Page 1

See page

10 | Groundbreaking

Move-in Day | See page 9

the horizon

IUS begins work on additional lodge Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Students anticipate college experience Volume 67 | Issue 00

www.iushorizon.com

SAF plummets for new school year By CLAIRE MUNN Senior Editor

ATHLE

clamunn@umail.iu.edu

27 2628 26

For the first time since 2004, the Student Activity Fee took a significant drop, with 11 percent of the budget being cut from the total amount. The SAF is a fee all students must pay and is determined per credit hour for up to 12 credit hours. This year, the budget for the SAF totaled $742,852 compared to last year’s $828,452 — a more than $85,000 difference. Anne Skuce, interim vice chancellor of Student Affairs, said the decrease was due to not only low enrollment rates in the spring, but also the discount on summer tuition this year. “We were told they were going to reduce the tuition for the summer, and when they did that, this campus took a hit on tuition dollars,” Skuce said. “Because it’s a percentage, it also decreased the amount of money we had in Student Activity Fees.” The SAF is determined through the Student Life Committee, which is composed of four faculty, two or three staff members and eight

3

CS TI

17 24 20

19 19 18 11

16 25

$742,852

23 22

6 21 27 4 8

E DR HIL

SC N’

Like our new design? What articles or content would you like to see? Send us your ideas or suggestions to horizon@ius.edu.

LE

10

$85,000 CUT

14 20

EN TE R

4 15

9 5

7

Visit www.iushorizon.com for an interactive PDF version of this graphic

students. In order for an account to receive funding, they must submit a budget proposal, which includes expenses from the year, what was spent and what they plan on spending. The committee also meets with each of the groups during the spring to discuss the budget proposal before allocating the funding

Obviously, the more we can support students, the faster we can grow the Alumni Association. John Watkins president of the IUS Alumni Board

tion was putting up,” Wayne said. In the past, the scholarship money was awarded exclusively to the Athletic Department. However, John Watkins, president of the IUS Alumni Board, said they voted to expand the scholarship program so more students could be included. “One of the things we determined was to See SCHOLARSHIP, page 8

NEW ALBANY, INDIANA SUGGESTIONS

1A TH

12

2C

As part of a new initiative to help the campus community, the IU Southeast Alumni Association is offering six scholarships to students for the 2012-13 school year. The scholarship amounts total $10,000, with six $1,000 scholarships and one $4,000 scholarship for Athletics. Of the six scholarships, each one will be divided between the six schools at IU Southeast. Jerry Wayne, vice chancellor of Alumni and Community Relations, said half of the scholarship amount for the individual schools came from the organization’s scholarship account. The other half was provided by Chancellor Sandra Patterson-Randles. “I went to the chancellor and asked her, and she graciously agreed to match what the Alumni Associa-

56. 1%

13

Alumni Association expands student scholarship program By CLAIRE MUNN Senior Editor clamunn@umail. iu.edu

GRAPHIC BY STEPHEN ALLEN

TICS :

and sending out an approved budget for the year. The SAF supports many organizations at IU Southeast, including the Graduate Research Journal, the Student Program Council and Family and Parent Programs. Of the various accounts, only two did not receive cuts in their budgets — Athletics and

the Children’s Center. While all of the individual teams received drops in funding, Athletics was approved for almost 24 percent of the budget. The Children’s Center received more than 17 percent. Skuce said the Athletics increase was based on the IU salary policy, which requires IU Southeast to raise all

2012-13

CUT MORE THAN 10 PERCENT

1) ATHLETICS

(23.9)

$177,230 (+$9,983)

2) CHILDREN’S CNTR

(17.4)

$129,165 (+$2,385)

3) SPC

(8.3)

$62,020

(-$13,366)

4) POST SEASON TRN (5.7)

$42,000

(-$20,000)

5) SOFTBALL

(4.8)

$35,357

(-$523)

6) BASEBALL

(4.6)

$34,279

(-$571)

7) WOMEN’S BB

(4.1)

$30,357

(-$543)

8) MEN’S BASKETBALL (4.1)

$30,000

(-$543)

9) VOLLEYBALL

(3.5)

$26,000

(-$100)

10) STUDENT INVOLV (3.2)

$23,995

(-$5,887)

11) THE HORIZON

(2.9)

$21,595

(-$2,415)

12) PLANNER

(1.6)

$12,000

(-$4,070)

13) CONTROL

(1.6)

$12,000

(-$11,048)

14) MEN’S TENNIS

(1.5)

$11,000

(-$100)

15) TENNIS

(1.5)

$11,000

(-$100)

16) STUDENT GRANT

(1.5)

$10,973

(-$4,027)

17) STUDENT GOV

(1.4)

$10,602

(-$2,295)

18) LEADERSHIP DEV (1.3)

$9,865

(-$5,775)

19) LEARNING ENRICH (1.2)

$9,000

(-$2,000)

20) PEP BAND

(1.1)

$7,822

(-$8,678)

21) CHEERLEADERS

(.9)

$7,000

(-$1,000)

22) FAMILY/PARENT

(.9)

$6,350

(-$1,300)

23) GAME ROOM

(.8)

$5,955

(-$2,508)

24) LITERARY MAG

(.7)

$4,921

(-$752)

25) GRAD JRNL

(-$2,115)

(.5)

$3,500

26) UNDERGRAD JRNL (.5)

$3,500

(-$1,457)

27) DANCE TEAM

(.4)

$3,000

(-$1,000)

28) VOLUNTEER PRGM (.3)

$2,000

(-$5,795)

professional staff salaries to certain set levels. Joe Glover, athletic director, said the Athletic account includes coaches’ salaries, work studies for students and an athletic training contract. Glover said he is thankful for the funding the Student Life Committee granted to Athletics this year, but

the teams will have to do more fundraising in order to meet their budgets. “Of course, we would all love not to receive any cuts, but we just kind of have to dig down together and come up with creative new ways of operating,” he said. “Once we

See SAF, page 2

Smoking ban draws out stricter rules By CLAIRE MUNN Senior Editor clamunn@umail.iu.edu

Where to Smoke

ed A new Indiana law was introduced this summer that will have conseequences on smokers at IU Southeast. st. Effective as of July 1, this law bans ns smoking within eight feet of any public blic building. Individuals who are caught smoking king within eight feet of a public building g on campus, such as Knobview or Crestview, view, will be cited for an infraction. “The fee won’t be toward the university versity because it is a state law,” Charlie Edelen, en, IUS Police chief, said. “If we do cite somebody for that that, t, they’d be going to Floyd County and paying g a fee.”” So outheast However, outside the eight feet, IU Southeast ng on campus. c still maintains a policy against smoking he only place p According to the university policy, the a he winperson can smoke is inside their car with the dows rolled up. “I think we even had a question of does that include motorcycles,” Edelen said. “It does not. You have to actually be in your car.” If a person violates the policy, they will have to see the Dean of Students or vice chancellorr of Stucellor of dent Affairs. Anne Skuce, interim vice chancellor Student Affairs, said she does not expect to see a lot of negative reaction to this change. “I think it is going to be tough because students will be cited,” Skuce said. “I do feel like we were ford I think tunate to already have a policy in place, and o it then as long as faculty, staff and students abide to it shouldn’t make any difference.” ny probEdelen also said he does not foresee any lems arising from this ban because the only change is, instead of it being a university violation, itt is now a state law, as well. “I’m sure it will take people a while to get used to

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• Outside eight feet of any public building

University Policy: • In car with windows rolled up

that, but ht it’s only eight feet,” Edelen said. “Since we already had a university policy saying you can’t smoke, I don’t think it will be that big of a deal because you weren’t supposed to be doing it anyway.” On top of receiving Graphic by Claire Munn

See IUS POLICE, page 8

the horizon

Indiana University Southeast CONTACT US

State Law:

