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the

Journal By and for the seniors of Guilderland Central High School

Senior Issue

June 2012


Senior Journal Staff, 2010-2011 Back (l-r): Nick Connolly, Prabjot Singh, Devin Fisher, Matt Simon, Bram Peterson, Justine Polonski, Austin Cornell, Mike Dvorscak. Front (l-r): Tony Pitkin, Xing-Yu Wei, Mike Crupi, Tara Jackson, Samina Hydery, Julianne Legnard, Devin Keenholts, Madi Taylor.

Letters From The Editorial Board Dear Senior Class of 2012, As many of us crawl closer and closer to the end of the diving board, preparing to cannonball into the deep end again, there are a few things I would like to reflect on before we relinquish our title as seniors, and break the surface of the water to become, alas, measly freshman. Winston Churchill said, “The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you can see.” On my journey towards the water I’ve been doing a little self-reflection. Looking back is much easier than looking forward, but unlocking Churchill’s secrets may be a little harder than it appears. Four years ago, I was a much different person than I am now. Yes, my hair was a little longer and my jeans were a little baggier, 1 but that 13 year old kid was lost

in his own mind. He was stuck between dreams of being the next Warhol or Hendrix, and desperately saving his pennies for an iPod Touch. Guilderland gave me the opportunity to become who I am; but also showed me who I’m not. During the many times that I emerged from my shell in the past four years, I met amazing people that I would have never met otherwise and have had incredible experiences. That being said, I learned that I do like having my shell. Sometimes it’s nice to just sit and watch, to spend time to observe the world around me. I don’t know many of you, not even half of you personally, but I’m okay with that. Maybe in a different life or different universe I’d be friends with more of you, or less of you, or just a different group all together. But, this is how it all sorted

out, and I’m content. I know that some of you that I have met will be my friends for the rest of my life. For the rest of you, I wish you the best. I know who I am, and have slightly more reasonable goals, if not just as extravagant. Looking forward now becomes slightly clearer. In four years, with a diploma under my belt, my goals may have done another 180°, if not a 360°. As an older and hopefully smarter version of myself, I most likely will have two choices; graduate school or to break the barrier and join the real word. To be honest, I’m looking forward to either option. Graduate school means more experience, and more time to work with true professionals in a controlled environment. But the prospect of joining the workforce is an exhilarating idea, like being thrown into the deep end all over again.

Most of us have four more long years of education ahead of us, but with a little bit of foresight, these could be four amazing years in our lives. Don’t be afraid to say yes, and gain new experiences. Try new things, meet new people. It’s a time for exploration and discovery. In four years we may be getting ready for Graduate programs, internships, or even scarier; joining the real world, finally knowing who we want to be when we ‘grow up.’ These years are ours for the taking; but it’s up to us. Let us all make the most of what’s in front of us and succeed exponentially. Good luck, Mike Dvorscak Editor-in-Chief


My Dearest Class of 2012, This is a time of remembrance. As new doors that we have so eagerly anticipated open, we find ourselves turned around, clawing for memories before they slip out of reach. As some of us struggle with moving forward, and others are eager to forget the past, there are a few thoughts that I’d like to share with you. I would call them pieces of advice, but that would almost imply that I’m a reputable source. And we all know that’s not true. #1 Connect the dots looking backwards, not forward. Whatever it is you believe in, believe that the dots will always connect. If you try and connect the dots before they are all on the page, you may miss what the picture (of your life) looks like. Guilderland High School was once the big picture. If we all zoomed in on it, some dots were connected and some weren’t. And that’s it. All of those dots have been placed. All of those lines have been drawn. What you didn’t do in high school, you won’t do. What you hated about high school is gone. Though as we look back together, we are all able to connect some of the same outlined pictures. In all of us there is the Dutchmen ship, the Red Sea, the Cultural Fair, the musical, the Living Museum, and, humor me here, even the Journal. We all have these pictures in common. ow we’re all drawing different lines from the new, singular dot that is Guilderland High School. #2 Guilderland is better than you think. Really. It’s amazing that we’re able to go to a public high school and be as successful as we are. If you think nothing goes on in Guilderland, remember Berne Knox Westerlo. If you wish Guilderland were bigger, remember that in large cities it is often difficult to get a good education

without attending a private school (which are, by the way, generally quite small). Guilderland is good at sports and we have many available to us. We have many opportunities in terms of class selection. Our teaching staff is caring, knowledgeable and influential. We were ranked #591 in the top 1000 public schools in the nation in terms of college-ready graduates. We have the best of many worlds here, and we shouldn’t let ourselves forget it. Also, don’t forget that Albany is better than you think as well. Though the city may not have as much to offer as you’d like, it’s still a great location. Pick a direction. Go in that direction for three hours. We have a world of opportunities available to us from here. #3 Some failure in life is inevitable. If you believe that your life has so far been without failure, you have lived so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all. And by this, you have failed the most. I recently dropped a pillow of mine between my bed and the wall. Before falling asleep, I had noticed its absence and terrifyingly grabbed it from the under-the-bed-abyss. To my surprise, I found that it was quite warm having lied next to the radiator on the floor. This was a reminder that even in the darkest of places, you can still find warmth. To fail is to learn. Treat all dead-ends the way you do with hair. Cut them off and grow. Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to find. My lovely classmates of 2012, here’s to hoping you never find yourselves asking to use the bathroom again, and here’s to hoping that you do find much, much more. Tara Jackson Editor-in-Chief

