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Thursday, March 21, 2013 thehilltoponline.com

Vol. 96 No.28

The Student Voice of Howard University

est. 1924

Head Football Coach Announces Leave, But Questions Remain p. 13

Photo Courtesy of the Sports Information Desk

INSIDE Gun Violence

Follow a man’s story after suffering from a gun shot to the neck. p.4

ASB In Review

Stories and photos from last week’s ASB trips. p.6

Youth Power

Who says we’re doomed? A young woman’s road to philanthropy and professionalism p.7

INDEX

CAMPUS.................... p. 2 METRO ................... p. 7 SPORTS .................... p. 13 MECCANISMS.......... p. 15

TODAY Mostly Cloudy High 39 Low 31

TOMORROW Sunny High 51 Low 34


THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

The Hilltop Newspaper

HU Dining Hall Workers Victors in Contract Negotiations

Christina Downs Editor-in-Chief Adegboyega Akinsiku Webmaster Jonquilyn Hill Multimedia Editor Angelique Gayle Campus Editor Letese’ Clark Metro Editor Khalea Underwood Life & Style Editor Glynn Hill Sports Editor Multimedia Staff Gerald Jackson Anissa Pierre Dominique Diggs Taylor Harris Staff Writers Noel Ogbannaya Staff Photographers Olivia Phifer Rachel Cumberbatch Andre Thomas Arneisha Copeland Jieasa McGivens Staff Cartonist Katie Downs

Lindsay Buchanan Public Relations Director

support their protest because companies that continue to out right neglect its workers need to be addressed,” said freshman, accounting major, Jessica Lughas.

By Nicole Billingslea Contributing Writer Phil Niblack breathes a little easier today, as he journeys back to his job as a Sodexo worker in Howard’s cafeteria with a newly ratified contract in his back pocket. After months of contract negotiations, a rally, and meetings, Howard University’s food service workers bargaining committee reached a tentative agreement on February 26th with Sodexo. About a week later, on March 5th , after participating in a large rally, the rest of Howard’s food service workers union voted on the contract. “This was the first time I was able to be a part of a contract negotiation,” said Niblack. This is the first time in five years that a contact negotiation is taking place between Sodexo and its food service workers, which is standard time for a contract to last. This year marks the first year a union contract has been ratified at Howard since 2008. Union organizers came to professor Gregory Carr’s Afro American studies class to draft the support of students by asking them to sign a pledge supporting real food and real jobs in the district; they spoke openly about an unusual policy implemented by Sodexo managers such as, a back door rule where workers allegedly were advised not to enter or exit through the front doors of Blackburn Center while at work. “I wasn’t shocked because at Howard things always seem to be more than they appear. I

forts of food service workers in the district. Although the battle for worker’s rights was already underway for Howard University food service workers due to contract negotiations that took place the previous day, the mission of the rally still proved to be imperative. Workers and the community chanted in unison, “Fair treatment” and “Fight for our worker’s rights,” they grew more energized and empowered. Niblack saw the rally as a portrait of solidarity between food service workers at universities in D.C. “We fight for each other,” said Niblack. In an interview with UNITE HERE, long-time Howard cafeteria employee, Jermaine Gaither, said that the contract gives the workers even better ways of building skills to produce really good food for the students. Employees at Bon Appetit Management Company in American University also had a victory earlier this year amongst its food service workers. The workers won a new contract that includes better working conditions, protections, and wages. Their success not only has aroused hope, but called for celebration of other food service employees around the district with the belief that they too can win similar benefits. Photo Courtesy of UNITE HERE As a part of their new contract Howard At the close of February, a crowd of about University food service workers won raises, af400 people paraded the streets with picket signs fordable healthcare and a sustainability comthat read “Real Food. Real Jobs” held staunchly mittee. The back door rule was also eliminated. above their heads as police bordered the crowd After contributing to a movement of workers on their march to the Thurgood Marshall Centhat organized and earned what they believed ter. Unite Here Local 23, a local union, launched they deserved, Niblack regards this experience as this rally on Feb. 28 at the African American vital, “We fought for the people that will come Civil War Memorial to catapult their support efafter us.”

