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What Makes Academics at The Gunnery Different? Teaching and learning at The Gunnery are made unique by the dedicated, accomplished, and creative teachers who bring the classroom (and everything outside the classroom) to life. In addition, the course of study for each student is enhanced by several programs specific to our school and community. These distinctive programs include: • LEADS - Learning for Ethical Engagement, Active Citizenship and Dedicated Service. The Gunnery LEADS Program is a four-year curriculum based on the mission of the school. In concert with their experience in our residential campus environment, students develop the life learning and leadership skills needed to be active and responsible citizens, both locally and globally. We encourage students to engage in topics and projects of interest that foster self-awareness and responsibility. The curriculum progresses each year, but has been developed to facilitate integration for students new to The Gunnery, and aims to teach stewardship, character, and community engagement. LEADS by grade level: • 9th Grade: Pathways – Who You Are; How You Learn • 10th Grade: Ethics & Responsibility – Making Decisions in The 21st Century • 11th Grade: Public Speaking – Expressing Yourself in The World • 12th Grade: Senior Service Project – Responsible Citizenship in Action • IDEAS Lab - The Innovation, Design, Engineering, and Applied Scholarship (IDEAS) Lab is designed to graduate students with the skills needed to holistically confront challenges found in the study of science, engineering, business, and other areas where creativity and problem-solving skills are essential. Understanding the global challenges our students will face as they move forward, the IDEAS Lab offers a space for students to connect their academic scholarship to their own questions about how they can contribute to their local community. Students will define problems and work collaboratively to develop innovative solutions. Student work culminates in their self-documented research and presentation of their plans and projects.

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What Makes Academics at The Gunnery Different? (continued) • Independent Study and Capstone Projects Students may submit proposals and earn credit for independent study, both on and off campus. The Senior Spring Capstone Project is one example. Open to eligible seniors in the spring term, the Capstone Project can be completed in place of an academic class or an afternoon commitment. The Capstone Program has been in place for more than 50 years and is one of The Gunnery’s most valued programs. • Experiential Learning School trips take students to the nearby cities of Hartford and New Haven as well as New York and Boston to see plays and shows, visit museums, tour the Stock Exchange and more. Classes, athletic teams, and sometimes even the entire school take advantage of local resources, such as Steep Rock preserve, Lake Waramaug and the Livingston Ripley Waterfowl Conservancy to enrich the curriculum. • The Gunn Scholars Program A Gunn Scholar is a senior chosen through his or her own efforts and character to pursue a topic of his or her choosing in The Gunnery archives as a yearlong course. It is an endowed program so there are opportunities to research in other archives such as the Baseball Hall of Fame, the National Archives, or the Beinecke Library at Yale. For more than a decade, our scholars have researched their topics, published their illustrated papers (which are then used by other scholars), and presented their findings to the school in the form of lectures, documentaries, exhibits and plays, and to various public groups such as the local library consortium. Each and every scholar has unearthed something new, either in our own archives or in others, sometimes answering questions we have not even asked, debunking myths, clarifying events, and contributing to our ongoing story. • Academic Merit Since 1991, our unique Academic Merit System has allowed faculty to give students feedback every five weeks. This feedback gives students a clear and broad sense of progress made and an understanding of improvements to strive for in the areas we believe are the foundations of lifelong learning: effort, collaboration, attitudes, and self-awareness.

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The Commons For The Gunnery, “The Commons” encompasses the values faculty hold in common across the curriculum, and the skills and scholarly habits necessary for student success here and wherever the student goes beyond his or her Gunnery experience. Our programs help students become aware of their responsibility to continue to learn throughout their lives, to speak their minds with conviction, and to actively and ethically engage their community at all times. The academic, residential, and co-curricular experiences enable all students to gain self-awareness, an analytical mindset, as well as creative, social, and moral intelligence. The core values outlined below are interdisciplinary and serve as the foundation for all courses offered. VALUES • Intellectual Curiosity The willingness to understand one’s own learning style and the learning process in general, to seek the ability to teach oneself, and to develop those habits essential to a life of learning •

Respect and Collaboration The ability and willingness to challenge one’s own perspective, to see, acknowledge, and appreciate the ideas of others, and to incorporate differing perspectives into one’s own growing perspective

• Effective Communication The ability to formulate one’s own ideas, having listened to and considered a variety of perspectives, and to express them clearly, effectively, and confidently • Context The ability to understand and analyze historical, cultural, aesthetic, ethical, spiritual, political and intellectual context, as well as the context of a specific academic discipline, that frames a course of study • Connections The ability to recognize and analyze patterns within and between disciplines, to synthesize various and sometimes differing ideas, to draw conclusions, and to connect personally to events around us

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Academic Schedule

An important note for students and families: All textbooks are supplied through the School Store. Students are not expected to purchase books on their own as courses, textbooks and editions are subject to change without notice.

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English The English Department provides an integrated four-year program that allows students to move from the fundamentals of grammar and rhetorical and literary analysis to Advanced Placement courses in language and literature. In the first two years, as the more detailed course descriptions suggest, attention is paid to foundational skills. By the third year, students will be working to develop individual voice and perspective. English I is for freshmen, English II for sophomores, English III and AP Language for juniors, and AP Literature, AP Language, and English IV for seniors and post-graduates. Placement for students whose first language is not English will be made by the Admissions and Academic offices.

English I

English I Honors

English I seeks to establish a solid foundation for subsequent study in both literature and composition. Understanding the role of the hero and the imagination as the impetus for storytelling are two themes followed throughout the year. Through an examination of a range of literature, students are encouraged to broaden their horizons, learn about themselves, and begin to recognize patterns in literature. Class discussions and group work help to facilitate these explorations. Writing assignments are creative, expository, and critical in nature. In addition, instruction in advanced reading skills and the study of rhetoric and grammar give students a sense of the structure and the patterns found in various literary forms, including short stories, novels, poetry, and drama. Representative texts: Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Susan Hill’s The Woman in Black; Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex and Antigone; Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories; Willa Cather’s My Antonia; selected short stories; and grammar lessons from Warriner’s Handbook.

This course covers much of the same concepts and content as English I. However, students also will examine additional and alternative readings, including Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, providing a greater challenge for highly motivated students. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendations, and approval of the Academic Dean and English Department Chair.

English II English II sets forth to explore other worlds and to confront individuals who may be similar to and different from oneself. In this journey, students read epic poetry, novels, drama, lyrical poetry, and short fiction drawn from both ancient and modern literary traditions. Through class discussions and written reflections, they learn to engage the assigned readings closely and from an increasingly analytical perspective. In addition, students review grammar to reinforce their understanding of the syntax of the English language, study vocabulary in context, and continue to strengthen their skills as critical writers and thinkers. Representative texts: Shakespeare’s Macbeth; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart; Albert Camus’ The Stranger; Homer’s The 5


Odyssey; Julie Otsuka’s The Emperor Was Divine, and Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies. Further readings, including lyrical poetry, are interspersed throughout the year.

poetry and short fiction, will be interspersed throughout the year.

English II Honors

AP English Language is a yearlong class for juniors who are highly motivated and enjoy the academic rigor of an Advanced Placement class. The students in this class will predominantly study a variety of non-fiction texts with some fiction texts in common with the other junior English sections, and their readings will be focused specifically through the lens of rhetorical analysis and the rhetorical tradition. Students will write a variety of essays that explore a wide range of approaches, including narrative, expository, comparison and contrast, argument, rhetorical analysis and synthesis. Supplementary readings and journal work will be assigned over the summer months for review in the fall. Representative texts: The Language of Composition: Reading, Writing, and Rhetoric, with essays and speeches from authors such as Amy Tan, David Foster Wallace, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, John F. Kennedy, Winston Churchill, and Toni Morrison; Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Admission requires the approval of both the instructor and the English Department Chair. A writing sample is required.

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition - Juniors

Students in this class move into analytic work earlier than those in the regular course and may be asked to examine additional and alternative readings. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendations, and approval of the Academic Office and English Department Chair.

