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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

T

hings seem to be getting back on track here at the farm after a crazy month in July. I wish I could say the same about our weather. We have only had one “hot,” summer-like week so far this year. (Of course, that was the week we baled hay.) Other than that, it has almost felt like autumn around here. The cooler temperatures definitely keep the horses feeling fresh and frisky! Even the older retired gelding was kicking the walls of his stall to get out to his pasture this morning. This issue has some great information to reference now and in the future. It’s almost time to start thinking about weaning those babies and Dr. Steve Fisch gives us some advice on how to handle the transition this month in “Ask the Vet.” We’ve also got the third leg of our Triple Crown coverage included in this issue for you. There are some beautiful pictures of Belmont Park and the competitors from the 145th running of the Belmont Stakes that you will surely appreciate. Thanks to Steve Heuertz for doing such a wonderful job! We hope you are all enjoying your summer with your equine and human friends (even if it feels like autumn) and we especially hope that you........

..........remember to count your blessings on horseback! God Bless and Ride Safe, Christa Conway

A Little “Barrel Talk” We have included a small section of “A Little Barrel Talk” for you this month. Remember to visit www.barrelhorseworld.com to read more Barrel Talk.

What do you do for herd bound horses?

annemarea Posted 2013-06-20 5:15 PM (#6763490) Location: Iowa, LA Please give me some advice. I have a 17 year old mare who is severely herd bound to a 5 year old mare (who could really care less). I have them in pastures that are separated by about 20-25’. They can see eachother. There is no set up on my property where I could keep them out of sight year round. I went on vacation for a week and my dear mom decided to rearrange my pasture pairings. She put the gelding by himself and put the two mares together. I had them separated by dietary needs and to keep the herd bound issues minimized. Now the 17 year old mare has been pacing her fence at a trot/lope for four days. She whinnies day and night. She has diarrhea and is covered in sweat a lot of the day. She’s way too worked up now for my daughter to ride. This is her usual activity when I ride the 5 year old mare out of her sight. I have both mares on Mare Magic right now. I don’t see a difference. They are fed oat/wheat/grass and Renew Gold. The 17 year old is a retired working cow horse and the 5 year old is being patterned/seasoned. The gelding is 2. What would you do? melaself Get her a mini to keep her company MO gal First, I have a mini-donkey as a companion for any horse left behind. Then, I have a gelding that is herd bound--pokes along going away from his friends and all but runs away coming back.

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I set aside a couple of hours to work him close to his buddies. Nothing fancy, just keep his feet moving when he is close to them. It takes some time at first and lots of patience, but he has been much better after a few sessions of that. He found out that when I rode him, it was more work to be close to his buddies than to be away from them. Other than that, don’t have much help. Good luck.

kwanatha I don’t mind so much if one of mine has a buddy as long as it does not interfere with tying or riding. I like to play a game called HAVE IT YOUR WAY - Take two people, one to hold the buddy in the middle of the pen. deep sand is great for this (wears them out quicker) The horse can have his way and have his friend anytime he wants as long as he is loping cirlces around the buddy! When he starts to huff and puff I stop him and tell the buddy handler to walk away slowly. If my horse shows any desire to have his buddy he GETS HIS WAY. Oh, but did I forget to mention he has to lope around him. Try again rinse and repeat LOL all I need to see is his head raising and I take that as “oh you wnat your buddy.” At first, horse may pitch fits but they figure it out pretty quick and drop their head and let them go This helps iron out other problems as well becasue after this they have a new attitude so other problems just go away. HorseMommyFiveO My hub will run away f I ask for another

horse - no matter the size. LOL! Maybe a goat. Under the guise of eating it eventually? Hmmmm

ACEINTHEHOLE RE: kwanatha I agree with this... make it very tiresome for her to be by the buddy... have someone hold the buddy horse and lope circles, lung circles or anything that is “work” every time they are together...and wear her butt out! Only let her relax when she is alone! BamaCanChaser Is the mare pastured by herself? Horses are herd animals by nature. I agree with finding her a pasture mate. I wouldn’t tolerate misbehavior while riding, but I have seen some very predictable horses have a complete personality change when they’ve been moved off by themselves. pookey I tried everything for my old gelding that I used to have and nothing worked until I got a donkey. She was free and I just fed the horse what I normally feed them and the donkey eats with them. So really she doesn’t cost any more. She’s now kept 3 more horses company. LRQHS RE: HorseMommyFiveO I have seen horses kill goats. I would be really cautious about doing this. Some horses are cool with it, but other’s want to kill them. One of my colt’s picked a large goat up by the back of his neck and threw him out of his pen, which is almost 6 feet high......that goat never went back in the pen......

graciemay Goat Goat has learned the hard way several of ours are not goat savvy, the others don’t pay any attention to him. Also, it’s really heard to keep a goat in a normal fence if he decides he wants to leave. Ridenrun4745 I got 2 pygmy goats for my colt when weaning him, I don’t think it helped at all and they were a PAIN. Ended up giving them away. But, my husband’s aunt said that the problem was that they were Pygmys, we should have gotten a larger breed. My colt just came back from the trainer. He keeps all of the training horses by themselves first, and though some of them talk (mine did) and carry on, he keeps on. He works them daily and ties them out for a bit each day, and after about a week they chill. He says that after a little bit they bond to him - he said it different, but it made sense at the time. That being said, my mare was anxious when we brought her home. Started her on Forco and it has made a WORLD of difference in her attitude, for what it’s worth! She’s way more laid back now, rarely paws, and is fine if I take the colt out. LRQHS LOL....My goat was the size of a small shetland lol...I don’t know how that horse picked him up an threw him, but I sure saw a goat, out of the corner of my eye, fly over the fence and I definitely saw him when he landed. He laid on the ground for a few seconds...guess he got the wind knocked out of him.....then got up and ran like the hounds of hell were after him lol.... www.barrelhorseworld.com

Thraugust2013 web  

The "Fast" Horse Resource August 2013

Thraugust2013 web  

The "Fast" Horse Resource August 2013

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