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THE HI-LIFE The Roaring Voice Of HHS Vol. 86, No. 2

FRIDAY November 8, 2019

Lions Honor Local Veterans At Kilgore Game

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

To conclude their halftime performance from the Henderson vs Kilgore game, the HHS Lionettes thank veterans in the crowd for their service. The Lionettes performed to “God Bless America” by Celine Dion. Before the game, a HHS Lion Pride Band trombone quartet, under the direction of head band director Craig Haynie, also honored the veterans by performing “Star-Spangled Boom Boom,” a song similar to the national anthem, as the Lion varsity football team and coaches shook hands with local veterans on the field.

Check out TheHi-Life.com to see more articles from this six weeks.


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NOV 8, 2019

The Road So Far

SPORTS

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Varsity Football District Scores Lauren Lee / THE HI-LIFE

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Lions vs. Palestine Wildcats 19 - 41 (L)

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Ani Aparicio / THE HI-LIFE

Lions vs. Kilgore Bulldogs

Lions Play Against Van on Senior Night

36 - 29 (W)

Lions vs. Chapel Hill Bulldogs

Ashley Wilkinson News Bureau Chief

63 - 35 (W)

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Above: Senior Eli Jones salutes the Lions pregame while Alma Mater plays.

Lions vs. Carthage Bulldogs

1: The Lions charge at the Carthage Bulldogs. 2: The Lions listen to their coaches on the sidelines at the Chapel Hill game. 3: The Lions line up against the Kilgore Bulldogs.

Below: Junior Bryson Collins runs with the ball during the Hnederson vs Kilgore game.

14 - 34 (L)

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

The Henderson Lions will play against the Van Vandals tonight at the Lions Stadium to determine if the Lions will advance to the playoffs. Henderson High School will also be honoring the Class of 2020 during the game. In the district, both football teams are essentially equal. This season, the Vandals lost against Kilgore and Carthage but won against Palestine and Chapel Hill. The Lions, on the other hand, won against Chapel Hill and Kilgore but lost to Carthage and Palestine. Overall, both teams have a 6-3 record. “I have faith in our boys,” senior Hannah Myers said. “I can’t say the odds are in our favor, but also, I can’t say the

odds are against us. As long as senior members of the drill team our boys play their hearts out, performed with their mothers. we will beat the Vandals.” The senior cheerleaders Traditionally, the last performed a special routine scheduled home to honor “It’s been an their fellow game of the season is dubbed honor twirling seniors. Senior Night to “ M a n y with the celebrate the last tears were game seniors shed after the Majorettes.” will experience pep rally,” during high school. senior and twirler Riley Foster “Tonight is bittersweet,” said. “I wore a t-shirt from the senior Ashley Wilkinson said. University of Texas at Austin. “After today, I will never It’s been an honor twirling with photograph another pep rally. I the Majorettes.” will never write another article If the Henderson Lions win about a high school football the football game tonight, game. I will never experience the team will advance to the the thrill of Friday night lights playoffs. again.” “Tonight is a reminder to all During Lions’ Den, the last seniors,” Wilkinson said. “It’s pep rally of the year took place almost time to say goodbye. in the gym. The senior twirlers Let’s make and cherish performed, wearing t-shirts memories while we still can.” from the college they will attend after graduation. The


SPORTS

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NOV 8, 2019 PAGE 3

Feature Coach

(Set) In Stone

Kristen LeShaw

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Lady Lions Advance to Playoffs Ashley Wilkinson News Bureau Chief The Lady Lions varsity volleyball team advanced to the playoffs after defeating the Chapel Hill Lady Bulldogs on Oct. 29 at the Chapel Hill gym. In the first match, the Lady Lions bolted ahead, leaving a score of 25 to 11. Chapel Hill caught up with the Lady Lions in the second match, winning by a mere three points. The score of the match was 22 to 25. The third round was also neck-and-neck as the Lady Lions managed to triumph with 26 points. The Lady Bulldogs trailed behind with 24 points. To determine a winner, the teams played a fourth match. Like the first game, the Lady Lions pulled ahead and made it to the winning 25 points before Chapel Hill. The score of the match was 25-18, marking the ultimate score of 3-1. Last year, the Henderson volleyball team advanced to the playoffs but was defeated by