English III English III builds on the previous years’ investigations of literature’s role in developing a clearer understanding of ourselves, each other, and of the world we inhabit. The course situates itself within an American landscape, both literally and imaginatively, as it examines what it means to be American and to pursue the sometimes illusory promise of the American Dream. Throughout the year, students will read and study a selection of fiction and non-fiction texts, primarily drawn from the 19th and 20th centuries, keeping in mind the literary and historical contexts in which they are grounded. Within a collaborative environment, English III students continue to develop their skills as close readers, critical and creative thinkers, and analytical writers. As well, the study of vocabulary and the review of grammar and composition skills remain integral components of the curriculum. Representative texts: 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology; Shakespeare’s The Tempest; Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire. Further readings, including lyrical

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition - Seniors The AP English Language course for seniors teaches the skills of analytic reading (primarily of non-fiction material) and of writing cogent essays. The instruction of writing covers everything from a thorough study of grammar and

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syntax to the techniques of writing in different forms, such as the narrative essay, the analytic essay, and the argumentative essay. Emphasis is placed on advanced reading skills, in particular that of bringing together varying insights on a subject from a number of different kinds of sources. Representative texts: The Language of Composition: Reading, Writing, Rhetoric; Teju Cole’s Known and Strange Things; Rebecca Solnit’s The Faraway Nearby. Admission requires the approval of both the instructor and the English Department Chair. A writing sample is required.

English course is designed to explore and practice the Montaigne-style essay with an emphasis on the precepts of Critical Theory. It explores concepts of self and society through a variety of specific topics, including literacy, education, identity, and ethics. Students will be required to engage in class discussion led by their own critical thinking and critical questioning. Through that process, they will learn to examine their own ideas as they work toward developing a more fully formed written voice. In keeping with Montaigne’s style, students will situate themselves within their writing in order to critically analyze the individual and society. This course contains a robust writing component that focuses on and encourages the writing process as much as, or more than, the final written product. At the end of the fall and spring terms, students will be expected to develop portfolios showcasing their written work.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition The AP English Literature course focuses on the careful reading, critical analysis, and enjoyment of imaginative literature. It includes the close reading of selected works of fiction, drama, and poetry from the 16th to the 21st century; the development of critical thinking skills; formal essay and informal journal writing; and AP practice exercises. Because a high score on the AP exam may earn college credit, the course may be considered equivalent to college freshman English. Representative texts: Shakespeare’s Hamlet; Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon; Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House; Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre; Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried; Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God; Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things; George Orwell’s 1984; and The Seagull Book of Poems. Admission requires the approval of both the instructor and the English Department Chair. A writing sample is required.

English IV The first part of English IV encompasses the fall and winter terms and culminates in a major assessment, taking place just prior to the spring break. It includes the close reading of selected works of fiction, including poetry, from the 16th to the 21st century; development of critical thinking skills; formal essay and informal journal writing; and a review of grammar and composition skills. Representative texts: Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds; Shakespeare’s Othello; Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony; and Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The second part of the course, occurring in the spring term, offers a series of electives. Each of these courses will examine a specific topic of contemporary import through various reading, writing, and research assignments.

Honors English: The Essay and Critical Theory This yearlong, junior-level honors

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English Language and Composition English Language and Composition is an intensive course for new international students needing a thorough preparation in English listening, reading, writing, and conversation for successful academic work in a U.S. college preparatory program. Reinforcing an already strong command of English grammar, students review verbs, verbals, and syntax for both formal and informal English. They also study academic and idiomatic vocabulary. The course is open only to new international students. Representative texts: Grammar Dimensions; Contemporary Topics; Models for Writers; Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings; and John Knowles’s A Separate Peace.

Elective Publication Course

The Highlander News In this course, the newspaper staff publish the student newspaper, The Highlander. In the process, students learn the principles and practice of journalism. This course is open to all students and may be taken for one or more terms for 1/3 art credit per term. Credit earned for this course does not fulfill the English diploma requirement.

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History and Social Sciences The History and Social Sciences curriculum at The Gunnery aims to provide students with information sufficient for a fundamental grasp of how the present world and their own lives have been shaped by past events and cultures. Students will learn skills necessary to acquire and critically assess historical interpretations, and analyze the perspective of others, both past and present, as they seek to construct purpose and meaning in their own lives. Students will graduate with the requisite organizational and independent study skills necessary to achieve success at an undergraduate, four-year university. With superior time management skills, Gunnery graduates will be able to handle both short-term and long-term projects as they enter college. content, make and support specific points, and write a clear and cogent argument. In this broad examination of our past, we will learn how to face the challenges of our future. Text: Ancient World History, Houghton Mifflin.

Underclassmen Required Courses World History, Modern Global History, and U.S. History (taken junior year) are required for graduation. Students must earn three history credits to meet the graduation requirement.

World History Honors This course has the same core content as World History with additional reading and writing requirements. Placement is based on prior performance, SSAT verbal scores, and approval from the History Chair and the Academic Office.

World History Freshman history is a big picture, thematic and systematic examination of the past, from the early humans to modernity. As a class, we will seek out common themes and patterns that can help us better understand people, civilizations, and the world we live in. We will move from the simplest beginnings to the most complex civilizations. Our focus will include our human connection to all that is around us, both environmental and cultural, and as such the class will draw on many disciplines to inform our historical analysis. Students will encounter challenging ideas and difficult questions, and through these they will learn to make multi-disciplinary connections. In engaging new ideas and information from a variety of sources, students will learn how to hypothesize, ask useful questions, seek out appropriate resources, analyze documents and

Modern Global History Sophomore history begins during the Age of Exploration as Western Europe began to create global economies. The course takes a “World Studies� thematic approach as it examines the influence of Western culture on other global cultures, specifically India, Asian Pacific countries, Africa, and the Middle East. The course individually examines those global cultures, religions, and political systems at their moment of connection to the West. Students will gain significant experience in the application of geography in understanding both the history and current events of the various regions studied. Text: Modern World History, Houghton Mifflin.

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per and formal (and informal) debates provide students with opportunities to sharpen research, writing, and communication skills. Other projects call upon students to work in groups and to become more creative historians. In addition, students will develop active reading and analytical skills to aid in constructing incisive research questions about United States history. Texts: A Short History of the United States, Harper; The Choices Program, Brown University, The American Yawp.

Advanced Placement World History AP World History is a rigorous study of world history that is open to rising sophomores and seniors. The content of this course covers from 8,000 BCE to the present and is broken down into six chronological periods to make this more manageable. Additionally, the course places a heavy focus on four specific historical thinking skills and five specific course themes: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures. This is a full-year course that will also require summer work. All students will sit for the AP World History exam. Students must be approved by the Academic Office, in consultation with the department and using criteria that takes into account grades, comments, and intellectual maturity. It is reading and writing intensive and does require some background knowledge in world history.

Advanced Placement United States History
 The goal of this course is to provide preparation for the successful completion of the AP examination in American History. Selected documents pertaining to key economic, political, and social developments are discussed and analyzed. The Junior Research Paper, independent research projects, class discussion, and the use of primary material are included. The AP examination is administered to all students enrolled in this course. Students must be approved by the Academic Office, in consultation with the department and using criteria that take into account grades, comments, and intellectual maturity. Text: Out of Many, A History of the American People (AP, Sixth Edition), Faragher, Buhle, Czitrom, Armitage.

United States History This course covers specific themes in U.S. History. In the fall term, the course focuses on the American Revolution, looking at
its causes and impact, and explores the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, historically, and in the contemporary context. The winter term covers the antebellum era, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and explores how this divisive time in American history affected our national and social identity. In the spring term, the 1960s as a defining moment in American history is the focus. Topics include the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, and the Vietnam War. The interdisciplinary Junior Research Pa-

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Dead Economists, Buchholz; Naked Economics, Wheelan; The Undercover Economist Strikes Back, Tim Harford; Economics by Example, David A. Anderson; and Man vs. Markets, Paddy Hirsch.

Upperclassmen Elective Courses - Full Year
 (The following elective courses are open to juniors and seniors. The department reserves the right to offer only those courses that meet minimum enrollment requirements.)

Advanced Placement Economics In Microeconomics,
we explore individual decision makers within the economic system, focusing on the actions of consumers and producers
and how the government can sometimes promote efficient and equitable outcomes between the two groups. We will attempt
to answer the questions: How do people make decisions? And how do people interact as individual households and firms and in market structures? In Macroeconomics,
 we study how the principles of economics apply to the economic system as a whole, including topics such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. We will attempt to answer the question: How does the economy as a whole work in both the short run and the long run? All students are required to take the AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics exams in May. Students must be approved by the Academic Office, in consultation with the department and using criteria that take into account grades, comments, and intellectual maturity. Texts: Krugman’s Economics for the AP, Ray and Anderson; Advanced Placement Economics, Microeconomics: Student Activities, National Council on Economic Education; Advanced Placement Economics, Macroeconomics: Student Activities, National Council on Economic Education. Summer work is required.