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News............................................. 1, 2, 8 Sports.................................................... 3 Events ................................................... 4 Opinions .............................................. 5 Diversions............................................ 7 Features.....................................6, 9, 10


2

News

the horizon

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Vandalism clogs up campus bathrooms By CLAIRE MUNN Senior Editor clamunn@umail.iu.edu May 18 at 3:46 p.m. A theft report was taken from Kurt McNew, 33, who said his headphones were stolen from Knobview Hall. The value totaled $10. May 23 at 8:18 a.m. There was a report of vandalism in the men’s restroom on the first floor of Physical Science. A report was taken. June 5 at 10:39 a.m. The Department of Natural Resources had to be called after a hawk was found caught in the batting net in the Baseball Field. The hawk was rescued and released. June 9 at 8 p.m. An officer was dispatched to Central Parking Lot to check on a suspicious vehicle with blankets covering the windows. Two individuals were found inside, and a verbal warning was given. June 10 at 10:29 p.m. A verbal warning had to be given for an individual in the Adult Student Center who was using the computer for inappropriate language. June 12 at 7:25 a.m. A vandalism report was taken in the women’s restroom on the first floor of Physical Plant. The damage totaled $100. June 13 at 5:02 p.m. IUS Police were dispatched following a report of a student stuck in the elevator in Knobview Hall. Maintenance was able to fix the elevator. July 23 at 9:16 a.m. A suspicious woman was found walking around the IUS Lake asking students for money. An officer located the individual, who afterward was reconnected with her social worker. Aug. 14 at 8:59 a.m. Another report of vandalism was made in the men’s restroom on the first floor of Physical Science.

Photo by Hanna Woods

Jeremy Perkins, as his drag persona Gizelle Summers, dances and sings to a crowd during the 2012 IUS Drag Show event that took place in April. Perkins won the show, which was his first stage performance in drag. This event was hosted by the Gay Straight Alliance.

GSA notes acceptance of campus sexuality By BRYAN JONES Profiles Editor jonesbry@umail.iu.edu IU Bloomington received a five out of five for being accepting of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transsexual students and staff members, according to their website on LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index. Of the various campuses, IU Southeast is not listed on the site. However, since IU Bloomington and IU Southeast are part of the same system, IU Southeast has a lot of resources for LBGT students and mirrors Bloomington. Dylan Kidwell, secondary education sophomore and Gay Straight Alliance president, said his organization has not had any problems with getting their events approved or co-sponsored. He also said they have not had any hate against them. “There’s not really a big anti-rally against us or anything,” Kidwell said. “If you look at our fliers for the drag show last year, we had a lot of people and a lot of groups co-sponsor with us. The majority of them are very nice to us and open armed and very helpful to us, at least.” Kidwell said he does not know of any organizations, groups or people who are not supportive of the GSA or their events. “We haven’t been hit with a lot of backlash or anything like that,” Kidwell said. “As far as on the

other side of the spectrum, I have no idea. A lot of people say they don’t care, and then you have people like us who really care.” Jason Bielefeld, informatics senior and GSA vice president, said they will possibly be working together with a lot of different organizations this year. “The sororities have been really nice to us,” Bielefeld said. “We will Dylan Kidwell probably be co-sponsecondary education soring some events sophomore GSA president with them this year. We also do a lot with the [Multi-Cultural Student Union].” Chris Cole, general studies senior and MSU president, said he agreed with Kidwell and Bielefeld about the acceptance of gay rights issues at IU Southeast. “I don’t have any problems doing any of our events,” Cole said. “We hit some snags with funding occasionally, but that’s a different problem.” For more information on the MSU or GSA, stop by their offices located in University Center North.

The majority of them are very nice to us and openarmed and very helpful to us, at least.

SAF

Student Affairs encourages fundraising despite drop CONTINUED FROM page 1

do that, we’ll all make it, we’ll all get together and make things the best we can for our students.” Glover also said he has not come across much questioning over the increase in the Athletic budget. “I think we’re trying to do as much as we can to give back and to make people feel a part of the campus, and I think we play a really pivotal role in shaping the campus community,” Glover said. Due to the Children’s Center seeking approval of a license, money also had to be directed to this account in order to com-

plete requirements to apply for the license. “Those were the first things we knew we had to do, and then after that we kind of listed out the programs,” Skuce said. “Based on how much they spent the prior year and what their needs were, we really had to look at each group and see what they were using the money for and see how we could cut without really making a huge impact.” Because there was an excess amount in the SAF from the previous year, Skuce said she received a lot of surprise about the cuts. “That budget committee meeting — when

we did the deliberations — was probably one of the most difficult meetings I’ve ever been in because it was so hard,” she said. “Everyone who came to talk to us had a really good case, and we wanted to fund everybody because everyone is doing great things with the money we are giving them.” Skuce also said there could potentially be another drop in the SAF again due to a decrease in enrollment for the fall 2012 semester. Victoria Bennett, political science and international studies senior and SGA president, said she believes the cuts are impacting the campus as

Bennett said. “The more [students] see our name and our brand and that it’s the students doing it, not just the administration out there giving a speech, it makes a difference.” Skuce said the toughest part of the decision ultimately came down to wanting the groups to continue to do good work, despite the cut. “We didn’t just go slashing,” Skuce said. “We really thought about it, and it was just a really difficult process because we really believe in all the student groups, but we had to cut the budget. We just didn’t have the revenue.”

a whole. “If you’re looking at it from a student perspective and what we do here, I guess the money does have to come from somewhere. It’s just finding that even balance, so it doesn’t impact one spot more than the other,” Bennett said. Organizations are still able to raise revenue through other means, such as fundraising, advertising and the availability of grants. “While there’s nothing really that the institution can do, we can help the groups try to figure out creative ways to fund their programs,” Skuce said. Due to the substantial

drop in the SAF, Skuce said the campus has been striving to increase enrollment and maintain retention. “A lot of our work this summer has been on student persistence and encouraging students to continue their education,” Skuce said. “The state funding model has changed for us for students who persist and graduate, so instead of getting the money in the front end like we used to, we’re getting it once the students complete.” Bennett said, in order to increase student participation, there needs to be an increase in community involvement. “It has to start with us,”

The Horizon is a studentproduced newspaper, published weekly during the fall and spring semesters. Editors must be enrolled in at least three credit hours and are paid.

The Horizon welcomes contributions on all subjects. Send them to this address:

The Horizon is partially funded by Student Activity Fees.

The Horizon IU Southeast 4201 Grant Line Road New Albany, IN 47150

Your first issue of The Horizon is free. All subsequent copies cost $2 each.

the horizon SENIOR EDITOR Claire Munn clamunn@umail.iu.edu

SPORTS EDITOR Hanna Woods hrwoods@umail.iu.edu

PROFILES EDITORS Bryan Jones jonesbry@umail.iu.edu Courtney McKinley comckinl@imail.iu.edu

FEATURES EDITORS Stephen Allen allen68@imail.iu.edu Brittany Powell bripowel@ius.edu

ADVISERS Ron Allman rallman@ius.edu Adam Maksl amaksl@ius.edu STAFF Tiffany Adams Jeremy Eiler Gail Faustyn Taylor Ferguson Samantha Frazier Aysia Hogle Kim Kerby Kali Schmuckie Sam Weber

To report a story idea or to obtain information, call 941-2253 or e-mail horizon@ius.edu. The Horizon is not an official publication of Indiana University Southeast, and therefore does not necessarily reflect its views.

or e-mail us at horizon@ius.edu The Horizon is a member of the Indiana Collegiate Press Association, Hoosier State Press Association, and the Associated Collegiate Press.

Letters to the editors must be signed, include student’s major and class standing and be fewer than 300 words. The Horizon reserves the right to edit for brevity, grammar, and style and may limit frequent letter writers.