Pleasant Grove in the bi-district round. This year, the Lady Lions played the bi-district round on Nov. 5 against Paris. In the first match, the Paris Lady Cats took the lead with 25 points, as the Lady Lions lingered behind with 18 points. The Lady Lions made a comeback in the second match by getting to the winning 25 points first, barely slipping by Paris. The match’s score was 25-22. Just like the first match, the Lady Cats led seven points ahead of Henderson in the third match. The score was 25-18. The final match had a similar outcome. The Paris Lady Cats slipped past the Lady Lions with eight points, marking the match’s score as 25-17. With a final score of 3-1, the Paris Lady Cats will advance to the Area game against Van.

HOMETOWN Daingerfield, TX

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Senior Kaylie Clark and the Lady Lions congratulate the Bullard Lady Panthers on Oct. 8 after the game.

COLLEGE

University of Texas at Arlington

SPIRIT ANIMAL Eagle

PRE-GAME JAM

“Congratulations” by Post Malone

FAVORITE CELEBRITY Lebron James

BEST ADVICE TO STUDENTS

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

The Lady Lions talk as a group about their strategy during a time-out.

Coby Sharp / THE HI-LIFE

Senior Heather Craig tries to tip the ball to the opponent’s side of the net.

Always keep your head up and stay positive through everything.


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NEWS

NOV 8, 2019

THE HI-LIFE

Student Council Holds Red Ribbon Week Erin Burris Managing Editor Lead by the high school student council, Red Ribbon Week took the stage across all the Henderson campus on Oct. 21 through 25. “I loved being able to help my little sisters dress up for Red Ribbon Week,” junior Joana Olvera said. “Teaching them the dangers of drugs is really important to me.” The dress-up days for the week are as follows:

Wednesday- “Turn Back” on drugs (Wear shirt backwards) Thursday- “Hugs” not drugs (Bring a small stuffed animal to school) Friday- “Shade out” drug (wear your favorite sunglass) “My siblings and I love Red Ribbon Week,” junior Chakota Clinton. “It’s a great time to learn about drugs and grow closer to earth as a family.”

Monday- “Sock it” to drugs (crazy sock day)

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Tuesday- “Band Together” against drugs (Wear favorite music band t-shirt)

Many students supported the Red Ribbon Week movement. Their pledge of support can be found by the door to the courtyard.

FFA Competes in National Competition Ashley Wilkinson News Bureau Chief

Henderson FFA / Facebook

The group gets ready to present with their props.

Henderson FFA / Facebook

(From left to right) Junior Macy Watson, senior Lara Chenault, senior Kassidy Bogle and sophomore Carter Wheat arrive in Indianapolis.

Members from the Henderson FFA placed 12th overall team in the National Agricultural Communications Career Development Event contest in Indianapolis, Indiana on Nov. 1 after winning the state competition. The group consisted of senior Kassidy Bogle, senior Lara Chenault, junior Macy Watson and sophomore Carter Wheat. Bogle also won first place in journalistic writing and second high point individual overall. The objective of the Agricultural Communications CDE contest is for a group of students to create a written

media plan and present it to judges. Individually, students take a quiz and complete an editing exercise. Henderson FFA’s media plan spotlights Memphis, Texas’ FFA program, “From Dirt To Shirt,” about the modern agriculture of cotton. “It was very exciting and nerve racking to represent a state as large as Texas, but I am proud of how we did,” sophomore Wheat said. “It’s amazing how well our team did. I’m glad to see our hard work pay off.”


THE HI-LIFE

NEWS

NOV 8, 2019 PAGE 5

Other Accomplishments (Right) Whatburger presented head football coach Phil Castles with a gift basket at the blacklight pep rally on Oct. 18 for winning Whataburger Coach of the Week. Castles won against the Palestine coach, Lance Angel, by 5,000 votes. There was a total of 17,262 votes from the community.

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

(Left) The debate team won 1st and 2nd place in CX Debate, 1st in Persuasive Extemp Speaking and 3rd in Informative Extemp Speaking on Oct. 19 at the Mabank Invitational Tournament at the Mabank High School.