Economics This introductory course in economic theory uses current events and other applications to better understand the world in terms of economics. Significant attention is given to the critical foundational concepts of economics as well as historical context. The general overview frames the study of everyday economic activity, such as setting budgets, paying taxes, and investment strategies. We then move to business operations, taking students through marketing, ethics, accounting, organizational behavior, quantitative analysis, finance and operations, and other topics. Finally, students are given a general overview of basic terms and vehicles used in the investment world, leading into a study of the more advanced concepts. Students maintain their own portfolios, following current events closely, and seeing first-hand the importance of diversity in investing, as well as how age, risk tolerance, and financial situation factor into the dynamics of investing. Focus on everyday application of economics both from the macro and micro perspectives allows students to analyze the dramatic impact of government on economics and the lives of individuals. Ultimately, students are challenged to make choices and decisions on substantial issues to best indicate their understanding of the core economic concepts covered in the course. Texts: New Ideas from

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Coordinator. Each business plan must include a social responsibility component. Speakers, videos, discussions, and project work will make up a majority of this class, and class participation is expected. Students who sign up for this class must be ready to be proactive, try new things, and learn from their failures. No other knowledge is required!

Honors Entrepreneurship Seminar This full-year class will look at all that goes into starting a business venture and demonstrate how you need so much more than a great idea in order to create a viable business. The class will follow a workshop format as the various business topics that are studied will be applied to starting a business with a group of fellow students. Gunnery alumni will come to speak to the class about their experiences in starting a business. At the end of the year, students will be required to write a business plan about their business and pitch this plan to a group of Gunnery alumni and current parents. Students will be required to write, to use spreadsheets, and to use graphical displays in presenting their business plan. Students will also be required to present their arguments orally. Both verbal and written communication is a must! There will be discussion about what defines a “great” business and why social responsibility is necessary for today’s businesses. This class will look at great entrepreneurs and ask what made them successful in their chosen path. Students in this class will focus on taking risks and being independent problem solvers. This class will also focus on exposing students to some of what they will see in the real world: personal finance (credit cards, car loans, budgets, life insurance, mortgages, school loans, credit scores, taxes, retirement accounts, investments), job searches (interviews, resumes, education, and training), life skills (laundry, tire changes, etc.). This class will also focus on community service and philanthropy. Here, we will look at ways to get involved in the local community and ways to give back. Students will be expected to interact with the Alumni & Development Office, Sustainability Coordinator, and Community Service

Honors U.S. Government and Politics This course provides students with a setting to critically examine and evaluate the multiple expressions of citizenship in the United States of America. The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics, and the analysis of specific examples. Students will learn the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. The course content will enable students to internalize and demonstrate the values of social responsibility, responsible citizenship, and a commitment to the advancement of the common good, justice, freedom, human rights, and the rule of law. While the course prepares students for the AP U.S. Government exam in early May, students may choose alternatively to contextualize citizenship and governance through the actual practice of citizenship, based on their involvement in a social entrepreneurial project. Text: American Government: Roots and Reform, O’Connor, Sabato, Yanus.

Honors Philosophy Seminar This course introduces key philosophical, moral, economic, and political concepts from the Ancient Greeks to the 21st Century. The class follows a seminar format, where students will be expected to undertake weekly reading of primary sources and engage in informed classroom

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discussion. Assessment will be based on participation, weekly short writing assignments, and term research papers.

Gunn Scholars Gunn Scholars are seniors who have been selected, based on aptitude, interest, and character, to pursue original research into some aspect of the early history of the school. The independent study course, with a history teacher and The Gunnery’s archivist as advisors, earns one history credit. The first term is for research, the second is for writing, and the third is for presentation. Each Gunn Scholar presents his or her completed research at a conference hosted by The Gunnery, but open to regional students, called “Rooted Research.” Gunn Scholars have also been asked to present their research to alumni over Alumni Weekend in June. In addition, a generous 50th reunion gift from the Class of 1957 has assured the publication of all Gunn Scholar research.

Psychology This seminar-style course will delve into the study of psychology, including an introductory examination of how and why we think, learn, perceive, feel, and interact with others the way we do. The course will utilize primary and secondary sources to investigate various aspects of psychology. Social psychology, group dynamics, interpersonal relationships, child and adolescent development, basic experimentation, and classical and operant conditioning will be among the topics addressed throughout the course of the year. Readings include writings by authors such as Jean Piaget, Ivan Pavlov, Erik Erikson, Edward Thorndike, and Sigmund Freud. Representative Text: Thinking About Psychology, Bedford, St. Martin.

The Spirit of New England This course will consider the roots of spiritualism as a religious practice in New England and New York, including the development of the religious practice as well as its connections to other religious practices and tropes of witchcraft in New England and in Europe. Given that many spiritualists were women, gender and religious expression will be explored as well. Class readings will include primary and secondary texts as well as folklore and will consider how social movements, such as suffrage and the push for the abolition of slavery, may be reflected in religious beliefs and tenets (as well as in the Civil War and World War I). We will focus on the emergence of the tradition in the 1840s through its fall in popularity in the 1920s.

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IDEAS Lab The Innovation, Design, Engineering, and Applied Scholarship (IDEAS) Lab is designed to graduate students with the skills needed to holistically confront challenges found in the study of science, engineering, business, and other areas where creativity and problem-solving skills are essential. Understanding the global challenges our students will face as they move forward, the IDEAS Lab offers a space for students to connect their academic scholarship to their own questions about how they can contribute to their local community. Students will define problems and work collaboratively to develop innovative solutions. Student work culminates in their self-documented research and presentation of their plans and projects. The IDEAS Lab offers an evolving classroom for students to understand how to begin to unpack and clearly define their own complex scientific questions that impact community and environment. We emphasize methods of research, problem definition and the process to solve through completion of their design. A student who completes this program will be ready to solve problems of any kind.

Full-Year Course

Term Courses

Engineering I

Low Impact Development

Students will work in pairs to gain general engineering knowledge and specific understanding in mechanical, civil and environmental engineering. Through readings connecting students to local environmental systems, guest professional experts in Connecticut, hands-on lab exercises and the completion of small design projects, students will learn the basics of engineering.

The course begins with students learning about carbon footprints from energy use and reviews current power generation methods through student group presentations. The course studies the importance of site location and placement of environmental structural features, including stormwater retention and management when designing a site. The 2019 project is to define what it means to be a sustainable building. Then, using their own group definition, students will design a dog house using as many low impact design features supporting sustainability as they are able to incorporate. The winning design(s) will be built to close out the term.

Through the year, students will learn about current project efforts from their own work in academic scholarship. They will then work in pairs to compete for innovative ways to improve current project proposals. Each team will design their own ideal project, and the winning engineering project(s) approved by a faculty panel will be built as the culminating class project. Engineering II and III will follow with increasingly complex projects.

Water Systems Design Students will work in small teams to design and begin implementation of an assigned problem. The 2019 project is to

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design a system that will collect rainwater from a roof or other area and use this water to irrigate the planting beds built last spring by Gunnery students. The project will include process, mechanical, energy, and control/overflow design systems. Students will test the water using basic chemistry water quality testing and begin to classify types of water uses to support sustainable systems in a community. (winter)

Innovation
& Engineering Students will be introduced to the engineering process when ideas turn into projects. Students will be introduced to the complexity of team dynamics and interdependence to successfully complete multi-phased projects. For the 2019 design and build team project, students will use the UConn Rain Garden app, assess The Gunnery campus for project location, scope site size, materials, time and costs, and compete for the winning design.

Robotics I Students work as a team to design and build a customized robot for the FIRST RoboticsÂŽ Competition. They learn how to work as a team to develop a design, order parts, fabricate parts and the final robot, solve problems, and prepare to compete. This class is 10% classroom learning and 90% hands-on design work in small subgroups working as part of one large group. Students fill one or more of these roles at different times during the term: project manager, designer, manufacturer (process, mechanical, electrical, pneumatic programmer), drive team (practice and at competitions), fund-raising, social media, and mentoring.