Public Relations Team Kelly Sharp Stephanie Holloman

Armanie Brooks Business Manager

Chasmin Anthony Asst. Business Manager Tiffaine Stephens Marketing Manager All inquiries for advertisements should be sent directly to The Hilltop Business office at: The Hilltop 2251 Sherman Avenue NW Washington, DC 20001 campusadvertising@thehilltoponline. com

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Photo Courtesy of UNITE HERE

Protesters rally for fair contract negotiations for food service workers.

Keeping you IN THE KNOW:

Want to write for Campus? Contact the Campus Editor, Angelique T. Gayle at Campus@thehilltoponline. com

THE HILLTOP

The Home Depot Retool your School Challenge is still underway Home Depotʼs Annual Retool Your School challenge is underway again. The challenege grants HBCUʼs up to $50,000 for a campus improvement project. Last year, Howard placed in the top 10. For being in the top 10 Howard received funding to build an eco-garden adjacent the Towers. This year the top prize is $50,000, and 11 other schools additional HBCUʼs will receive a $10,000 grant for minor projects. This year, the home improvement chain has increased the amount of grants available from 10 to 12. Currently, Howard is number 17 with a total of 8,541 votes. Voting is done online and will be open until April 15. The system allows one vote per device per day. In addition to voting, Home Depot tallies Twitter volume using hashtags. Howardʼs hashtag is #HURYS2013. Specific rules, regulations, and any additional information can be found at: retoolyourschool.com.


THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

THE HILLTOP

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Campus

THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

Angelique Gayle, Campus Editor ï campus@thehilltoponline.com

President Ribeau and HUSA Award $600,000 in Need-based Aid By Sholnn Freeman HU Communications Phil Niblack breathes a little easier today, as he journeys back to his job as a Sodexo worker in Howard’s cafeteria with a newly ratified contract in his back pocket. After months of contract negotiations, a rally, and meetings, Howard University’s food service workers bargaining committee reached a tentative agreement on February 26th with Sodexo. About a week later, on March 5th , after participating in a large rally, the rest of Howard’s food service workers union voted on the contract. “This was the first time I was able to be a part of a contract negotiation,” said Niblack. This is the first time in five years that a contact negotiation is taking place between Sodexo and its food service workers, which is standard time for a contract to last. This year marks the first year a union contract has been ratified at Howard since 2008. Union organizers came to professor Gregory Carr’s Afro American studies class to draft the support of students by asking them to sign a pledge supporting real food and real jobs in the district; they spoke openly about an unusual policy implemented by Sodexo managers such as, a back door rule where workers allegedly were advised not to enter or exit through the front doors of Blackburn Center while at work. “I wasn’t shocked because at Howard things always seem to be more than they appear. I support their protest because companies that continue to out right neglect its workers need to be addressed,” said freshman, accounting major, Jessica Lughas. At the close of February, a crowd of about 400 people paraded the streets with picket signs that read “Real Food. Real Jobs” held staunchly above their heads as police bordered

the crowd on their march to the Thurgood Marshall Center. Unite Here Local 23, a local union, launched this rally on Feb. 28 at the African American Civil War Memorial to catapult their support efforts of food service workers in the district. Although the battle for worker’s rights was already underway for Howard University food service workers due to contract negotiations that took place the previous day, the mission of the rally still proved to be imperative. Workers and the community chanted in unison, “Fair treatment” and “Fight for our worker’s rights,” they grew more energized and empowered. Niblack saw the rally as a portrait of solidarity between food service workers at universities in D.C. “We fight for each other,” said Niblack. In an interview with UNITE HERE, long-time Howard cafeteria employee, Jermaine Gaither, said that the contract gives the workers even better ways of building skills to produce really good food for the students. Employees at Bon Appetit Management Company in American University also had Photo by Justin Knight, HU Communications a victory earlier this year amongst its food L-R Lennon Jackson, director of Student Life and Activities; Patrick Goodin, Ph.D., associate professor of Philosophy; HUSA Vice President Madiagne Sarr, President service workers. The workers won a new conSidney A. Ribeau, HUSA President President Brittany Foxhall and Vice President tract that includes better working conditions, protections, and wages. Their success not only for Student Affairs Barbara L.J. Griffin announce $600,000 in need-based grants has aroused hope, but called for celebration After contributing to a movement of workers that organized of other food service employees around the and earned what they believed they deserved, Niblack regards district with the belief that they too can win similar benefits. this experience as vital, “We fought for the people that will As a part of their new contract Howard University food come after us.” service workers won raises, affordable healthcare and a sustainability committee. The back door rule was also eliminated.