Callie Lawrence / THE HI-LIFE

(Right) The Lion Pride Band competed at UIL Marching Region on Oct. 19 and scored sweepstakes. Sweepstakes is when all judges score the band as first division.

Ani Aparicio / THE HI-LIFE

(Left) The Henderson High School chapter of the National Honor Society welcomed new senior and junior members with an induction ceremony on Oct. 21 at the middle school. Here, current members and new members pose for a group picture.

Emma Sanchez / THE HI-LIFE

(Right) The Lion Pride Band competed at the National Asssociation of Military Marching Bands (NAMMB) competition on Nov. 2 and scored first division. The band also won the Bobby Goff Superior Performance trophy.

Ani Aparicio / THE HI-LIFE


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NOV 8, 2019

Adventures in

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Health Science

1: Senior Trayana Sanders plays the role of the patient during the feeding exercise. 2: Senior Dylan Martinez pratices dressing a dummy patient. 3: Senior Jamashia Polk feeds Sanders during a feeding exercise. 4: Junior Hannah Mansinger performs CPR on a dummy. 5: Senior Addison Northcutt learns how perform CPR 6: The Health Science class learns all aspects of taking care of patients, including washing feet.

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Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

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Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

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Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

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Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

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Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE


NEWS

THE HI-LIFE

Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

Senior Sydni Baxter plays the role of a patent and takes a nap during class

Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

Senior Gloria Gonzales adjusts the seat belt for the wheelchair for senior La’chundria Morris.

NOV 8, 2019 PAGE 7

Christiana Whitt / THE HI-LIFE

Senior La’chundria Morris pratices brushing a patient’s teeth with senior Gloria Gonzales.

HHS Welcomes Health Science Into The CTE Program Ashley Wilkinson News Bureau Chief

H

ow are we actually going to use this when we get out of high school? This is a question that has escaped the lips of many bored students. This is a question that haunts the hallways and classrooms. The Health Science program aims to answer this burning question. Henderson High School started categorizing Health Science in the new Career and Technical Education program this school year. The CTE program aims to teach students how core subjects such as math, science and writing are used in real-life careers, and in many of these courses, students will have certification opportunities. In the Health Science program, students learn firsthand what it takes to be apart of the healthcare industry.

“CTE programs of study reflect high wage, high demand occupations in Texas and help prepare high school students to enter college or a career,” CTE coordinator Lisa McCreary said. “We have several new programs of study and a lot of new courses this year in CTE. We plan to continue to grow these programs based on student needs and interests.” Freshmen can get involved in the program by taking Principles of Health Science, where students learn an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services and biotechnology research in the healthcare industry, and Medical Terminology, where students learn all about medical abbreviations and vocabulary. As a sophomore, students can take Health Science Theory and Health Science Clinical. Both classes require that the student takes Biology their freshman year, and both classes are

typically taken concurrently. In these classes, students’ knowledge in the health science industry is advanced. During junior and senior year, students can take Anatomy and Physiology, Practicum in Health Science and Extended Practicum in Health Science. Anatomy and Physiology teaches students about the parts and the functions of the human body, as long as the student has taken Biology and another science credit as prerequisite classes. Practicum in Health Science and Extended Practicum in Health Science are also taken concurrently, and students have an opportunity to use the skills they learned in class in the real world. “You get to see a lot in clinicals,” junior Emma Cross said. “I got to watch a tooth extraction once, and it excited me to go watch such a procedure. I learned a lot about the anatomy of the mouth from

the doctor.” All students also have an opportunity to join HOSA Future Health Professionals. HOSA is a program that allows students to participate in competitions that reflect unique aspects of the health science industry, such as Biomedical Debate, Health Career Photography, Medical Innovation and Health Career Display. HOSA also helps students develop a value for leadership, learning, service and innovation. By becoming a CTE class, students have the opportunity to graduate with certifications that are crucial in their fields, such as a CPR certification. Health Science classes also are able to offer more hands-on curriculum and more real-world experiences in the medical industry to help them connect what they learned in the classroom to their career. “The CTE program is wonderful for any students

who want to go into any of the fields we offer,” graphic design and CTE teacher Callie Lawrence said. “I’m excited to see the opportunites that will come to this program as the years progress. At Henderson High School, we are evolving education through this program, and I cannot wait to experience how CTE changes students’ perspective of learning.”