Independent Study Project Computer Science is studied at The Gunnery through our IDEAS program in combination with our Independent Study Project (ISP) option. Students interested in AP Computer Science or coding will be supported through an online learning platform and supervised by the Director of IDEAS. Please follow the ISP process (see page 37). In the case of Computer Science, an exemption can be made to the prerequisite of being a returning student.

Robotics II Students work as a team to design and build a customized robot for the FIRST RoboticsÂŽ Competition. They learn how to work as a team to develop a design, order parts, fabricate parts and the final robot, solve problems, and prepare to compete. This class is 10% classroom learning and 90% hands-on design work in small subgroups working as part of one large group. Students fill one or more of these roles at different times during the term: project manager, designer, manufacturer (process, mechanical, electrical, pneumatic programmer), drive team (practice and at competitions), fund-raising, social media, and mentoring. 15


LEADS The Gunnery LEADS Program – Learning for Ethical Engagement, Active Citizenship and Dedicated Service – is a four-year curriculum based on the mission of the school. In concert with their experience in our residential campus environment, students develop the life learning and leadership skills needed to be active and responsible citizens, both locally and globally. We encourage students to engage in topics and projects of interest that foster self-awareness and responsibility. The curriculum progresses each year, but has been developed to facilitate integration for students new to The Gunnery, and aims to teach character, stewardship, and civic engagement. time. Developing the skills essential to true engagement in informed discourse and learning to respect diverse belief systems are two outcomes of this course. In response to the Socratic injunction, “Know Thyself,” each student explores his or her own personal moral code, tests it against critical issues, and reflects upon its deeper meaning in his or her individual life, and as a member of a learning community. The ideal of service to others is promoted through a consideration of individual and group responsibility. Questions of social justice are raised and explored. Each student develops a personal statement of moral principles over the course of the term, which is delivered to their class at the end of the term. Grading in this course will be on a Credit/No Credit basis.

Pathways (Freshmen) Pathways is a mandatory one-term (fall) diploma requirement for all freshmen. Meeting twice weekly, this course engages with a variety of issues directly relevant to adolescence: identity, relationships and communication, health and wellness, and, finally, what it means and takes to lead. It is a class in which students are expected to engage actively in the topic at hand; it requires that students manage their impulses, relate effectively to others, and engage in respectful and constructive dialogue about subjects that can be sensitive, but are essential to the reality of freshmen. Priority is given to creating an environment where these discussions can safely and constructively take place. The students also begin their curricular requirement of completing service hours and learning about the outdoors. Grading in this course will be on a Credit/No Credit basis.

Public Speaking (Juniors) Public Speaking is a one-term course that is required of all juniors. Meeting twice weekly, Public Speaking at The Gunnery is designed to raise student awareness of the rhetorical implications inherent in public performance and to equip them with the necessary tools to be effective communicators. Making students aware that public speech has a specific goal and that they must recognize their audience, this course introduces a variety

Ethics
and Responsibility (Sophomores) Ethics and Responsibility is a one-term (winter or spring) course that is required of all sophomores. Meeting twice weekly, this course is designed to guide students to engage in various forms of discussion – debate, dialogue, and discourse – around a wide range of the central issues of our 16


of strategies from which to make informed rhetorical choices for maximum effectiveness. Students also are made aware of and practice specific aspects of performance: body language, volume, eye contact, etc. Students participate in classroom discussion, give speeches and critiques, and deliver a final speech to the school community. Overall, this one-term course aims to make students comfortable and effective in front of an audience.

Service Project (Seniors) The Service Project gives seniors an opportunity to immerse themselves in the mission of the school in a hands-on way and to apply what they have learned over their years as a high school student. Students are expected to research and generate a proposal regarding their project of choice. Once approved, the students are expected to complete their hours outside of the academic day (including on breaks when appropriate). While students are assisted through the process by faculty, they are encouraged and expected to take as much responsibility over its completion as possible. Every senior is required to complete an approved service commitment of a minimum of 30 hours.

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Mathematics Students at The Gunnery are required to receive an Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II credit in order to fulfill the academic diploma requirements. Part of earning these credits includes passing a cumulative final exam in each of these courses. It is the mission of this department to teach students to reason algebraically, numerically, analytically, verbally, and graphically. An emphasis is placed on the use of the TI-84 Plus calculator to support their written work. Students are encouraged to take a mathematics course each year. First-year students will be placed into classes based on a placement test and past teacher recommendations. Admission for returning students to a course is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval.

Required Courses

Mathematics 21 - Geometry This course stresses the language of geometry, the development of proof, and the appropriate applications from algebra. The use of definitions, postulates, and theorems to justify conclusions will be emphasized. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation and Department Head approval. Text: Prentice Hall: Geometry Student Companion with Practice and Problem Solving, Pearson Publishing. Students must pass both the course and the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit in this diploma requirement course.

Mathematics 10 - Algebra I This is an introductory course in algebra. Topics include the field axioms, operations on real numbers, solving linear equations and systems of linear equations, graphing linear equations and inequalities, exponents, radicals, polynomials and factoring, and quadratic functions. There is a heavy emphasis on problem-solving strategies. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: Algebra Quick Review. Students must pass both the course and the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit in this diploma requirement course.

Mathematics 29 - Topics in Algebra II

Mathematics 20 - Geometry This course emphasizes problem solving in real-life situations using geometric concepts. Formal proof is introduced but greater attention is devoted to practical applications, such as perpendicular lines and area, as well as the language of geometry. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: Geometry Concepts and Skills, Larson, Boswell, Stiff. Students must pass both the course and the cumulative final exam held at the end of the winter term in order to receive credit in this diploma requirement course. Students will study algebra during the spring term.

This is a second course in algebra. Topics include an in-depth look at linear, quadratic and rational functions. Other topics may include: statistics, probability, and trigonometry. Students will be asked to analyze problems analytically, numerically and graphically. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Students will be placed in this course based on placement test results, current teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. Students must pass both the course and the cumulative final exam in

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order to receive credit in this diploma required course.

Elective Courses Mathematics 43 - Topics in Mathematics

Mathematics 30 - Algebra II This is a second course in algebra. Topics include the natural numbers and integers, rational numbers, series, polynomials and factoring, coordinate geometry, complex numbers, relations and functions, exponents and logarithms, quadratic relations, and word problems. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: Algebra and Trigonometry: Structure and Method Book 2, Dolciani, Sorgenfrey, Brown and Kane. Students must pass both the course and the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit in this diploma requirement course.

This course is for students who have completed Algebra II. Transitioning from form to practice, this course is designed to explore topics in algebra, statistics, and more by using technology. Requirements: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator, laptop with fully functioning Google Sheets and the Python programming language. Texts: Python for Kids, Jason Briggs, and Doing Math with Python, Amit Saha.

Mathematics 50C PreCalculus (co-ed section) This course is intended for students who have completed Algebra II. Topics include analysis of polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, circular functions, sequences and series, complex numbers, translating graphs, and applications. Heavy emphasis is placed on trigonometry. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: PreCalculus, Wiley.

Mathematics 32 - Algebra II Honors and Trigonometry 
 This is a more demanding and enriched Algebra II curriculum with additional topics that include transformations of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, the law of sines and cosines, complex numbers, sigma notation, sequences and series, and limits. This class brings together talented students who enjoy math and whose scholarship indicates a strong sense of responsibility. Admission is based upon past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: Algebra and Trigonometry Eighth Edition, Larson. Students must pass both the course and the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit in this diploma requirement course.

PreCalculus (all-female section) This course is intended for students who have completed Algebra II. Topics include analysis of polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, circular functions, sequences and series, complex numbers, translating graphs, and applications. Heavy emphasis is placed on trigonometry. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: PreCalculus, Wiley.

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introduction to differential and integral calculus, topics discussed include analytic geometry, polar coordinates, differential equations, parametric equations, and infinite series. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. The Advanced Placement examination is required of all students enrolled in this course. Text: Calculus, Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, Finney, Demana, Waits and Kennedy.

Mathematics 51 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry This course is intended for students who have completed PreCalculus and have a knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. It does not assume that they have acquired a sound understanding of the theory of elementary functions; the development of this understanding is the first priority of the course. Differentiation and integration techniques and applications will be studied. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: Applied Calculus, Sixth Edition, Houghton, Mifflin

Mathematics 54 - Advanced Placement Statistics This course is for students who have completed PreCalculus. Topics include: exploring data using various graphical and numerical methods, data collection and analysis, probability, statistical inference, using appropriate models, and tests of significance. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. This course will follow and complete the Advanced Placement curriculum. The Advanced Placement exam is required of all students enrolled in this course. Text: Stats, Modeling the World, AP Edition, Bock, Velleman, DeVeaux.

