beauties are totally worth the splurge,

especially for backsplashes which typically require minimal square footage. The finished backsplash is lustrous with lots of movement and organic texture and a nice natural white color that marries well with the countertops.

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The Fashion Designer Behind Franky Dune Extends the Olive Branch For Other Designers

WRITTEN BY: AIDA M. TORO | PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF: FRANKY DUNE

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Fashion Designer Karen Yakymishen began her quest in the fashion industry in a small town in Canada at a low volume boutique obtaining quite a large amount of success. Needless to say, she grasped sewing skills at the age of eight due to her mother’s teaching, while she also took sewing classes in school and always felt an interest and understanding of pattern construction. When hired at the boutique, Yakymishen was originally hired to watch the front of the shop throughout the busy weekends, as the owner did almost everything in house. The owner prepped the fabric by pre-washing and drying it fully then laid out multiple layers of

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fabric on a massive wooden cutting table that her husband made for her, and cut out the pattern pieces with an intimidating industrial cutter before sending the cut pieces off to her sewers. “She had two women who did the sewing for her from their own homes and were paid per garment, well above minimum wage,” said Yakymishen. “I loved being part of this shop’s processes...knowing I could sew, the owner offered me a chance to start my own line.” Yakimyshyn became very inspired and not at all thinking about what she was getting herself into, she agreed and her first brand was born almost 20 years ago in 2004. As the years passed, she had her children who were already in school

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and she realized that she had lost her purpose outside of her homelife. “Cliché I know...but there I was all the same,” she said. “My husband saw I was struggling internally with my loss of self worth and asked me, quite simply, what do I go to bed thinking about and what do I think about when I wake up... aside from coffee…” Her husband knew the answer and so did she: fashion, sewing, fabric, and wide leg pants known as trousers for those of U.K. origin. At that moment, Yakimyshyn knew it was time to reboot her brand. By then, she and her family were living on the southwest coast of France in a small fishing and surf village that is lined with massive sand dunes to


protect the towns from the ocean. Thinking about her brand and her ideal customer, Yakimyshyn had lined a wall in their dining room with bright coloured post- it notes with any word she could think of that related to the brand and designs she had in mind. “I included words that I loved, like Franky,” she expressed. “When I was pregnant with my youngest, I wanted to name the baby Franky if she was a girl. I had a boy so the name Franky was still up for grabs.” Yakimyshyn continued, “The words Franky and Dune both stood out to me as I stared for the hundredth hour at that wall covered with those post-its...Franky Dune. She is the mama on the beach wearing my designs.” Nowadays, she works as much as she can while the kids are at school, and while they are home, there is no balance. For Yakimyshyn, designing a life and career that incorporates work life integration is ideal.The example would be taking her eldest with her to London when she goes for a textile event and meanwhile can hang with her aunt while she attends the event during the day. Therefore, she and her child are having shared experiences that incorporate both work and life without stress, guilt or anxiety of one aspect is getting not enough or too much of her attention. While being a creative working mother, she launched Franky Dune in 2018, which was converted into a space where Yakimyshyn assists fashion designers source sustainable fabric suppliers offering minimum order quantities (MOQs) two years later in February of 2020 when she and her family left France and moved to Porto, Portugal. When moving to Portugal, her intention was to register her business and start off fresh. “We happened to move just two weeks before the first lockdown,” said Yakimyshyn. “The opportunity to register my brand was on pause...as offices closed, my residency appointments cancelled, and an endless amount of homeschooling caused me to shift...to pivot... like so many of us had to do.” Being a business owner in the fashion industry during the pandemic was frustrating at first, expressed Yakimyshyn. As much as she appreciated the digital events, being at live events was sorely missed. Connecting with fabric manufacturers in person, feeling free to ask questions at the moment and actually touching the fabric is everything. “Fashion design is such a tactile profession,” she said. “The flip side to that was being able to attend so many more

talks digitally and watch replays during the lockdown. I felt far more educated during that time at home and like I wasn’t missing out on information or exciting speakers...there were positives and negatives to both.” For Yakimyshyn, moving to Portugal during the pandemic was a dream, especially as a designer and as someone interested in sustainable innovations. The craftsmanship for fabric and garment making is honored and respected as it is so deeply rooted in the culture. Being a stone’s throw from fabric and garment manufacturers makes it easy to connect with and learn more from leaders at the heart of the fashion industry. “Portugal is progressive in the way the industry here too has had to shift this past almost two years to serve designers better on their sustainability journey by shifting in their own practices,” explained Yakimyshyn. Yakimyshyn mentioned that over the past year of on and off lockdowns, she witnessed more and more designers wanting to source sustainably made fabric, and to buy from sellers that offer low MOQs, meaning designers wanted to buy a 100 metres of fabric instead of 3,000 metres of fabric. Trying to find these suppliers online can feel like trying to find a needle in a haystack, she stated. “I deeply relate to how soul-draining and frustrating it can be to source fabric with these requirements, done mostly online with an increase of digital events because of restrictions,” she said. “This inspired me to open up access to my personal resources, which has now grown five times larger than when I had started last year!” She also mentioned there is an education piece that she believes is so important right now. By sharing what manufacturers are doing in the industry to have cleaner, more sustainable, transparent, and more ethical practices, Yakimyshyn feels it helps with overall positivity. Sharing what she’s learned while learning it is an important part of Franky Dune. “Sustainability can be a heavy, overwhelming, and an even helpless topic,” Yakimyshyn said. “Yet there are so many people out there who are doing so much good, and by sharing this, and promoting what others are doing as a sustainable community, can help bring some light into what often feels like a dark topic and hopefully be an inspiration to designers who are just starting out.” Franky Dune has worked with brands such as Melke NYC and Conscientiously Fashioned. and has many projects in the works, such as launching a new website, which is the >

