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HERE+NOW A TEAM OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS + DESIGNERS WHO DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY. WE CHAMPION INNOVATIVE AND GENUINE ENGAGEMENT AS PART OF A COMPLETE DESIGN PROCESS.

WHO WE ARE A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAM OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS + URBAN DESIGNERS. WITH ADDITIONAL SKILLS IN COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, PHOTOGRAPHY, USER EXPERIENCE, RESEARCH AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT

YEAR

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CONTENTS MANIFESTO ................................3 WHO WE ARE ..............................5 OUR APPROACH..........................7 CO-DESIGN TOOLS .....................9 AWARDS ....................................11 TALKS + PRESENTATIONS ........13 POLICY CONTEXT.......................15 OUR IMPACT...............................17 PROJECTS .................................19 WHAT’S NEXT.............................49


MANIFESTO WE AIM TO DESIGN BETTER PLACES FOR PEOPLE AND THE ENVIRONMENT. WE ARE A TEAM OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS + DESIGNERS WHO DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY. WE CHAMPION INNOVATIVE AND GENUINE ENGAGEMENT AS PART OF THE DESIGN PROCESS. We improve design outcomes by valuing and listening to local people and the end users of a place. The result is more successful places which are designed for the end user, bustling with nature, and which meet the client brief. By combining community engagement and research with landscape architecture and urban design, we help create places which work better in practice, strengthen local relationships, and bring public spaces to life. We are constantly iterating our co-design tools and approach to ensure we continue to improve and deliver the best place design outcomes.

Cycle and walking tours showcasing local community growing and arts projects around Edinburgh that received a hand-made up-cycled seat as part of our #SpaceToSit design&build hack at Fountainbridge earlier in the summer.

#SpaceToSit community briefing evening at Fountainbridge Wikihouse ahead of the one-day design&build hack we facilitated at Fountainbridge Meanwhile project in June 2016.

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WHO WE ARE

LIZ THOMAS Co-Director, Chartered Landscape Architect, Engagement Facilitator

HERE+NOW is a multi award-winning landscape architecture studio specialised in co-design. We offer an experienced team of landscape architects, urban designers, engagement facilitators, researchers and photographers who are passionate about making places better.

METTE MĂ˜LLER Urban Designer and Planner, Engagement Facilitator

Our landscape architecture work aims to improve places for both people and environment, resulting in more vibrant, sustainable and attractive cities and landscapes. We believe in actively engaging people in their local places, and have expertise in facilitating events, exhibitions, and workshops which feed into design outcomes and/or research studies. We have a proven track record in projects relevant to urban public space, active travel, and research - including public life and place assessments, as well as landscape architecture and built environment design and construction. We recognise the importance of engaging with local communities, stakeholders and organisations to input into both research and design responses for places and aim to integrate co-design techniques and user engagement with the design process throughout our work. HERE+NOW’s work has won multiple awards in 2016, recently winning two Scottish Design Awards 2016 for our City Link Festival codesigned exhibition.

FIORELLA MODOLO Urban Designer, Graphic Designer and Illustrator, Engagement Facilitator

We were also recognised in the UK-wide Planning&Placemaking Awards 2016, winning the Regional Award for Scotland, were shortlisted in the Kew Grow Wild Awards for our innovative use of wildflowers in the Porty Art Walk project, and have been shortlisted for the Landscape Institute Awards 2016.

A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAM OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS + URBAN DESIGNERS WITH COMPLEMENTARY ADDITIONAL SKILLS IN COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, PHOTOGRAPHY, GRAPHIC DESIGN, AND RESEARCH. WE ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT MAKING PLACES BETTER FOR PEOPLE AND ENVIRONMENT.

HERE+NOW was founded in late 2014 and is a not-for-profit Community Interest Company. Any profit generated from our commercial activities goes back into providing design services for communities at reduced rates or adding valuable engagement elements to projects where this would otherwise not be possible as part of the design process. This approach helps us further our positive impact on people and place throughout our work. You can find out more on our website: www.thehereandnow.org.uk

JENNY ELLIOTT Co-Director, Landscape Architect, Researcher, Photographer

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We combine our design expertise as landscape architects and urban designers with community and stakeholder engagement activities that value local knowledge, aspiration and expertise. This allows us to deliver more resilient design outcomes, improved social capital and better places as a result. It also ensures it builds on and complements the work of existing organisations and groups in the area. By offering services in, and combining both community engagement, user and place research and assessment, and professional lansdcape architecture and urban design expertise - from concept design through to implementation and construction - we ensure there is a smooth process from initial engagement to built design so that no information is lost along the way.

OUR APPROACH WE USE A ‘CO-DESIGN’ APPROACH, COMBINING OUR DESIGN EXPERTISE WITH LOCAL KNOWLEDGE AND ASPIRATION TO TOGETHER DEVELOP THE MOST RESILIENT, ROBUST DESIGN OUTCOMES THAT MEET BOTH THE CLIENT AND END USERS’ BRIEF.

We capture local knowledge from the people that know most about it; how a place is currently used, aspirations for the future, local experiences and community networks. We also work with other stakeholders such as relevant local businesses, organisations and the client to ensure we have the full picture of how to best improve a place for everyone. We do this via workshops, discussions, walkabouts, design+build hacks, user interviews, and innovative exhibitions and events that use unique approaches to bring a diverse range of people together for genuine conversations about local places. We complement our learnings from this process with design expertise from our team of professional landscape architects and urban designers to integrate this local aspiration and knowledge, with the client brief, and our own design expertise to create an evolving finalised design that responds to both the place, environment and the people who will use it.

We call this approach ‘co-design’ for the built environment. Co-design is when design professionals work closely with local people to create better places designed both for and with the end user. Combining local knowledge with professional design expertise to create more meaningful, resilient and relevant design outcomes. Putting people at the heart of place and design. From greenspace design to urban research, whatever the project, we always advocate for user-centred design as this delivers the most successful implemented built designs, community briefs or urban interventions as its output.

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LISTENING + LEARNING IDEAS MAPPING WALKING

DESIGN+BUILD HACKS / PROTOTYPING

WALKABOUTS OUTSIDE

CLUSTERING + CLARIFYING ASPIRATIONS GREEN SPACE

DEVELOPING + TESTING

SEEING PLACES DIFFERENTLY

ONE DAY EVENTS TO MAKE AN IMPACT NOW WORKSHOPS TO TEST + ITERATE DESIGN IDEAS

CYCLING

PROTOTYPE

PAPER MODELS OR 1:1 SCALE

UNDERSTAND LEARN + IMPROVE

SPORTS

PLAY

SEATING

IDEATE

THINK OF IDEAS

COLLECTIVE DESIGN BRIEF

PROBLEM STATEMENT + SUMMARY DESIGN BRIEF

USER INTERVIEWS

LISTENING + LEARNING ADDS DEPTH + INSIGHT

DESIGN BRIEF

‘HOLD ME DEAR’ PHOTO WORKSHOPS ONLINE PHOTO GALLERIES + OUTDOOR EXHIBITIONS INVITING COMMUNITY PHOTOS+STORIES OF PLACE

DESIGN OPTIONS

FEEDBACK ON DESIGN OPTIONS RESULTS IN PREFERRED DESIGN

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UNDERSTANDING NEEDS + ASPIRATIONS FROM OTHER PERSPECTIVES

USING ROLES + PERSONAS

“ “

TESTING + ITERATING IDEAS WITH USERS

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MIXING DESIGN EXPERTISE WITH STAKEHOLDER FEEDBACK TO CREATE A FINAL DESIGN THAT MEETS THE NEEDS OF BOTH CLIENT, END USERS AND ENVIRONMENT

We use a series of innovative tools to engage local people and organisations inclusively in the design process in ways that are genuine, exciting and productive. Respecting and incorporating their input results in better design outcomes that value the experiences of the people that will end up using that place, whilst also meeting the client’s brief. This adds additional layers of information to the typical ‘site survey’, allows us to test and iterate the design based on feedback and input from local people and stakeholders, and ultimately ensure the most robust, resilient and appropriate design outcome for a place, whilst building relationships and community. We achieve this by using a series of tools we have developed and tested over the last two years. These methods go beyond the typical ‘consultation’ and reach a more diverse range of people to enable a more inclusive and robust design process that listens and learns from a wider variety of local people and organisations.

‘LIVE DESIGN’ SKETCHING

PROBLEM STATEMENT

STARTING A COMMUNITY DISCUSSION ABOUT A PLACE

‘PEP TALK’ SPEAKER EVENTS

FINAL DESIGN

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We select the tools most appropriate to use on a project-by-project basis, but these typically include an element of design prototype with local people where we use design + build hack days to try things out at 1:1 scale, ‘live design’ where our team of designers sketch concept designs and ideas ‘live’ for instant feedback and input from stakeholders, walkabout workshops outside to get people thinking differently, or initiate interventions such as pop-up cinema nights or exhibitions that test an idea while bringing the community together. We feed the outputs of this community and stakeholder engagement into the design process by synthesising and documenting the results of these events, workshops or activities. This process values local voices, gives us a more holistic understanding of the social, cultural and historic context of any site, and the aspirations and needs of those who will use the space.

OUR CO-DESIGN TOOLS WE USE OUR CO-DESIGN TOOLS TO LISTEN + LEARN FROM LOCAL PEOPLE AND ORGANISATIONS. GIVING THEM A GENUINE VOICE AS PART OF THE DESIGN PROCESS. THIS LEADS TO BETTER, MORE INCLUSIVE + ROBUST PLACE DESIGN OUTCOMES.