Mathematics 52 - Advanced Placement Calculus AB This course follows the AP syllabus for Calculus AB. The course is intended for students who have completed PreCalculus or Algebra II Honors and Trigonometry and have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Heavy emphasis is placed on the development of differential and integral calculus. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. The Advanced Placement exam is required of all students enrolled in this course. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Text: Calculus, Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, Finney, Demana, Waits and Kennedy.

Mathematics 63 - Operations Research This course is for students who have completed Calculus. Topics discussed include matrices operations, Gauss-Jordan elimination process, Linear Programming, simplex method, maximum flow problems, shortest route problems, minimum spanning trees, and transportation problems. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and Department Head approval. A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required and

Mathematics 53 - Advanced Placement Calculus BC This course follows the AP syllabus for Calculus BC and is for students who have completed AB Calculus. After the 20


a laptop computer with Excel and Solver that shows error messages and menu selections in English is required. Mac laptops need to have a Windows mode function or Windows emulator program installed. Text: Introduction to Operations Research Eighth Edition, Hillier-Lieberman.

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Science Earth and Physical Science Honors

Laboratory Courses There is a three-year laboratory course requirement at The Gunnery. The Science Department strongly encourages all students to first take at least one life science course and one physical science course. Then, based on student preference, recommendations, and other prerequisites, the third-year course can be selected from among the various lab science offerings. The Science Department also advocates that every student completes one year of both biology and chemistry.

This course provides students with an introduction to experiential learning in the areas of physics and chemistry. Students will explore how science relates to their lives and will acquire some of the skills required to continue their study of science. They will learn to work with formulas, take measurements, follow and generate laboratory procedures, collect and analyze data, read articles about science, debate scientific ideas, study scientists and inventors, and prepare presentations. Major topics include physics (Newton’s laws, work, energy), chemistry (the atom, chemicals, gas laws, chemical reactions), and other topics. Students will develop skills in observation, analysis, and reasoning in addition to pertinent content that will support future scientific studies and promote a deeper awareness of the world around them. The honors course seeks to cover extensions of these topics. Placement in this course will be based on past performance and approval by the Science Department Chair and the Academic Office. Text: STEM: Student Research Handbook.

Earth and Physical Science This course provides students with an introduction to experiential learning in the areas of physics and chemistry. Students will explore how science relates to their lives and will acquire some of the skills required to continue their study of science. They will learn to work with formulas, take measurements, follow and generate laboratory procedures, collect and analyze data, read articles about science, debate scientific ideas, study scientists and inventors, and prepare presentations. Major topics include: Newton’s laws, work, energy, and electricity (physics), and the atom, gas laws, chemical reactions, and bonding (chemistry). Students will develop skills in observation, analysis, and reasoning in addition to pertinent content that will support future scientific studies and promote a deeper awareness of the world around them. Text: STEM: Student Research Handbook.

Biology This course introduces basic concepts in biological science, including cell structure and functions, cell physiology, and cellular reproduction. Also covered are basic living systems (digestion, circulation, reproduction, etc.), genetics, evolution, and ecology. Weekly laboratory exercises are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: permission of Department Head or Academic Dean. Text: Biology: The Core, Pearson.

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This full-year, interdisciplinary course will prepare students to do just that. In order to understand how our actions affect the environment, we must first gain a strong basis of understanding for the complexities of the natural ecosystem, including topics such as ecology, organism interactions, and nutrient cycling. Next, we will delve into more anthropocentric (human-centered) topics such as population growth, resource and energy consumption, pollution management, biodiversity conservation, and global climate change. Laboratory activities and field work help to reinforce the understanding of the subject. Prerequisites: Biology and/or Chemistry and Algebra II (completed or concurrent). Enrollment limited to 14. Text: Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, edited by Paul Hawken.

Biology Honors This course introduces basic concepts in biological science, including evolution, plant biology, animal biology, cellular physiology and organization, and forest and stream ecology. There will be regular labs in and outside of the classroom that are integral to the course. There will be regular discussions and presentations on topics related to our course material. Prerequisites: Earth and Physical Science, and recommendation of the department. Text: Biology: The Core, Pearson.

Advanced Placement Biology This course follows the Advanced Placement curriculum and is a rigorous, full-year, college-level biology course. The curriculum focuses on the four “Big Ideas� of biology: Evolution, Energy and Molecular Building Blocks, Information Storage and Retrieval, and System Interactions. Sub-topics include genetics, ecology, cell structure and function, and biological diversity. Twenty-five percent of class time is dedicated to inquiry-based lab activities. The Advanced Placement Biology examination is required of all students enrolled in this course. Prerequisites: Chemistry (85% or higher) and recommendation of the Science Department. Any waiver of a prerequisite must be approved by the Science Department Head. Text: Biology in Focus, Second Edition.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science This full-year laboratory course in environmental science will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. These topics include energy conversions underlying all ecological processes; the earth as one interconnected system (biogeochemical systems); human impact on the environment, including technology and

Environmental Studies Environmental Studies is emerging as arguably one of the most important topics in both our current and future lives. As humans continue to modify the natural world, it is essential that students have a strong basis of knowledge and understanding regarding the issues facing us in order to confront these challenges and make their own informed decisions. 23


population impacts; the role of cultural, social, and economic factors in developing solutions; achieving sustainable systems and management of common resources. Prerequisites: Two years of lab science including Biology and/or Chemistry and Algebra II (completed or concurrent) and recommendation of the Science Department. Any waiver of a prerequisite must be approved by the Science Department Head. Text: Environmental Science: A Global Concern, McGraw Hill Education.

Chemistry The objective of this first-level chemistry course is to provide students with an understanding of basic organic and inorganic chemistry. Through lectures, problem solving, and experimentation, students will learn the fundamentals involved in changes to matter and energy. Topics include measurement and calculation techniques, what is matter, the elements, atoms and ions and how they interact, nomenclature, chemical composition and reactions, solutions, states of matter, bonding, acids-base behavior, and how these relate to energy. Students will read articles about applied chemistry and prepare a research paper on a contemporary topic in chemistry. Experiments are used to familiarize students with the scientific method, good lab practices, and to relate theory to practice. Text: Modern Chemistry, Houghton Mifflin.

Human Anatomy and Physiology This course provides the student with an understanding and appreciation of the major body systems, their structures and their functions. Clinical consideration and its impact are covered. This course is intended for students who are interested in careers in health-related fields or who simply possess a curiosity to learn more about the human body. Labs and class activities are used for reinforcement of core concepts. Prerequisite: Biology. Text: Anatomy Coloring Book (Fourth Edition).

Chemistry Honors The objective of this first-level honors chemistry course is to provide students with an understanding of basic organic and inorganic chemistry. Through lectures, problem solving, and experimentation, students will learn about the changes that occur in matter and energy. Topics include measurement and calculation techniques, what is matter, the elements, atoms and ions and how they interact, nomenclature, chemical composition, reactions, and quantities, solutions, states of matter, bonding, acids-base behavior, thermo-and electro-chemistry, and how these relate to energy. Students will read articles about applied chemistry and prepare a research paper on a contemporary topic in chemistry. Experiments are used to familiarize students with the scientific method, good lab practices, and to relate theory to practice. Students will work towards proficiency in all aspects of

Pre-Med The objective of this one-year course is to expose highly motivated high school students, who are interested in pursuing a career in medicine, an introduction to clinical methods with hands-on experience in medical techniques (such as taking vitals) and a brief exploration of topics such as anatomy, histology, embryology, physiology, cardiology, neuroscience, pathology, immunity, and endocrinology, among others. Prerequisite: English II or higher and at least one of the following: Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Human Anatomy and Physiology, or Environmental Studies. This course has a lab/practical component and thus qualifies as a lab science. 24


quantitative analysis along with enhanced problem-solving skills. Students should be enrolled in Algebra II or a higher math course. Text: Modern Chemistry, Houghton Mifflin.

laboratory data. An online instructional tool will be utilized throughout the course. Prerequisites: Algebra II (completed or concurrent), one year of a lab science completed, and Science Department recommendation. Text: Conceptual Physics, Hewitt.