“Sustainability can be a heavy, overwhelming, and an even helpless topic, yet there are so many people out there who are doing so much good.”

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Van Cleef & Arpels Florae Exhibition Explores the Parisian Imagination W R I T T E N B Y A I D A M . TO R O I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F VA N C L E E F AND ARPELS

Many know Van Cleef & Arpels as the timeless French luxury jewelry company offering a plethora of breathtaking pieces featuring flowers, animals, and fairies, which have been worn by style icons such as Grace Kelly, Farah Pahlavi, Eva Perón, Elizabeth Taylor, the Duchess of Windsor and Queen Nazli of Egypt, among others. Since its founding in 1906, Van Cleef & Arpels has drawn from nature as the ultimate source of inspiration, which is why the jewelry company provided Japanese photographer Mika Ninagawa carte blanche to create an exquisite jewelry exhibition celebrating flowers, with her work presented alongside the Maison’s floral creations, titled Exhibition Florae Mika Ninagawa. “For this collaboration, I used photographs of fresh flowers and jewelry together, as well as an exhibition method that combines photographs of flowers and jewelry,” said Mika. “When I thought about the brilliance of Van Cleef & Arpels’ jewelry, which

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M I K A N I N A G AWA

considers nature to be important, the choice of fresh flowers was a natural one for me. Van Cleef & Arpels has given eternity to the shifting life sparkle of fresh flowers.” The exhibition opened its doors to the public on Sept. 10 at Hôtel d’Évreux, on Place Vendôme in Paris, alongside Mika’s brightly colored photographs, an immersive decor designed by Architect and Founder of Atelier Tsuyoshi Tane Architects in Paris (ATTA) Tsuyoshi Tane and over a hundred pieces from Van Cleef & Arpels’ patrimony collection and contemporary jewels commune are showcased throughout this dreamlike imaginary garden this exhibition draws the mind to. “I want to design something we have never seen or even imagined yet,” said Tane. “It was the first time for us to design such a project and there are so many museums or exhibitions for displaying high prominent jewelry, so we needed to think of something different, especially including artistic photographs by Mika Ninagawa and specificity for Van Cleef &


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Arpels.” The exhibition is organized in three parts, each mirroring a vision of flowers shared by Mika and the Maison. The first section pays homage to a naturalist aesthetic which accentuates representations propelled by reality. Importance is placed on natural colors and the volume of corollas, in addition to the textures along with particular features of petals that are both in the photographs and on jewelry pieces such as the 1937 Mystery Set Peony clip and the Myosotis watch. The second part focuses on bouquets, magnifying the charming compositions which beautify an assortment of Van Cleef & Arpels creations from the 1930s and 1940s, together with profuse flower beds such as the flourishing rosebushes Mika has a deep admiration for. “Photographing flowers is an act of instantaneously freezing the beauty of a changing moment and transforming it into something universal,” said the photographer. “Because we know that things disappear in an instant, we want to preserve the momentary radiance of the flower, including

the thoughts of the person who carefully nurtured it, at least in a photograph. I thought this was a feeling very similar to when people wear jewelry or when they send jewelry to someone, when they think about the brilliance that colors that person’s life.” Lastly, the exhibition’ final space presents a stylized vision of flora, containing authentic representations of nature capitulating to graphic lines, striking blends of color and a taste of motion. The influence of other artistic worlds, in conjunction to couture for the Silhouette clips, shines through, championing a fresh collection of profiles. To assemble this one of a kind exhibition between jewelry and photography, Tan visualized an immersive set design grounded in plays on light and mirrors. Two main concepts come together at the center of this scenography: the kaleidoscope, with its everlasting chromatic effects, and the maze, inviting visitors to “get lost” in this surreal space.The imaginative journey in the exhibition comes to fruition due to reflective glass walls that display Mika’s photographs when illuminated. The Maison’s creations shine within subtle showcases specially designed to blend into their surroundings, seeming to float in this magnificent garden. Visitors’ thoughts of the venue undergoes a transformation during the exhibition, sparking a veritable sensory experience. The shapes, details and nuances of flora are infinitely reflected in this fantastical labyrinth, reminiscent of certain passages in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland or Michael Ende’s novel Momo, where flowers symbolize time for living. “As an architect, we like to think archaeologically,” said