Time Moves Slowly for Gun Violence Survivor: Ismail Watkins Views Life From a Wheelchair

Amber Ravenell Howard University News Service

Photo by Amber Ravenell, HU Newservice Ismail Watkins was shot in the neck on March 6, 1998. The bullet left him paralyzed.

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Ismail Watkins was on his way to see his son when he was shot in the neck. He was walking down the front porch steps of a house near Lincoln Road in Northeast Washington, D.C., when a guy came up behind him and said, “Give it up.” Watkins, who thought it was a cousin or friend joking with him, started to turn around but did not get very far before he heard and felt the gunshot. His whole back locked up. “I felt like I was in the matrix,” Watkins said. “And I got real numb.” He remembers everything that happened as he was laid on the ground. A friend’s father took off his shirt and pressed it tightly against his skin to stop the blood gushing from Watkin’s neck. His cousin, who was with him, kept telling him “you gon’ be alright.” Watkins remembers thinking “let me just get to the hospital.” He was taken to Washington Hospital Center, where he remained for 18 days before he was transferred to MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital. He was paralyzed. “I was messed up,” Watkins said. He will never forget that day. It was March 6, 1998. Just two days earlier, Watkins had been set to start a new job working in the stockroom at Hank’s Warehouse. “Why did this happen when I’m about to be on the right path?” he recalls thinking at the time.

THE HILLTOP

The National Rehabilitation Hospital where Watkins was sent hosts a weekly support group, called the Urban Re-Entry Group where gun violence victims can share their experiences and support each other as they transition back to their lives. Even though he now seeks therapy at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Watkins has been attending the support group for 15 years and is still a regular attendee. The group includes patients who have been disabled for over a decade, and those who have been hospitalized for months. With the current national debate on gun control and gun violence, members of the group say that survivors of gun violence are often not considered. “They really forgot about the people that survived,” said one member who goes by the nickname Uni. Uni has been in a wheelchair for 13 years. “If you don’t advocate for yourself, they don’t give a f---,” said Uni. “People don’t know what we gotta go through when we wake up in the morning.” The group members discuss the difficulties they go through daily like bathing, using the bathroom and transportation. They gripe about D.C. sidewalks without ramps for wheelchairs. “When you want something, that’s when it will hit you. When you want a drink of water or want to get some food,” said Earl Council. “But I try everything before I call my wife or my kids.” Several of the members say that they are regularly in pain. Watkins said he dreams about walking again.

WHEELCHAIR continued on p. 11


THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

HOWARD UNIVERSITY DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE OF RESIDENCE LIFE

Resident 2013-2014 Assistantship in university residence halls

Positions

Qualifications: Undergraduate - Sophomore, Junior, Senior - 3.0 (GPA) average at the time of application submission. Residence Hall occupant for a minimum of one academic year, a record of active participation and positive leadership in hall programs and activities. Responsibilities: R.A.s. work under the supervision of a Community Director, working a minimum of fifteen (15) hours per week, assisting with hall openings and closings, working with 40 to 60 students occupying a floor, assisting with hall programs and activities, attending all meetings called by the Community Director, and assisting with administrative responsibilities. Employment:

Is for one year and includes a taxable stipend of $1,250.00, plus free room rent for the academic year. Reappointment a new application.

"We Need Good People Interested In Promoting Student Learning And Personal Development While Strengthening Their Leadership Skills." Secure application online at www.howard.edu/residencelife complete and submit to the: Office of Residence Life 2401 4th Street, NW Washington, DC 20059

Due March 28, 2013 Before 5pm Close Of Business!!!

APPLY NOW THE HILLTOP

Rev. 3-13

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

#Recap: Alternative Spring Break My ASB Experience:

ASB2013 Locations: Atlanta *Baltimore Chicago Detroit *Memphis Memphis, Tenn.