2

News

the horizon

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Vandalism clogs up campus bathrooms By CLAIRE MUNN Senior Editor clamunn@umail.iu.edu May 18 at 3:46 p.m. A theft report was taken from Kurt McNew, 33, who said his headphones were stolen from Knobview Hall. The value totaled $10. May 23 at 8:18 a.m. There was a report of vandalism in the men’s restroom on the first floor of Physical Science. A report was taken. June 5 at 10:39 a.m. The Department of Natural Resources had to be called after a hawk was found caught in the batting net in the Baseball Field. The hawk was rescued and released. June 9 at 8 p.m. An officer was dispatched to Central Parking Lot to check on a suspicious vehicle with blankets covering the windows. Two individuals were found inside, and a verbal warning was given. June 10 at 10:29 p.m. A verbal warning had to be given for an individual in the Adult Student Center who was using the computer for inappropriate language. June 12 at 7:25 a.m. A vandalism report was taken in the women’s restroom on the first floor of Physical Plant. The damage totaled $100. June 13 at 5:02 p.m. IUS Police were dispatched following a report of a student stuck in the elevator in Knobview Hall. Maintenance was able to fix the elevator. July 23 at 9:16 a.m. A suspicious woman was found walking around the IUS Lake asking students for money. An officer located the individual, who afterward was reconnected with her social worker. Aug. 14 at 8:59 a.m. Another report of vandalism was made in the men’s restroom on the first floor of Physical Science.

Photo by Hanna Woods

Jeremy Perkins, as his drag persona Gizelle Summers, dances and sings to a crowd during the 2012 IUS Drag Show event that took place in April. Perkins won the show, which was his first stage performance in drag. This event was hosted by the Gay Straight Alliance.

GSA notes acceptance of campus sexuality By BRYAN JONES Profiles Editor jonesbry@umail.iu.edu IU Bloomington received a five out of five for being accepting of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transsexual students and staff members, according to their website on LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index. Of the various campuses, IU Southeast is not listed on the site. However, since IU Bloomington and IU Southeast are part of the same system, IU Southeast has a lot of resources for LBGT students and mirrors Bloomington. Dylan Kidwell, secondary education sophomore and Gay Straight Alliance president, said his organization has not had any problems with getting their events approved or co-sponsored. He also said they have not had any hate against them. “There’s not really a big anti-rally against us or anything,” Kidwell said. “If you look at our fliers for the drag show last year, we had a lot of people and a lot of groups co-sponsor with us. The majority of them are very nice to us and open armed and very helpful to us, at least.” Kidwell said he does not know of any organizations, groups or people who are not supportive of the GSA or their events. “We haven’t been hit with a lot of backlash or anything like that,” Kidwell said. “As far as on the

other side of the spectrum, I have no idea. A lot of people say they don’t care, and then you have people like us who really care.” Jason Bielefeld, informatics senior and GSA vice president, said they will possibly be working together with a lot of different organizations this year. “The sororities have been really nice to us,” Bielefeld said. “We will Dylan Kidwell probably be co-sponsecondary education soring some events sophomore GSA president with them this year. We also do a lot with the [Multi-Cultural Student Union].” Chris Cole, general studies senior and MSU president, said he agreed with Kidwell and Bielefeld about the acceptance of gay rights issues at IU Southeast. “I don’t have any problems doing any of our events,” Cole said. “We hit some snags with funding occasionally, but that’s a different problem.” For more information on the MSU or GSA, stop by their offices located in University Center North.

The majority of them are very nice to us and openarmed and very helpful to us, at least.

SAF

Student Affairs encourages fundraising despite drop CONTINUED FROM page 1

do that, we’ll all make it, we’ll all get together and make things the best we can for our students.” Glover also said he has not come across much questioning over the increase in the Athletic budget. “I think we’re trying to do as much as we can to give back and to make people feel a part of the campus, and I think we play a really pivotal role in shaping the campus community,” Glover said. Due to the Children’s Center seeking approval of a license, money also had to be directed to this account in order to com-

plete requirements to apply for the license. “Those were the first things we knew we had to do, and then after that we kind of listed out the programs,” Skuce said. “Based on how much they spent the prior year and what their needs were, we really had to look at each group and see what they were using the money for and see how we could cut without really making a huge impact.” Because there was an excess amount in the SAF from the previous year, Skuce said she received a lot of surprise about the cuts. “That budget committee meeting — when

we did the deliberations — was probably one of the most difficult meetings I’ve ever been in because it was so hard,” she said. “Everyone who came to talk to us had a really good case, and we wanted to fund everybody because everyone is doing great things with the money we are giving them.” Skuce also said there could potentially be another drop in the SAF again due to a decrease in enrollment for the fall 2012 semester. Victoria Bennett, political science and international studies senior and SGA president, said she believes the cuts are impacting the campus as

Bennett said. “The more [students] see our name and our brand and that it’s the students doing it, not just the administration out there giving a speech, it makes a difference.” Skuce said the toughest part of the decision ultimately came down to wanting the groups to continue to do good work, despite the cut. “We didn’t just go slashing,” Skuce said. “We really thought about it, and it was just a really difficult process because we really believe in all the student groups, but we had to cut the budget. We just didn’t have the revenue.”

a whole. “If you’re looking at it from a student perspective and what we do here, I guess the money does have to come from somewhere. It’s just finding that even balance, so it doesn’t impact one spot more than the other,” Bennett said. Organizations are still able to raise revenue through other means, such as fundraising, advertising and the availability of grants. “While there’s nothing really that the institution can do, we can help the groups try to figure out creative ways to fund their programs,” Skuce said. Due to the substantial

drop in the SAF, Skuce said the campus has been striving to increase enrollment and maintain retention. “A lot of our work this summer has been on student persistence and encouraging students to continue their education,” Skuce said. “The state funding model has changed for us for students who persist and graduate, so instead of getting the money in the front end like we used to, we’re getting it once the students complete.” Bennett said, in order to increase student participation, there needs to be an increase in community involvement. “It has to start with us,”

The Horizon is a studentproduced newspaper, published weekly during the fall and spring semesters. Editors must be enrolled in at least three credit hours and are paid.

The Horizon welcomes contributions on all subjects. Send them to this address:

The Horizon is partially funded by Student Activity Fees.

The Horizon IU Southeast 4201 Grant Line Road New Albany, IN 47150

Your first issue of The Horizon is free. All subsequent copies cost $2 each.

the horizon SENIOR EDITOR Claire Munn clamunn@umail.iu.edu

SPORTS EDITOR Hanna Woods hrwoods@umail.iu.edu

PROFILES EDITORS Bryan Jones jonesbry@umail.iu.edu Courtney McKinley comckinl@imail.iu.edu

FEATURES EDITORS Stephen Allen allen68@imail.iu.edu Brittany Powell bripowel@ius.edu

ADVISERS Ron Allman rallman@ius.edu Adam Maksl amaksl@ius.edu STAFF Tiffany Adams Jeremy Eiler Gail Faustyn Taylor Ferguson Samantha Frazier Aysia Hogle Kim Kerby Kali Schmuckie Sam Weber

To report a story idea or to obtain information, call 941-2253 or e-mail horizon@ius.edu. The Horizon is not an official publication of Indiana University Southeast, and therefore does not necessarily reflect its views.

or e-mail us at horizon@ius.edu The Horizon is a member of the Indiana Collegiate Press Association, Hoosier State Press Association, and the Associated Collegiate Press.