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I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F VA N C L E E F AND ARPELS

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“As an architect, we like to think archaeologically,” said Tan. “We started to dig into the idea of a garden, especially French-style maze gardens where people get lost and may discover nature and flowers. At the same time, we are fascinated by cuts of jewelry and reflection as if it were a kaleidoscope, therefore, we put those ideas into one project.” Tan. “We started to dig into the idea of a garden, especially French-style maze gardens where people get lost and may discover nature and flowers. At the same time, we are fascinated by cuts of jewelry and reflection as if it were a kaleidoscope, therefore, we put those ideas into one project.” “When I think about how to confront the beauty of a flower that changes its expression in an instant of light, I am faced with the same challenge: how to express that beauty in a photograph in the same way that Van Cleef & Arpels captures that very expression,” said Mika. “ I am fascinated by the beauty of flowers, and I am very inspired by the approach to giving form to them.” Van Cleef & Arpels Florae Exhibition will be available for viewing till Nov. 14 at Hôtel d’Évreux. The public can view the exhibition for free. For more information on the exhibition, visit www.vancleefarpels.com. ARTIST BIO - MIKA NINAGAWA Mika Ninagawa has been accredited numerous awards including the Kimura Ihei Photography Award. Besides various short films, she also directed the movies “Sakuran”(2007), “Helter Skelter”(2012), “Diner”(2019) and “No Longer Human”(2019). Her exhibition,”Mika Ninagawa: Earthly Flowers, Heavenly Colors” created new records at various museums in Japan. Her retrospective was also held in major cities in Asia including Taipei and Shanghai and was well received by the audiences. From 2018, her solo exhi-

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bition “Mika Ninagawa -into fiction and reality-“is touring around Japan. Mika Ninagawa is represented by Tomio Koyama Gallery as an contemporary artist. ARTIST BIO - TSUYOSHI TANE Tsuyoshi Tane is a Japanese architect based in Paris. He graduated from Hokkaido Tokai University in 2002 and gained professional experience in London, Denmark and Japan. He founded Atelier Tsuyoshi Tane Architects in 2017, after co-founded DGT in 2006. He is recognised for a series of award-winning projects and buildings including the Estonian National Museum, Kofun Stadium of Japanese Olympic 2020, the installation LIGHT is TIME, Todoroki House in Valley and many more. Tsuyoshi is credited with being one of a new generation of emerging architects, designing architec ture that manifests memory of place as a guiding principal, leading him to develop his concept of “Archaeology of the Future”. Tsuyoshi has received numerous awards and honours, including the French Ministry of Culture Architecture Prize, AFEX Grand Prix 2016, Estonian Cultural Endow ment Grand Prix and has been nominated for the European Union Mies van der Rohe Award 2017 and the 67th Japanese Ministry New Face Award of Minister of Education Award for fine arts.


I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F VA N C L E E F AND ARPELS

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A LWAYS T H I S WAY Katie Daniels, oil on linen, Australian hardwood frame 61 x 61 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery

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S T. C LO C H E G A L L E R Y ABOVE: Katie Daniels’ In Time series displayed in the Saint Cloche Gallery, Melbourne Australia. LEFT: Katie Daniels at the Saint Cloche Gallery.

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Austrailian landscape painter defines the purpose of capturing the Earth’s beauty with her awe-inspiring skills with oils and unique color palettes. WRITTEN BY KACEY PEREZ

I CAN’T QUITE REMEMBER HOW I first discovered Katie Daniels. It could have been while I was perusing Instagram, but that seems a bit too lucky. However it happened, the result was me, taking a dive deep into a rabbit role of pure awe as my fingers scrolled through the colorful brush strokes. This went on until I stopped on a piece filled with bright and unique color choices to represent the trunks and leaves of the trees. It was magic - and since then, I’ve always thought of Daniels’ work whenever viewing a landscape painting. It was a natural choice to include Daniels in our first issue when our team decided to cover sustainability. She captures the elements of the Earth in a way that’s unforgettable. And as our society faces environmental crisis on a global spectrum, it takes work like hers to remind us of the need to continue to fight for it until we see change. THEHOUSEOFPEREZ.COM

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A L L T H AT FA L L S Katie Daniels, Oil on linen, Australian hardwood frame 132 x 102 cm Saint Cloche Gallery

We have been following you and your work for some time, but for those who may not know you, can you tell us a bit about yourself and your background? I’m a landscape painter and I predominantly work with oil paint. I majored in Creative Arts at university, but I actually learned how to paint in oil paints by taking after-school still life classes during my preteens and teens. I’m originally from the Illawarra in

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New South Wales but I moved to Melbourne 11 years ago. I live with my fiancé and our two dogs in the outer suburbs. What ultimately made you decide to study art? I’ve always been drawing and painting ever since I was very young. Being preoccupied with making art is my one enduring habit, the one pastime I always loved (aside from reading). As