3/17/ 2013- Spring Break 2012, I was coming back from Alternative Spring Break (ASB) Atlanta with a fire in my belly. I declared during that week that there should and would be an ASB in Memphis. Why? Because Memphis is a place with exceeding potential. Because Memphis was the place people once came to make it in life. Because Memphis was the breeding ground for social change. Because Memphis was home to me and I could not see myself doing anything else with my Spring Break other than serving the community which contributed to my life. I am the product of twelve years of public school education and almost every youth organization you could name. I know that Memphis has some powerful leaders and some powerful problems for those leaders to solve. What happens more often than not is that our powerful leaders go off to college and stay where they are. I have often asked people why they do not come back and they say that there is nothing Memphis has to offer or that people don’t want to change. Many even go so far as to say that I’m young, and in a few years I will see as they see. For me, the response is an off- handed excuse to avoid working to make the city better, rather than going where the cup is already full. Who can change Memphis like Memphians? Who will? As one dedicated to education with the hopes of one day being the superintendent of the school system in Memphis, I wanted more people to understand the struggles of the education system, any education system so that we know what to do now, to change it . I believe that changing a city starts with changing the way we educate and nurture our

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children. It’s not more programs we need, but love and investment in our future leaders from the whole community. I wanted the ASB: Memphis site to reflect that in everything that we did. Honestly, I was scared those first two days. I lost my phone, some service partners cancelled and participants were already complaining to me. I understood at that time more than ever that leadership was more than programming. It was my duty to deal with it all, to diffuse the bombs. I remembered that I was doing God’s work, that I was doing good work, and that I had planned for a year to make this a life- changing experience. It took a few days, but participants started to share my view of the big picture. They started to consider changing their majors, relocating to Memphis, or doing service back home. They started to understand that we don’t do service because it’s easy, but because it is our responsibility to reach back as we climb. Over the course of the week, the health group worked with Planned Parenthood and learned how to teach sexual health education. Using what they learned, they built a workshop teaching ( age –appropriate) components to children, teens and adults. They also learned about food deserts as they cleaned up a community garden in preparation for spring planting. The education group assisted in ACT tutoring with Kaplan at Hamilton High School and Manassas High School. They did tutoring and mentoring with children, grades 2-3, at Cornerstone Prep. They learned about the community of Binghampton and worked at a community facility called Caritas Village, started by a woman who

invested in the community when everyone of her status had moved away. In the evening, both groups participated in a summit with forty Northside High School students. In the summit, we discussed students’ vision for success. Based on their responses, we worked to expose them to resources in their community and online. We gave them tools for conflict resolution and exposure to professional dress. We also talked to them about life in general, reminding them that the development of self is just as important as career development. The summit was special to me because it was my first time writing a curriculum not related directly to academics. I found that the curriculum works only if the participants are invested in it. I gathered the participants around Monday night and took all of their suggestions in consideration for the days to come. By redeveloping the curriculum, each day became better than the last. It was not my curriculum but the curriculum of which all of us could be proud. I thank all of my service partners, my family, my friends, my church and my participants for making my dream come true. As I look forward to next year, I take this time to thank God for allowing me to be His vessel. I hope that everyone who was touched by our work will take the challenge of doing what you have been led to do, regardless of your age or experience. In the words of Ghandi,” The Best way to find yourself by losing yourself in the service of others.” --Ayanna McFarland is a sophomore English major from Memphis, Tennessee. She is the founder and the coordinator of Alternative Spring Break: Memphis 2013.

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New Orleans Washington, DC Croix des Bouquets (Haiti) Petion Ville (Haiti) *Locations added this year.

In the news: Students were featured on a story about the Alternative Spring Break program on Fox News.


Metro

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2013 2012 THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21,

Letese’ Clark, Metro Editor ï metro@thehilltoponline.com

Black Professional Pursues Philanthropy for Millennials by Krishana Davis Special to the NNPA from the Afro-American Newspaper Ebonie Johnson Cooper has a whirlwind life. One typical day found her leaving a lunch date with friends, headed to a business meeting and planning to conduct the Washington, D.C. session of “Defining Young Black Philanthropy.” The panel discussions, she explained to the AFRO recently, are designed to help Black people, and particularly the under-30 crowd, to engage in charitable giving in an organized way. In the age of social media, Johnson, like many other millennials, found blogging to be a creative outlet to express her interest with her online community of family of friends. But a year later, Johnson’s blog, Friends of Ebonie (FriendsofEbonie.com), has developed into a social responsibility and career enrichment haven for Black millennials pushing philanthropy and social causes. Millennials is the label used to cover the segment of the population born between the late 1970s and the early 2000s. “The social entrepreneurship portion of my career has been organic, part of my DNA… But I didn’t know earlier in my career how to balance my career with philanthropy and giving back,” said 29-year-old Cooper, who hopes her events will help bridge the gap for her and other young Millennials. More than 100 Black urban professionals crowded into the foyer of the National Council of Negro Women headquarters in D.C. after work on Feb. 21 to talk philanthropy. For the first hour, attendees mingled and enjoyed a happy-hour feast of mini-cupcakes and other hors d’oeuvres while visiting a series of tables lined with literature from non-profit groups such as Dreams