We are constantly testing, iterating and improving these co-design tools. This helps us to ensure the tools are as inclusive, productive and useful as possible. On each project, we share back observations and best practice with clients, local people and other stakeholders who have been part of the design process. We typically do this via engagement reports, community briefs, monitoring and evaluation reports analysing project impact, community exhibitions, publications, photography or film. We also feed the lessons learnt from each project forward into our continually evolving and improving approach, sharing these with the wider built environment industry to promote codesign as best practice. 9


AWARDS Within our first two years, the HERE+NOW team have been humbled and thrilled to have won a series of awards. We were recently awarded both the 2016 Scottish Design Award for ‘Regeneration’ for our Hold Me Dear community photography exhibition, launch event and workshops transforming Rodney St tunnel, and the Scottish Design Awards Chairman’s Award for Architecture 2016. This project was also recognised at the Planning & Placemaking Awards 2016, where it won the Regional Award for Scotland.

WE ARE THRILLED THAT OUR APPROACH COMBINING ENGAGEMENT + DESIGN HAS BEEN RECOGNISED WITH A NUMBER OF AWARDS IN OUR FIRST TWO YEARS.

In addition we have been recently shortlisted for our 2015 Co-Design Publication as part of the Landscape Institute Awards 2016, communicating our first year as a non-profit landscape architecture studio specialised in co-design and sharing the tools, techniques, projects and experiences from our first year.

Our Hold Me Dear exhibition transformed Rodney Street tunnel in Edinburgh with a series of workshops, engagement events and design&build hacks, leading to a one month community photography exhibition in the tunnel, a launch event bringing community together to celebrate the project, and a series of Locally Loved Routes to explore local people’s favourite spots nearby via a series of walking and cycling trails. This project by HERE+NOW won two Scottish Design Awards and the Regional Award for Scotland at the Planning&Placemaking Awards 2016.

project initiated by a small not for profit design “ This studio does much to capture the imagination and

zeitgeist of real issues at the heart of regeneration. How people use and engage with spaces is critical to the understanding of the transformative impact of design. Curating an installation and online record of personal and moving reflections of places and memories in a way that encourages engagement and participation in local places is worthy of special recognition. A beautiful and highly relevant project. Heinz Richardson of Jestico + Whiles, Chairman’s Award for Architecture 2016, Scottish Design Awards

We were also recognised at the Grow Wild Awards 2016, where we were Highly Commended for our #BloomingBricks project as part of Porty Art Walk, Edinburgh. This community engagement event invited people to take part in a drop-in workshop on the promenade at Portobello to make a ‘Blooming Brick’ using a mix of soil, native wildflower seeds and recycled paper to bring nooks of the street space and city to life and promote urban biodiversity.

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One of our core aims is to champion the voice of local people and stakeholders as part of a more inclusive and robust design process. We share our co-design approach, tools and lessons we learn with the wider industry and public to help demonstrate the positive impact that integrating community engagement as part of designing the built environment can have, and to help enable others to do the same. We are advocates for integrating engagement and codesign as an important approach to landscape architecture and urban design, and want to help catalyse a step-change in this approach becoming not just best practice but standard. From exhibitions and publications, to monitoring and evaluation reports and presentations. We also document the engagement and design process using photography and film and share this back to those involved. An important part of how we share what we do is via talks and presentations. In 2016 we were invited to speak at the following events:

TALKS + PRESENTATIONS WE BELIEVE IN SHARING OUR CO-DESIGN APPROACH FOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN. WE REGULARLY DELIVER TALKS TO SHARE THE LESSONS WE LEARN.

February - EASF 2016 - ‘(un)democratic urban regeneration’ panel debate and presentation. at The Biscuit Factory, Edinburgh. April - Pecha Kucha presentation for Year of Innovation in Architecture and Design 2016 May - Hidden Door Festival presentation and discussion as part of the Open Space Debate June - The Causey AGM key note speakers on topic ‘Cities for People’ July - Pecha Kucha for TAKTAL, part of Agile City summer school, Glasgow November - ADAS Dundee University lecture ‘The Value, and Values of the Void’, part of the Value and the Void lecture series. 13


pan

User led engagement is underwritten across Scottish legislation, planning policy and guidance. The Planning etc (Scotland) Act 2006 and associated secondary legislation promote opportunities for people to get involved in place planning via community engagement relating to the built environment and their local places. Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) sets out the Government’s policy on community engagement, highlighting its importance in relation to the planning system, inclusive participatory democracies and community led regeneration. By way of introduction, Scottish Planning Policy (2014) sets out this focus on engagement and involvement by local people at the beginning of the policy document, stating:

“Engagement between stakeholders should be early, meaningful and proportionate. Innovative approaches, tailored to the unique circumstances are encouraged, for example charrettes.” (SPP, 2014).

This is supported by relevant Planning Circulars, which contain Scottish Government policy on the implementation of legislation or procedures. Circular 1/2009: Development Planning and Circular 4/2009: Development Management Procedures relate to positive community engagement and may be material considerations taken into account for development plans and development management decisions. Planning Advice Note 3/2010: Community Engagement provides advice to communities on how they can get involved in built environment planning matters as well as advice to planning authorities and developers on ways of effectively engaging with communities. It states:

“Effective engagement with the public can lead to better plans, better decisions and more satisfactory outcomes.”

PLANNING SERIES

SCOTTISH COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT ACTION PLAN Celebrating Success: Inspiring Change

This PAN also links directly with the ‘National Standards for Community Engagement’ which set out best practice principles for engagement with communities.

A POLICY CONTEXT OUR ETHOS IS UNDERPINNED BY NATIONAL POLICY, WHICH STRONGLY ADVOCATES A USER-LED APPROACH AND MOVING BEYOND ‘CONSULTATION’ BY USING GENUINE ENGAGEMENT WITH COMMUNITY AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE

The Scottish Parliament passed the Community Empowerment Act in 2015 setting the context for the Scottish Community Empowerment Action Plan which states:

“the process of community empowerment helps to [...] stimulate and harness the energy of local people to come up with creative and successful solutions to local challenges.”. The Community Empowerment Act aims to empower community bodies by strengthening their voices in the decisions that matter to them. In addition, the Designing Streets and Creating Places policy statement and Place Standard are core to, and inform, much of our work designing places using an engagement approach. 15


ST MARGARET’S HOUSE

I really want to sell my car and buy a bike!!

‘‘

The #SpaceToSit cycle and walking tours were a series of free guided tours around Edinburgh showcasing local community and creative projects. Each project visited en route had received a hand-made upcycled seat as part of our #SpaceToSit design&build hack earlier in the summer. The tours stopped by these exciting local projects and places, and offered a chance to explore the city on foot or by bike, listen to inspiring speakers and find out about the diverse and exciting range of community growing and arts projects across Edinburgh.

The #SpaceToSit project included three stages - a community briefing event where local participants could meet each other, find out about the project and ways they could be involved, a design&build hack day where small teams hand-built unique furniture for the public realm at Meanwhile Fountainbridge, and then a series of walking and cycling tours later in the year to visit these seats in their new homes at other community gardens and arts projects around Edinburgh when the Meanwhile Fountainbridge site closed. During all 3 phases of the project we conducted monitoring and evaluation and also documented the project with film and photography. Our team used surveys and user interviews to gain valuable feedback and insight from those participating. We also recorded a range of quantiative data including attendee numbers and other impact.

‘‘

COMMUNITY BRIEFING / DESIGN • 98+ volunteers and attendees involved • 67 new project mailing list sign ups • 78 likes on ‘Space To Sit’ Facebook page • 3,644 total post reaches of ‘Space To Sit’ Facebook page • 12,457+ Twitter impressions

Friendly, fun and inspiring to see the community gardens. It took us to spaces you wouldn’t just come across.

‘‘

DESIGN+BUILD HACK DAY EVENT • 30+ volunteers • 9 additional signups for the Fountainbridge Meanwhile talks for the potential WikiHouse extension • 11 seats designed and built in total

3 TOURS

‘‘

One walking and two cycle tours

I loved the mixture of being outdoors, in nature, and the physical exercise of going between the gardens by bike.

‘‘

8 LOCAL

community garden / creative projects visited

85+

Attendees total

17 TALKS

given by speakers along the routes

CYCLE AND WALKING TOURS • 85+ attendees • 17 talks at community garden and arts projects around Edinburgh • 3 cycle and walking tours

WE MONITOR AND EVALUATE THE IMPACTS OF OUR PROJECTS AT EVERY SCALE AND IN EVERY CONTEXT. CAPTURING THE IMPACT OUR WORK HAS + LEARNING LESSONS, USING PHOTOGRAPHY, FILM, QUOTES + STATISTICS.

built anything today, but came “ Itohaven’t see and support the event. I would love the seats to be used along cycle paths Mary, build event participant

can definitely think of people who’d “ Ilove to build something outside together - I’ll help spread the word! Elaine, Spring Fling attendee

came here without thinking I would build “ Isomething, but now I feel really inspired so I am going to get a team together!

Judith, community briefing event attendee

CYCLE

INBURGH

PLORING ED

G TOURS EX AND WALKIN

‘‘

We monitor and evaluate our projects using a range of different qualitative and quantitative techniques to learn lessons about what went well, how we can improve, and what the project’s impact was. A recent example of monitoring and evaluation was for our Space to Sit project.

T I S O T E #SPAC

OUR IMPACT

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PROJECTS It’s been another busy and exciting year for HERE+NOW, and we’d like to share with you some of our projects that have made our second year in business really special. On the following pages you’ll find a range of projects that we have delivered in 2016. These focus on landscape architecture and urban design, community engagement, research or curation - or a combination of these. Whatever the project, we aim to put people at the heart of place and design, and to make places better for people and environment either through built designed outcomes, research that has an impact or place-making activities that foster social capital and a more vibrant inclusive public realm. If you’d like to find out more about our current projects or follow our blog please visit:

A SNAPSHOT OF THE RANGE OF PROJECTS WE HAVE BEEN WORKING ON DURING 2016. FROM LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN TO ENGAGEMENT EVENTS AND PLACE-MAKING, WE ALWAYS PUT PEOPLE AT THE HEART OF DESIGN.

www.thehereandnow.org.uk

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SPACE TO SIT A DESIGN+BUILD HACK TRANSFORMING THE PUBLIC SPACE AT MEANWHILE FOUNTAINBRIDGE WITH 11 SEATS - DESIGNED, UPCYCLED + BUILT BY THE COMMUNITY. 3 CYCLE AND WALKING TOURS THEN VISITED THE SEATS + THEIR NEW HOMES AT COMMUNITY PROJECTS AROUND EDINBURGH.

