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TheHORIZON Volume XVII/ Issue 3/February 21, 2014 / 1300 NW 139th St. Vancouver, WA 98685

S S E R T S F O E C N E I C S E TH

pg. 4

IN THIS ISSUE OF TheHorizon

H Has technology made people

LESS INTELLIGENT?Pg.3

A S B

f r o m

BEHIND THE SCENES

Pg.7

Girls Basketball goes for the repeat Pg.8


News

2 Required Tests:

2014

START

Reading and Writing HSPEs

Algebra I or Geometry EOC exams

by Briana Diehl Editor & Sage Ferrell Reporter

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est requirements are changing; some tests are being taken away and others are being added. The Biology EOC exam was added for the graduating class of 2015 and beyond. Previously students did not need to pass a science EOC exam. In the 2014-2015 school year the HSPE

7 1 20

English Exit Exam based on the Common

Core

Smarter Balanced Math Test Biology EOC

will not be administered and will be replaced with exit exams based on the Common Core State Standards, a state-led initiative that establishes a set of standards for English and Mathematics for kindergarten through 12th grade. For the graduating classes of 2015 through 2018, students must pass

one of the Math EOC exams: Algebra or Geometry. In 2019 students will have to pass the 11th grade Smarter Balanced ELA Test for Language Arts, and the 11th grade Smarter Balanced Math Test in order to graduate, along with the Biology EOC exam.

Algebra I or Geometry EOC exams Biology EOC

20 15 English Exit Exam based on the Common Core

Smarter Balanced Math Test after winter 2015

The road to graduation

9 1 0 2

Test requirements for classes 2014 through 2019

Smarter Balanced English Language

Biology EOC

Arts Test Smarter Balanced Math Test


Opinion

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The psychology of technology Technology promotes human development uted to the rise of global intelligence in the past several decades. Skeptics such as Larry Cuban, an emeritus professor at Stanford University, argue that humans are losing their ability to problem solve and to think for themselves. Cuban says that computers have been by Selina Cairel Reporter oversold and under used, especially in schools. Schools are integrating ince December of 2001 the technology in schools and advonumber of Internet users cating its use in classrooms. Cuban worldwide has increase by argues that students are using this over 2 billion, according to the tool to access social media profiles, International Telecommunications which distracts them from their Union. Technological advances in schoolwork. However, most school the last 30 years have improved lives computers have limited access to the for the better by increasing global internet and social media sites are intelligence, providing easy access to blocked. an incredible amount of informaTechnology can be used to enrich tion and promoting visual intellione’s intelligence and promote childgence in education. However, there hood development. The understandhave been some issues regarding ing of pictures or icons develop its use and how it has impacted our earlier than the ability to read. The mental process and critical thinking use of technology at school such as ability. According to Patricia Greenfield, a professor of psychology at UCLA, there has been a continuing global rise in the IQ performance over the last 100 years. This rise is known as the Flynn effect. The Flynn effect is the substantial increase in average scores on intelligence tests all over the world. The Flynn effect states that external influences in society create an impact on the intellect of each generation, which in turn influences the next. The most fascinating of the four main causes of the Flynn effect is change in technology. Technological advances, and other factors such as diet and the education system, have contrib-

S

digital tablets and computers is a way to promote visual intelligence. This is an observable aspect of the Flynn effect, as it demonstrates how the external influence of technology on intellect begins as attitudes are changed. Digital tools have given new and powerful ways of dealing with information. Douglas Engelbart, an early computer and Internet pioneer, theorized that writers equipped with electronic word processors would be superior brainstormers. The Internet has a myriad of information. It is filled with knowledge that is easily accessible. People use search engines to acquire quick answers to questions. Humans are more exposed to information when using the Internet. This increased exposure allows for immense opportunity to research information quickly and easily. Technology has changed the minds of people and will continue to do so for decades to come. It has shaped our future and our past. The proper use of this tool can revolutionize the future and increase the collective intelligence of humans.

Staff

Editor in Chief................................................................................Macey Burt Managing Editor & Photo Manager..............................................Briana Diehl Opinion & News Editor.....................................................Vanderson Langjahr Features Editor........................................................................Michelle Chang Arts and Entertainment Editor................................................Madison Graves Sports Editor.................................................................................Allison Ford Reporters.................................................................................... Selina Cairel ..................................................................................................Sarah Durmaz .....................................................................................................Sage Ferrell ................................................................................................... Max Huskins ..........................................................................................................Eriq King ...................................................................................................Mileena Polk ......................................................................................................Lizzy Rowe ...............................................................................................Makena Watson Interns...........................................................................................Tanner Kee ...........................................................................................Shannon Korsgren ..............................................................................................Mirjeta Livoreka Adviser.........................................................................................Lydia Brooks Cover Illustration by Vanderson Langjahr and Max Huskins