Letters to the editors must be signed, include student’s major and class standing and be fewer than 300 words. The Horizon reserves the right to edit for brevity, grammar, and style and may limit frequent letter writers.


the horizon

Sports

3

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Grenadiers power over Patriots

Patriots’ Rebecca Just, freshman outside hitter, ended the set by a forced Grenadier error off her serve. The Patriots went into the fourth set with the same aggression. They IU Southeast ,3-2, faced off against found holes in the Grenadier dethe Patriots of St. Catharine, 4-1, Aug. 21 fense placing kills just out of reach in the Activities Building. for IU Southeast. The Grenadiers The newly renovated crimson bleachfailed to break the Patriots in the ers contained a fairly large crowd of third set and ended the set in an unSt. Catharine and IUS fans for the first forced error 25-14. home game of the Lady Grenadiers seaStevenson said his team came out son. playing timid, and in the third and During the summer session, the Athforth set there was a change in the letics Department updated the bleachers team’s dynamics. in the gym to accommodate for a safer “We showed up, and we played environment for the Grenadier fans. well,” Stevenson said. “In the first “The old bleachers had been there two sets, we made a lot of mistakes. for 30 or 40 years,” Joe Glover, athletic If we don’t make errors, we play redirector, said. “They were just out-ofally well.” date and not up-to-date with new safety The final set was more contested standards.” by both teams creating a lead of no The fans were met with a night of more than 3 points by either opheavily competitive collegiate volleyponent for the duration of the final ball. The two teams faced off in a five-set set. game, with the Grenadiers prevailing. The break point came from a PaThe game showcased the talented untriot error, forcing the ball into the derclassman that are new to the crimson net for the Grenadier lead 6-5. Mayteam. One of the outstanding debuts brier found her stride in the fifth set came from Coral Maybrier, freshman with nine kills. She broke down the outside hitter, who clinched nine kills in Patriots defense, putting the Grenathe fifth set and was a key factor to the diers ahead for the second half of Grenadier win. the set. The Patriots were down two players The Grenadiers defeated the Padue to injury, and Head Coach Adam triots 15-12 in the tie-break set. Stevenson said that was a partial factor Schum lead the Grenadiers with to the Patriots loss. 13 kills. Jade Trouter, junior middle “It’s the beginning of the season, so back, followed, picking up 12 kills. we’re starting off on a rough note with Lesley Drury-Prather, IUS volinjuries,” Stevenson said. “We knew it leyball head coach, declined an inwas going to be a tough game, but it Photos by Hanna Woods terview to comment on the game. should have been a competitive game.” Emily Knight, senior defensive specialist, serves to St. Catharine in the match up between Stevenson said part of the loss for The Grenadiers got off to an early the two teams Aug. 21 in the Activities Building. The Grenadiers defeated the Patriots in 5 sets; his team was due to the lack of exlead, taking the first set 25-14. The ag- 25-14, 25-23, 17-25, 14-25, 15-12. perience on the court. gressive start from the Grenadiers failed “We’re playing six freshmen, and I think she is to translate to the rest of the game. The early win point on the scoreboard for the Grenadiers with a playing one,” Stevenson said. “Experience will beat turned out to be the only quick win for IU South- kill. The Grenadiers found their break in the second talent in collegiate volleyball.” east. The two teams will meet again at St. Catharine The Patriots came out more defensive in the sec- set with a kill from Schum to put the Grenadiers ond set, getting an early lead on the Grenadiers and ahead of the Patriots for the first time in the set at 24- on Oct. 9, and Stevenson said he expects a different maintaining that pace up until the last two points of 23. A Patriots hit, placed just outside the back court outcome in scoring. clinched the second set for IU Southeast. “By the time [IUS] comes to our place we will be the game. The Patriots came into the third set with similar in school, and we have a very large ruckus crowd,” The Patriots served for the first four points of the game shutting out the Grenadiers. After a long rally, aggression. The Grenadiers trailed by a deficit of Stevenson said. “My girls playing at home gives them at least five points, two points in every game.” Sara Schum, sophomore middle back, put the first five to seven points for the duration of the game. By HANNA WOODS Sports Editor hrwoods@umail.iu.edu

Sara Schum, sophomore middle back, prepares to bump the ball up to one of her teammates. Kristen Newberry, sophomore defense specialist, and Stephanie Bradshaw, sophomore defense specialists, wait for the ball. Schum lead the Grenadiers with 13 kills.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jade Troutman, junior middle back, and Stephanie Bradshaw, sophomore defense specialist, celebrate the Grenadier victory with Coral Maybrier, middle. Maybrier ended the game with placing kill just outside of the reach of the Patriots defense to end the tie-break set 15-13.

Coral Maybrier, freshman outside hitter, helped clinch a late victory against the St. Catharine Patriots Aug. 21. Maybrier picked up 9 kills for IU Southeast, the majority in the fifth set. Maybrier’s aggressive set led to the 15-12 win. This is the 5’7” freshman’s first season playing as a Grenadier.


4

Events

the horizon

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

TOP EVENTS Monday

Thursday

Friday

Donuts and Directions

Campus Boogie

World Fest

Where: University Center, McCullough Plaza When: 7:30 a.m. - 10 a.m. The Student Program Council will be helping new students become acquainted with the campus by giving directions and handing out a special treat. This event will take place on Tuesday, as well.

Where: Ogle Center When: 7 - 8:30 p.m. The IUS annual dance competition among student organizations where contestants compete to win the Campus Boogie trophy and bragging rights as the “best dance crew” will take place.

Where: Downtown Louisville When: 5:30 - 9:30 p.m. There will be a bus tour of the downtown Louisville area where participants can enjoy music on three stages, food vendors and crafts. Admission is free and bus leaves from McCullough Plaza.

MONDAY

August 27

CSF Day

Democrats

Noon - 1:15 p.m. University Center North, McCullough Plaza

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. University Center North, Student Organization Center

Week of Welcome kicks off with a free lunch and music provided by the Christian Student Fellowship organization. All students are welcome to enjoy the festivities.

The College Democrats will have a meeting to discuss the upcoming election and other activities of the College Democrats. All new and returning students are welcome.

TUESDAY

SUBMISSIONS To submit material to The Horizon for the Events page, call The Horizon at 812-9412253 or e-mail us at horizon@ius.edu. Events should be submitted one week in advance.

August 28

Diversity Day

Sororities

Show Off Show

Noon - 1:15 p.m. University Center North, McCullough Plaza

12:15 - 1:15 p.m. University Center South, room 127

7 - 9 p.m. Meadow Lodge, Great Room

Week of Welcome presents Diversity Day where students are invited to enjoy free food, music by Soul Khan and to learn about the diverse groups on the IUS campus.

Sorority recruitment information sessions will take place throughout the day. The times are 12:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. This event will reoccur on Wednesday, Aug. 29.

As part of Week of Welcome, comedians Evan and Scot will perform tricks such as balancing on bowling bowls and telling jokes in the Show Off Show.

WEDNESDAY

August 29

Free Pancakes

Greek Day

Zanzabar

8 - 10 a.m. University Center South, Breezeway

Noon - 1:15 p.m. University Center North, McCullough Plaza

9 - 11:55 p.m. Zanzabar, Louisville

Students, faculty and staff are all invited to join the chancellor and vice chancellors for a complimentary pancake breakfast to kick-off the new year.

As part of Week of Welcome, students are invited to enjoy free food, music performed by Fools for Rowan and see the fraternities and sororities from the IUS campus.

Zanzabar will present Birds and Batteries and Lydia Burrell. Doors open at 8 p.m. with an admission of $6. Individuals must be 21 or older to enjoy the show.

THURSDAY

August 30

SPC Day

SGA

Volleyball

Noon- 1:15 p.m. University Center North, McCullough Plaza

4:30 - 6 p.m. University Center South room 122

7 - 9 p.m. Activities Building, Grenadiers vs. Midway

As part of Week of Welcome, students are invited to enjoy free food and music. This event will give students the chance to get to know the Student Program Council.

The Student Government Association will be having its weekly meeting. All students are welcome to attend and bring concerns or ideas to the SGA.