Following the closure of the temporary Fountainbridge site these seats needed to be relocated, and so HERE+NOW found them new homes at a variety of other community projects around Edinburgh, ensuring their ongoing use.

#SpaceToSit design&build hack facilitated at Fountainbridge Meanwhile project in June 2016. More than 100 attendees together built eleven seats to bring the public realm to life.

Walking tour en route to Summerhall’s The Grove Garden. Part of 3 cycle and walking tours showcased 8 different local community growing and arts projects around Edinburgh that received one of the hand-made up-cycled seats.

It was heartwarming to find out about the many different community initiatives that exist in the city.

want to sell my “ Icarreally and buy a bike!!

loved the mixture of being “ Ioutdoors, in nature, and the physical exercise of going between the gardens by bike. I saw new bits of Edinburgh and met amazing people.

We believe in rigorously evaluating the impact of our projects. This helps us communicate the value these can bring to community, local people and their positive impact in enhancing places. Our monitoring and evaluation showed more than 100 attendees at the design+build hack, and a total of 86 attendees at the 3 cycle and walking tours, with 17 talks across 8 different sites.

During October 2016 we visited the seats at the variety of inspiring Edinburgh community garden and arts projects they are now located at. We partnered with MyAdventure cycle leaders and City of Edinburgh Council, and invited the public to join us for a series of three #SpaceToSit cycle or walking tours over the space of 3 weeks, featuring speakers at each project and showcasing the breadth of interesting and unique community projects around the city.

#SpaceToSit was a design+build project that transformed the public space at the ‘Meanwhile’ Fountainbridge site in Edinburgh with 11 unique hand-crafted seats. These were designed, upcycled and built by the community as part of a one day ‘hack’ facilitated by HERE+NOW and invited by the local community group at Fountainbridge to celebrate the last 6 months of activity on the site. To do this we invited local community, interested individuals, and architecture / landscape architecture students to design and then build a seat during a oneday hack with us on 18 June to coincide with the Fountainbridge Canal Festival.

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HERE+NOW conducted a series of Public Life Street Assessments over an 8 month period for client City of Edinburgh Council of five key local town centres across Edinburgh. These gave insight into how each public realm space currently functions in terms of public life and movement for pedestrians and cyclists. The local town centres assessed were: Portobello, Stockbridge, Nicolson St and Clerk St, Bruntsfield and Morningside, and Leith Walk and Great Junction St. To carry out Public Life Street Assessments, direct observation methodologies are used in combination with qualitative semi-structured user interviews, and the expertise and observations of the HERE+NOW research team of landscape architects and urban designers. Together this mixed method approach enables a large amount of useful data and analysis regarding the town centres in terms of their existing public life, user experience, and movement and place functions. The suite of research tools and techniques used by the HERE+NOW team represent current international best practice based on methodologies advocated by Gehl Architects amongst others, in addition to the team’s inhouse expertise and development of a series of analysis tools. This is used as a baseline of the existing condition, from which design recommendations are made for these public spaces, active travel routes and other city centre spaces to be enhanced for both public life and walking/cycling activities. The project output was a series of reports detailing this evidence and the way it can be used to target improvements in these places to create most impact, including a holistic series of design recommendations. This included development of a series of case study pages detailing global precedents for public life

PUBLIC LIFE STREET ASSESSMENTS USING ROBUST RESEARCH TO GIVE VALUABLE INSIGHT AND EVIDENCE INTO HOW PEOPLE CURRENTLY USE CITY STREETS AND OUTDOOR SPACES. PROVIDING A BASELINE FOR FUTURE DESIGN DECISIONS.

and active transit in urban areas, as well as production of a series of easily distributable one-page ‘cards’ showing how ideas distilled from these design precedents combined with the location-specific research could be interpreted and practically applied to these Edinburgh spaces. City of Edinburgh Council have since utilised the information to help inform planning guidance for these specific town centres. The Public Life Street Assessments research and findings will also be used for ongoing reference by the relevant Council locality teams to help supplement their exisitng understanding of and decisions regarding these key Edinburgh town centres. 23


The HERE+NOW team were invited by Newhaven Community Heritage group to develop a garden design and layout that would be accessible for the public to enjoy, enable a mix of food growing and planting with sensory and biodiversity interest, and bring their community garden to life. The current small garden space was underused by local people, but a valuable local asset with a great deal of potential. Through discussions with the community garden steering group and site visits a brief was established based on the community’s needs and aspirations for the garden. The HERE+NOW team translated these aspirations and the brief into a workable garden design, from organisational principles and concept through to detail design, specification and costings. This included providing a variety of options and activities which could be delivered by local people and volunteers as part of a phased approach during a series of community volunteer days.

NEWHAVEN COMMUNITY GARDEN WORKING WITH LOCAL COMMUNITY IN NEWHAVEN TO REVEAL THE POTENTIAL OF A SMALL URBAN SPACE AS A COMMUNITY GARDEN FOR ALL TO ENJOY.

Our designs and costings have since been used by the local community group, in collaboration with ELGT and City of Edinburgh Council to inform the final realised design in the garden.

help, wonderful co-operation “ Marvellous and a delightful plan for the community

garden. HERE+NOW really understood the needs of the garden and were able to create a fabulous design. Our ideas became real on paper. So empowering!

Heather Yang, Newhaven Community Heritage

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On a woodland embankment between St Margaret’s House and London Road extending over 3 hectares and on a linear sloping site at 1:1, HERE+NOW are supporting Edinburgh Palette to create a new community garden. With current access to the ground very limited and difficult to resolve, the project team led by HERE+NOW is exploring various approaches to open up this site as a secluded woodland garden with opportunities for growing and the installation of sculpture. As landscape architects, we’ve been challenged to reconsider what is possible on such an inaccessible and constrained site. Undertaking early survey work to explore the potential for activities on this sloping site and providing advice on works programming, we’ve been engaged in an incremental unlocking of this special greenspace resource. In parallel, and to gauge local interest in a greenspace project, HERE+NOW ran a series of engagement activities (late 2015 –2016). This process has drawn out a number of key stakeholder organisations within the building at St Margaret’s house, notably Upward Mobility (a charity working with people with learning disabilities), Link Up Support (a women’s support group) and a number of local artists interested in using the woodland as a setting for sculpture, workshops and storytelling. To realise these aspirations and deliver physical greenspace management and design a basic community garden infrastructure needs to be installed which HERE+NOW is currently scoping in detail for implementation in 2017. We propose to develop St Margaret’s Garden as a green growing and cultural space for all community, with areas for educational purposes, art events, reflection and respite, food growing and beekeeping; all ideas put forward by the stakeholders we’ve engaged

ST MARGARET’S HOUSE ART GARDEN WORKING WITH STUDIO TENANTS AND EDINBURGH PALETTE TO CO-DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS TO THE ST MARGARET’S HOUSE GARDEN

with. This would be delivered by creating a solid and safe infrastructure of paths allowing access to the embankment and providing flat areas and terraces to host growing and community activities. The construction activity will be undertaken by Edinburgh Palette’s maintenance and on-site builders, in combination with volunteer participants from Upward Mobility and Link Up Support. With feasibility and design concluding early 2017, the completed infrastructure and woodland management works will be in place by February 2018. 27


HERE+NOW have been working in collaboration with Bright 3D for client RSPB on the Inner Forth Landscape Initiative’s (IFLI) “Telling the Inner Forth Story” project. HERE+NOW project task has been two-fold: to engage the people who live within the Inner Forth area in a project which shares the rich and multilayered stories associated with the place’s multifaceted heritage, and to design a sequence of interpretation ‘Beacons’ and ‘Markers’ along an active travel route, sited throughout the area as physical interventions sharing these stories. The starting point for the project was to explore and understand the rich and diverse landscape of the Inner Forth. To begin this process, HERE+NOW facilitated ‘walkabout’ workshops with school aged children at three selected locations. The children shared existing landscape features and walking routes that are valued and used by them and their families. HERE+NOW then facilitated a broader process of sharing and celebrating the Inner Forth project by directly inviting local people via dropin sessions and ‘pop up’ outdoor exhibitions to contribute their stories about the landscape and area. These provided an opportunity for a more diverse range of the public to share places, features, landmarks, traditions and history specific to the landscape.

INNER FORTH LANDSCAPE INITIATIVE ENGAGEMENT WALKABOUTS + WORKSHOPS WITH LOCAL PEOPLE TO LEARN ABOUT THE LANDSCAPE. EMERGING THEMES INFORM BUILT LANDSCAPE INTERVENTIONS + INTERPRETATION DESIGN

These walkabouts, engagement workshops and public invitation to contribute photographs and text via use of a hashtag and our ‘Hold Me Dear’ website, revealed insight into a number of factors which fed into the subsequent design of interventions in the landscape and provided a variety of useful images and quotations. The themes that emerged also informed the interpretation design and content to help tell the Inner Forth Story using an inclusive and participatory approach.