Work Inc., A Legacy Left Behind, Black Benefactors, D.R.E.A.M. Life and TheMusicianShip. In the second hour, there was a panel discussion moderated by David J. Johns, director of Impact, a consulting firm that specializes in charitable fundraising. It contained a diverse group of millennials with backgrounds in philanthropy and organizing including: Stefanie Brown-James, former African American national vote director for Obama for America 2012; Kezia Williams, chair of Capital Cause; Rita Lassiter, secretary of the National Urban League Young Professionals; Clarence Wardell III, research analyst for the Center for Naval Analyses, and co-founder of Tweenate; and Joshua Lopez; political adviser and former candidate for an at-large seat on the Washington, D.C. Council. The conversation became a discussion on social accountability as it relates to the millennial population’s people of color and other successful community members. Among the questions to trigger lively debate that evening: What is philanthropy? Who gives? How can social media affect giving? One of the hottest discussions surrounded whether African American basketball legend Michael Jordan, who celebrated his 50th birthday this year, should be held responsible, on a moral and social level, for the stampedes, riots and violent, robbery-related deaths that occur whenever the latest version of Air Jordan athletic shoe is released. “Defining Young Black Philanthropy: D.C.” is just one of a handful of webinars and workshops headed by Cooper to provide resources and ideas for young people of color interested in giving. Cooper’s philanthropic efforts come on the heels of her personal interest in arts and culture. She grew up a dancer and actress in Harlem and was taken on frequent

trips to the Rockefeller Center and Lincoln Center by her parents. “I’ve always had an affinity for the arts, so naturally I’m a supporter of them,” said Cooper. Her dream of a career in the arts faded with age, but she stayed connected, becoming a young patron of the Alvin Ailey Dance Company, joining the junior board of New York Cares and becoming active in Black Benefactors in D.C. For years, Cooper tried to find the best way to juggle philanthropy while finding her perfect career fit. She worked at the mass media firm Viacom doing international marketing of BET and MTV but quit to join the staff of 2008 Obama presidential campaign. Ebonie Johnson Cooper, Blogger and Young Philanthropist She was unable to secure a posicareer struggle,” said Cooper, who tion with his new eventually went into business for president’s administration after the herself creating Friends of Ebonie. Obama victory. Today, Cooper is engaged in Cooper, like many young, marketing and communications on educated post-grads, hopped from a part-time basis while pursuing a job to job because of the crummaster’s degree in public relations bling economy, working at several and corporate communications at non-profit groups over the next few New York University and buildyears. ing and refining the Friends of “Every job isn’t going to be the Ebonie blog. She hopes to brand right job, and that was a part of my the organization into the go-to site

Photo courtesy of NNPA

for non-profit groups eager to learn about the philanthropic habits of black millennials. Philanthropy is traditionally associated with old, white, men, said Cooper. But Cooper is on a mission to change that perception. “Just because you are on the receiving end of philanthropy, doesn’t mean you aren’t also on the giving end,” said Cooper.

Nine Area High School Students Compete in “Poetry Out Loud” Competition By Emmy Victor Contributing Writer Students and parents filled the seats in the Nat Turner McEvoy Auditorium at the National Portrait Gallery on Monday evening as nine high school students from the metro area competed in the poetry competition, “Poetry Out Loud”. The young poets went back to back, competing for a spot in the National Youth Poetry Competition. The competition opened with a powerful message from the Judith Tarra, Chairwoman of the D.C Commission of the Arts and Humanities. “Regardless of whether the students in the audience tonight pursue a career in the arts or poetry, this opportunity I believe will foster a lifelong love of creativity,” she said. Tarra shares the vision of increasing cultural vision in D.C., starting in the classroom with a hint of poetry. The poets competed in three rounds: classics, featured and modern poetry. The intermissions included performances by poets from the D.C. metro area, teachers and students from the represented high schools. At the end of the event, two students were given titles in the contest as the second-runner up and first runner up. Natalie Daly, a 14-year-old freshman from Archbishop Carroll High School, swept the grand prize award. “I’m super excited- really nervous though because of the