The IU Southeast women’s volleyball team will be facing off against Midway in the Activities Building. Students are invited to cheer on the Grenadiers.

WEEKEND

We like to move it, move it

Photo by Stephen Allen

Melissa Weissinger, development officer, assists students moving into the Residence Halls during Move In Day.

Aug. 31 - Sept. 2

Ghost Train

FAT Trolley Hop

Cat Show

Rage-O-Saurus

Burgoo Festival

Flea Market

9 - 11:55 p.m. Zanzabar, Louisville

6 - 10 p.m. The Comfy Cow, Frankfort Avenue

9 a.m. - Noon Kentucky Expo Center, Louisville

1 - 3 p.m. School of Sharks Theater, Louisville

Sept. 1 - 3 Louisville Water Tower, Louisville

Sept. 2 - 5 Kentucky Expo Center, Louisville

On Aug. 31, Zanzabar will present The Midnight Ghost Train and Left Lane Cruiser. Doors open at 8 p.m. Individuals must be 21 or older. Admission is $7.

A Maker’s Mark Trolley Hop will take place on Aug. 31 for a “red-headed pub crawl” where trolley hoppers pick up a red wig and enjoy drink specials.

On Sept. 1, cats from all around the world will compete for the championship prize in the 51st annual cat show.. For more information, please consult kentuckianacatclub.com.

Hot-tempered dinosaur puppets learn how to deal with their anger from a talking volcano during a puppet show for pre-schoolers on Sept. 1. The show admission is $5.

There will be live Bluegrass music, food, an arts and craft vendor market and free parking at the festival on Sept. 1 at 5 p.m. through Sept. 3 until 7 p.m.

A Kentucky Flea Market Labor Day Spectacular will present more than 1,100 booths to celebrate Labor Day weekend. Admission is free during this four-day event.

NOTICES

UPCOMING

LOCAL Girls Night

Celtic Heritage

SGA

Open Books

Labor Day

Dance Team

8 p.m. - 4 a.m. The Sports & Social Club, 4th St. Live! in Louisville

1 - 10 p.m. Jeffersonville Riverstage, Jeffersonville

4:30 - 6 p.m. University Center South, room 122

Noon - 1 p.m. Lower Floor, IUS Library

All Day IU Southeast, New Albany

2- 4 p.m. Activities Building, Open Tryouts

There will be a Girls Night Out on the first Friday of every month featuring $25 bottles of Skinnygirl cocktails and other drink specials. This event begins on Sept. 7.

“Celts on the River 2012” will be held on Sept. 8 to celebrate Celtic heritage through music, crafts, and food. Admission is free when participants donate a backpack.

The Student Government Association will be having its weekly meeting on Sept. 6. All students are welcome to attend and bring concerns or ideas to the SGA.

There will be an open books discussion on Sept. 14. Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson will be the book discussion’s focus. This is an open event.

There will not be any classes scheduled for Sept. 3, due to the holiday. Students, faculty and staff are given an early-inthe-semester break for Labor Day.

The IUS dance team will have open tryouts on Sept. 9. For additional information and practice times, please contact Alicia CorcoranScott at (812) 283-3936.

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Louisville Zoo

Open Mic

Refund

Counseling

All Day Louisville Zoo, Louisville

12:15 - 1:15 p.m. University Center South, The Commons

All Day Bursars Office, University Center North

All Day IU Southeast, New Albany

There will be a Family Day Out at the Louisville Zoo on Sept. 15 to experience fun and adventure. Free tickets are available to students and staff with an ID, while supplies last.

The Mike Sullivan Band will perform on Sept. 19, during open mic. The event is free. For more information about the band, visit www.mikesullivanband.com.

The last day for students to receive a refund for dropped classes is Sept. 23. After this date, students will no longer be able to receive a refund for dropped classes.

Advising sessions for interested Master’s in Counseling candidates must attend an advising session. Sessions will be offered throughout September.

Goth Night @ Irish Exit

207 East Main Street, New Albany

Fridays, $5 all access (21+) VIP lounge downstairs with DJ DV8


Opinions

the horizon

5

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Political slamming limits voter choice By BRITTANY POWELL Features Editor bripowel@ius.edu

“I am a concerned citizen, and I approve this message.” During this political election, most media outlets — TV, radio, etc. — are bombarding viewers and listeners with messages about why or why not to vote for a particular candidate. Lately, the campaign advertisements have been focusing on the “why not” to vote. Yes, the goal is to persuade the public to vote for their candidate; however, more and more of this is being done through fear and spite for the other party. Negative presidential advertisements are successful only because they confuse vot-

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

ers into believing a candidate to be untrustworthy and corrupt. Hoping to spread a shadow on his opponent, each party continues to give a bad reputation about their opponent through negative campaign ads, while the only case they are providing the public about their party is their candidate is the lesser of two evils. The voter’s choice has been simplified to choosing which candidate terrifies the public the least. Obama has cut welfare-to-work requirements. Well, this is what Romney is falsely claiming in one of his more recent campaign focuses. Is this another tale of “Romney Hood?” Romney does not pay his income taxes — at least Obama would have us believe this. How about that “Obamalogna?” All of this mudslinging and finger-pointing leads more toward public skepticism and confusion instead of toward the campaign’s goal of seeing the opponent in a clear light. While a voter second guessing his choice for president is never bad, it can be difficult to weigh options when all he is faced with is scandal and dishonesty. It is ridiculous enough that all this “he said, she said” business is getting forced down the public’s throat. What is more ridiculous is the cost of the advertising. “In the most recent election cycle last year, way over $2 billion was funneled into political ads, a record high for a midterm campaign,” Michael Copps, commissioner, said in a statement made on the

FCC’s government website. That’s right. Presidential candidates are spending more than $2 billion to bash each other after episodes of Everybody Loves Raymond. What was that about healthcare? Did someone say something about the economy? All I could hear was money being flushed down the toilet. Every voter has the right to a clear understanding of his choice of candidates, and political advertisements abuse that right. Thankfully, these campaign ads are not viewers’ only available source of information. Local representatives for the Democratic and Republican parties will be more than happy to give information to any citizen about the goals and beliefs of their particular candidate. Watch the news, look up the facts online and, whatever you do, when those slanderous ads sneak their way onto the TV, take them with a grain of salt. Better yet, put them on mute or change the channel.

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

Editors come out for civil rights, acceptance ery other American, so they deserve the same rights that marriage grants. There are domestic partnerships, but that does not guarantee the same rights During the summer, gay rights and marriage for the spouse, such as insurance or any decision if equality has been talked about in the news and po- the spouse dies. According to certain groups of Christians, homolitical arenas. Even some companies, such as Chick-Fil-A and sexuals are going to hell because it says in Leviticus Oreo’s rainbow cookie, have come out against it or that a man should not lie next to his fellow man. However, it also says people should not get their in support of it. It has caused a lot of controversy on both sides, from people refusing to eat at Chick-Fil- hair cut. Leviticus is a part of the Old Testament, and, when the New A and others boycotting Testament was written, Oreo because of their supeven though it does port. condemn homosexualIt is not a surprise to us ity, it talks more about that Chick-Fil-A came out forgiveness because Jeagainst gay equality. They sus died for the sins of are a Christian-founded everyone who accepts company and have kept him. So the argument it that way for more than about homosexuals 66 years; however, their from Leviticus is insupport and donations of valid. millions of dollars to antiOther people claim gay, hate groups and orthat homosexuality is a ganizations claiming they choice. One of our edican cure homosexuality is tors is openly gay, so what sent a lot of people his argument, and a lot over the edge about it. of others’ arguments, Many people were ofis they were born this fended by Oreo coming way. out in support of marIt is a choice if a riage equality because Creative Commons photo courtesy of Adam Bouska. person comes out as they do not support it This photo was taken as part of the NOH8 @ IU photo homosexual or bisexthemselves. What they fail to realize shoot in Bloomington in collaboration with the nationwide ual. However, it is not a choice. Why would is a lot of major Ameri- NOH8 Campaign. people choose to be a can companies support it, including Apple, Dell, Coors Brewing, Ford Motor way that makes a lot of people look down on them for and consider them less than a human? Why Companies, Best Buy and more. Gay marriage is not a personal issue for most would they choose it when a lot of people are haof us because most of our editors are heterosexual; rassed or die while they are walking down the street however, just because it is not an issue in our lives with their significant other? It is no choice, it is genetics. does not mean we are not taking a stand. Why There are some who claim the LGBT community should certain individuals, just because they like something different than most, be denied the rights is going to try and turn all straight people gay, and that is not the case at all. They just want rights, and that are supposed to be given to them? Just because someone likes or loves a member of they are going to fight for them until they get them, the same sex does not make them any less of a per- the same way African Americans and women did son. They still wake up, work and pay taxes like ev- more than 60 years ago. It’s the same situation, just STAFF EDITORIAL horizon@ius.edu