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NEWS

NOV 8, 2019

THE HI-LIFE

SENIOR SENIORS CLASS OFFICERS

PRESIDENT PRESIDENT

VICE VICE PRESIDENT PRESIDENT

SECRETARY SECRETARY

TREASURER TREASURER

HISTORIAN HISTORIAN

Saul Quintanilla

Ann Mills

Riley Foster

Carson Lee

Mia Hay

JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

TREASURER

JUNIORS

Not Pictured: HISTORIAN Analena Tava

Erin Burris

PRESIDENT

David Padilla

PRESIDENT

Macy Watson

Emma Cross

Lilly Turlington

SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

TREASURER

HISTORIAN

Ella Wheat

Ally Brooks

Carter Wheat

Nathan McKinney

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS SECRETARY

Not Pictured:

TREASURER

JUNIORS

Not Pictured: HISTORIAN

VICE PRESIDENT Abby Everitt

Meg Moores

Taylor Dickerson

Jaci Taylor

Camille Freeman


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NOV 8, 2019

FEATURE

THE HI-LIFE

Tw i r l i n g Tw i n s Sophomore Named Second HHS Majorette Feature Twirler RILEY FOSTER Staff Reporter

Callie Lawrence / THE HI-LIFE

Senior Jana Higgs and junior Grace Lane perform at the Carthage vs. Henderson pep rally.

Ani Aparicio / THE HI-LIFE

The feature twirlers perform at NAMMB contest on Nov. 2.

Bright stadium lights shine on sequinstudded uniforms, carefully wrapped batons and painted red lips. Two girls take matching deep breaths and assume their beginning positions. They’ve done this a hundred times, but each time brings nerves as if it’s the first. A whistle blows and they leap into action, nerves disappearing and smiles growing. They’ve done this a hundred times, and each time is as exciting as the first. Feature Twirlers Jana Higgs and Gracie Lane have taken on stadiums from Henderson to Palestine, and the

pair always comes out on top. “It is very fun to have someone out there to share the field with,” Higgs said. “Friday nights are always amazing.” Higgs is a senior and has been a feature twirler for the HHS Majorettes since her sophomore year. This is her first year to have another twirler to share the field with. “Twirling with Gracie this year has made me realize how different it is choreographing a routine for two people rather than one is,” Higgs said. “I really have enjoyed it.” Lane, a sophomore, is making her feature twirling debut this year. “It has been a very exciting year so far, and I love getting to twirl with someone

on the field,” Lane said. “Jana has been a huge support this year.” Both girls say they practice regularly, sometimes alone and sometimes together. “I practice for the most part everyday,” Lane said. “Jana and I usually practice together through the school week.” Higgs plans to attend East Texas Baptist University as their feature twirler after she graduates. “It is sad to know that I won’t be able to twirl at the high school level much longer,” Higgs said. “I do plan on continuing my twirling career at ETBU.” Lane hopes to continue as the HHS Majorette’s feature twirler, and she plans to possibly pursue collegiate twirling in Arkansas. “I would love to twirl through college,” Lane said. “Hopefully I will be able to twirl at the University of Arkansas.” As football season comes to an end, the girls are saying goodbye to high school’s Friday night lights, Higgs for the final time. “The last three years of being HHS’s feature twirler have been amazing, and I wouldn’t trade them for the world,” Higgs said. “I can’t wait to use all I’ve learned at ETBU.”