Mission Statement and Editorial Policy The mission of the Horizon is to communicate information in an ethical manner, convey impactful stories, and create strong leadership skills for the purpose of increasing our readers’ perspectives by combining the might of a skilled staff whose diverse abilities are used to actively find and convey the truth. We will strive to: Report the news accurately, objectively, fully and in depth, avoiding the publication of rumor, gossip or innuendo. Meet professional journalism standards. Provide a platform for the exchange of ideas. The newspaper reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, inappropriate content, obscenity, violation of federal, state or local laws and District or School policy or space considerations. We also reserves the right not to print a letter. Provide leadership by presenting a major editorial in each issue, which will be unsigned and represent the opinion of the staff. Other commentary will be signed and as such, would represent only the opinion of the author. Reviews will be considered signed commentary. Cooperate fully with the administration, faculty and student body in supporting school projects and activities and offer constructive criticism when appropriate. Give full credit for material that is not original. Acknowledge significant mistakes, and correct any major errors that are brought to the attention of the staff. Use the most effective style of expression, based upon the Associated Press Stylebook. The newspaper will not endorse political candidates nor accept political advertising. The Horizon reserves the right to refuse any advertising inappropriate for the age group of its readers. Skyview High School is not an open forum as defined by the US Supreme Court case, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier. Administration reserves the right to exercise prior review including removal of content and advertisements before publication. Control of publishing and distribution of student materials by the administration will be confined to standards necessary to protect the orderly process of education and standards of responsible journalism.


stress for succe

conquer the pressure of educatio by Sarah Durmaz Reporter

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oices echo from the choir room. Someone is shouting at the top of their lungs. Sophomore Emma Knudsen is pounding on junior James Silk’s chest. Suddenly, senior Bekah Martorano races over to them and starts banging on his chest also. She is hitting him harder and screaming loudly at Silk. He is knocked to the carpeted floor by Martorano’s fists. Two girls sitting on the side laugh. Everyone stands back up and smiles at the job well done, even Silk. The rehearsal is a success, even though they are under a lot of stress with homework, characters, and lines. It takes a lot of time to prepare for the winter double feature and that along with homework can be very stressful, especially to one who does not handle stress well. According to psychologist Carl Pickhardt, stress can often result in procrastination where students are so stressed, that nothing gets done. Many high school students have a lot on their plate, whether it be homework, AP classes, sports or clubs, college applications and jobs; high school students are buried under stress. “I usually get all my stuff done some time before it’s due. If not, I do it a day before it’s due, or even right before it’s due,” Knudsen said. Knudsen considers herself very stressed. She is currently taking AP World History while juggling the rest of her pre-AP classes and theater. With lines to memorize and a character to portray, she spends approximately two and a half hours a week rehearsing for the winter double feature play The Pot Boiler and thirty minutes each day running lines. She also spends three to four hours every day doing homework; that doesn’t leave much time for fun, let alone time to relax and breathe. “I’ll be too focused on school to memorize lines. I’ll have one or two lines that I don’t have completely memorized because I’ve been doing homework or I’ll try to be memorizing lines and I’ll be ignoring my homework,” Knudsen said. According to Knudsen, being overwhelmed is not good because it can lead to procrastination. Junior Akhil Mulpuru also deals with this issue. “I got super overwhelmed and tired. I missed robotics and did no homework,” Mulpuru said. In Knudsen’s experience, procrastination

is triggered by stress and stress is not healthy. She advises that doing the work first can be much more rewarding and the leisure activities will be more entertaining for there will be no underlying stress eating away at your conscience screaming ‘Do your work.’ “I procrastinate all the time; it’s not something that I’m proud of,” Knudsen said. “I try to put off the things that worry me; I’d rather do something fun than something I have to worry about right now. I usually procrastinate so I can feel a little bit of comfort before I have to deal with the stressful tasks.” According to psychologist Timothy Pychyl, procrastination happens because instead of focusing on work, the focus is set to more desirable things to do. “Although we may know intellectually what we ought to do right now, we don’t feel like doing it. So we focus on short-term mood repair: Feel good now, worry about that intention later. Short-term gain, long-term pain,” Pychyl said. According to U. S. History teacher Dave Armstrong many of his students get stressed. His advice to them is to breathe and they will get through the day. Armstrong suggests that preparation can help relieve stress and can boost confidence in the task at hand. “When you’ve studied and you really know the material, you go in there, you feel good and are excited to take the test. I like to get to where excitement replaces anxiety,” Armstrong said. Armstrong advises that a little stress is a good thing; it can keep students on track, but if that student ends up feeling overwhelmed there are multiple ways to relieve stress such as exercise, hanging out with friends, and listening to music. “Procrastinating only leads to more stress,” Knudsen said. “ Just focus on what’s important and then once that’s done you won’t feel any more stress because you accomplished something.”