different discriminants. Denying one group of people rights that anyone else is entitled to is like giving all but three children in a class of 30 a cookie and telling the three who did not get one they did not deserve it because their shirts were multi-colored. We are all people, and we all want to be accepted. Even though some may not agree with what we are saying, all we are asking is for acceptance. It is not going to ruin the sanctity of marriage, and it will not cause the end of the world. Acceptance is key. It is 2012, and fighting for civil rights should be a thing of the past. There are millions of issues that need attention, and, because we are still fighting something that should have been taken care of years ago, other issues are being ignored. It will not be an easy battle for the LGBT community, but it will happen, whether people are for it or against it. It is not a “gay issue,” it is a human rights issue.

Student Opinion How has the delay in receiving financial aid affected you?

Nick Lawrence Business sophomore

I wasn’t affected because I had the money to buy books beforehand. Even if I didn’t IUS gave us the option to charge up to $600 on the UCard.

Jason Bielefeld Informatics senior

It’s inconvenient for students that are depending on financial aid to pay for books or other school-related items.

Ryan Malone Psychology sophomore

It’s affecting me because I cannot buy my books from Amazon, and I’m forced to buy them through the bookstore here.

Chelsey Hicks International business freshman

It hasn’t really affected me. It would be nice to have the money now, but I just used my UCard to charge my books. Photo by Stephen Allen

Justin Armenta, psychology sophomore, Dylan Kidwell, secondary education sophomore and president of Gay-Straight Alliance, and Christian Miller, secondary education sophomore, pass out candy and condoms for Gay Straight Alliance during Orientation on Aug. 24.

ONLINE


6

Features

the horizon

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Students study socialist structure By BRITTANY POWELL Features Editor bripowel@ius.edu One small, post-communist island south of the border has permanently altered many study abroad students’ perspectives this past summer. Cuba in Transition, a program offered for class credit, took 20 students from IU Southeast and Spring Hill College, along with three faculty members, on a three-week venture to an island whose culture is not well known in the U.S. “The focus of the trip was to look at changes being made in Cuba,” Clifford Staten, professor of political science, said. Staten said Cuba is in a period of transition, from a socialist to capitalism system. In order to see this transition in action, the students talked to anyone they encountered, asking them what changes they have seen in the past four years, and if they still support Fidel Castro. While talking to government officials, business owners, faculty from the University of Havana and people on the street, Staten said the students heard a wide variety of responses. “People argued there shouldn’t be any change,” Staten said. “Some said that change wasn’t happening fast enough.” In the three-week class prior to the trip, students learned what to expect when visiting Cuba. They read several books and articles about Cuba and the history of the island, and they learned about recent changes in the post cold war era. “What we studied in class we saw on the streets,” Staten said. Mary Mour, political science se-

Courtesy photo

Adam Sirles, IUS student, drinks from a coconut on a hot day after visiting the Ernest Hemingway property.

nior, said the biggest change she saw were Cubans making money without getting it approved by the state. Previously, Cuban people could not own cars or start personal businesses. “Before, everything was run by the state,” Mour said. “You literally had

to have permission from the state to breathe. It was a dictatorship. There were a lot of boundaries, a lot of rules.” Mour said she noticed a lot of pride in everyone she met in Cuba. “I saw socialism and socialism works,” Mour said. “They didn’t have

anything to begin with. Everyone is poor. Everyone is equal. The Cuban people are happy people no matter what.” Noticing differences between cultures, Mour said she felt helpless for the people living in Cuba while she was visiting; however, when she got back to the U.S, she could appreciate their culture more. “That’s how they live,” Mour said. “It’s not bad for them, that’s their life. They don’t feel mistreated or poor.” One person’s story stuck with Mour even after she left Cuba. Their tour guide, Linnet, went to school, speaks four languages and served in the military. “You’re in a third world country, and you meet someone that intelligent,” Mour said. “That didn’t stop her from being successful.” While the trip was focused on learning about political change in Cuba, the trip was not lacking in cultural aspects. Students took salsa lessons in Havana and danced to Cuban bands playing mambo and cha-cha. Bicycling tours, hiking and boat rides were of the many activities involved in the trip. “We learned a lot, but, at the same time, we had a really good time,” Staten said. One of the biggest focuses of the trip was in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra. Hiking up the secluded area, Mour said a path was nowhere to be found. “We hiked up four kilometers where Fidel and the gorillas lived for six months,” Mour said. Students were able to see the conditions of Fidel Castro’s 1957 rebel camps in the mountains.

Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo

Joe Van Horn, John Kummer, Dejan Tomanic, Mary Mour, Amory Alvey, and Cory Cochran in front of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution in central Havana.

Mary Mour, political science senior, gives an employee at the Ernest Hemingway property a cigarette.

IUS preserves in time capsule for 25 years By COURTNEY MCKINLEY Profiles Editor comckinl@imail.iu.edu Last spring, Dale Brown, secondary education senior and president of the Student Alumni Association, and Matt Owen, political science senior, met to discuss new tradition ideas to implement for the 70th anniversary of IU Southeast. Brown, Owen and fellow members of the SAA came up with the tradition of burying a time capsule on campus. “We thought a time capsule would be a great tradition for the campus because it is a collaboration and a larger connectivity for the organizations and university departments,” Brown said. “It’s a great way for student alumni to look back and see the university from the past.” The time capsule will be re-opened in 25 years. “We decided to make the time capsule opening date 25 years from now because, by then, the items may be unique and have aged a bit,” Brown said. “In addition to that, the individuals who chose those items for the time capsule would more than likely still be around 25 years later to see it re-opened.” Every five years, Brown said the SAA plans to put together another time capsule. “We chose to add another time capsule every five years so every student who completes their tenure at IU Southeast will have a chance to put something in the time capsule and leave their mark on the campus.” In the last few weeks of the spring semester, the SAA reached out to other campus organizations and asked each group to donate an item for the time capsule that symbolized their cause or purpose for the campus. Several organizations, such as the Gamer Society, the Non-Traditional Student Union and the Student Veteran’s Organization, donated various items that represented their group. The Gamer Society donated a PlayStation console

with accessories and a game. Members of the society also signed the console before donating it to the time capsule. The Non-Traditional Student Union donated a photo of their group during the spring planting project of 70 trees. Most organizations on campus were offered an opportunity to plant a tree in their organization’s name. Each organization that participated was able to place a ribbon with their organization’s name around a limb of the tree they planted. “The original ribbons from the organization tree planting project will be put into the time capsule,” Brown said. “That way, if an organization was not able to donate an item for the time capsule, they are still accounted for and remembered by the time capsule.” The Student Veteran’s Organization donated a book about Medal of Honor recipients. What made this book unique was the signature of Herself Woodrow “Woody” Williams, the oldest Medal of Honor recipient from the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II. Along with his signature, Williams also wrote what he thought life would be like in 25 years. “In 25 years, our automobiles will not require a driver to operate the car,” Williams wrote. “Most of our teaching and learning will be from our homes with electronics.” There were certain criteria each organization had to follow when choosing an item for the time capsule. Explosives, flammable items and items that could mold were not permitted inside the time capsule. Also, each item had to fit a certain size criteria due to the time capsule’s limited amount of space. Every organization that submitted an item was approved by the committee of SAA officers to go into the time capsule. Chancellor Sandra Patterson-Randles donated an acorn that came from the tree that was used to carve the Grenadier statue that resides in the IUS Library. The acorn symbolizes the campus of IU Southeast as it started off small and grew into a large, strong university. Like the Grenadier statue, the time capsule will reside in the IUS Library, as well.