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

The feature twirlers dance with the rest of the twirlers on Oct. 18 at the blacklight pep rally. Marty Lane / Facebook


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NOV 8, 2019

FEATURE

THE HI-LIFE

hat-a-Student Senior Gets Promoted To Manager At Local Whataburger ASHLEY WILKINSON News Bureau Chief Welcome to Whataburger, Texas’ favorite restaurant for burgers, chicken strips and opportunities. Within those orange and white walls, among the unique display of electric guitars and matching surfboards and 80s throwback music, you’ll find senior Hannah Myers taking care of your every need. Myers was promoted to the customer service manager at Whataburger on July 8 after working as a server starting on June 7, 2018. “I love all the responsibilities that come with the job,” Myers said. “I would have to say the best part is the customers. I love being able to make certain that all the customers who walk into Whataburger leave with a memorable experience and a smile.” During the summer before her junior year, Myers was hired as a server, joining some of her friends on the Whataburger staff. Being a server entailed

bringing out customer’s food register drawers ready to be in a timely manner as well as counted, and provide a fresh providing drink refills and drawer at the designated times. extra napkins. “The new responsibilities “I’ve always wanted to get were a lot more to take on than a job and have my own money I thought I would be,” Myers instead of said. “I asking my “What I worked so realized parents for hard for was finally I had to money all in my grasp.” figure out the time,” exactly M y e r s what my said. “I wanted a job, and I responsibility was. Then I had friends who worked at problem-solved and worked Whataburger.” through those first weeks.” Myers found out that she Myers plans to stay was one of five employees under employed at Whataburger consideration for manager when she goes to Kilgore two weeks beforehand. After College next year, majoring working for exactly one year, in entrepreneurship. After one month and one day, Myers Kilgore College, Myers is still was officially promoted. narrowing down universities to “What I worked so hard for find the best program for her. was finally in my grasp,” Myers “It’s something I’ve always said. “I was really excited wanted to do,” Myers said. “I’ve about a promotion. The job is always had the idea of having everything I thought it would my own business. Whataburger be, plus more.” has given me the skills I need to Myers’ promotion extends do that, for sure.” on the duties of her job as a server. As a customer service manager, Myers’ responsibilities expanded to giving refunds, getting the

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Image Courtesy of Google


FEATURE

THE HI-LIFE

NOV 8, 2019

In Like A Lion, Out Like A Lamb HISD Hires New Superintendent ERIN BURRIS Managung Editor Rare is it that lions take orders from a sheep, but at Henderson, this maybe the start of a beautiful new beginning. Transitioning from Chief of Schools at Duncanville ISD, Dr. Thurston Lamb Jr. started the 2019-2020 school year with a new job as the Henderson ISD superintendent. “I enjoy teaching,” Lamb said simply. “But my favorite part about being a superintendent is working collaboratively with all stakeholders to create an educational learning environment that allows all students to have unforgettable learning experiences.” After graduating high school at Morrilton High School in Morrilton, Arkansas, Lamb served in the United States Marine Corps. Then,

after realizing his passion for education, he walked at the University of Central Arkansas earning a Bachelor of Science in Education. Then seeking a higher level of education, Lamb acquired his Masters of Science at Texas A&M Commerce and his Ph.D. at Capella University. “I think one thing

a new level. “I hope to enhance what is currently happening right now,” Lamb said. “I hope to increase opportunities for students to earn college credit, expand the courses in Career and Technical Education, and establish a school climate that connects all students.” Even though Lamb This job is not about makes it look like a piece of cake, being money; it is about a superintendent is a helping others.” troublesome and stressful responsibility for anyone. Henderson needs is a more “You have to be disciplined, positive environment,” senior focused, and have an incredible Ashley Wilkinson said. “The work ethic,” Lamb said. “If changes he’s making are already you want to lead and serve the starting to make a difference, people, you are responsible and I have a feeling this is only for supervising then being an the beginning.” educational leader is priceless. Lamb transferred to This job is not about money; it is Henderson for the small, about helping others.” supportive tight-knit community; he hopes to use this experience to take Henderson to

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Lamb (top fourth from the left) showing his school sprit at the high school during Homecomg week with stufents.

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FEATURE

THE HI-LIFE

NOV 8, 2019

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Halloween: Dos and Don’ts

MIA HAY Graphic Design Specilsit The season of spooks and sweets has thoroughly arrived, bringing cooler weather and exciting festivities with it. Halloween is fast approaching, but sometimes etiquette flies out the window like a witch on a broomstick. Here are several tips to keep everyone happy and healthy this All Hallow’s Eve.