finals coming up, but I feel really prepared and ready,” Daly happy to be here,” she said. said. Known as the National Recitation Contest, “Poetry Out Daly reveals that she wants to continue to be a motivation Loud”, is a catchy competition to get the youth in the United to rising young poets in the community. States engaged in the fine art poetry. Founded by the National “I want to give them the motivation to keep on going. If Endowment for the Arts, the program requires students to they really like poetry they should keep on doing it, no matter compete at school wide, state-wide and nation-wide competihow old they are. I am only a freshman and look at where I tions, in order to build literary knowledge, speaking skills and stand now,” she said. self confidence through memorization and recitation. The The host of the “ want to give them the motivation to keep on going. If they really like poetry they should keep on doing evening was it, no matter how old they are. I am only a freshman and look at where I stand now.” Free- former host for -Natalie Daly, BET’s 106 Grand Prize Winner of the “Poetry Out Loud” Competition & Park and D.C. Radio personality. “They called me and asked if I would come in and I said of course- I would love to be a part organization gives out over $50,000 annually: ranging from of this,” she said. personal scholarships for the winners, to money awarded to Free is a major fan of poetry, as well as supporter of the the winner’s high school to invest in poetry books. characteristics the competition builds for young poets. “Kids doing positive things in any city are important and I’m so

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

APR 26th, 7:00pm Housing Fair: APR 22nd, 12pm-5pm Apply in person and pay $0 security deposit and $0 application fee. Email us at thetowers@greystar.com for more details.

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

#ASB2013 in Review

Photos by Olivia Phifer, Staff Photographer (Left) ASB Detroit participants pose in t-shirts dedicated to Donald Hill, a Howard student who recently passed. Hill was the ASB Chicago coordinator. (Center left and right): Howard students share embraces with children from local Detroit Public Schools during their visits last week. (Bottom): The ASB Detroit crew listens to a tour at the Museum of African American History.

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

HU

Howard University Office of Student Life and Activities  &                      Undergraduate Student Assembly  Springfest  presents 

BISON DAY

Saturday March 30th PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT: WWW.SIXFLAGS.COM/AMERICA

Promo Code: HOWARD 1867

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Student ticket includes: * Admission * Meal * Transportation

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

Campus (Continued) WHEELCHAIR continued from p. 4

North Capital Street and Rhode Island Avenue when he was growing up. Alfonzo Moore, who has been in a wheelchair for one “On New Year’s people used to be like, who’s the first one year, still has a hard time accepting his situation. getting killed?” he said. “Sometimes,” he said. “I wish I was gone.” Watkins said one of the hardest things about being a The group members who have been in the wheelchair gun violence survivor is the stereotypes people attach to him. longer, including Watkins, tend to have a different perspective. People automatically think that he is a thug or “It gets stressful sometimes but you gotta keep goinvolved with the drug world. Watkins was shot ing,” Watkins said. “Keep smiling. I don’t even get mad “Criminals will get guns regardless. People who carry guns donʼt care about no during a robbery by someone he knew. The anymore.” license,” gunman was identified by a woman who lived in Said Uni: “I don’t use the word can’t. I know I can a house next to the one where Watkins was shot. --Alfonzo Moore, do it. I’mma try.” Watkins said the shooter’s family visited him in Gun violence victim One thing all of the group members do agree about the hospital in the days following the shooting, is the uselessness of current debates on new gun control but he never revealed to them that their relative laws. Since the December school shooting in Newtown, was responsible for him being there. According Conn., gun control has been at the top of the White to Watkins, the shooter was eventually killed while in prison Uni said. “They didn’t say anything until these white kids got House agenda and at the center of media discussions, includfor another offense. However, before his death Watkins had shot.” ing a proposed ban on military-style assault weapons and his cousin—who was serving time at the same prison as the Watkins said that gun violence has been a problem his universal background checks for firearms purchases. shooter—show him pictures of Watkins taking a few steps whole life. He estimates that between 200 and 300 people “Gun violence ain’t gon stop,” Moore said. “Criminals will were killed by guns in his Northeast neighborhood off of with his walker. get guns regardless. People who carry guns don’t care about no license.” There is bitterness and anger among some in the group, a feeling that the toll of gun violence did not matter in the United States when the bodies suffering where largely those of black males. “None of this was going on when we were getting shot,”

WE LIKE THE WAY YOU THINK,

CHERISE!