“We decided to keep the time capsule in doors to protect it better, It is risky to actually bury the time capsule because of the uncertainty of how the items will hold up underground,” Marty Rosen, director of Library Services, said the time capsule will be placed in a secure location in the lower level of the Library that will serve as a safe haven for the time capsule. This location will also still be accessible 25 years from now. “I think this is an exciting project,” Rosen said. “Dale has immerged as a quiet, but very effective leader for this campus. I’m pleased he chose [the IUS Library] to be the settling place for the time capsule. It will be a great legacy for the campus.” The IU Alumni Association paid for the time capsule; however, Brown said he hopes the time capsule can eventually help fund itself. The SAA donated an IU cheerleader Barbie from 1996. The Barbie is still in the original box, and Brown said he is hoping the Barbie could e ve n t u a l l y be auctioned off as it ages and becomes an antique to provide a fundraising option for the time capsule. Brown said he is waiting on a few more significant items to put into the time capsule before it is sealed. One of the items Brown is waiting for is a letter of intention that describes the purpose and intention of the time capsule, which will also include a list of each item inside the time capsule and the organization the item symbolizes. In addition to the letter, Brown said he plans to put a journal inside the time capsule. “The journal asks students, faculty and staff to recall something they thought was important in this academic year,” he said. “It could be anything, not necessarily IU Southeast related. It also asks what people think life will be like in 25 years.” Brown said the purpose of the time capsule is to help alumni reconnect with the university.


the horizon

Diversions

7

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

By SAMANTHA WEAVER • It was William E. Vaughan who made the following sage observation: “To err is human, but to really foul things up you need a computer.” • Those who study such things say that your brain can store 100 times as much information as a typical desktop computer. • In 1930, United Airlines began using the aviation industry’s first stewardesses. To qualify for the position, applicants had to be registered nurses. • George Washington, Dolley Madison, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton helped to found this country, but that wasn’t all they had in common; they were also all big fans of eating ice cream. • If you ever hear an orangutan belch, you’d better watch out. That’s a warning sign that you’re encroaching on his territory. • When Andrew Jackson was running for president in 1828, an opponent called him a

jackass. Instead of being offended, Jackson embraced the epithet, using the image of a donkey in campaign materials to represent his stubborn refusal to knuckle under to big business. Later, Thomas Nash, a political cartoonist in New York, started using the donkey to represent the Democratic Party as a whole. • If you’re a well-traveled person, you might have noticed that the average woman in Scandinavia is taller than the average man in Asia. • Only 12 people have walked on the surface of the moon. • The framework for the Statue of Liberty was built by Gustave Eiffel, who later became famous for building Paris’ iconic tower. • If you’re stopping at a fast-food restaurant for lunch today, you might want to consider the following: It takes a whopping 1,500 gallons of water to produce an average fast-food meal. —•— Thought for the Day: “The more information you get, the less fantasy you have.” — Andy Warhol (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

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8

News

the horizon

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

IUS Police

Abundant thefts lead to arrest of Louisville criminal CONTINUED FROM page 1

a citation for smoking within in the eight feet, Skuce said individuals will still have to see administration. “I respect students’ right to o smoke, but we just have to limit the location,” ocation,” Skuce said. Since the law has only been en in effect for a short amount of time, me, Edelen said they are willing to give out warnings in the beginning. “Honestly, when I’ve seen n people smoking on campus, they haven’t been within the eight feet,”” Edelen said. “Usually, they’re out by the picnic tables or the parking lot.” IU Southeast will also bee placing stickers on each door stating g the new law and describing the details ails of the ban. Parking Beginning this school year, r, changes in citation fees and costs will be occurring in the IUS parking policy. y. The main changes involve issues of a invalid permit or improper display of a valid permit, which were both h raised from $10 to $15. The charge for an expired parking meter also increased from $5 to $10. However, Edelen said students dents who receive a

citation but have a valid permit may, on an appeal, fill out a form once every calendar year in order to waive the fee. “A lot of the appeals we get are ‘I left it in my car,’ or ‘I left it in my other car, but I have a va valid permit,’ and people don’t understand why it has to be displayed, so we’re trying try to give them a free one,” Edelen said said. IU South Southeast will be notifying students of the new parking policy through its website and an a booklet with a page describing it. Edelen said this is also an effort to encourage individuals to buy parking permits. know we’ve got some students “I kno who want to go along and do the day not do anything and take a gampass or no ble that they th won’t get a citation, so inthe citations would help people creasing th doing that,” Edelen said. get away from f “We’d like everyone to have the permit don’t have to write as many tickso we don ets.” While it may be cheaper for students who attend only a few classes a the day passes, Edelen week to purchase pu said there are more negatives to not having a parking permit. perm “[With the day d passes,] you have the hasmaking sure your dollar sles of waiting in line, l up, sometimes it’s raining and isn’t crumpled up

sometimes it jams,” Edelen said. “Also, people don’t realize the pass is assigned to you and not to your car, so you can move it between cars.” Student parking permits cost $30 per semester and can be purchased at the IUS Police Department located in University Center North, room 027. Thefts

IUS Police have been occupied with several theft reports that arose in the spring semester, during the second week of April. Five individuals claimed to have items stolen, including a wallet on April 11 and a phone on April 12. Both of those items were returned later those days. However, the suspect of two other thefts from April 10 was caught and involved Brian Dillen, 40, who was arrested on a charge of three counts of fraudulent use of a credit card and one count of theft. All of the counts were felonies. The items stolen from IU Southeast included a wallet and a camera from the University Center. Prior to IU Southeast, Dillen had also stolen items from both Jefferson Community and Technical College and Spalding University. “What these guys do is walk around and try to find just anything lying around,” Edelen said. “They’re just walking through, and they see a bag, they pick it up and walk out. They’re getting laptops, wallets, cameras and whatever is sitting out.” The final theft occurred on April 6, involving a stolen wallet and credit cards, has not been found, and the case is still open.

Scholarship

Organization seeks increase of activeness through SAA CONTINUED FROM page 1

focus on increasing our ability to award scholarships to students that are active in the Student Alumni Association,” Watkins said. In order to qualify for these scholarships, Wayne said there are a few requirements they are looking for when se-

lecting recipients. One important qualification is the student must have a family member who is an alumnus or alumna from IU Southeast. “What Bloomington does in theirs is you must be a son or a daughter,” Wayne said. “We wanted to expand ours to be family members. Family members

could be a spouse, a cousin, an aunt, an uncle and obviously parents, brothers or sisters.” Another condition of the scholarships is the student must be an active member of the Student Alumni Association. Wayne also said students do not necessarily have to be a graduate from IU Southeast

in order to become an alumni. He said as long as a student takes one class on campus, they are a member of the organization. “We do want this to be a value for our alumnus to be a member,” Wayne said. Other requirements include being a fulltime, undergraduate

sophomore or junior with at least a 3.0 GPA, and submitting an essay about the purpose of the IU Southeast Alumni Association. While the deadline is still open, Watkins said there will be a board meeting on Sept. 27 to review the applicants and determine the recipients of the scholarships. Wayne said the most significant task for the Alumni Association is to raise enough money in order to distribute it through scholarships. “I can’t think of anything more important for our students than to help them graduate and to afford their education,” Wayne said. Watkins said he believes it is very impor-

tant for students to have assistance with attending college. “The more we can give, the better off we are, and it’s our way, as alumni, of returning something to the university,” Watkins said. Wayne also said he thinks the most important message is students have a strong support system from the Alumni Association. “We all graduated from here — I graduated from here — and the help that all of us received, whether it be from faculty, staff or scholarships, we want to keep that feeling alive, and we want our students to realize that the Alumni Association is here to support them.”