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I got older I began to conceptualise an intention to become an artist but even when I was studying at university I don’t know that I had any solid frame work about what that would look like. Take us through your journey to becoming a landscape painter. I had wanted to paint landscapes for some time before making my first attempts. Initially, I


IN TIME ABOVE: Katie Daniels, oil on linen, Australian hardwood frame,102 x 102 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery VIEW FROM THE RISE LEFT: Katie Daniels, drawing on paper, Australian hardwood frame, UV perspex frame 30 x 30 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery

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T H E R E I S J OY Katie Daniels, oil on linen, Australian hardwood frame, 61 x 61 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery

didn’t have the conviction that I would be very good at it. I wasn’t sure I would have a stylistic approach that would be interesting visually, or that I would have the technical skill to realise the images I had in my head. It also took me some time to discover the tropes or subjects within landscape that most appealed to

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me. Linear depiction is less of an interest to me than moving the viewer through the landscape. I think envisioning landscape as doorways was initially what hooked me in - what’s down the path, what’s round the bend, where does the river go,? And after my first few more abstract forays I was able to move from |

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figurative work to landscape with growing enthusiasm and confidence. Outside of landscapes, what else do you enjoy painting? Occasionally, I paint still life paintings of flowers or a self portrait, but really I think I am consistently engaged with landscape in a way that it always feels new and fresh to me. Out-


“I’m most proud that I didn’t give up on my dream of being a professional artist when I didn’t have an audience, or when I didn’t really have a subject, but I would just dream of the work I wanted to be making.” A THOUSAND SIGHS TOP: Katie Daniels, drawing on paper, Australian hardwood frame, UV perspex frame, 30 x 30 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery TO K E E P A LWAYS RIGHT: Katie Daniels, oil on linen, Australian hardwood frame 41 x 36 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery

side of painting I’ve recently returned to making drawings which was my first medium and first artistic love. When you put yourself into your “creative place”, what does that look like for you? What’s your process, what is the space like, how long does it take? My studio is in my living room. In essence it is makeshift

and has a semi collapsable quality, but this has become something I’m especially grateful for! Having a studio at home meant I could continue working all the way through the pandemic and multiple lockdowns here in Melbourne. When I come to paint I have a long meandering playlist of music that I will pop on, and

usually I skip through songs until I find the ‘right’ tone for the mood I’m feeling, or rather that I’m trying to activate in the work. Music is a really delightful access point for me creatively. Initially there can be a lot of false starts whilst I flip through photos of source imagery trying to find the one that wants to work for

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me at that time. Initial attempts are usually ruthlessly scrubbed back, even if I like a small part of what I’ve made I can’t keep it to sacrifice the whole painting. So if I feel ambivalent about anything I get rid of it and start again. Being in flow is a wonderful feeling but it takes a while to achieve, but once I’m in it I can be working for several hours at a time. We first fell in love with your work because of your unique color palettes. How do you decide on colors and how important are those decisions when it comes to creating a Katie Daniels piece? I love colour! Colour is always a central concern for me in my work, because of its ability to convey mood, and the effect that colour has on us visually, how different colours interplay and speak with each other. There are colours in my work now that I have been obsessed with and have used consistently in strong ways for over 10 years, such as Magenta, Prussian and Ultramarine Blue. I usually find a certain colour obsession will feed from my art into my life and then back again. Sometimes I intend a certain colour palette for a painting only to have it not work, and something else intuitively develop instead, which is wonderful and I enjoy being surprised by new combinations and variations. What has been the most challenging part about being an artist today? There’s so many ways to answer this question, so for ease I’ll frame it in terms of my experience of committing to my own creativity. In my experience it takes a lot of dogged determination to pursue being an artist, and an unwillingness to give up. I know now to expect doubt as a natural part of the process, but when I was younger and when I was making work I wasn’t happy with, or that wasn’t working as I wanted it to, it

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did eat away at my self confidence. For myself, I’ve found it has been important to avoid comparison of my work with that of others, and my success with that of others, as much as possible. I’ve also grown to respect my periods of non-production as part of the rhythm of being a creative person. All things in their time. What are your greatest sources of inspiration? There are certain landscapes that I come back to a lot in my work because they were environments of great emotional resonance and hold significant importance to me personally. For example; one tiny corner of the Pappinbarra River in New South Wales, the stretch of Merri Creek that I lived near to for a few years. Several hiking and walking trails in Tasmania that I was incredibly moved by… Being in nature is very restorative and inspiring even if no source imagery comes out of the experience. What are you most proud of thus far? On a personal level I find I’m most proud that I didn’t give up on my dream of being a professional artist when I didn’t have an audience, or when I didn’t really have a subject.I would just dream of the work I wanted to be making. I didn’t go straight from university to being a professional working artist, it was actually several years before I really was able to finally feel confident, and to dedicate myself to my truth that there wasn’t anything else I wanted to do with my time. So even through periods when I didn’t necessarily believe in myself I kept sticking with the idea that all the hours I had put into making work, and of holding on to the dream must mean something. I was simply seeking the right way through. In terms of outward success, when I was made a finalist in


