Page 11

@HCC_Egalitarian

Commentary

Egal•i•tar•i•an (adjective) aiming for equal wealth, status, etc., for all people 3517 Austin; 303 Fine Arts Center; Houston TX 77004 Phone: 713.718.6016; Fax: 713.718.6601 Adviser: Fredrick Batiste

FALL 2017 EGALITARIAN STAFF Editor-in-Chief........................................... Jimmieka Mills News Editor................................................................ TBA Sports Editor............................................. John Cañamar Culture Editor.............................................. Erik Calderon Photo Editor............................................................... TBA Social Media Mgr....................................................... TBA Staff Writer............................................................ Zain Ali Staff Writer...................................................Fabian Brims Staff Writer....................................................Ana Ramirez Staff Writer..........................................Skarleth Velasquez Staff Writer................................................................. TBA Staff Photographer..................................................... TBA ——— The Egalitarian has been the official student newspaper of the Houston Community College System since September 1974. The Egalitarian is published bi-monthly, every other Wednesday except during holiday breaks. Print circulation is 8,000 copies per issue and distributed to selected HCC campuses in the Houston, Spring Branch, Alief, Katy, North Forest and Fort Bend areas. Comments and contributions are always welcome. Deadlines for contributions and advertisements are one week before the issue print date. The Egalitarian is written and edited by students of Houston Community College. This publication does not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, interests, attitudes and tastes of the Board of Trustees, HCC administration, faculty, staff or students. Opinions and editorial content of The Egalitarian that are unsigned do not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Egalitarian staff or adviser. The Egalitarian reserves the right to edit any submitted material for grammatical errors, offensive language, libelous materials and space constraints. It may also refuse any advertising that does not adhere to the HCC mission.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

The Egalitarian staff consists of HCC students who must complete all tasks required to produce the newspaper, which serves all campuses of the HCC System. We want all students from all majors to contribute. However, we must follow our submissions policy in order to operate under our limitations of time, energy and staff. All staff and contributing writers must be currently enrolled students at Houston Community College. The Egalitarian interacts with contributing writers via e-mail and telephone. Visiting The Egalitarian will not help contributors get published, only quality work will. Publication priority is given to staff members and assigned articles, and verbal commitments for assignments will not be accepted or recognized. Press releases, story ideas, news tips and suggestions are always welcomed. Any student interested in joining The Egalitarian staff may request more detailed information regarding story length, topics, style, etc., by e-mailing The Egalitarian Faculty Adviser Fredrick Batiste at adviser@hccegalitarian.com.

Thursday September 14, 2017

The Egalitarian www.HCCEgalitarian.com

11

Trump gets bullied into ending DACA program Skarleth Velasquez

svelasquez@hccegalitarian.com

I

was 5 years old when I first arrived in the U.S. All we had was a backpack with a few clothes for the way and some food. The bus arrived and there I was saying my goodbyes to the only parents I had known so far, my grandparents, with tears running down their eyes. Fast forward a couple days, maybe even weeks, I’m laying down on a mattress next to my aunt who was next to who knows who, in someone’s attic in Mexico with 40 other people. I still remember not being able to breathe right because it was really hot, I fell asleep. Fast-forward a couple days later, our bags are gone, we are in a raft with a man using his hands as paddle boards, we are crossing a river and then we were dropped off in the middle of the street with no sense of direction of where we could be. I met my parents for the first time that night. I don’t remember much about the life I had in Honduras, except from pictures I have seen and things my parents have told me. I always knew I was undocumented. It was never kept from me; my parents had made sure they made it very clear. They wanted to make sure I knew the risks of what being an undocumented person in this country meant. They wanted to make sure I knew that any type