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BECKET’S PARK Becket’s Park is located in the heart of Northampton, England. It is currently forms a crucial piece of green space sat between and bordered by the busy town centre, city’s Cultural Quarter, main hospital and, from September 2018, the Waterside Campus of Northampton University. It has a river frontage as the River Nene flows through it, and a serpentine bridge connecting the new university campus to the park has recently been constructed. From September 2018 this will become a key movement route between the university and town centre, as well as providing valuable green space on the doorstep of the hospital. As part of a team including One A Studio and Northampton University’s Collaborative Centre for the Built Environment (CCBE), HERE+NOW have been working to demonstrate the potential for Becket’s Park to be improved and reimagined as a valuable piece of green infrastructure that provides a setting for health and well-being. The aim of the project has been to start with stakeholder engagement, events and participatory outdoor exhibitions that will knit together the new university campus, city centre, Cultural Quarter and hospital to provide an improved and enhanced green, healthy and vibrant places to spend time. The project is ongoing, but to date has included a feasibility study and successful initial proposal to work with the university and other partners to start to develop the thinking and concept for Becket’s Park. Follow-up stages are still in development, but may include community engagement and stakeholder events to discuss possible ways forward for the park that engage both the public and organisational stakeholders, outdoor photography exhibitions

REIMAGINING A VALUED GREEN SPACE CENTRAL TO NORTHAMPTON. A FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR KNITTING TOGETHER THE UNIVERSITY, HOSPITAL, CULTURAL QUARTER AND TOWN CENTRE WITH A RE-IMAGINED GREEN SPACE FOCUSSED ON WELL-BEING.

that reveal the existing connections and future aspirations that local residents, visitors, students and stakeholders feel to the park, or temporary pop-up art interventions and storage units that support social enterprise and cultural initiatives. The long-term aim of this project would be to help input into a landscape design that would improve this important green space and extend the Cultural Quarter to include the Waterside Campus and a re-imagined Beckets Park, Wellbeing Park.

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The charity contacted HERE+NOW describing aspirations to make the existing garden space a more inclusive, attractive and sensory space to benefit the 54 older people with dementia the organisation serves. Scoping out an approach to help the charity to secure further funding from external sources to contribute to the cost of enhancing the garden space, HERE+NOW helped plan a strategy of initial project development which would support and strengthen future funding applications. Caring in Craigmillar were keen that the service users were involved in a dialogue about what the design would include, and as a result HERE+NOW teamed up with staff from Carr Comm to run two co-design workshops to listen to what the dementia patients would like to see their garden space become. Very often, this was about sharing what the garden used to be like in its hey-day, and tapping in to the memories of this older generation to allow us to make a meaningful and engaging design response. Each workshop focused on conversations, both in small groups of 3-5 and one-to-one depending on service user’s needs and abilities. We encouraged participants to come outside to talk about the existing garden facilities: what it used to be like here, what’s special about this place, and what they’d like to be able to do or see here. Using a range of visual aids to guide the conversation and as a graphic way of recording ideas and opinions, the aim was to capture the essence of what people like in a

ENGAGEMENT WORKSHOPS LISTENING + LEARNING FROM THE END USERS OF THE BUILDING AND GARDEN TO INPUT INTO AN INCLUSIVE AND INVITING LANDSCAPE DESIGN.

garden space, and what they would like to do within an enhanced landscape setting. HERE+NOW produced an illustrative landscape design plan of a phase 1 garden development scheme supported by a cost plan for the capital works and a report capturing the conversations with dementia patients at Caring in Craigmillar with quotes, photographs, and statistics describing the project.

is nice to be able to come to “ Ita place where you can sit outside. would like to walk around in the “ Igarden and see the seasons change you for coming to talk to us. “ Thank It’s really kind of you to listen to us.

“ “ “

Caring in Craigmillar is a local charity which offers support services to elderly, disabled and vulnerable members of the local community in Craigmillar who have dementia. The property benefits from a large outdoor space, but which is difficult for the service users to navigate, is disorientating, and offers very little opportunity for the patients to become involved in the garden at any level.

‘CARING IN CRAIGMILLAR’ GARDEN

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GREENING INDUSTRIAL ESTATES

HERE+NOW were commissioned by ELGT to deliver a feasibility study that would flag up the existing greenspace provision and quality on industrial estates in Scotland, using Sighthill Industrial Estate as a typical example. The project involves researching the best approach to improve the landscape and biodiversity of Scotland’s many industrial estates.

RESEARCH EXPLORING THE CHARACTER AND TYPOLOGIES PRESENT IN SIGHTHILL INDUSTRIAL ESTATE AND THEIR POTENTIAL FOR INCREASED GREEN HABITAT

In trying to improve or introduce green networks, there is a need to explore the potential of all areas of land to create enhanced networks or to bridge missing links in biodiversity corridors. We cannot ignore large areas such as industrial estates, rather, there is an opportunity to look at how the space between the buidlings functions and can offer provision of greenspace. This feasibility study looked particularly at older more established industrial estates, where each site is often owned by a range of different interests and where there is no overall management body. This was chosen as it represents the biggest challenge to introducing increased green space to an industrial area. As part of the feasibility study we mapped existing greenspace and analysed the landscape context which the industrial site sits within . This offered insights that allowed us to prepare and develop an approach and series of strategies to catalyse implementation of increased planting and a management plan at Edinburgh’s Sighthill industrial estate. The feasibility study included analysis of: • • • •

Land ownership and different stakeholders Mapping of local opportunities in landscape / greenspace. Mapping of the different types of existing planted areas and typologies. Identification of new areas with potential for planting.

• •

Identifying opportunities for connections to nearby existing green networks. Preparation of planting strategies / approache that would meet the needs of the various site stakeholders and could be applied as and when opportunities arise. Identifying opportunities for mini parks.

The project engaged with local stakeholders to identify the key issues and perceived barriers to implementation of a greenspace enhancement plan. This complemented and fed into the strategic approach suggested to encourage green space within a ‘typical’ older industrial estate. 35


HOW WOULD IT WORK?

bringing public spaces to life greening the city more productively using left-over urban street spaces re-using and upcycling waste materials connecting people and community connecting and integrating urban green networks promoting health and well-being creating habitat and enhancing biodiversity upskilling and learning

THE PROBLEM

THE SOLUTION? CITY GARDEN: BEYOND THE PARK

• •

Increasing urbanisation reduces space for nature to defined park spaces that act as ‘islands’ rather than an integrated green network. How do we bring nature back into the city? Many city streets and public spaces have ‘left over’ scraps of land - traffic islands, unused corners, awkward small pieces of land which are currently impermeable, hard surfaced and un-used. These cause water runoff, don’t add anything to the urban aesthetic and are literally a waste of space in that they are unused. How can we make these more productive, permeable and attractive? There is a huge demand for allotments and community gardens, with waiting lists of an average of 8 years in Edinburgh. People want to get involved in gardening and greening the city but with many living in flats, and long waiting lists for formalised growing spaces, they don’t have the space to do so at present. Council budgets have been cut, and so many beneficial improvements to the public realm and street spaces are not possible in the short term due to a lack of resources. Offcuts and other left over waste materials from construction sites cost developers money to landfill. This is also not very sustainable. It would be better if these materials were reused.

• •

City Garden: Beyond The Park aims to more productively use ‘left-over’ nooks of urban land for small green spaces, from raised planters to mini gardens. They would be: » built and maintained by the local community (with facilitation and design support from the City Garden team) » connect up urban green networks, » upskill local people with building/gardening skills, » improving public spaces and the urban environment at no cost to Council, » upcycle and reuse waste materials that would otherwise have gone to landfill, By partnering with professional makers and facilitated by HERE+NOW landscape architects, the City Garden team would ensure high quality outcomes whilst overseeing maintenance. City Garden would be a win-win-win: matching local people with green thumbs wanting to get their hands dirty and grow plants with underused nooks of city space, greening these up and improving public space for the benefit of all, upskilling local people and upcycling waste materials, and overseen by professional landscape architects, designers and makers would ensure high quality finishes. Similar ideas are already successfully happening elsewhere: see Paris + Melbourne.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS A

CITY GARDEN

• Risk: poor quality plant Initial promotion and publicity of the project via partners networks. • Solution: Only mini-gar Interested individuals identify a left-over public scrap of street space local to design&build workshops them take a photo of this and get in touch with the City Garden team/part-time if felt to achieve quality s staff member (HERE+NOW). City Garden team monito • City Garden staff help establish land ownership and facilitate agreement/ City permissions (likely with Council, some private owners) on behalf of individual Garden: Beyond the Park is an urban A SELF-INITIATED CITY WIDE (all are recorded on the greenspace project self-initiated by HERE+NOW. • Individual ‘pins’ their location on the City Garden website map so other PROJECT AIMING TO WORK unmaintained, the indivi It would aim to improve the quality and quantity someone else or remove interested people can get in touch and form a small team with them if desired. of the urban green space network by promoting WITH LOCAL PEOPLE TO • Risk: Difficulties securi • Regular design&build workshops facilitated by HERE+NOW/City Garden team the use of unconventional - and often small• Solution: As part of a fe are held in partnership with local making enterprises (potentially Edinburgh Tool scale - city spaces for community planting BRING ANY SMALL NOOK projects. We are currently looking for feedback pilot test study, we woul Library or The Remakery). OF LEFT-OVER URBAN and Workshops include use of upcycled possible support in terms of advice, land owners such as Cit • materials and a number of ‘standardised’ collaboration and/or funding from potential STREET SPACE TO project could be assigne design options for making high quality, pre-designed planters or similar. partners in order to develop this further with a to confirm permission fo Individuals can pick from these to make, or work with HERE+NOW Landscape LIFE. GREENING THE feasibility study and pilot prior to potential ‘rollagreement in principle w Architects to design a high quality bespoke design for their specific nook of out’ across Edinburgh. CITY, CONNECTING Garden spaces that mee space. Quality control checks are done before given the ‘City Garden’ (literal) stamp of approval. This brands and ‘approves’ the planter before installed. What is City Garden? Many people just name PEOPLE AND theirIndividuals install local park when they of their city’s • theirthink mini-City Garden in situ, photograph this and add this to COMMUNITIES, localCity Garden social media. This is then updated on the website. greenspace. What if we thought beyond the park and made the city our garden? There AND USING • Individuals can access the City Garden ‘toolkit’ PDF including maintenance tips POTENTIAL PARTNERS are a wealth of underused spaces across and common FAQs (moving house so can’t maintain anymore, plant advice). LAND MORE Edinburgh. From smaller awkward scraps • Regular workshop days are held for more individuals to meet • HERE+NOW (project ma of land alongdesign&build road carriageways or between PRODUCTIVELY each other, learn simple building skills, and build planter installations. Planting buildings, to larger vacant sites and everything engagement, landscape talks and workshops are combined with these build days to advise on species in between. These spaces are often overlooked • City of Edinburgh Counc in their potential for greenspace due to their and plant selection for different spaces. Monthly gatherings and tours of City • Edinburgh Tool Library small size or unconventional location. The Garden spaces to share advice and promote social engagement. • Edinburgh Remakery (m • •