Do Use UV Protection

Check out this edition’s Spotify Fall playlist! Featuring throwback jams such as: Africa by TOTO Thriller by Micheal Jackson Calling All the Monsters by China Anna McClain

As soon as cooler weather rolls around, sun damage preparation is always forgotten. Despite the rapidly falling temperatures, UV rays are still a concern, especially in crisp, clear, October weather. Use SPF moisturizer or BB cream to keep that sunburn far, far away.

Do Hydrate

Much like precautions against the sun, we often fail to drink enough water when cooler temperatures replace the oppressive heat of the summer. For kids and parents out trick-or-treating, carry water to stay safe walking in your costume.

Do Consume Electrolytes

The second half of water’s necessity comes with electrolytes. Sports drinks such as Gatorade and Body Armor and even pickle juice contain electrolytes that replace vital nutrients your body loses in sweating. They also offer hydration, but not to the extent that water does.

Do Eat Protein

Trick-or-treating is not a competitive sport by any means, but eating a snack rich in protein beforehand increases energy for walking. Protein also makes it safer to consume large amounts of Halloween candy. By eating a handful of almonds or a boiled egg, one can avoid the sugar coma that a successful Halloween always promises.

Don’t Be Offensive with Your Costume Choice

Halloween is a season of creative parody, but some costumes are entirely inappropriate to mock. While dressing as characters from Disney’s Coco is one thing, using Dia de los

Muertos as a costume if you are not of Mexican descent is disrespectful to the culture and celebration. Blackface and brownface, as they have come to be known, are also highly disrespectful and racist in nature. One should also be careful to avoid hypersexualized costumes of Asian or Native American origin. Also, if the costume has to do with a crime such as domestic terrorists, foreign terrorists or convicts, it is probably best left unworn.

Don’t Be a Jerk to Children

Everyone (for the most part) knows that the American, capitalist version of Halloween is largely geared toward children collecting ungodly amounts of candy from their neighbors as a reward for cute or ‘scary’ costumes, much to the dismay of the tired parents. I ask of the teenage readers not to ruin it for them. All of us have fond memories of ringing the doorbell of the old grandma on the block who gave out full-size chocolate bars or passing out on the couch in green face paint after scarfing down one-toomany Reese’s pumpkins. Let these kids have their fun this Halloween season. And for the love of all that is holy, do not smash any pumpkins.

Pompeii by Bastille H o p e f u l l y, this article gives you some helpful tips to have the best, spookiest Halloween yet! Be safe, and

Image Courtesy of Google


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FEATURE

NOV 8, 2019

THE HI-LIFE

Black Cats: Friend or Foe? ASHLEY WILKINSON News Bureau Chief A black cat crossed your path! Bad luck, right? Well, as it turns out, these purring creatures are not a witch’s sidekick, like Thackery Binx from Hocus Pocus. They are just like any other ordinary cat but with a major target on their backs for something we have been trying to eradicate within us humans for centuries: their color. Ironically, black cats are considered good luck in many cultures around the globe. We have all seen the Egyptian drawings of a black cat head on a woman’s body. In ancient Egypt’s religion, the daughter of the sun god was called Bastet, and she was known as a fierce home protector, slaying any snakes or vermin that dare enter her home, just like a cat. To give her proper representation in their drawings, Egyptians drew her with a black cat head. Any black cat within Egypt was then considered sacred and worshipped. Ancient Egypt is just one of many cultures that celebrated these cats instead of feared them. So how did black cats get

labeled as unlucky? It all starts in the Salem Witch Trials. Black cats were seen as associated with sorcery, so they were as distrusted as every so-called witch. Somehow, this viewpoint was engraved in American culture. Ergo, when Halloween rolls around with witches on broomsticks, their loyal buddy, the black cat, follows. Black cats are everywhere as you roam down the Halloween decoration aisles at Walmart, but these creatures are more than just decoration; they are pets. Animal shelters around the nation have begun to notice that cats and dogs that have black fur are less likely to be adopted than any other animal. Because of outdated superstitions in our culture, black animals are not trusted as much, at no fault of their own. This is called Black Dog Syndrome, and it has definitely become a problem for shelters. In fact, the black fur gene in cats in the most dominant, so there are more black cats than any other cat. Many shelters are crammed with these “unadoptable” black cats. Something’s got to give. Because of the Halloween season, these cuddly creatures are in danger of irresponsible adopters. Many people are