Advanced Placement Chemistry Advanced Placement Chemistry is a rigorous, full-year, college-level course. Students in this course will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. Topics include: chemical bonding, molecular models (geometry), atomic structure and theory, states of matter (gas, liquid and solid), chemical reaction types, solutions and equations, equilibrium, chemical kinetic theory, and stoichiometry. The topics covered emphasize chemical calculations and mathematical formulation of basic chemical principles. The increased quantitative emphasis beyond that conducted within the basic chemistry class appears both in each of the topics and in the time spent by students in laboratory analysis and calculations. Prerequisites: Chemistry Honors (with average grades of 85% or higher), Calculus, (completed or concurrent), and recommendation by the Science Department. Any waiver of a prerequisite must be approved by the Science Department Head.

Advanced Placement Physics 1 This full-year laboratory course is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce basic electric circuits. Students should be enrolled in Algebra II or a higher-level math class with average grades of 85% or higher, and be recommended by the Science Department. No prior physics course is required for this class. Waivers to prerequisites must be approved by the Science Department Head. The Advanced Placement Physics 1 final examination is required of all students enrolled in this course. An online instructional tool will be utilized throughout the course. Text: College Physics by Knight, Jones, and Field.

Advanced Placement Physics 2 This full-year laboratory course is equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. This course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics. Students should have completed Algebra II and be enrolled in PreCalculus or a higher-level math class with average grades of 85% or higher; completed AP Physics 1 or an equivalent (with average grades of 85% or higher),

Physics This course surveys major topics in physics: laws of motion, universal gravitation, heat transfer and thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, vibrations and waves, sound, light, color, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. While the course emphasis is on conceptual knowledge of physics, there is a high level of routine manipulation of algebraic equations and weekly analysis of

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and be recommended by the Science Department. Waivers to prerequisites must be approved by the Science Department Head. The Advanced Placement Physics 2 final examination is required of all students enrolled in this course. An online instructional tool will be utilized throughout the course. Text: College Physics by Knight, Jones, and Field.

Science Electives (Non-Lab Courses) Biology of the Brain This course introduces students to the anatomy and physiology of the brain, its remarkable curiosities and complexities, and the neural basis of thought. Additional topics include an overview of the visual system, the limbic (emotional)/hormonal system, and the deleterious work of the many abused substances. The course concludes with student presentations on a topic of their choice. (fall)

Advanced Placement Physics C (Mechanics and Electricity/ Magnetism) This full-year lab course is divided into two major parts. In Mechanics, instruction and labs cover six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. In Electricity and Magnetism, the instruction and labs cover five content areas: electrostatics; conductors; capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; and magnetic fields and electromagnetism. Although fewer topics are covered in AP Physics C than in AP Physics 1 or 2, they are covered in greater depth and with greater analytical and mathematical sophistication, including calculus applications. Calculus applications such as differentiation, integration, and separation of variables technique for solving differential equations will be extensively utilized. Additionally, vector mathematics will be used extensively in the course. Students should have completed one year of physics and have completed or be concurrently taking BC Calculus and be recommended by the Science Department. Waivers to prerequisites must have prior approval by the Science Department Head. Students are required to take both the AP Physics C Mechanics and AP C Electricity and Magnetism exams in spring. Text: Physics (For Scientists and Engineers) A Strategic Approach by Randall Knight.

Human Health This course deals with many different aspects of health, nutrition, and wellness. Topics include cardiovascular disease, cancer, addiction, and AIDS. The course encourages a seminar format supplemented by open discussion of issues that affect high school and college students. (winter)

Introduction to Athletic Training This course offers students an introduction to the field of athletic training. Students will learn about injury prevention, basic injury assessment and taping skills as well as further their understanding of human anatomy and physiology. This course will be a mixed format of student presentations, lab activities, and seminar. (spring)

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The Arts All students must take the equivalent of one credit in art. This can be accomplished through three single-term courses or one full-year course in the arts. This can be either in the Visual Arts or Performing Arts offerings. While the requirement is one credit, students are encouraged to take more classes. music theory and listening assignments. Interested students should contact the instructor, Mr. Perkins (perkinsj@gunnery.org), or the Academic Office about openings and the audition process prior to registering. Enrollment in the course is by audition only.

Performing Arts Full-Year Courses Advanced Jazz Band

Chamber Ensemble

This class focuses on developing an expanded understanding of jazz music, including improvisation, composition, and playing technique, through regular performances. Individual growth and progress are monitored closely and are important factors in determining the final grade. A great deal of practice outside of the classroom is called for, along with regular music theory and listening assignments. Interested students should contact the instructor, Mr. Perkins (perkinsj@gunnery.org), or the Academic Office about openings prior to registering. Enrollment in the course is by audition only. New students are encouraged to contact the Academic Office for audition guidance.

Chamber Ensemble focuses on the skills needed for playing within a small group. Typical ensembles at The Gunnery have been string quartets, string trio, woodwind quartets, woodwind duets, and piano trios. Students develop both technical skills and musicianship through ensemble participation. Students in Chamber Ensemble are expected to participate in winter and spring student recitals. Students who excel have additional performance opportunities both on campus and in larger ensembles off campus throughout the year. (Year, 2/week, 1/3 credit)

Gunnery Troubadours The Gunnery Troubadours is designed to promote the musical growth of several select students, by developing vocal skills and honing music-reading skills. Although primarily performance based, there is a strong emphasis on sight-reading, ear training, solfège, and advanced music theory. The intention of the course is to provide an outlet for more advanced choral singers and offer a comprehensive approach to musicianship, giving them the

Rock and Blues Band This class focuses on the fundamentals of playing music, including rhythm, harmony, melody and playing technique, by learning and performing classic rock and blues songs. Individual growth and progress are monitored closely and are important factors in determining the final grade. A great deal of practice outside of the classroom is called for, along with regular

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opportunity to listen, sing, evaluate, and study different styles of music. A yearlong commitment is required. Enrollment is by audition only. New students are encouraged to contact the Academic Office for audition guidance. Text: The Music Theory Handbook, Merryman.

Academic Office well in advance of the beginning of the academic year, so that appropriate scheduling arrangements can be made. A yearlong commitment is required. The cost of private music instruction is billed home. (Year, 1/week, 1/3 credit)

Private Dance Instruction

AP Music Theory (online)

This course provides students with the opportunity to work one-on-one with a professional dance instructor. Private instruction in dance is excellent for beginning students, students who have previous dance experience who are looking to improve their technique and artistry, but also for actors, skaters, and athletes who are looking to improve their technique – or who need specific coaching on technique, choreography, or audition preparation. In private dance instruction, students can expect to work on basic skills, stretching, positions, technique, precise foot placement, and stage character as well as musicality, strength of the legs and feet, and balance. Private lessons are scheduled once or twice per week for one hour. A one-year commitment is required. The cost of private dance instruction is billed home. (Year, 1/week, 1/3 credit)

The AP Music Theory course is designed to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. These abilities will be developed through various listening, performance, written, creative, and analytical exercises. Although this course focuses on music of the Common Practice Period (1600 – 1900), materials and processes found in other styles and genres are also studied. The AP Music Theory exam tests students’ understanding of musical structure and compositional procedures through recorded and notated examples. Strong emphasis is given to listening skills, particularly those involving recognition and comprehension of melodic and rhythmic patterns, harmonic functions, small forms, and compositional techniques. This course will be housed completely online. Students will be required to manage their time effectively and complete assigned tasks online by assigned deadlines.

Private Music Instruction Students are encouraged to pursue private study of an instrument at The Gunnery. These lessons offer students an individualized learning experience with a private instructor. Lessons are given in all orchestral and keyboard instruments. Students may also study voice, composition, jazz, popular and folk instruments. Students receive one 40-minute lesson per week, and are expected to practice a minimum of two hours per week. Students interested in private instruction should contact the

Term Courses Songwriting This class focuses on the composition, recording and performance of original works of music. Among the many concepts studied are melody, harmony, rhythm, arrangement, instrumentation, lyric writing, lead sheet notation, and audio recording. Individual growth and progress

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are monitored closely and are important factors in determining the final grade. A great deal of work outside of class is called for, along with regular music theory, composition analysis, and listening assignments. Performance opportunities are also available but not required. Students should be competent on a musical instrument in order to take this course. Questions should be directed to the instructor, Mr. Perkins. (fall)

music theory and listening assignments. (spring)

Visual Arts Full-Year Courses AP Studio Art This yearlong course is for highly motivated junior and senior art students. The scope of work is equivalent to that of an introductory college course in studio art, providing a special opportunity to prepare a portfolio for admission to art schools and to acquire knowledge of the professional art world and careers in the visual arts. Students work in both traditional and experimental media. AP Studio Art students are required to document their work photographically and to present a portfolio that demonstrates their proficiency. Students have the opportunity to submit materials to the College Board AP Studio Art Exam as well as National Open Portfolio Review Day and the Scholastic Art Awards competition. Prerequisites: Drawing and a portfolio review by the Visual Arts Chair.