City Garden project would aim to remove the • EDI and other developer barriers to transforming these spaces into • GRAS / Custom House (v mapping tool to connect people with each other more productive use as greenspace to benefit WHAT WE NEED TAKEresilience THIS FORWARD and the locations they would like to tranform• Royal Botanic Gardens E biodiversity, climateTO change and into greenspace, and provide a toolkit and• Grow Wild / Kew Garden community. By creating a project at the citypractical ‘how to’ guide to help answer common• Scottish Historic Buildin wide scale but by localising its implementation, • Funding for a feasibility study and pilot (£10,000). To include: queries. we can create change and reveal the potential » Partnership/support from City of Edinburgh Council (permissions, • Local artists (outdoor pu for more greenspace in the city. agreement including quality control methods/management). An attitude change is needed as to which spaces Establish develop organisations. can relevant bring green space value, recognising that The City »Garden projectand would have apartnerships facilitating with other » Pilot workshop + location testing the process. even the smallest of urban spaces or street role - aiming to overcome common barriers to corners part of an integrated networkPOTENTIAL FUNDING S » Refinement of local website, toolkit, part-time staff role,can howform to manage local people greening their street spaces, of many different types of greenspace across such as establishing who how owns and across Edinburgh ongoing, and to the bestland roll-out the city. The result? Bringing the city to life with• CSGN Development Fun how to navigate permissions. City Garden would » Business plan including running costs, ongoing funding. improved networks, act as a bridge between some of the larger • If the feasibility proves successful, ongoing annual funding togreen support a part- acting as a catalyst• Landfill Communities Fu for social connection and feelings of ownership private and public land owners in Edinburgh provement of a public pa time post, website, regular workshops, facilitation and management of the of local places, increased urban green networks and local people self-identifying the spaces they Conservation Volunteers project Edinburgh-wide (c.£40,000/year) with an ambition to make this at providing habitat and climate change resilience, want to turn into wildlife habitat, community • Neighbourhood Partners least partially self-sustaining long-term. and more productive use of urban space. gardens, or small improved greenspaces, and then providing them with all the information, Interested? We’d love to hear from you or your guidance and support they need to make it organisation: hello@thehereandnow.org.uk happen! The project would develop a website 37


In summer 2016 HERE+NOW were pleased to collaborate with Edinburgh World Heritage to create a new planting strategy for the New Calton Burial Ground on Regent Road, Edinburgh. New Calton Burial Ground is one of the city’s hidden gems, with its breath-taking views over the Scottish Parliament, Holyrood Place and Arthur’s Seat. It is important as an early forerunner of the Victorian ‘Garden Cemetery’. Across Britain, the introduction of cemeteries with their ornamental planting and designed landscapes proved a very popular alternative to the more traditional courtyard. As part of their core mission to connect people to their heritage through delivering improvements to the public realm, through the conservation of historical buildings and a direct engagement of communities with the rich heritage of the city, Edinburgh World Heritage focussed on New Calton Burial Ground, and in particular its entrance, to create an open invitation to visit its hidden features and to celebrate its special qualities, showing how Edinburgh’s historic burial sites hold something to please and surprise every visitor.

NEW CALTON CEMETERY GARDEN WORKING WITH EDINBURGH WORLD HERITAGE AND LOCAL COMMUNITY TO CONNECT PEOPLE TO THIS HISTORIC SITE USING LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND PLANTING

After surveying the site and thanks to a tight collaboration and continuous dialogue with Edinburgh World Heritage and the local community, HERE+NOW designed and helped deliver approximately 100 sqm of planted area, responding to the local topography and built elements, together with an awareness of soil conditions and exposure.

a green backdrop to the New Calton Burial Ground entrance. Further visual stimulation was provided by using a mix of perennials for colour, spreaders to create a uniform ground cover and evergreen shrubs to add height and structure to the planting scheme.

With the current stonework and mature trees as points of reference, a terraced schemes was designed and delivered making use of sleepers kindly donated by Edinburgh Palette from St Margaret’s House in Edinburgh. All plants used were locally sourced and arranged to create

Planting took place in July 2016 thanks to a joint effort of Edinburgh World Heritage, HERE+NOW and a group of enthusiastic local and visiting volunteers over two days. The project was a success and it is currently undergoing a second phase to expand planting within the cemetery, together with illustrative boards for visitors. 39


As part of Porty Art Walk 2016 HERE+NOW invited participants to create their own #BloomingBricks - little bundles of native seeds, soil and recycled paper bringing the nooks and crannies of Portobello (and beyond) to life with wildflowers across the city. Already part of the Porty Art Walk in 2015 with Stop+Sea, HERE+NOW were thrilled to be invited again to contribute to the Porty Art Walk curated programme of art works and installations across Portobello on Saturday 3 Sept 2016. With our stall on the Promenade and only a stone’s throw from Portobello’s historical kilns - the last two surviving pottery kilns in Scotland - we wanted to create a visual reference between our project and this interesting chapter of Portobello’s local history and important local landmark.

PORTY ART WALK COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT EVENT INVITING LOCAL PEOPLE TO MAKE THEIR OWN ‘BLOOMING BRICK’ FILLED WITH NATIVE WILDFLOWER SEEDS TO ‘PLUG’ NOOKS OF URBAN SPACE IN THEIR NEIGHBOURHOOD

With buckets of soil and clay, plenty of wildflower seeds, a briquette press and lots of energy, we were up and running at 12noon, ready to involve as many participants of all ages as possible. We were pleased by the enthusiasm and interest showed throughout the afternoon by everyone involved and were able to make over 70 Blooming Bricks to be positioned around Portobello, and even as far as Fife and Glasgow. We were overwhelmed by all the positive feedback received during the day from participants, who were extremely supportive of our approach that was inclusive for all ages, participatory and offered a chance to get your hands dirty and make a native flower briquette to make a small active positive change to the neighbourhood. We would like to thank Porty Art Walk for making this project possible, and Grow Wild Scotland and Kabloom for the seeds.

This project has since been Highly Commended at the Grow Wild Awards UK for its mix of community engagement, innovative use of native seeds and promotion of biodiversity habitat through activities with the public. A short film of the event is available to view here: www.thehereandnow.org.uk/porty-art-walk

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BLAIRGOWRIE Working as part of a 12-strong design team representing seven different disciplines led by DPT Urban Design on a Charrette process in Blairgowrie, HERE+NOW contributed engagement facilitation and design concept synthesis to a 4-day pop up studio based at the Town Hall. Engaging the public in discussions about the town centre of Blairgowrie & Rattray we wanted to capture the issues and opportunities of the place from a user-led perspective. In order to understand what works and doesn’t work in the town centre, we used the Place Standard - a conversation tool around placemaking - to spark discussions within the local community and allow a completely anonymous process of place appraisal. The turnout to the 4 day event was excellent, and we saw 280 people come through the doors during the 4 day Charrette process. This generated a huge amount of data to ensure their ‘place’ was fully represented and our team could generate authentic, place-specific ideas and proposals. At the end of the Charrette, the design team presented back the key findings and some suggesions for design recommendations which will be taken forward to the main projects outputs - a Town Centre Masterplan and an Action Plan, both of which were compiled from the raw data and direct observations shared at the Charrette by DPT Urban Design. This whole process contributes to the SSCI Charrette Mainstreaming Programme for Scottish Town Centres.

BLAIRGOWRIE / LENNOXTOWN CHARRETTES ENGAGEMENT FACILITATION, LIVE DESIGN AND USE OF THE PLACE STANDARD AS PART OF A 4 DAY CHARRETTE TO EXPLORE ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPROVE THE TOWN CENTRE

LENNOXTOWN HERE+NOW was appointed by DPT Urban Design to complement a full design team in the delivery of a SSCI Charrette Mainstreaming Programme for Scottish Town Centres at Lennoxtown. Ahead of the Charrette event, we took part in a study of the public life of the Main Street in Lennoxtown, using techniques similar to the Public Life Assessment methodology developed by HERE+NOW but adapted for a lighter-touch application. HERE+NOW facilitated discussions with the public using the Place Standard tool to explore the existing condition of the place, going on to prepare design concepts and initial design responses which were presented back to a group of stakeholders and the public at the end of the 4 day process. 43


‘GREEN CYCLE ROUTES’ COPENHAGEN

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MILE END PARK, LONDON

90 ACRES OF GREEN ROUTES MERGING WITHIN THE URBAN CONTEXT

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A CYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORK FOR GREEN COMMUTING Copenhagen’s ‘Green Cycle Routes’ or ‘Kobenhavns Gronne Cykelruter’ are a ‘green’ alternative to the main network of cycle paths across the city. These paths are considerably wider, offering an opportunity to slow down and enjoy the green spaces which surround them at a safe distance from traffic, whilst still facilitating easy movement to/from your destination by bike or on foot.