looking for a cool Halloween decoration, so they adopt a black cat. Once Nov. 1 comes and the Halloween vibes wear off, these adopters realize that their new pet is more responsibility than they planned to take on, so the cat ends up in the shelter again. Black cats are also subjected to abuse from Satan worshippers and extremist horror movie junkies during the Halloween season, not to mention the possibility of being harmed by trick-ortreater traffic. Before you rush off to adopt a black furry friend, please consider all of the new responsibilities they bring.

Two unnamed kittens (left) are available for adoption at the Henderson Animal Shelter as well as Otis the domestic shorthair (right). Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE

Ashley Wilkinson / THE HI-LIFE


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OPINION

NOV 8, 2019

THE HI-LIFE

Does a Healthy Lunch Program Make A Difference? Erin Burris Managing Editor

Mia Hay Graphic Specialist Since 2012’s implementation of the National School Lunch Program, students have seen plenty of changes in the cafeteria. Hamburgers were eclipsed by baked chicken sandwiches, fries lost their salt and sodas disappeared altogether. Wraps, salads, whole wheat buns, baked sides and fresh produce replaced cafeteria food in schools across the country, to very little complaint. But what happens to poorer rural schools when healthy options lead students to unhealthy choices? Though, in theory, a healthier lunch requirement is effective and beneficial, in actuality, this program fails in the cafeterias of schools with low funding. Based on my own observations and experiences in Henderson High School’s cafeteria, students do not often enjoy the healthier culinary options (by no fault of the kitchen and serving staff). Wraps and

salads g o untouched in the refrigerators, with students opting for low-sodium, reduced-fat, gravycovered chicken nuggets or a baked and breaded chicken sandwich on a whole wheat bun with sugar free ketchup. One choice students tend to make due to the distaste for these healthy options is simply not eating lunch. Regular, filling meals are imperative to students’ success in the classroom, but unfavorably-flavored healthy options drive students to skip meals altogether, lessening focus and understanding. Being that focus and understanding are necessary for academic success and performance, students choosing not to consume poorly-funded healthier options could hurt school’s test scores, thus decreasing funding

Way back in 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. The purpose of the act was to raise the minimum nutritional standards for public school lunches. This sparked the debate: does having healthier school lunch programs really make that big of a difference? The answer is

simple- yes. An outstanding number of studies have linked better school food quality with both direct and indirect positive effects on students in the classroom. A lack of nutrients directly affects a child’s cognitive development, behavior in class and mental health. What is the point of kids being legally obligated to go to school and then not allowed to focus at fault of the school? Often school foods have nutritional deficiencies in zinc, vitamin B, Omega-3 fatty acids and protein, but instead, have high amounts of trans and saturated fats that

further. Students also tend to choose to leave campus for lunch. Although this is technically not allowed at Henderson, some juniors and seniors feign being dual credit students in order to get a tastier lunch, despite the added cost and rules in place to prohibit this. In specifically poorer, rural communities, healthy school lunches shoot themselves in the foot by driving students to pick up off-campus fast food options. This fully defeats the purpose of healthier school lunches.

Perhaps w i t h m o r e f u n d i n g , Henderson’s cafeteria could provide more appetizing lunches, keeping kids safe on campus more effectively. The National School Lunch Program fails in rural communities such as Henderson, despite its

negatively impact cognition due to this students cannot focus or correctly process the information that they are being told. With healthier school lunches, the number of beneficial elements in the food they consume will increase helping kids be able to focus in the classroom and actually learn what their teacher is teaching them. Indirectly, better quality foods improve students’ lifestyles, allowing them to remain healthy longer rather than constantly falling ill. We all know that one student who seems like they spend more time at home sick than at school. Through the power of healthy living, statistics have proven that eating foods with higher nutritional value has drastically improved attendance records. Not only does healthier food help improve