O N LY LO V E L E F T: K a t i e D a n i e l s , o i l o n l i n e n , A u s t r a l i a n h a r d w o o d f r a m e , 41 x 36 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery FORGIVE EVERYTHING T H I S PA G E : K a t i e D a n i e l s , o i l o n l i n e n , A u s t r a l i a n h a r d w o o d f r a m e , 1 3 2 X 1 0 2 c m , C a l l e e n A r t A w a r d Fi n a l i s t

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WA L K F O R Y E A R S Katie Daniels, oil on linen, Australian hardwood frame 41 x 36 cm, Saint Cloche Gallery

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the Wynne Prize in 2018, it anchored something in me that everything, all of my wrestling with uncertainty and self doubt, had been worthwhile. It was hugely emotional for me and an honour to be included. Ultimately, it was so encouraging for my continued progress and it made a huge difference to my outlook of what it might be possible for me to achieve as an artist. Where is your favorite place to travel? There are lots of patches of wilderness around Melbourne that I love to go on day trips when possible, and recently - in between lock downs - my fiancé and I visited the Blue Mountains in NSW for the first time which was wonderful. I’ve been lucky enough to go to Paris and different regions of France a few times and I truly loved it so much. Also Italy is just extraordinarily beautiful. What about your paintings make them distinctively yours? I honestly don’t know how to answer this question. Visually, I think the colours that I choose to use in my works do have a consistency to them, so there is the palette of my works for sure. I also think when I look at a successfully resolved painting that I have made I feel there’s a real sense of joy or an emotional quality to them. So maybe it’s that feeling that is my strongest intention for my work. My intention is to create beautiful visual records of nature and emotional experience; they’re my offerings of appreciation for the natural world. What do you consider your purpose to be as a creator? I feel it can be easy sometimes to consider ‘what is the point of making art?’ Especially in light of world events, climate change, the pandemic, etc. There is so much to respond to and take in… Where does art fit within, and how can it help or what does it add? For myself within my own practice I do tend to continually come back to the idea that offering joy is no small feat, and making something for myself and others that has the potential to provide space for contemplation, emotional response and joy is a worthwhile pursuit. In my work I aim to transmute personal inarticulate and/or complicated feelings across a threshold and create something of beauty and appreciation. I am concerned with conveying (those mostly fleeting) feelings of joy, hope, harmony, and gratitude; of providing respite to the viewer and of making visual record of what I see, and what I feel in the presence of nature. All of my pieces share the thread of delighting in the wonder of being here and a desire to share that delight with others. I create my paintings and artworks with the intention that they will be received as personal mementos and gestures of appreciation and honour for the landscape and our environment. I trust that collectively these are feelings we all share.

“I create my paintings and artworks with the intention that they will be received as personal mementos and gestures of appreciation and honour for the landscape and our environment.”

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S TA P L E P I E C E S Styled by Anastasia Vakula Photography by Triston Cooper

The future of fashion is sustainable according to

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To kick off Volume I. of House of Perez, we’ve decided to feature Anastasia Vakula, as this first special issue is based on sustainability. Many know Vakula to appear in magazines such as L’officiel, Elle, Martha Stewart and The Knot, and you might notice that a fair amount of her social media content focuses on environmental issues. As a model with a substantial following, Vakula is in a unique position to do some good for planet health. With this being stated, we sat down and had a conversation with Vakula on her take on sustainable fashion and how you can still look and feel your best by rocking sustainability from head to toe.

Tell us about your background before starting your career in modeling. What were you up to and where were you raised? AV: I am born and raised in Ukraine. My dad is a former military and we were traveling a lot around the country, I switched 3 kinder gardens and 4 schools. I went to college in Kyiv, where my family finally settled down. I am a the only child in the family. I have been always studying hard and being a good, well-behaved daughter. I also grew up watching my mom acting at the local theater, following fashion shows and reading vintage Vogue magazine. I even tried to apply for a modeling school in Kyiv when I was 16 but my parents insisted that studying is more important than the beauty industry. I graduated from college and went to visit US in the age of 20. I came here as an exchange student, spent two summers working and traveling, I fall in love with America and decided that I want to try to live here. When it comes to fashion and lifestyle, does sustainability mean compromising luxury? AV: You would think that sustainability and luxury are two very different words and almost can be termed as oxymoron but lately I find it very

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controversial. Usually “luxury” means an undertone of excess and waste and is often associated with words like ‘couture’, ‘high life’. Sustainability is on another side, always comes as ‘environment’, ‘long term’, ‘economy’ or even ‘climate change’. But I am confident you can find ways to compromise those two words. Luxury has a long term, creative and extraordinary designs with sustainability. You can invest $2,000 worth Dior bag you will appreciate for qualities like uniqueness, elegance and long term! Similarly, sustainability is