THE ATLANTA BELTLINE ATLANTA, USA

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SUSTAINABLE REDEVELOPMENT OF 22 MILES OF HISTORIC RAIL CORRIDOR Mile End Park was created during the 1940s and 50s as two separate sections crossed by the major thoroughfare of Mile End Road. It was designed as a network for active travel along the Regent’s Canal, in East London. After extensive community consultation, in 2000 the two halves of Mile End Park were connected by the Green Bridge, a pedestrian and cycle thoroughfare to

They are an excellent exemplar of integrating green active travel routes within an urban setting, and have been documented to offer an attractive route for large numbers of cyclists and pedestrians undertaking primarily functional journeys.

allow a dialogue between these previously separate parts whilst avoiding vehicular traffic. The bridge has since become a heavily used piece of landscape infrastructure, providing safe crossing and additional green areas and trees, but also becoming site for new local amenities and restaurants.

The Atlanta BeltLine is one of the largest transport redevelopment projects taking place at the moment in the United States. The project focuses on providing a network of public parks, multi-use trails and transit creating a circular belt around the city of Atlanta. The Atlanta BeltLine offers enhanced transportation links and encourages economic growth within the neighbourhoods involved, offering a network of

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A SCOTTISH COMMUNITY LED PROJECT TO IMPROVE TWO GREENWAYS The Livingston South Blue/Green Network (LSBGN) Project, Scotland, is of interest given its elements of engaging communities with green corridors, promoting their use as resources for community projects and active travel. The project was delivered by CSGNT and three community groups (Murieston Environmental Group, Dedridge Ecological Environmental Project and the

‘Riverlife: Almond & Avon’ is catchment scale river improvement project to improve rivers within the Almond and Avon catchments while engaging communities with rivers and woodland. This project includes a number of river restoration twin projects which will also enhance green corridors and areas along active travel routes in locations such as Bathgate and Livingston in Scotland.

Grünes Netz is a masterplan and urban systemic strategy that helps create a green network promoting active travel. The basis for the Grünes Netz (or Green Network) in Hamburg consists of radiating Landscape Axes and two Green Rings, complemented by key recreational areas, such as borough parks, district parks and urban leisure areas. This framework takes from the original

connection among neighbouring communities. It is transforming the city with a combination of rail, trail, greenspace, housing and art.

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ROGER LAPEBIE CYCLE PATH, FRANCE A RAIL LINE IN FRANCE CONVERTED INTO A BIKE PATH

The Drauradweg is a popular cycle route along the river Drau starting in Toblach/Dobbiaco, Italy and ending in Maribor, Slovenia. The first and most popular section of the Drauradweg stretches for 43 kilometres from Toblach/Dobbiaco in the Italian Alps to Lienz in Austria. It is a gently sloping route characterised by highly panoramic routes and bike friendly roads and facilities. The bike route runs

The Roger Lapébie cycle track is named after the winner of the Tour de France in 1937. This ‘voie verte’ or ‘green path’ in Creon, France, is remarkably well laid out along a historic railway line. It is also home to the very first ‘bike station’, a series of several dedicated stops for cyclists where former railway stations have been transformed into restaurants, wine bars and other bike resting points.

parallel to the railway line for all of its course allowing cyclists and families to return to the starting point at any moment. This combination of attractive scenery, high quality paths and frequent access to other modes of transport, makes this an accessible and popular active travel route within a magnificent green landscape setting.

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Connswater Community Greenway will reconnect the existing Connswater, Knock and Loop Rivers to create a 9 km linear park, running from Belfast Lough to the Castlereagh Hills. It will bring a range of benefits to residents, as new leisure and recreation areas with more health and wellbeing options and 16 km of new walking and cycling routes, 30 new or improved bridges among a range of other improvements.

A HERITAGE TRAIL BUILDING ON SCOTLAND’S CANAL LEGACY The Monkland Canal Heritage Path is a Scottish cycle and trail path running between Bargeddie, Coatbridge town centre, Calderbank and in future, on completion of M8 works, Eurocentral. This heritge path is great example of partnership working between Scottish Canals, Sustrans, North Lanarkshire Council and local community groups along the route. It promotes active travel on foot and by bike,

directly interacting with water-based activities along the Canal itself, such as paddling, canoeing and water sports. The path is particularly friendly for families, and it offers a wide rage of amenities for outdoor activities.

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The cycle path passes through Créon and is 54-kilometre route running between Latrense, Bordeaux and Sauveterre-de-Guyenne. It is a popular cycle path, especially on the weekend, providing plenty of opportunities for a relaxing and enjoyable bike excursion on your own, with friends or family.

BLYTH ESTUARY GREEN TRAVEL PROJECT, NORTHUMBERLAND, UK The Connect 2 Blyth Estuary Green Travel Project shows how green infrastructure can enable a range of local authority departments to achieve their objectives through a single project. For Northumberland County Council, up-front investment in green infrastructure has paved the way for housing growth and the widespread adoption of sustainable modes of transport.

The project has just gone into its the second phase which will include new paths for walking and cycling, new bridges, crossings and signage together with improvements to rivers and flood defences and new lighting, benches, landscaping and planting. The second phase will be finished in late 2016.

MONKLAND CANAL HERITAGE PATH, SCOTLAND

The National Cycle Route 754 is a family friendly route used regularly by commuters, and which links both local movement routes and local attractions and destinations. Bonnybridge to Falkirk Wheel is a pleasant and mostly flat cycle and walking route running along the Forth & Clyde Canal in Central Scotland. It stretches for 2.2 miles between the town of Bonnybridge and the famous

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‘A SILVER THREAD THROUGH A RIBBON OF GREEN’

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PARKLAND WALK, LONDON RAIL LINE CONVERTED INTO A CYCLE AND WALKING PATH

The ‘John Muir Way’ is a popular walking and cycling route that crosses Scotland coast-to-coast across the Central Belt. With its 215 km of paths, towpaths and roads, it is a well known and loved active travel route across Scotland’s heartland, running between Helensburgh in the west through to Dunbar on the east coast and Muir’s

birthplace. The route takes its name from the famous Scottish Naturalist John Muir and it passes natural locations of particular visual and cultural interest, such as the Trossachs and the Antonine Wall. The ‘John Muir Way’ in suitable for all means of active travel including walking, cycling and horse riding.

The Parkland Walk is a 4.5-mile linear green walkway in London, which follows the course of the railway line that used to run between Finsbury Park and Alexandra Palace, through Stroud Green, Crouch End, Highgate and Muswell Hill. The route follows the bridges and cuttings of the line, but avoids the closed surface section of Highgate station and its adjoining tunnels, which are closed to walkers

for safety reasons. The walk is almost entirely in Haringey, with a short stretch between Crouch Hill and Crouch End Hill in Islington, which incorporates Crouch Hill Park.

A CYCLEANTWERPEN AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORK FOR GREEN COMMUTING 6 F1 FIETSOSTRADE LIVINGSTON SOUTH BLUE/ TO MECHELEN, BELGIUM

GREEN NETWORK PROJECT

The F1 Fietsostrade is a cycle path that stretches for 23 kilometres between the towns of Antwerpen and Mechelen in the Flanders region in Belgium. The path flanks the railway line with various points of connection between the active travel path and railway. It also crosses over the Berchem canal via a 270m cycle bridge. The cycle path is intended to encourage active travel

The Livingston South Blue/Green Network (LSBGN) Project, Scotland, is of interest given its elements of engaging communities with green corridors, promoting their use as resources for community projects and active travel. The project was delivered by CSGNT and three community groups (Murieston Environmental Group, Dedridge Ecological Environmental Project and the

as an everyday activity to go to school or go to work between the two towns and other points along its path, and creates an attractive green corridor with which to do so. This high quality path, incorporates a linear green habitat that makes this a popular and practical route.

CENTRAL PARK LOOP, NYC

BRINGING ACTIVE TRAVEL + GREENING INTO THE HEART OF A BUSY CITY

The Central Park Loop is situated in Central Park, in the centre of Manhattan, New York. Central Park spans from 110th Street to 59th Street, comprising a total of 843 acres of urban space. The Central Park Loop is a great place to explore on on foot or by bike, offering interesting views of the flat, hilly and scenic terrain comprising this green amenity space and attractive surrounds. In addition to its leisure function, the Central Park

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A PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLE ROUTE IN THE HEART OF EDINBURGH

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SCOTTISH ACTIVE TRAVEL ROUTE FROM PORTAVADIE TO LEITH INCLUDING A SECTION OF ‘GREENER GREENWAY’ (AIRDRIE TO BATHGATE) This active travel route is an example of a popular route for both functional journeys and leisure use which integrates both green and blue space and incorporates a section of ‘Greener Greenway’. Greener Greenways are a Sustrans’ initiative to promote biodiversity and habitat along active travel routes. National Route 75 of the National Cycle Network connects Leith in east Edinburgh with Portavadie on the

Cowall Peninsula in Argyll, via Glasgow and using the ferry between Gourock and Dunoon. Route 75 includes a long section between Edinburgh and Glasgow which follows dismantled railways and riverside and canal tow paths. The Airdrie to Bathgate section of NCN 75 is a new greenway, constructed as a replacement for the original cycle path, closed in 2008 to allow construction of the railway line, which opened in 2010.

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90 ACRES OF GREEN ROUTES MERGING WITHIN THE URBAN CONTEXT

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NCN ROUTE 75 /GREENWAY

SCOTTISH ACTIVE TRAVEL ROUTE FROM PORTAVADIE TO LEITH INCLUDING A SECTION OF ‘GREENER GREENWAY’ (AIRDRIE TO BATHGATE) This active travel route is an example of a popular route for both functional journeys and leisure use which integrates both green and blue space and incorporates a section of ‘Greener Greenway’. Greener Greenways are a Sustrans’ initiative to promote biodiversity and habitat along active travel routes. National Route 75 of the National Cycle Network connects Leith in east Edinburgh with Portavadie on the

allow a dialogue between these previously separate parts whilst avoiding vehicular traffic. The bridge has since become a heavily used piece of landscape infrastructure, providing safe crossing and additional green areas and trees, but also becoming site for new local amenities and restaurants.