attendance, but it helps create healthy eating habits for when students go off on their own- inspiring them to carry these good attendances and eating habits later on into their career life. The main argument against healthier lunch is the price. However, according to Brookings Institution, healthier foods are actually more cost-efficient. It is estimated that it cost approximately $80 per student per year, while this may seem expensive at first; however, due to the dramatic increase in students’ test scores and overall grades, schools do not have to spend money on hiring more teachers to help students with the problems that unhealthy habits cause. In the end, there are no valid reasons to negate school lunches. The facts are there, loud and clear. The beneficial direct and indirect consequences topped with the money schools save makes it easy to say yes, school lunch really do make that big of a difference.

success i n wealthier s c h o o l districts. What Image Courtesy of Google


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NOV 8, 2019

OPINION

Why Do Americans Not Vote? Mia Hay Graphic Design Specialist The 2016 Presidential Election was one of the most divisive and complex times for American politics in recent history. According to an article by PBS, 58 percent of eligible voters actually turned out on polling day, meaning that millions of voters chose not to participate. The truth of the matter is, Americans are not turning out because they do not want to vote or they cannot vote. Those who choose not to vote may do so because they feel that their voice in politics is left unheard. The Electoral College can put in place a president not elected by popular vote, which drives potential voters to opt out entirely. If leaders the people do not choose or even choose against still manage to end up in office, what is the point? According to PBS study over the election of 2000, only about one in four voters aged 18 to 24 showed up to vote. These numbers show that eligible voters in the United States have collectively caught a serious case of what the PBS study

dubbed as “voter apathy.” Voter apathy is the general disinterest in or carelessness for input in politics. The aforementioned “itmakes-no-difference” attitude contributes greatly to voter apathy and low voter turnout as a whole. Although many Americans choose not to vote, some eligible voters are simply incapable of voting. According to NPR, this category is more likely filled with young people, racial minorities and poorer individuals. For many, voting means leaving for part of the work day, which is a luxury many underprivileged voters literally cannot afford. Taking a few hours off to vote might seem like a brief reprieve from a day of work to some, but to hundreds of thousands of potential voters, it could mean one less meal on the table, or a few days without hot water or air conditioning. Transportation can also be difficult to find for these people groups, adding to their inability to contribute. Given that these specific minorities are more likely to vote progressively, it is safe to say that the input of these groups could change the political climate if they were capable of turning out

with minimal financial loss. One way to solve the issue of low voter turnout and overwhelming political passivity is by making voting day a national holiday. A national day off work and school would permit all eligible voters to turn out and let their voices be heard, while increasing awareness of the importance of voting. Communities and local youth centers such as Boys and Girls Club and other afterschool programs could host information sessions and workshops for those too young to vote and perhaps even register seventeen-year-olds in states where that is permitted. All in all, voter turnout is at an all time low due to voter apathy and systemic silencing of underprivileged minorities. Perhaps with the creation of a national holiday dedicated to voting, America’s testy political climate could change for the better.

THE HI-LIFE

By The Numbers... Recently, the Ecomonic and Government classes helped register the seniors to vote.

138 out of 185 seniors were able to register.

Statistically,

81 out of the 138 of these seniors will actually turn out on polling day.

Image Courtesy of Google


The Hi-Life Student Newspaper is dedicated to producing news for Henderson High School students and the community. We publish all our articles on our website, but we publish a newspaper version of the highlights every six weeks. Check out our website at www.thehi-life.com. ADVISOR Callie Lawrence NEWS BUREAU CHIEF Ashley Wilkinson MANAGING EDITOR Erin Burris ETHICS MAVEN Dylan Clinton GRAPHIC SPECIALIST Mia Hay STAFF REPORTERS Emmily Riley Riley Foster

Profile for The Hi-Life Student Newspaper

Hi-Life Highlights Vol. 86 No. 2  

Check out the happenings around Henderson High School during the second six weeks of the 2019-2020 school year.

Hi-Life Highlights Vol. 86 No. 2  

Check out the happenings around Henderson High School during the second six weeks of the 2019-2020 school year.