“Sustainability is related to use of exceptional materials, classic designs and quality with a focus on the long-term - fewer is better.” related to use of exceptional materials, classic designs and quality with a focus on the long-term - fewer is better. You just need to learn how to find the balance between these two terms. What are your tips/tricks to shopping for vintage pieces to add to your closet? AV: Take your time while shopping. Vintage is a unique treasure, you don`t want to be rushing while looking for new items. Sometimes pieces find you on their own, you just have to give it a time. Know where to shop. To my opinion, independently owned vintage and thrift stores have the most unique pieces. |

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Know what you can fix/alter/ redesign. Some of thrifted finds can have a completely new life after a few easy alterations, like a new zipline or new hardware. But when it comes to completely altering a retro dress, take a minute to think of how feasible the fix is. I am not the best at it, I have tons of things in my closet that will never leave the house because I overestimated my sewing skills. Don`t afraid to experiment with the size. Marilyn Monroe was NOT a size 14. She was a size 8. In 1960s sizing, Marilyn Monroe was a size 14, which would be a size 8 in modern ready–to-wear sizing. Today’s size 14 is more like size 20 in Marilyn’s day. So don`t mind the size and try it on before saying “no” to a piece. Don`t do the “name game”. It doesn`t have to be Gucci or Valentino to fit you perfectly. Most of my vintage collection is “unknown” brands and I love them! From a sustainability perspective, what is the most frustrating part of the fashion industry? How do you see that changing in the future? AV: To me, wastewater pollution and plastic pollution that fashion causes is the worst. Approximately 60% of all materials used by the fashion industry are made from plastic and it mostly ends up back at landfill and essentially in the ocean. I just hope to see more investment into sustainable fashion, technology and culture dictate behavior. Let`s have more interviews like that! I find it a good investment into better sustainable future. Who is your favorite sustainable brand in the fashion industry right now? AV: I love Alternative Apparel, People Tree and Parade for clothes, Able for bags and accessories, and Toms has lots of fun choices if you are looking for a cute pair of shoes. There are so many creative activists


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M I X & M ATC H Anastasia wears vintage finds combined with items from her own closet to create high-end looks. | OC TOBER 2021 53


that use their vision to help change our societal perspective on sustainability and climate change. Do you have any favorites/ who should we be following? AV: Absolutely, happy to share! Dominique Drakeford, Céline Semaan, Arizona Museand my favorite Sophia Esperanza. In your personal day-to-day, what is the hardest part about being sustainable? What is the easiest part? AV: It is always easy for me: I always carry my water bottle, to-go coffee mug, snacks in jars etc, I walk whenever I can instead of driving. And I stay always cautious about the waste I produce during the day. The hardest part is to watch people not doing the same. Give us some advice - what are some of your tips for moving towards a “less is more” lifestyle in the world of fashion and how we decide to fill our closets? AV: I am not necessarily a “less is more” girl, I like to have options and change/ combine outfits every day differently but I am definitely in for a deep research before you shop: where did it come from? Is the brand you are buying from sustainable? Do they care about the environment? Are you going to use your purchase for a long time? What is it made of and can you recycle it? Is it possible to live 100% sustainable? AV: Sadly, no. But I do believe that 100% sustainable is an easier goal than 80% or 50%, because once you set your mind to an ambitious goal, everyone gets on board and does what needs to be done. Let`s always think of a 100 even if we are doing 50 only. Are there any causes or charities you would like to direct us to? AV: Helping to clean up are the ones I actively follow. Love these organizations helping to clean up the hot-mess known as the fashion industry in a variety of ways. What are your go-to sustainable brands or creatives in the fashion, food, art, or design industries? AV: I named my favorite fashion brands above. For food: Eat the Change, Beyond Meat, Thrive Marker. Design: Armadillo & Co, Threaded, Linen & Stripes. What are your plans for the future? Where do you see yourself in five years? AV: I want to keep doing what I am doing but add more partnerships to it. I love to collaborate with other creative artist (photographers, models, producers, writers, artists, creative directors etc) who care for the environment and raise the issue of climate change in their work. In five years I want to see myself being by two sides of the camera and creating arts that matters. At some point I want my guitar to be involved, I have been enjoying it lately.

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CANNELLE ET

anileV

A visit with Aran Goyoaga about the launch of her new cookbook and her journey to gluten free cooking.