HERE+NOW were commissioned by the Central Scotland Green Network Trust (CSGNT) to develop a suite of exemplar Active Travel & BLYTH ESTUARY GREEN TRAVEL PROJECT, NORTHUMBERLAND, UK Greening case studies using a research process that built on the input and knowledge of key stakeholders, partners and end users. BLYTH - THE FIRST ‘ACTIVE TRAVEL TOWN’ IN THE UK

Bellsquarry Woodland Working Group), who input into discussions about how the project would deliver benefits for the local community. Outputs included improved access, woodland habitat, wetlands and amenity facilities delivered through the project.

primarily used by commuters, and offer an attractive route for large numbers of cyclists and pedestrians undertaking primarily functional journeys to/from work or education. They currently consist of more than 60km of green active travel routes - deliberately integrating these two qualities and functions for the benefit of people’s health and well-being, enjoyment of the city, and sustainable water management and environmental condition.

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The Connect 2 Blyth Estuary Green Travel Project shows how green infrastructure can enable a range of local authority departments to achieve their objectives through a single project. For Northumberland County Council, up-front investment in green infrastructure has paved the way for housing growth and the widespread adoption of sustainable modes of transport.

This suite of exemplary green active travel routes were intended to inspire, share lessons and promote the benefits of combining active travel routes with green and blue infrastructure. The final suite of case studies provides best practice examples to raise awareness of Active Travel & Greening (AT&G) with stakeholders and inspire creation of additional ‘green’ active travel routes in Scotland and beyond. The case NCN ROUTE 75 /GREENWAY studies demonstrate how and why green active travel routes can be accommodated within planning, identify the broader policy drivers and ways they can contribute to the wider Scottish Government policy agenda, and also practically illustrate the various creative ways they can deliver benefits to people and environment through a deliberately integrated approach. SCOTTISH ACTIVE TRAVEL ROUTE FROM PORTAVADIE TO LEITH INCLUDING A SECTION OF ‘GREENER GREENWAY’ (AIRDRIE TO BATHGATE)

This active travel route is an example of a popular route for both functional journeys and leisure use which integrates both green and blue space and incorporates a section of ‘Greener Greenway’. Greener Greenways are a Sustrans’ initiative to promote biodiversity and habitat along active travel routes. National Route 75 of the National Cycle Network connects Leith in east Edinburgh with Portavadie on the

Cowall Peninsula in Argyll, via Glasgow and using the ferry between Gourock and Dunoon. Route 75 includes a long section between Edinburgh and Glasgow which follows dismantled railways and riverside and canal tow paths. The Airdrie to Bathgate section of NCN 75 is a new greenway, constructed as a replacement for the original cycle path, closed in 2008 to allow construction of the railway line, which opened in 2010.

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‘GRÜNES NETZ’ HAMBURG, GERMANY

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MASTERPLAN AND STRATEGY FOR A GREEN ACTIVE TRAVEL NETWORK Grünes Netz is a masterplan and urban systemic strategy that helps create a green network promoting active travel. The basis for the Grünes Netz (or Green Network) in Hamburg consists of radiating Landscape Axes and two Green Rings, complemented by key recreational areas, such as borough parks, district parks and urban leisure areas. This framework takes from the original

Cowall Peninsula in Argyll, via Glasgow and using the ferry between Gourock and Dunoon. Route 75 includes a long section between Edinburgh and Glasgow which follows dismantled railways and riverside and canal tow paths. The Airdrie to Bathgate section of NCN 75 is a new greenway, constructed as a replacement for the original cycle path, closed in 2008 to allow construction of the railway line, which opened in 2010.

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Core to our methodology was engagement with delivery and industry stakeholders throughout the process. Early on we invited input to the project from industry leaders, green space and THE ATLANTA BELTLINE active travel professionals and the public via a ATLANTA, USA mixed method approach including structured user surveys, social media, and one-on-one discussions. This helped extend the project’s reach and respected the existing knowledge and experience of existing stakeholders to draw up an initial ‘long list’ of possible case studies for inclusion. SUSTAINABLE REDEVELOPMENT OF 22 MILES OF HISTORIC RAIL CORRIDOR

The Atlanta BeltLine is one of the largest transport redevelopment projects taking place at the moment in the United States. The project focuses on providing a network of public parks, multi-use trails and transit creating a circular belt around the city of Atlanta. The Atlanta BeltLine offers enhanced transportation links and encourages economic growth within the neighbourhoods involved, offering a network of

masterplans for Hamburg in the early 20th century and is part to Hamburg’s vision to be an “Open Space Interconnecting System”. Already partially developed, the green Network is an integral part of landscape policies for the city of Hamburg and is being integrated as a phased gradual project.

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connection among neighbouring communities. It is transforming the city with a combination of rail, trail, greenspace, housing and art.

Follow-up stages aimed to refine and add detail to chosen case studies. We did this via partnerships with case study project delivery organisations, including in-depth interviews and

A LIVING LANDMARK FOR EAST BELFAST

F1 FIETSOSTRADE ANTWERPEN TO MECHELEN, BELGIUM

Connswater Community Greenway will reconnect the existing Connswater, Knock and Loop Rivers to create a 9 km linear park, running from Belfast Lough to the Castlereagh Hills. It will bring a range of benefits to residents, as new leisure and recreation areas with more health and wellbeing options and 16 km of new walking and cycling routes, 30 new or improved bridges among a range of other improvements.

The F1 Fietsostrade is a cycle path that stretches for 23 kilometres between the towns of Antwerpen and Mechelen in the Flanders region in Belgium. The path flanks the railway line with various points of connection between the active travel path and railway. It also crosses over the Berchem canal via a 270m cycle bridge. The cycle path is intended to encourage active travel

CONNSWATER COMMUNITY GREENWAY, EAST BELFAST The project has just gone into its the second phase which will include new paths for walking and cycling, new bridges, crossings and signage together with improvements to rivers and flood defences and new lighting, benches, landscaping and planting. The second phase will be finished in late 2016.

ACTIVE TRAVEL & GREENING CASE STUDIES

Its ‘Green Travel Project’ for Blyth demonstrates how a new cycle route can be sensitively integrated with the existing environment and motivate people to change their behaviour.

10 CASE STUDIES

gives a wealth of statistics about its use. This active travel route was originally established in 1743 and combines both green infrastructure and other amenity functions related to its prominent central position adjacent to a mix of university, retail, office, residential and public realm. It shows how incremental improvements can be made to an established active travel route, encompassing changes in surrounding land use and working together with development through Section 75, as well as local groups to ensure minimal conflict between path users.

NCN ROUTE 75 /GREENWAY

MILE END PARK, LONDON Mile End Park was created during the 1940s and 50s as two separate sections crossed by the major thoroughfare of Mile End Road. It was designed as a network for active travel along the Regent’s Canal, in East London. After extensive community consultation, in 2000 the two halves of Mile End Park were connected by the Green Bridge, a pedestrian and cycle thoroughfare to

A SCOTTISH COMMUNITY LED PROJECT TO IMPROVE TWO GREENWAYS

Loop offers a safe series of walking and cycling paths for commuting. For cyclists, the park ‘drives’ provide three long distance routes - each 6.1 miles, 5.2 miles or 1.7 miles in length, but which can also be used for shorter routes, cutting through the park at a number of locations. This is a good example of a successful series of active travel routes set amongst high quality green amenity space in the heart of one of the world’s biggest cities.

MIDDLE MEADOW WALK This busy central Edinburgh walking and cycle route is a key thoroughfare for those on foot or by bike between destinations in South Edinburgh and the city centre. It is heavily used for active travel and has a key strategic position for North-South movement, disecting The Meadows large public park in Edinburgh to provide a link between the city centre and South. This key active travel linkage also connects the new adjacent development at the Quartermile and nearby university. The recent incorporation of a cycle counter has demonstrated the popularity of this route for commuting by bike, and

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They are an excellent exemplar of integrating green active travel routes within an urban setting, and have been documented to offer an attractive route for large numbers of cyclists and pedestrians undertaking primarily functional journeys.

‘GREEN CYCLE ROUTES’ COPENHAGEN

The Green Cycle Routes are an excellent exemplar of retrofitting and integrating green active travel routes within an urban setting and as part of broader aspirational strategic urban planning. The routes are

Colinton Village and Dell, the Union Canal, Saughton Winter Gardens, Murrayfield Stadium, the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, Dean Village, Stockbridge, and the Royal Botanic Gardens and Leith. It is an example of an active travel route combined with both ‘green’ and ‘blue’ infrastructure, and which is maintained and delivered by a collaboration of partners, organisations and volunteers.

A COAST-TO-COAST WALKING AND CYCLING ROUTE ACROSS SCOTLAND

Copenhagen’s ‘Green Cycle Routes’ or ‘Kobenhavns Gronne Cykelruter’ are a ‘green’ alternative to the main network of cycle paths across the city. These paths are considerably wider, offering an opportunity to slow down and enjoy the green spaces which surround them at a safe distance from traffic, whilst still facilitating easy movement to/from your destination by bike or on foot.

masterplans for Hamburg in the early 20th century and is part to Hamburg’s vision to be an “Open Space Interconnecting System”. Already partially developed, the green Network is an integral part of landscape policies for the city of Hamburg and is being integrated as a phased gradual project.