Capital One® is thrilled to announce Howard University’s winner of this year’s Capital One Scholarship, Cherise Hardiman. Congratulations on this major accomplishment! Have a great semester, and we’ll see you at our Summit for Developing Leaders in May. For information on scholarships, careers, and the Summit for Developing Leaders, please visit www.capitalone-campus.com

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

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Sports

THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

Glynn Hill, Sports Editor sports@thehilltoponline.com

Head Coach’s Announced Leave Comes as Surprise to Many in Athletic Community By Glynn Hill Sports Editor

Photo courtesy of Gary Harrell Head Football Coach Gary Harrell announced that he will take a leave of absence.

Last week, as many Howard students were leaving campus for Spring Break, head football coach Gary “Flea” Harrell announced that he will be taking a personal leave of absence. “It is with much sadness that I announce today that I will be taking a leave of absence for the 2013 season,” he said in a statement released by the university on March 11. “At this time, my personal and family issues make it impossible for me to give them (Howard) 100% and anything less than that is unacceptable to me,” Harrell went on to say. When contacted for details on the situation, university spokeswoman Kerry-Ann Hamilton wrote in an email that, “It is the University’s policy not to comment on personnel matters.” Harrell, who took over for a program that went 1-10 the year before he arrived, has a career record of 12-10 in two seasons with the Bison. He was honored as Local

#MarchMadness It’s that time of year again. Some keep up with college basketball all season while others tend to tune in as March approaches. Nevertheless, filling out a bracket for the NCAA Tournament is something every die-hard sports fan has done at least once in their life. Whether you analyze every matchup, or make your bracket just for the trill, here are a few tips to know. Upsets are inevitable. The topthree most shocking upsets in last year’s tournament include the first round exit of No. 2 seed Duke, No. 2 seed Missouri, and No. 4 seed Michigan. Last year’s No. 15 seed and fellow Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference team Norfolk State defeated Missouri in their first NCAA

tournament appearance. This year North Carolina A&T is representing the MEAC as they search for just their second NCAA tournament victory after ending the longest losing streak in NCAA tournament history with a victory over Liberty on Tuesday. In their 10th appearance in the Big Dance, the sixteenth seed Aggies will face off against No. 1 seed Louisville on Thursday, trying to become the first No. 16 seed to knockoff a number one. Upsets are a big part of Bracketology so keep that in mind as you make your bracket; they’re are bound to happen. Not once have all four No. 4 seeds passed the Round of 32 together and advanced to the Sweet Sixteen. In fact, over the past five years, at least one No. 13 seed has defeated a team in the Round of 64. Keep that in mind if you have Saint Louis, Syracuse, Kansas State, or Michigan all going deep into the

“I was surprised,” said senior wide receiver Clayton Gidron, recounting when he heard the newson social media. Still, Gidron believes that Howard football will be business as usual under Petty. “[Workouts and practices] ain’t going to change; if anything, we’re going to work harder,” he said. For redshirt-freshman defensive back Jacob Bennett, the news was unexpected, as he did not hear it from Harrell himself until later. “I was kind of shocked,” he said, “he didn’t tell us [at] first; we found out from the university.” Bennett notes that Harrell “didn’t explain” his situation to the team but that he “said it was personal issues…that’s it.” Like Gidron though, Bennett is still very optimistic about the upcoming season as well as Harrell’s return. “I don’t think it’ll be any different,” Bennett says, “he’s (Harrell) a great motivator, but I’m not even trippin’ because he put us in the right place [to] do our thing this season.”