Features

the horizon

9

Week of Aug. 27, 2012

Incoming students prepare for new semester

Photo by Stephen Allen

Nick LaBorde, business marketing freshman, spins a prize wheel at the Residence Life and Housing booth at Orientation on Aug. 24. Amanda Stonecipher, new director of Residence Life and Housing, worked the booth and handed out prizes, such as a flying disc, T-shirts and cups to students who participated.

Scan this QR code to hear student opinions about Move-in Day.

Photo by Hanna Woods

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Photo by Stephen Allen

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1. Sara Niebes, psychology junior, and Daniel Huhnerkoch, criminal justice senior, volunteered to help students move into the Residence Halls on Move-in Day.

2. Laura Heatherly, physics freshman, and Mickayla Crane, biology freshman, attended high school together and reunited at IU Southeast’s Move-in Day.

3. Coral Maybrier, special education freshman, unpacks dishes in her new apartment at Forest Lodge.

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Photo by Stephen Allen

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Photo by Stephen Allen

4. Bill Goodwin aids his wife, Rose, elementary education freshman, at the pinning ceremony during new student orientation.

New director encourages change Amanda Stonecipher By BRITTANY POWELL Features Editor bripowel@ius.edu Amanda Stonecipher, new director of Residence Life and Housing, has been working the summer away preparing Residence Life and the lodges for fall semester students. “Summer is the busiest time,” Stonecipher said. “We have to successfully move out all the spring semester students.” Since she took her position on April 16, Stonecipher said she and the other staff members of Residence Life have been busy with yearly summer work. Room inspections and organizing, normal repair and replacement, and work orders, such as changing light bulbs, painting and fixing damages are a few of the many tasks to be finished before fall. Full of enthusiasm for the new semester, Stonecipher said she is ready to end the busy pace of summer and move into a more normal pace of fall. She said she is excited to welcome the incoming students to the lodges. Anna Sneed, elementary education senior, is a community adviser for Grove Lodge. She said she has become close to Stonecipher, and Stonecipher listens to student concerns. “I always feel she really cares about what’s going on in my life,” Sneed said. Sneed also said Stonecipher is a good listener, and she asks community advisers for their opinions about the changes being made. Sneed said one of the

biggest changes being made was the involvement of Residence Life with the Police Department and the Physical Plant. “She’s made it her priority to work hand-in-hand with the different departments on campus,” Sneed said. Peter Felice, music composition senior and community adviser for Meadow Lodge, also said he has noticed major changes happening in Residence Life since Stonecipher became director. Since he was a community adviser last semester, Felice said the program seems more structured than before. “With Amanda, she provided direction,” Felice said. “Now we have a clear understanding of where we are going.” Both community advisers said their training program has been improved and now includes more hands-on learning tools. For example, Felice said they have learned more about the Police Department, as well as how to use a fire extinguisher. Stonecipher said her main goal is to encourage student interaction, especially to the faculty. “We want to make sure our residents are connected to the staff, to the institution,” Stonecipher said. She said this connection between students and IU Southeast will improve student perspectives and experiences. Referring to her motto “change is healthy, change is good,” Stonecipher said any changes to be made in Residence Life and Housing will be for the betterment of the students. “We are here to support student success,” Stonecipher said.

Director of Residence Life

If you were a salad dressing, which kind would you be?

Bolthouse Farms yogurt-based ranch dressing

What is your dream vacation?

The rainforest in Costa Rica

What is your least favorite house chore?

Folding laundry


FEATURES

AUG. 27, 2012 2 // THE HORIZON

LODGE TO FULFILL NEED FOR HOUSING IU Southeast broke ground for the newest campus lodge during a ceremony on April 25.

STUDENTS

LODGE

COMPLETION

Photo by Stephen Allen Chancellor Sandra Patterson-Randles breaks ground for Timber Lodge on April 25. “I remember when I first came here a decade ago, the campus was in complete frustration over 18 years of futile attempts to get housing,” Patterson-Randles said.

Timber Lodge will be the sixth housing unit on campus with a projected opening in fall 2013 with an additional 76 beds. “Much like four years ago, this is also a very special moment for we seized upon a unique opportunity to add another lodge and thereby meet a growing student demand for living and learning on this beautiful campus,” Chancellor Sandra Patterson-Randles said. “This is indeed a very special milestone because this lodge, called Timber Lodge, will be our first LEED certified building on campus.” Patterson-Randles said the construction of a new housing unit resulted from a feasibility study conducted in 2006 that determined a demand of housing for 576 to 730 beds for full time students and an additional 48 beds for part-time students. “I’m so proud that through a lot of blood, sweat and tears, just four and a half years ago, we were able to achieve this campus’s dream and more than that, make a rousing success of it,” Patterson-Randles said. Indiana University Trustees originally implemented a phased approach to the lodges with 400 opening in the first phase in 2008 with 95 percent occupancy. The subsequent years yielded 98 percent in 2009 and 100 percent in 2010 and 2011. “In each year of operation, the occupancy rate has exceeded the projections built into the budget performer,” Dana Wavle, vice chan-

cellor for Administrative Affairs, said. “Over the last three years, the need for additional housing has been ever so apparent.” Despite a resounding need for housing, Wavle said IU Southeast decided to pursue incremental growth rather than a formal second phase due to the economic environment and instability. “In other words, we thought it would be best to add one more lodge with 87 beds rather than two buildings with 300 beds,” Wavle said. Wavle said a need for additional housing was also expressed through a rising waitlist and a significant students demand. Hannah Smith, communications junior, said, for her first year on campus, she was a resident. However, now she is a community adviser. “I’ve been on both sides of the table where I’ve been on the wait list,” Smith said. “The waitlist kind of makes people nervous, so I think it will ease students’ minds.” The newest lodge will be located on the south side of campus near Grove and Orchard Lodge, mirroring the design of Orchard Lodge. “I’m excited for the new lodge,” Hozie Brown, psychology senior, said. “When I first came here, there were no lodges and a lot of people where wondering if lodges would ever be built. To see the sixth lodge shows that the campus is growing a lot in the last few years.”

TIMBER LODGE The total cost will be $5.3 million

2011 | 100%

2010 | 100%

The lodge will be similar to the others, but will be LEED Silver certified.

A $1 million anonymous donation will be used for the housing

2009 | 98%

2008 | 95%

An additional 70 parking spaces will be created

TOTAL CAPACITY

TIMELINE Proposal Approved

2006

First Lodges Open

2007

Projected Completion

Fifth Lodge Approved

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

PHEN ALLEN THE HORIZON | STE

Timber Lodge will appear similar to the other five lodges but is targeted to be LEED Silver certified with a smaller carbon footprint.

The lodge will be sustainable with biorediation basins to remove pollutants from stormwater runoff.

MORE ENERGY EFFICIENT

Toilets will consume 20 percent less water per flush.

Shower heads will consume 30 percent less water per minute.

Aug. 27, 2012  

Issue 00; Aug. 27, 2012

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