History of Rock and Roll This course seeks to deepen the students’ understanding of the modern world and their relationship to their society and culture by examining the music of American youth in its many cultural settings. The course explores music as a manifestation of the youth culture that emerged during the 1950s as an entity separate from the mainstream. Within the confines of a narrow time frame (ca. 1940 - present), the course presents a broad coverage of music fundamentals, as well as sociological and historical aspects of musical study. While seeking to balance an understanding of the development and significance of Rock and Roll in its historical and social environment, this course will maintain a focus on listening to the music as the main mode of understanding. (winter)

The Highlander (Newspaper) In this course, the newspaper staff publishes the student newspaper, The Highlander. In the process, students learn the principles and practice of journalism. This course is open to all students and may be taken for one or more terms for 1/3 art credit per term. Credit earned for this course may not be used to fulfill the English diploma requirement. (fall, winter and/or spring)

Music Technology This class focuses on the technology used to compose, create, and record music in our very own Mac-based digital recording studio. MIDI programming, digital sampling and editing, and traditional audio recording techniques are all learned. Individual growth and progress are monitored closely and are important factors in determining the final grade. A great deal of work in the studio outside of class is called for, along with regular

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discussion. Surface decoration is explored through glazing and firing techniques. No previous experience is required. (fall, winter)

The Red & Gray (Yearbook) This course is a full-year, visual arts course dedicated to the production of the school’s yearbook, the main chronicle of student life at The Gunnery. Students work as a team to organize pages, design layouts, and gather photos that represent their year at The Gunnery. Although all students within the class share equal responsibilities in creating the yearbook, one editor will be selected each year to fulfill a leadership role within the group. Students of all years may take this course.

Ceramics II This course is designed for students who are proficient on the potter’s wheel and who are interested in continuing to improve their techniques. Lid and handle making techniques are introduced. Altered forms on the wheel area also are investigated and incorporated into final pieces. High fire glazes are used for surface decoration, and students learn kiln stacking and firing procedures. Prerequisite: Ceramics I. (spring)

Term Courses Black and White Photography This course is a beginning- to intermediate-level course designed to give students a thorough introduction to the 35mm film camera, film development, and printing in the darkroom. Aperture (f-stops), lenses and focusing, as well as shutter and film speeds are all thoroughly reviewed. Darkroom work accounts for a significant portion of the class and is the place where students will learn how to develop film and make enlarged prints from their 35mm negatives. Projects are designed to help students understand the relationship between shutter speed, aperture, and focus. Projects are also designed to help students develop a sense of photographic composition and style, as well as an understanding of how light and shadow effect the photographic process. (fall, winter)

Digital Photography For novice students, this course is an introduction to the camera, photographic process and digital software. The emphasis is on artistic qualities of composition and image content. The course includes camera handling, exposure, darkroom techniques, and exploring the potential of digital photography. Students will master skills that will apply to all forms of image making and will gain and understanding of basic camera operations. (fall, spring)

Drawing This introductory drawing class is based on the Betty Edwards workbook, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. During this class, students explore line, shading/ tonal values, positive/negative space, and the principles and elements of design. Students work with a variety of media, including graphite pencil, charcoal, pastels, colored pencil, and mixed media. A historical and cultural perspective is explored through slides, visual aids, and discussion. No previous experience in art is required. (fall, winter, spring)

Ceramics I This course includes basic techniques and understanding of clay as an art medium. Coil, slab, and other hand-building techniques are introduced, followed by the opportunity to work a potter’s wheel. A historical and cultural perspective is explored through slides, video, and

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stationery, brochures, newsletters, and school posters. Students explore the artistic possibilities of Adobe Photoshop. Class critiques and discussions are held at the conclusion of each project. No previous experience in art is required. (winter)

Experimental Photography Experimental Photography will explore alternative ways of making photographs. Among the methods we will explore are photograms, pinhole photographs, painting with light, long exposures, flash photography, and camera obscura. Some of our time will be spent in the darkroom, some on the computer, but most of it will be spent making interesting photographs. Previous photographic experience is helpful but not required. (fall)

Painting In this class, students learn color theory and explore color relationships in their paintings. Students explore various techniques in watercolors, oils, and acrylics. Landscape, portrait, self-portrait, and abstract expressionism are covered from a historical as well as a technical point of view. Methods of painting are introduced through examining the work of master painters. Prerequisite: Drawing. (spring)

Film Production This course is a general introduction to film production. A variety of film genres will be explored with an emphasis on narrative and documentary. All aspects of the process will be explored from camera functions to lighting, acting and production methods. Two to three short film projects will be completed during the trimester. Students who have taken Digital Photography and Film Studies are preferred, but all are welcome. (fall, spring)

Film Studies This course is a survey-based class that looks at the history of film from its very beginning in the late 1880s to now. We watch, analyze and critique movies, both old and new, and across many genres. The course will explore film analysis, the principles of film form, genre, as well as the elements of narrative, cinematography, acting, editing, sound, and film criticism. This is not a studio course. (winter)

Graphic Design I This studio art course introduces students to the basics of graphic design using publication and digital-imaging software. With text and scanned graphics, students solve design problems to create publications such as business cards,

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World Languages and Cultures Students at The Gunnery are required to complete through level III in a language in order to fulfill the academic diploma requirements. Part of earning these credits includes passing a cumulative final in levels I and II. It is the mission of this department to provide students with a foundation in the four essential skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as to help them develop an understanding of various cultures. First-year students will be placed into classes based on a placement test and prior performance. Admission for returning students is based on past performance, teacher recommendation and department head approval. Note: The department reserves the right to offer only those elective or accelerated courses that meet minimum enrollment requirements. Students must earn a passing grade in the course and a minimum score of 50% on the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit and advance to the next level. The materials for these courses are from D’accord 2 (Vista), original materials generated by the teacher and culturally authentic sources that are adapted by the teacher. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Text: D’accord 2, Vista Higher Learning.

Required Courses French Language French I This course provides students with an introduction to the four basic skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to basic French syntax and structures, verb forms, and extensive vocabulary via thematic units. They develop an awareness of Francophone culture through exposure to a variety of authentic sources. Students must earn a passing grade in the course and a minimum score of 50% on the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit and advance to the next level. Text: D’accord 1, Vista Higher Learning.

French III In these courses students will build upon the skills they have developed over the past two years. They will continue to acquire a wider variety of verb tenses and more advanced grammar structures, expand their range of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions, and further their knowledge and understanding of the Francophone world. Students will also enhance their reading skills by reading longer passages from the text as well as a short reader. Students must earn a passing grade in the course in order to receive credit and fulfill their diploma requirement. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Text: D’accord 3, Vista Higher Learning, Le Petit Nicolas et les Copains, Goscinny, Sempe.

French II and French II Honors In these courses, students will continue to hone their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Thematic units serve as the vehicle for expanding the students’ vocabulary and exposing them to a wider variety of grammar structures. Cultural context will continue to be a key factor in increasing the students’ knowledge and understanding of the Francophone world.

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required of all students. Admission is based on past performance in Pre-Advanced Placement French, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Texts: AP French, Allons au-delà (Pearson), L’étudiant étranger (Gallimard).

Elective Courses French Language Pre-Advanced Placement French This course, taught primarily in French, seeks to refine and expand the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students read and discuss a variety of works, including poems, online resources, excerpts from interviews, short stories, and novels grouped into thematic units. Francophone culture, civilization, and history are included to provide an authentic cultural context. In addition, students screen and discuss films relevant to the themes. The course also provides students with a review and expansion of key grammar concepts, with the goal of developing the students’ use of idiomatic language, as well as their ease of expression both in conversation and in writing. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Text: Le Petit Prince (Harcourt, Inc.), Schaum’s Outline of French Grammar (McGraw Hill).