Weekend Roundup

Tips for Filling Out a Successful Bracket By Khari Arnold, Contributing Writer

College Coach of the Year by the D.C. Touchdown Club after the Bison went 7-4 this past Fall, finishing second in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. Harrell tweeted about is accolade earlier last week. “Coach of the Year is a team award. I give all the credit to God, my coaches and my players. Thank you all for the support and kind words,” he wrote on March 8. When contacted for comment, there was no answer from Harrell’s office. For this upcoming season, defensive coordinator Rayford Petty was named as interim head coach. Petty previously led the Bison to a 25-30 record as head coach from 2002-2006. The Hilltop was granted permission to speak to Petty about anything except for Harrell’s situation and were given “ground rules that the interview has to be strictly on spring football and the upcoming season.” For many players and students in the athletic community, the news came as a shock.

tournament. Also, 1988, 2000, and 2007 mark the only years a No. 12 seed did not advance to the Round of 32. They’ve surprisingly reached the Sweet Sixteen the same amount of times a No. 7 seed has. Therefore, it wouldn’t be a bad idea if you have Oregon, California, or Akron making noise in the first few rounds. Don’t forget about Marshall Henderson and Ole Miss who are hot after fighting their way to an SEC tournament championship. In the end, a No. 1 seed should still have the upper hand when it comes to winning it all. Over the past fifteen years, only five times has a No. 1 seed failed to win the championship. The season starts all over again in March, so will Gonzaga, Kansas, Louisville, Indiana or a dark horse be the last one standing in your bracket?

And in another corner of sports...

The Bison Cheerleaders took SECOND in their MEAC Cheer Championship in Norfolk, Va. last week. THE HILLTOP

FRIDAY

Menís Tennis vs. Morgan State Womenís Tennis vs. Morgan State MEAC Bowling Championship in Chesapeake, Va.

SATURDAY

Womenís Lacrosse vs. Campbell Womenís Tennis vs. Maryland-Eastern Shore Softball vs. Maryland-Eastern Shore

SUNDAY

Womenís Tennis vs. Towson Softball vs. Maryland-Eastern Shore

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

MARRIAGE EQUALITY: THE COUNTRY IS READY

WASHINGTON, DC | MARCH 26, 2013 A majority of Americans say the ability to marry the person you love is a Constitutional right. On March 26 and 27, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider two cases that are about whether gay and lesbian Americans should have the same opportunities as everyone else. We hope you can join us on March 26 for the United for Marriage Rally in Washington, D.C. Wear red to show your support for freedom and equality. We’ll be gathering at 8:30 a.m. outside of the Supreme Court at First and East Capitol Streets, N.E.

Light the Way to Justice

unitedformarriage.org

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THE HILLTOP

PLAN TO ATTEND? TWEET THIS EVENT USING OUR HASHTAG #UNITEDFORMARRIAGE


THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

Meccanisms BY NONE OTHER THAN THAT GENT PHIL JONES

1. On a scale of 1 to Keyshia Cole how salty are you that Spring Break is over? 2. Which was more popping? Panama City Beach or Miami? 3. How many times have you regretted giving out your phone number since Spring Break ended? 4. Only 6 weeks left to get your act together before the end of the semester. Does that intimidate you? 5. Having problems getting the classes you need for next semester? 6. Have you considered suing? #whenkeepingitrealgoeswrong 7. Speaking of the future, seniors, what’s the game plan after May 11th? 8. How much longer will you continue to tell people you are “keeping your options open” after graduation? 9. Does that mean you’ll be moving back in with your parents in less than 2 months? 10. What’s wrong with starting from the bottom? 11. Have we learned nothing from Drake? 12. It’s Springtime at Howard. How you gonna act? 13. Can we get one last snow day minus the snow for nostalgia purposes? 14. At least the warm weather will make it easier for you to make it to class? 15. Maybe? Maybe Not? 16. So... about this Commencement speaker??? 17. How many of you will be seeking refuge from the heat in your rooms at Fro-Yo? 18. Can we all agree that Justin Timberlake deserves the comeback of the Year award? 19. Maybe he can teach Keyshia Cole a couple of things about staying relevant? 20. Speaking of comebacks, isn’t probate season coming up?

THE HILLTOP

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THE HILLTOP | THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

e m

o c e B A r e h c a e T

Do you want to become a teacher while pursuing your major in another field? If so, attend the following information session:

“Become a Teacher” WHO: Any student interested in teacher certification or a minor in the field of education. WHEN: Monday, March 25, 2013

12-1 p.m.

WHERE: School of Education Room 316 (Located behind the College of Arts and Science/ Locke Hall) THE HILLTOP

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