A R A N G OYO A G A Gathering flowers Photography by Dorothee Brand

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TO KICK OFF HOUSE OF PEREZ’S FIRST ISSUE, gracing the publication with delectable bites, especially sweet ones, is ideal to welcome our readers for a sweet read. I’ve had the pleasure of speaking with Aran Goyoaga, who is a well-known Spaniard cookbook author, food stylist, and photographer. Goyoaga was born and raised in the Basque Country, in northern Spain, where her maternal grandparents owned a pastry shop and her paternal grandparents lived off the land. Her blog, Cannelle et Vanille, is a two-time James Beard Award finalist while her first book, Small Plates & Sweet Treats, was named one of the top cook-

books of 2012 in Good Morning America and praised by the New York Times and GOOP. Goyoaga’s second cookbook Cannelle et Vanille was published in 2019 and was named a best holiday book by the New York Times. Currently, she has over 306,000 followers on Instagram, which is a world-renowned culinary account. Let’s start from the beginning. Tell us about your background, where you are from and what led you to start your career in food. AG: I grew up in the Basque Country in Northern Spain. Baking and cooking has been an integral part of my life as I grew up across the street from my maternal

“A cookbook I am going to love is not a mere collection of recipies. I need a cookbook that feels like a moment in time, like a world in itself just like films create”

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PA S TA D I N N E R Photography by Aran Goyoaga

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grandparents’ pastry shop. My mom is the oldest of 8 and nearly everyone worked in the shop. I studied business and economics in university but after moving to the US, I enrolled in culinary school and began working as a pastry cook for a few years. Then, I turned to blogging, photography, and into cookbook writing. Take us through your journey to gluten-free cooking. What was it like to make this transition and build it into your daily routine? AG: I was diagnosed with gluten intolerance in 2010 after a couple of years of autoimmune issues and not feeling well. The transition was actually a welcomed one as it immediately helped me feel sane and heal. Because I had a pastry background and I had played around with alternative flours before, the transition wasn’t a difficult one. Yeasted breads have

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PHOTOGRAPHY COUR TESY OF ARAN GOYOAGA

“Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple feels like an extension of the baking and dessert chapter of my last book. There are many more yeasted breads, sourdough, cakes, cookies, tarts and pies, holiday baking and many staple recipies”

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SEASONAL INGREDIENTS PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF GOYOAGA

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always been the hardest piece of the gluten-free conundrum but with time, I experimented and learned from other bakers. What brought you to Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple and how would you like to see readers utilize the book? AG: After I published my last book, Cannelle et Vanille, I knew I had many more baking recipes in me. Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple feels like an extension of the baking and dessert chapter of that book. There are many more yeasted breads, sourdough, cakes, cookies, tarts and pies, holiday baking and many staple recipes. Your photography is beautiful. Why is it important to style and capture your food the way that you do? AG: A cookbook I am going to love is not a mere collection of recipes. I need a cookbook that feels like a moment in time, like a world in itself just like films create. I like a cookbook with a strong point of view, narrative, and visual storytelling where the authors message transcends a collection of steps. Photography is a really important step in all of this. It moves emotions. What has been the most challenging

part about becoming an author and public figure in the food space? AG: Selling a book is definitely the most challenging part of the whole process for me. I am not one to push product on anyone. I want people to discover the book and integrate it into their lives in an organic way. So finding the right balance of talking about a book without tiring your audience is a fine line. We are all so bombarded with messaging and it’s very hard maintaining people’s attention. When you put yourself into your “creative place”, what does that look like for you? What’s your process, what is the space like, how long does it take? AG: There are three different parts of that creative process. The first one is really about the flow of ideas and inspiration in a general form. What am I trying to say, what is the story behind this book or project? I find this stage a bit torturous because I am such a perfectionist and I have to see ideas through. I tense up, which is the opposite of what this stage really requires. So I have to remind myself to open up and let ideas flow instead of clenching. I read,

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“I’ve paved my own way in this world. I left everything behind, I went through a difficult time with a secret eating disorder, healing myself, redisovering myself through my work and motherhood. take walks, listen to music, and avoid looking at work that might be similar to mine. I just need to relax into the flow. In the second stage of creation, there is a part that is a lot more mechanical and focused. Requires more planning and organization. I am naturally good at this and I welcome it after a bit of a more chaotic beginning. I make sure I have my favorite notebooks and pens and I begin to work. This is more of a recipe development and testing side. Finally, I go on to photographing the work, which is a bit more ethereal and emotional for me. Music is an integral part of this step. The music I listen to while I shoot is hugely influential. I shot Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple last winter and I listened to Handel non-stop. I think it shows in the images. There is a melancholy and austerity to them. What are your greatest sources of inspiration? AG: Such a cliché but seasons are a huge influence. I love the passing of time and change. The farmers markets, music, films, other books. Anything that catches my attention. What are you most proud of thus far? AG: I think having paved my own way in this world. I could have easily stayed in the Basque Country and followed the expected path but I left everything behind, I went through a difficult time with a secret eating disorder, healing myself, rediscovering myself through my work and motherhood. I am in awe of my kids. What is your favorite meal and how do you prepare it? AG: Not a very common one but I love elevenses. It really reminds me of my grandmother. I wake up really early most mornings