SpeakOut What is the best way to handle stress in everyday life? Trent Craber freshman “Hanging out with your friends, because they will always be there with you, even on the worst days.”

Zach Beamer sophomore

Stress Relievers Write Pick up a pen and jot down your feelings to relieve stress. For example, pour out your thoughts in a daily journal to express your frustrations and concerns. Exercise Exercise could be getting up and stretching for a minute or two or taking a walk. This could help relieve stress immediately. Getting your blood moving releases endorphins which can improve your mood. Make sure you are comfortable Switching chairs, using a good computers, and wearing loose clothing will make you more comfortable and will prevent aching backs and sore eyes. Laugh Take a break and entertain yourself. Watching comedies and reading humorous novels can reduce your stress level. Don’t be afraid to cry Crying every once and a while can help relieve anxiety. Crying can also prevent headaches or other consequences from bottling things up.

“Playing football, going to the batting cages, putting on music I like (Nickelback, Def Leppard, Poison and Whitesnake) or playing Xbox.”

Emma Price junior “The best way to handle stress is definitely music. It’s another world to get lost in, and it really helps.”

Christina Heid senior

“Don’t focus on everything you still have to do; instead, focus on things one at a time, and take deep breaths. If you feel yourself stressing, take a break to de-stress so you can be more productive.”

Nate Macon staff “I binge eat… I wouldn’t call it the ‘best’ way but it seems to be a trend.”

Compiled by TANNER KEE Source UT COUNSELING AND MENTAL HEALTH CENTER PHOTOS BY MAX HUSKINS Compiled by ERIQ KING and MILEENA POLK


Arts & Entertainment

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Behind the scenes of ASB The effects student government has on school by Michelle Chang editor & Lizzy Rowe reporter

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utting, snipping and painting. Drawing, erasing and pasting. Paint brushes, poster paper and brown cardboard are littered across the faded, dull gray carpet. The occasional score of cardboard and scratch of pencil on paper is heard over the light buzz of conversation. Ten gold spray painted cardboard squares are arranged neatly in a row, spelling the words “Great Gatsby” in neat black painted letters. Senior executive president Matt Gaylor paces around the area, making sure that everything is going smoothly. ASB is in charge of many school events such as assemblies, dances, and fund raisers. Winter formal is one of the biggest events ASB puts on; members try to choose a theme that will interest the whole student population and also will be easy to decorate. “To plan a dance, we start about three weeks before and start coming up with ideas and making the props. For the most part, we have everything made before we do the decorating. We spend about five and a half hours putting it up, and 30 minutes taking it down,” Gaylor said. In order to pick a theme for an upcoming dance, ASB compiles old and new ideas to decide on an appropriate theme. The final decision is a theme that incorporates the whole student body and is most appropriate for that dance. “We try to make sure the theme is something all Skyview students will want to dress up for, and suitable for all students, which can be difficult,” ASB adviser Jenn Johnson said. All of the money raised through dance ticket sales and coat check goes toward ASB funds for futures dances and events. In addition to winter formal, the members of ASB work hard on many other smaller and less noticed projects around the school. “ASB organizes all of the dances, fund raisers like student chest drive, and also extra programs like the Storm Super Fan and teacher of the week. We are pretty involved and a lot of people don’t realize that,” junior school board representative Laura McDonnell said. McDonnell has been an active ASB member for three years. ASB has given McDon-