of problem with the law could cause my deportation and also theirs. In 2012, DACA (Derived Action from Childhood arrivals) was introduced by the Obama administration. Not only did it relieve many students like myself from the fear of being deported to a country some of us barely knew, or had not been back to in a while, but it also took away the fear of having everything we had worked hard for being taken away. Fast forward 5 years later, I’m being told, not by our president because who knows what else he had to do that day, that the program is being taken away. “We love the DREAMers. We love everyone.” Is what president Trump said days before his attorney general, Jeff Sessions announced the end of the DACA program. The program gave thousands of students like me the opportunity to live a life without fear of deportation. Ending DACA has left more than 700,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children or teenagers at risk of getting deported. The program will expire in 6 months giving congress the opportunity to find a replacement program. DACA was not a free program and had very specific requirements that not everyone qualified for. Ending the program without another solution for it at hand has left

thousands of DREAMERs in a state of uncertainty and fear. Trump did not need to attack the program now, and could have easily refused to accept the threat of the 10 attorneys who said they would sue if the program didn’t end by September 5. DACA was not just a protection from being deported, but it allowed us to receive basic rights many undocumented immigrants are denied, and that many citizens take for granted. Being able to apply for an ID or driver’s license, being able to apply for a job, amongst many others are privileges that not all of us are able to have. Jeff Sessions used the words “illegal aliens” to describe DREAMers who for some, have been living here most of their lives here. Using the term illegal alien is inhuman and offensive. It criminalizes the efforts, sacrifices and struggles our parents and ourselves have made to come to this country. No, we are not taking your jobs, no we are not benefiting from government money. We are contributing to the country just as much as the next person, and nothing is being handed to us. We are just as American as anybody else here. We are your neighbors, your classmates, your co-workers, etc. The only difference between us and somebody that is a citizen is that they have a document that says so.

Thankful for help during Harvey Fort Worth Star-Telegram

The line outside of the west side Salsa Limon one afternoon in late August consisted young men and women anxiously awaiting the call — not to their schools, but to Texas’ southern coast. They were members of the Texas National Guard and on Aug. 28, Gov. Greg Abbott mobilized all 12,000 of them to help with rescue, security and cleanup efforts in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Activating the state’s full National Guard was one in a laundry list of decisions Abbott has made in preparation of and response to Harvey. For the most part, his decisions have served the people of Texas well. It’s been more than two weeks since the hurricane ravaged Texas’ southern coast and he’s already helped secure a massive federal relief package — some $15 billion of aid to those affected. More aid is expected to come in more comprehensive legislation in the coming months. Abbott has also offered

nearly daily briefings, has been praised for his accessibility to local officials and has overseen an effective communication strategy regarding his office’s response to Harvey. The governor this month announced that John Sharp, the chancellor of Texas A&M University, will lead the Governor’s Commission to Rebuild Texas. Abbott’s choice was shrewd. Sharp, a Democrat with a bounty of experience in managing state bureaucracy, will play a critical role in ensuring that federal and state monies are wisely spent. The governor’s performance hasn’t been flawless. Abbott has been noncommittal about using the state’s Rainy Day Fund to help with Harvey efforts. With only an estimated $10 billion in its coiffeurs, it could only help supplement other efforts, but still should be considered. And the split between Abbott and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner over whether city residents should evacuate or hunker down caused an uncomfortable rift

early on. But being governor during a disaster is often tricky. City and county officials tend to have jurisdiction over emergency events and they are none too pleased to see them usurped by Austin. It’s a fine line to tread. But all in all, Abbott has also proven adept at crisis management. Now back to those National Guardsmen, who answered Abbott’s call and still don’t get the praise they are due. Like so many of the people who rushed to serve in Harvey’s wake, our National Guardsmen and women left jobs and families all across the state, eager to serve wherever they were needed. They conducted day and night wide-area search-andrescue missions along the Texas coast from Corpus Christi to Houston, created supply lines and kept generators running as power outages plagued the region. They will continue to play in effort in the cleanup and rebuilding of Houston and other coastal towns deserved continued support and thanks.

Profile for The HCC Egalitarian

The September 14, 2017 issue of The HCC Egalitarian  

Houston, South Texas begins to recover after Hurricane Harvey; Harvey could impact victims' mental health; Steps to recover from Harvey; Tru...

The September 14, 2017 issue of The HCC Egalitarian  

Houston, South Texas begins to recover after Hurricane Harvey; Harvey could impact victims' mental health; Steps to recover from Harvey; Tru...

Advertisement