The ‘Green Cycle Routes’ Copenhagen (GCRC), or ‘Kobenhavns Gronne Cykelruter’ are a ‘green’ alternative to the main network of cycle paths across the city. These paths are considerably wider, offering an opportunity to slow down and enjoy the various green spaces, habitats, amenity parklands and open spaces which surround them within the city at a safe distance from traffic, whilst still facilitating easy movement by bike or on foot. 14

‘GREEN CYCLE ROUTES’ COPENHAGEN

A CYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORK FOR GREEN COMMUTING

AN ACTIVE TRAVEL ROUTE FOR EVERYDAY COMMUTING

Cheonggyecheon. The stream was opened to the public in September 2005 and was lauded as a major success in urban renewal and beautification. It has been seen to fit well with the movement to re-introduce nature to the city and promotion of eco-friendly urban design. The £700 million project initially attracted public criticism but, after opening in 2005, has become popular among residents and tourists.

WATER OF LEITH, EDINBURGH The Water of Leith walkway is described as ‘a silver threat through a ribbon of green’. This 12 mile walkway starts in Balerno, following the path of the old Balerno Branch Railway line to Colinton, then runs parallel to the river all the way to Leith. The route is used for both leisure and commuting, and offers an off-road quieter route for cyclists and pedestrians. The walkway passes many points of interest including:

Its ‘Green Travel Project’ for Blyth demonstrates how a new cycle route can be sensitively integrated with the existing environment and motivate people to change their behaviour.

THE JOHN MUIR WAY, SCOTLAND

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Falkirk Wheel rotating boat lift. As part of the cycle Route NCN 754, which runs for 56 miles and connecting Glasgow to Edinburgh, Bonnybridge to Falkirk is a popular route for active travel and is used both as a commuting thoroughfare and a travel route for leisure.

CHEONGGYECHEON RIVER, SOUTH KOREA PRESERVING THE UNIQUE IDENTITY OF THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Cheonggyecheon is a 7 mile long, public recreational space in downtown Seoul, South Korea. This large-scale urban renewal project is on the site of a stream which used to flow through the city before rapid post-war economic development caused it to be covered by transportation infrastructure. The Seoul Metropolitan Government established several organisations to oversee the successful restoration of

BLYTH - THE FIRST ‘ACTIVE TRAVEL TOWN’ IN THE UK

A LIVING LANDMARK FOR EAST BELFAST

NCN754 BONNYBRIDGE TO FALKIRK WHEEL, SCOTLAND A FAMILY-FRIENDLY COMMUTING ROUTE CONNECTING ATTRACTIONS

Riverlife has elements of community engagement with green corridors and also promotes the responsible use of river and woodland resources.

A FAMILY FRIENDLY CYCLE ROUTE ACROSS THE ALPS

CONNSWATER COMMUNITY GREENWAY, EAST BELFAST

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ENHANCED RIVER LIFE MERGING BIODIVERSITY AND ACTIVE TRAVEL

Bellsquarry Woodland Working Group), who input into discussions about how the project would deliver benefits for the local community. Outputs included improved access, woodland habitat, wetlands and amenity facilities delivered through the project.

‘DRAURADWEG’, TOBLACHLIENZ, ITALY/AUSTRIA

RIVERLIFE: ALMOND & AVON SCOTLAND

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MASTERPLAN AND STRATEGY FOR A GREEN ACTIVE TRAVEL NETWORK

1 LIVINGSTON SOUTH BLUE/ GREEN NETWORK PROJECT

‘GRÜNES NETZ’ HAMBURG, GERMANY

RESEARCH TO DELIVER A SUITE OF EXEMPLARY GREEN ACTIVE TRAVEL CASE STUDIES TO INSPIRE, LEARN FROM, AND SHARE THE BENEFITS OF THIS APPROACH

5 CASE STUD

surveys to draw out ‘behind the scenes’ practical lessons and insight from those managing or instigating chosen case study projects. Later stages also included public engagement via social media and connection with local groups via project partners. This enabled end-users and the public to input their comments, images and quotes relating to featured case study routes. Extending communication in this way, via online and offline means, and with both managers and end users of these public spaces gives a more holistic understanding and engages with a more diverse audience.

AN ACTIVE TRAVEL ROUTE FOR EVERYDAY COMMUTING

as an everyday activity to go to school or go to work between the two towns and other points along its path, and creates an attractive green corridor with which to do so. This high quality path, incorporates a linear green habitat that makes this a popular and practical route.

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We were commissioned by Architecture & Design Scotland to assist in the graphic design, curation and artwork for their ‘Assembly’ exhibition to be held at The Lighthouse, Glasgow.

Response to

SCHOOLS FOR THE FUTURE Programme

Schools for the Future is the Scottish Government investment of £1.8billion into the learning estate working collaboratively with local authorities. The programme is managed by Scottish Futures Trust, supported by thinking on contemporary school design and cost metrics. In 2015, A+DS collaborated with SfT on a lessons learned exercise reviewing the first wave of schools under the programme.

The review identified collaboration as a key feature of the success of the programme, sharing learning. Assembly provides examples of different approaches to the programme from 9 local authorities, where the specific responses are informed by a mix of factors: innovation, integration of community services, landscape contexts.

The exhibition highlighted the ways that policy, national programmes, and community needs are changing the way we think about spaces for learning. The exhibition aimed to share examples of these changes - as an ‘assembly’ to understand, learn, and explore opportunities for improvement. As part of the exhibition, A+DS invited Scottish local authorities to share approaches to current challenges, as well as incorporating discussions from the Scotland’s Learning Estate Conference 2016. The exhibition then focussed on the 3 themes that emerged: • Responses to the parameters of the Schools for the Future programme; • Responses to place specific issues and needs; • Responses to modernising the learning estate as a whole, using a mix of small scale investment and collaboration. We used this information from local authorities combined with a number of images and visuals to create a curated series of exhibition boards and artwork for the Assembly exhibition. We designed each exhibition board to be part of a modular whole, to enable maximum flexibility for the exhibition to be installed in other different sized spaces following its launch at The Lighthouse. By using this modular approach, and curating the exhibition boards utilising colour and themes, a variety of different combinations and focusses, key messages were easily communicated to the audience as well as enabling flexibility for their use in future exhibitions to fit in spaces elsewhere. As part of the project we created bespoke illustrations to visually communicate case

‘ASSEMBLY’ EXHIBITION GRAPHIC DESIGN, CURATION AND ILLUSTRATION TO CREATE ARTWORK FOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN SCOTLAND’S ‘ASSEMBLY’ EXHIBITION SHARING LEARNINGS FROM RECENT SCHOOL ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PROJECTS

study projects and themes, used our skills in graphic design to create artwork layouts for all exhibition boards, and compile text, and input into exhibition design and curation. As a complementary additional commission for Architecture & Design Scotland we also created a short 6 minute film of one recently completed case study school - James Gillespies in Edinburgh. This film incorporated interviews with staff and teachers at the school as well as pupils regarding the building design and usage, in combination with graphics and research about the innovative design and architectural approach demonstrated in the school’s concept and construction. This film was shown as part of the Assembly exhibition. 47


At the end of our second year as HERE+NOW we have been reflecting on our work engaging local people, organisations and communities as part of a user-led design process for landscape architecture and urban design. We have found this approach is successful in meeting the client brief, building ownership of local places and social connections, and delivering better design for place as a result. We are pleased that this people-focussed engagement approach is also promoted in various Scottish Planning Policy and guidance documents, its benefits realised and considered to be best practice. Something we talk less about but also place great value on in any project is green space and the natural environment. This additional key theme to our work is central to a project we are hoping to further develop into our third year as HERE+NOW. We have been self-initiating and developing a proposal for a project called ‘City Garden’ which would aim to bring to life different nooks of urban street space and small left-over scraps of land with small planted spots that integrate green networks ‘beyond the park’ across the city. We are currently seeking feedback from potential partner organisations for this project, and funding to enable us to conduct a feasibility study and pilot. To find out more please take a look at the City Garden project page within this document or get in touch: hello@thehereandnow.org.uk

WHAT’S NEXT WE TAKE A PEOPLE-FOCUSSED ENGAGEMENT APPROACH TO PLACE DESIGN AND RESEARCH, AND ADVOCATE FOR GREEN SPACE AND ENVIRONMENT. WE LOOK FORWARD TO CONTINUING THIS DUAL FOCUS INTO OUR THIRD YEAR AS HERE+NOW.

Another theme which runs through our work is active travel, in research activity exploring ways to improve experiences for pedestrians and cyclists in the public realm. We are pleased to currently be working with CSGNT on an Active Travel & Greening exemplar case studies project, which combines our passion for green space and environment with active travel and demonstrates how these can be successfully integrated holistically. We hope to continue working on projects which combine our passion for both people and environment into our third year.

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are very approachable. They think “ HERE+NOW differently. They are interested in really getting

to grips with the issue and are thorough in their research and planning. They are engaging and inspiring, and make great partners.

Barbie Lyon, Dalry Colonies Residents Association

provides a high quality, efficient “ HERE+NOW and professional service that is mindful of the

commercial realities. HERE+NOW has ambition, realism and a smile on their face - truly a pleasure to work with.

Andrew Trigger, Avant Homes

not hesitate to recommend HERE+NOW. They “ Iarewould extremely enthusiastic, professional, conscientious Emma Fitzgerald, City of Edinburgh Council

and lovely people. They completed the work to a very high standard and exceeded our expectations.

have brought a fresh perspective to place “ HERE+NOW making in Edinburgh, that keeps people at the heart of all

they do. Their proactive approach is inspiring and it has been a pleasure to work with them. HERE+NOW are an inspiring, proactive and extremely professional organisation.

Carol Hayes, Givrum, Denmark

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE URBAN DESIGN COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CO-DESIGN WORKSHOPS RESEARCH PHOTOGRAPHY

2016: HERE+NOW our second year  

We are celebrating our second year of HERE+NOW by reviewing our projects from 2016 and the co-design tools we use for our landscape architec...

2016: HERE+NOW our second year  

We are celebrating our second year of HERE+NOW by reviewing our projects from 2016 and the co-design tools we use for our landscape architec...

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