nell the opportunity to communicate and interact with students and administration on many levels. She joined the class as a freshman, and enjoys the challenge and work she puts into ASB. “Outside of ASB, I’ve probably spent 100 plus hours working on ASB projects and events,” McDonnell said. In addition to school dances, each student is required to complete 25 hours of service outside of school plus a school service project. “I spend about 200 hours a year working on ASB projects outside of school. I think it’s worth it; before I joined ASB, LIZZY ROWE school was fun, but I Junior Laura McDonnell and sophomore Kirsten Johnson snip out letters for the Great Gatsby themed winter formal. ASB members spend five to six hours the night before a dance to decorate the commons. Representing the entire school, ASB hopes to interest all students in the events they plan. never felt as involved as I do now. I feel like I However, getting recognition from the the kids to go to dances that normally don’t matter to the school doing something for the student body is not the purpose of ASB. show up. It’s not always easy. We try to come bigger cause,” Gaylor said. Students in ASB understand that hard work up with creative new ideas every single year Service projects are designed to make the often goes unrecognized. to incorporate them, but it all comes down student body and faculty more involved and “ASB runs events like assemblies and to ‘do they want to be involved?’ If they do, recognized. Assignments range from planting dances, but other than that I don’t know we give them the opportunity.” a garden by the 600 wing to the “Care Dare” what else they plan,” freshman Bailey Bergue Gaylor believes his task is to involve stuin the daily announcements to friendly notes said. dents in school activities and unite the stuon car windshields and helping the custodiASB does a good job informing about dent body; he works hard to make everyone ans clean up the commons after lunch. events around the school, yet they rarely feel welcome and wanted here at Skyview. “Service projects really don’t take up much broadcast about how they contribute to the “Our main job is to make students feel time or a lot of work and they are really school. involved,” Gaylor said. “We always try to give fun,” Gaylor said. “We want to make every“Doing things without the need for them something to do, even though most one feel like they matter.” recognition gets much more fulfillment than people think all we do is make posters. We ASB has many responsibilities; they are a seeking recognition for the things we do. We want to make people feel at home when they group that represents the school’s reputation hope that’s something we pass on to the rest are at Skyview, and give them events they as a whole. Their actions reflect the school’s of the student body,” Johnson said. look forward to.” image in a negative or positive way based As the voice of the student body, ASB’s on their actions as a group. Even outside of main goal is to involve every student, recschool, ASB influences the face of Skyview. ognize students for their achievements and “A lot of time, we get negative criticism,” accomplishments, and to effectively commuJohnson said. “We don’t hear a lot of the nicate upcoming events. positives. If students can see how hard ASB “It is very challenging to involve everyone works, then they can see how much work at the school,” Gaylor said. “A lot of kids goes into the events we put on and how just don’t care; our goal is to get the kids at much thought goes into it.” the back of the assemblies to stand up, to get


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Sports

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Girls basketball storms the court Varsity dribbles their way back to state by Maddy Graves Editor

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t’s 5:34 p.m. on a Thursday night, and the JV and varsity girls basketball teams already started practice. There are seven and a half minutes ticking away on the clock as the girls warm up. “Get better at targets, get better at hitting the targets. Get it?” yells coach Jennifer Buscher from the sideline. As the clock comes down to the last two minutes, Senior Stephanie McDonagh makes a three-pointer. Last year varsity finished the season as league champions and lost the district championship game. That changed their placement on the district play off bracket and they played a team in a higher seat. The girls lost that game by one point, which made the climb to state championship more difficult. This year, however, the team has worked hard to have all of the pieces in place to make it back to state. “The difference is we are more experienced this year. We have a junior and senior class that have more experience and are doing an exceptional job in leading the Lady Storm,” Buscher said. Coach Busher has been coaching Since 2011 and has been guiding the girls to league champions for four seasons now. “These seniors have put a lot of time energy and effort into this program, and I want them going out with one more trip to the Tacoma Dome,” Buscher said. “I’m just really proud of them, I feel pride, of what this senior class has accomplished.” McDonagh plays point guard and has been on varsity since her freshman year along with her fellow senior captain and friend Aubrey Ward-El. Comparing practices from last year to this year, the players have built more confidence in their practice. “Everyone shows up and are ready to work with the same goal in mind, which is to get back to state and to get better each day to reach that goal,” McDonagh said. A noticeable difference from last year to this year is that the varsity and JV practice together.

The coaches of JV and varsity agreed that they should make this year a transition for the JV girls to play at a higher level. “We feel we have a talented enough JV group who will be next year’s varsity team,” Buscher said. As of press time, varsity holds a 22-1 record and JV is undefeated. “I feel like we have a really good team and we’re young, but effort-wise everyone gives full effort every practice and that’s something our coach really emphasizes,” Ward-El said. Before games some girls prepare with their good friends at home. Then return when everybody hangs out in the locker room as they complete some of their traditions and rituals, like writing symbols on their arms whose meanings aren’t revealed until after the season. “Stephanie and I are always together after school before games, sometimes we nap. If it’s a long day our moms will cook for us. We pray with our team, we sit together and we play music,” Ward-El said. McDonagh along with Ward-El and coach Buscher agree that the team definitely has built more confidence through this year and it’s showing in the practices and the games. Buscher refers to juniors Gen Lo and HannahJoy Adams as the “silent assassins.” And a number of other players have stepped up to help varsity earn the placement they have now. “This is a pretty tight-knit group, I think all believe in each other, and they are confident in each other. And they’re a group that doesn’t really care who gets the credit,” Buscher said. Ward-El says that having positive energy and keeping level-heads throughout the season has an impact on the outcome of the game and the goals of the players. “We come out with a mind set that every team we play is going to be the best team we play,” McDonagh said. “Because you can’t underestimate a team.”

MADDY GRAVES Point-guard Stephanie McDonagh is in possession of the ball at the Skyview vs. Union game, looking for an open player to pass to. McDonagh has played basketball since sixth grade and has been on varsity since ninth grade. McDonagh sports the secret team symbol on her harm that is reveled after the season ends. This year girls varsity has a winning record of 22-1.

The Horizon, February 2014 , Issue 3 , Volume XVII  
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