Required Courses Mandarin Language Mandarin I This course in Mandarin (Putonghua) is designed for students who have had little to no prior exposure to the Chinese language. The emphasis of this course is to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills using both the Pinyin phonetic system and simplified Chinese characters. These will be taught through thematic units. By the end of the first unit, students are able to have a preliminary conversation in Chinese, and over the course of the year, they explore the topics of likes and dislikes, self-descriptions, family, school, and making plans. Students also develop an awareness of Chinese culture through exposure to a variety of authentic sources. They must earn a passing grade in the course and a minimum score of 50% on the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit and advance to the next level. Text: Standard Course HSK 1, Textbook and Workbook, Phoenix Tree Publishing; assorted readers.

Advanced Placement French Language This course is conducted entirely in French and prepares students to take the AP French Language and Culture Exam in the spring term. Students develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through a study of six cultural themes: les défis mondiaux, la science et la technologie, la vie contemporaine, la quête de soi, la famille et la communauté, et l’esthétique. Video clips, songs, online sources, and newspapers supplement the required texts and are used weekly to explore the Francophone world. Expectations of student participation are high. The Advanced Placement exam is

Mandarin II This course in Mandarin (Putonghua) is designed for students who have had one full year of study in Chinese. Students will use more complex grammar and work to improve their reading and writing skills. More emphasis is placed on Chinese character instruction, and increased confidence in writing is stressed through short writing exercises centered on learned

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grammar structures and the themes being discussed. Additionally, students begin to work on their conversation and presentation skills, as well as their listening and reading comprehension. Cultural context continues to be a key element, as students increase their knowledge and understanding of the Chinese world. Students must earn a passing grade in the course and a minimum score of 50% on the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit and advance to the next level. Text: Standard Course HSK 2, Textbook and Workbook, Phoenix Tree Publishing.

This course seeks to refine the basic skills of reading, writing, and speaking by separating the coursework into thematic units. Students will study more advanced vocabulary and grammar, with the goal of teaching them how to use it in a coherent and idiomatic way and improve their ease of expression in both speaking and writing. Intensive efforts in writing are stressed through speed writing assignments, reading and listening comprehension, storytelling, and short papers. Additionally, they will explore and discuss various cultural topics that will focus on improving their practical communication skills and cross-cultural understanding. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Text: Standard Course HSK 4, Textbook and Workbook, Phoenix Tree Publishing.

Mandarin III This course, taught primarily in French, seeks to refine and expand the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students read and discuss a variety of works, including poems, online resources, excerpts from interviews, short stories, and novels grouped into thematic units. Francophone culture, civilization, and history are included to provide an authentic cultural context. In addition, students screen and discuss films relevant to the themes. The course also provides students with a review and expansion of key grammar concepts, with the goal of developing the students’ use of idiomatic language, as well as their ease of expression both in conversation and in writing. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Text: Standard Course HSK 3, Textbook and Workbook, Phoenix Tree Publishing.

Required Courses Spanish Language Spanish I This course provides students with a foundation in the four essential skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Thematic units serve as the vehicle for introducing students to basic Spanish syntax and structures, verb forms, and extensive vocabulary. Students also develop an awareness of Hispanic culture through exposure to a variety of authentic sources. Students must earn a passing grade in the course and a minimum score of 50% on the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit and advance to the next level. The materials for these courses are original materials generated by the teacher and culturally authentic sources that are adapted by the teacher.

Elective Course Mandarin Language Mandarin IV This course in Mandarin (Putonghua) is designed for students who have had three full years of high school study in Chinese.

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Spanish II and Spanish II Honors

Elective Courses Spanish Language

In these courses students will continue to hone their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Thematic units serve as the vehicle for expanding the students’ vocabulary and exposing them to a wider variety of grammar structures. Cultural context will continue to be a key factor in increasing the students’ knowledge and understanding of the Hispanic world. Students must earn a passing grade in the course and a minimum score of 50% on the cumulative final exam in order to receive credit and advance to the next level. The materials for these courses are original materials generated by the teacher and culturally authentic sources that are adapted by the teacher.

Pre-Advanced Placement Spanish This course, taught primarily in Spanish, seeks to refine and expand the basic skills of listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Students read and discuss a variety of works, including poems, online resources, excerpts from interviews, short stories, and novels grouped into thematic units. Hispanic culture, civilization, and history are included to provide an authentic cultural context. In addition, students screen and discuss films relevant to the themes. The course also provides students with a review and expansion of key grammar concepts, with the goal of developing the students’ use of idiomatic language, as well as their ease of expression both in conversation and in writing. Admission is based on past performance, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Reader: El Principito (Harcourt), and Schaum’s Outline of Spanish Grammar.

Spanish III and Spanish III Honors In these courses students will build upon the skills they have developed over the past two years. They will continue to acquire a wider variety of verb tenses and more advanced grammar structures, expand their range of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions, and further their knowledge and understanding of the Hispanic world. Students will also enhance their reading comprehension skills by reading short stories from different Spanish and Latin American authors, as well as read news articles about current events happening in the Spanish-speaking world. This course is taught primarily in Spanish. Students must earn a passing grade in the course in order to receive credit and fulfill their diploma requirement. The materials for these courses are original materials generated by the teacher and culturally authentic sources that are adapted by the teacher.

Advanced Placement Spanish Language This course is conducted entirely in Spanish and prepares students to take the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam in the spring term. Students develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture through the study of six themes: Los desafíos mundiales, La ciencia y la tecnología, La vida contemporánea, Las identidades personales y públicas, La familia y la comunidad, La belleza y la estética. Video clips, songs, online sources, and newspapers supplement the required texts and are used to explore the Hispanic world. Expectations for student participation are high, and the Advanced Placement exam is required of all

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students. Admission is based on past performance in Pre-Advanced Placement Spanish, teacher recommendation, and approval of the Department Head. Text: Temas: APÂŽ Spanish Language and Culture, Vista Higher Learning, and APÂŽ Spanish Prep, Pearson.

Independent Study Project The Gunnery supports the study of languages not offered by our faculty through our Independent Study Project (ISP) option. Students who have a foundation of study or speaking in a non-offered language can be supported through an online learning platform and supervised by the World Language Chair. Please follow the ISP process (see page 37). In this case, an exemption can be made to the prerequisite of being a returning student.

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Independent Study Project Students at The Gunnery are encouraged to pursue individual interests and advanced learning opportunities through an Independent Study Project (ISP). ISPs are individualized learning plans (either one-term or full-year) in which a student or pair of students undertake self-led courses of study with the support and under the direction of a faculty member capable of providing leadership on the topic. ISPs can cover any academic area and often include an online learning component. Students should not propose a course that significantly overlaps with the content of a course already offered at The Gunnery.

The process for establishing an ISP is as follows: 1) Interested students should approach the Academic Office with their ideas for the coming year by the midpoint of the spring term by requesting a meeting with the Assistant Head of School for Teaching and Learning or the Assistant Academic Dean (both of whom can be reached at academics@gunnery.org).

The Gunnery values individuals and their ideas. Students here join generations of alumni before them who have learned to be curious, to question, to debate, reflect and share what they know. Small classes are the norm, which means that each student’s contributions are expected and welcomed. A comprehensive

2) If the project seems possible, the interested student will be asked to complete an ISP form and submit a proposal. This will include meeting with the appropriate Department Chair and working with both the Department Chair and the Academic Office to describe the learning outcomes and educational material that will be used for the ISP, to be detailed in the proposal. 3) The Department Chair and Academic Office will then approach a suitable faculty advisor. Assuming the right match can be found between student interest and faculty availability, the ISP will then be approved and added to the student’s course load for the following year.

curriculum, with more than 100 courses to choose from (including honors, independent study and 19 APs), helps students master

Prerequisites: ISPs are only open to returning students. Students in their first year should follow a standard course load at The Gunnery.

different subjects and become confident articulating their ideas in spoken and written forms. Teachers at The Gunnery are passionate about their subject matter and love what they do. Students get to know them as their instructors, advisors, mentors, role models, coaches and dorm parents. Their guidance and encouragement help students to reach beyond their expectations and preconceived notions. Each Gunnery student receives the guidance, attention and support of a team of faculty members dedicated to their academic and personal success.

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The 2019-2020 Curriculum Guide

Teaching and Learning at The Gunnery

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2019-2020 Curriculum Guide  

2019-2020 Curriculum Guide