(4:30am most of the time). I love the alone time with coffee, but I rarely eat breakfast until 11am. Then, I prepare myself something hardy, likely savory, such as sautéed vegetables with eggs, or I’ll eat leftover soup, or a piece of sourdough bread with roasted vegetables and some kind of spread. My grandmother always had elevenses ready for my grandfather as he was at work by 4am making brioche and preparing the pastries for the day. She opened a canned of sardines and then would fry some eggs. Or she sautéed some foraged mushrooms and served them with hunks of bread. What about your food makes it distinctively yours? AG: I think it’s hard for me to identify that. I think my focus In vegetables and subtle food. My food is not bold but I think it’s very textural. What do you consider your purpose to be as a creator? AG: I think I’m a teacher at heart. But beauty is super important to me so and that has a lot of weight in what I do. What does the future look like for Cannelle et Vanille? Other creative endeavors you are currently passionate about? AG: Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple will come out on October 26th so I will be tied up with that for a bit. I also have some on-demand baking videos coming out next month. I want to continue to offer more baking classes as people have responded so positively to them. And perhaps, begin thinking about another book. I love the process. WRITTEN BY AIDA TORO

CANNELLE ET VANILLE BAKES AVAILABLE AT ALL MAJOR BOOKSTORES OCTOBER 26.

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FRESH FROM THE GARDEN P H O T O G R A P H THEHOUSEOFPEREZ.COM | O CYT C OOB UE R T E2 S0Y2 1O F G O Y O 71A G A


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Georgina Preston

Meet the artist behind capturing equestrian aesthetic, giving the lifestyle and highfashion elements a respecful nod. IMAGES COURTSEY OF GEORGINA PRESTON

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HUNT COUNTRY ART Georgina Preston is a UK based fashion, lifestyle and equestrian photographer. Influenced by artists such as Stubbs and Munnings. her photography emulates fine art, depicting scenes from a bygone era. Timeless and transportive are words used to describe her poignant hunting scenes. Portrait photographers such as August Sander and James Ravilious inspire her gritty portraits, whilst painterly light adds a softness to her work. Growing up in rural England, surrounded by fox hunting and quaint villages, she has learned to capture her subjects genuinely with familiarity and fondness.

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Index Feast Vintage

People are always looking for the latest and greatest and yet there are amazing things out there that still serve a purpose. Showing how these items can be used definitely fuels my passion. We (society) are currently in a solid “change the world” state. How do you see yourself, and your business as part of the change? I believe we all have a purpose and part in bringing positive change to our world and Feast promoting sustainability plays into that. It is something I feel strongly about and live on our farm. We practice a permaculture form of farming to best steward the land. I believe that if we do our part to take care of nature, nature takes care of itself and we all win. What are your MUST HAVE’s for your dining room or kitchen? A must for me is texture on the table in the form of rattan and woven serving pieces. Always. I am also a big fan of mixing and matching patterns to add visual interest. I am always on the look out for items that serve as neutrals; objects that are able to pair with multiple pieces in order to create different looks. Where are your favorite places to shop for pieces for your home? My number one places to shop for things for my home will always be antique stores. We have some really fantastic shops here in Franklin, Tennessee. I often find myself traveling to smaller towns seeking out antique stores there. I traveled for my corporate job all over the South and always sought out little shops that were off the beaten track. The best treasures are usually found there. I buy a lot of my vintage clothing from my friend Rebekah @LittleByrdVintage and find beautiful pieces for my home from shops like Saint Signora. What is your favorite vintage piece you’ve found for yourself, or FV? I love finding large vintage cheese servers. Some of these pieces are big enough to hold sections of layer cake and the patterns are just fantastic. All bets are off on those making their way into the shop. Finding vintage luxury items is always thrilling. Luxe for less? Yes, please! I have an authentic Gucci handbag with bamboo handles and a set of French St. Louis crystal glassware found while thrifting. I know you enjoy being in the kitchen. What is your favorite thing to cook? I love to cook and nothing pleases me more than creating meals from food that has been grown on our own land. My favorite meals are always 100% home grown. Lastly, leave us with a wellness tip - I know you manage a lot between a full-time job, your farm and FV - what do you do for yourself while managing it all? Life is crazy busy and juggling a job, the farm, the shop and a family feels like too much somedays. One of my biggest sources of spiritual nourishment, Dr. Dharius Daniels talks about the need to identify your

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values in priority order to create your ideal day. If we are not prioritizing what we value most then we are not living in an optimal way. My top values are my faith, my family, my fitness & my farm. I start each day with quiet time dedicated to my spiritual nourishment because a sound mind is key to life. I work out at least 6 days a week because my physical fitness is just as important as my spiritual fitness. It is like the oxygen mask principle on an airplane: if you don’t take the time to put your own oxygen mask on, you will ultimately be no help to anyone else. Self care & self love better enable us to meet the needs of others. In other words, a strong core (both spiritually and physically) will helps us carry the weight of everything else.

Franky Dune

the coming week and has expanded her services up from the curated resource list to consulting services to assist sustainable fashion designers with fabric sourcing, along with helping them create a sustainable brand they can stand behind to help with any negative pushback they might be experiencing. She also has her next YouTube video coming out surrounding the latest fabric sourcing event in Porto. For more information on Yakimyshyn, Franky Dune, and all things sustainability in the fashion industry, you can give her a follow on Instagram, view some of her informative YouTube content and add her on LinkedIn. frankydune.squarespace.com


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