Dear Senior Class of 2012, We are a generation of change. I don’t think there isn’t a kid out there who doesn’t remember “Now That’s What I Call Music” or “Hit Clips”. Think of how many times you heard Aaron Carter or the Backstreet Boys or ‘NSYNC played on the radio. You went out and bought not just their t-shirts, hats, coffee mugs, towels and other assorted memorabilia, but most importantly you bought their music. Now, not only is music available instantly for most, and on the go via a quick download from the iTunes store, but in fact, most of us don’t even buy our music anymore. We download our music illegally from P2P sites like “The Pirate Bay”. We are a generation of change. We were born in a world where an average computer had around a 250MB Hard Drive and 4MB of RAM. A world where a cell phone was simply for calling one other person. A world where when you wanted to see a movie, you went to Hollywood Video or Blockbuster and rented the VHS. Now Apple’s smallest iPod, the Shuffle, holds 2GB of music (8 times what an entire computer could hold). Not only do our music devices hold more than our computers did, but they also function as our cellular devices, which by the way, can now call, text, browse the web, play games, video chat, look up the weather and do nearly anything else short of breathing for you. Now, if you want to rent a movie, you need a Netflix membership or a local Redbox machine, which instantly dispenses a DVD of the newest releases with the same ease as purchasing a soda. We are a generation of change. When you wanted to know what was going on

in the world around you, or see what your friends were doing, you had to read the papers, watch the news, and call your friends over the home phone. When you wanted to promote and event or gain support for a cause you had to hit the street with fliers. In our generation, what better way to find out about the world around you than in 140 characters of less. Twitter and Facebook have revolutionized the way we look at the world around us. When we want to share something on our mind we “Tweet it” and “hashtag” the subject of our tweet. If what we have to say is something new or innovative it will go “viral” in hours. We are a generation of change. When we were younger you could walk to the boarding gate at the airport and wait with the person flying, even if you didn’t have a ticket. Your carryon baggage was rarely checked unless there was any reasonable suspicion. Best of all, if you couldn’t make your flight you could sell your ticket to anyone and it won’t matter that their name doesn’t match that of the ticket. Now every carryon bag and pocket must be emptied so x-rays and metal detectors can scan it all. If you try to walk through the security to wait with your friend at the gate, airport security might take you in for questioning. Most of all, if you see or hear a plane flying low overhead you immediately think of that horrific day in September of 2001, a day that forever changed our nation and the way we view it. We are a generation of change and the world around us will keep changing. It’s up to us to keep up with those changes and spark the ones that haven’t begun yet. Tony Pitkin Editor-in-Chief

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Growth & advice

Julianne Legnard

Over the past four years, a lot of things have changed for me. I’m a little taller, a lot wiser, and instinctively know which sinks actually work in the bathrooms. The constant throughout this personal growth, however, has been my location; Guilderland High School has seen and spawned the transformation of

Before you even think about sitting in the student section at a football game, stop! Unless you have a beard or a case full of money, you’ll have to wait a few

each of its 448 seniors. Just think, without these walls and the influential people within them, we would still be the gawky freshman we once were, sportin’ sketchers and mouth full of braces (well…at least I would be). Thus, it’s only fair that we share some parting advice with those at GHS we’ll be leaving behind. Here’s what to expect for your upcoming years:

years before you dive into the Red Sea. It’s best to wait it out in the swarm of underclassmen stalking around the snack bar.

& Pokémon Michael Crupi

At some times, it may seem like your life is the most chaotic and complicated that’s it’s ever been, but don’t worry…it’s not. While school may seem stressful, sophomore year is a time to have fun,

join clubs, and enjoy your friends. So study hard but play harder; this is a year to try out for teams and hit the floor at sweet 16’s. Just do your “cupid shuffle” and try not to get your feet stepped on.

If you’re not drinking coffee yet, you should be. Late nights of papers, planning and prom will basically require it. There’s no doubt that it’s the most difficult of the four years you’ll spend at GHS, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be just as fun. My best and most sincere advice: be proactive. Even if it’s out of paranoia,

break out those SAT flash cards in October. You’ll have less mindless cramming to do as the spring approaches, and big words can make a kid feel quite sanguine. Look at colleges early, and start to dabble in your career interests. No worries though, by this time next year, you’ll believe me when I say that everything turns out just fine.

Start your college apps early, and stay away from senioritis!

Use this year to make a final and lasting difference at GHS.

My final suggestion: keep up the good work. While I’ve experienced both the good and the

bad, I know I’ll fondly remember the many educators at GHS that engaged and inspired me to learn.

Lastly, I’d like to thank and congratulate my peers in the senior class. Whether I knew you or not, I wish you well,

and hope you pursue whatever you truly love in life. Senior year was fun…now let’s become freshmen once again!

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Soccer

challenges is so strong I can’t imagine how Graduation marks the ending of a awful it would be to live without such actwelve year journey that began in a dif- complishments. In fact, I am much more ferent millennium, and a different world thankful for the tough times I had in high altogether. When we school than I am for seniors first arrived easy or fun ones. Seniors are now set the in kindergarten FaceWithout all of the book didn’t exist, challenges I faced, I to enter a world that portable CD players would have learned is moving at a faster were cool and most nothing these past pace than it ever has, four years and would importantly Pikachu would follow you probably have beand we are ready to around in the new come a professional conquer it. Pokemon game. Fast bum. forward to graduaWe also must retion and the idea of leaving the house member the lessons we learned from the without the internet in your pocket is Guilderland faculty. Mr. Lampman taught unheard of. us to always be friendly and positive. Seniors are now set to enter a world Mr. Mapstone taught us to explore the that is moving at a faster pace than it ever world. Ms. Whitman taught us to pursue has, and we are ready to conquer it. The happiness and Mr. Heidinger taught us to future belongs to those bold enough to laugh at ourselves. All these lessons, given make it their own. With that being said, outside of academic subjects, are the most it is important to remember all the good important things learned in high school. of high school. All of the fun moments, They are priceless, and the sooner we such as field trips, hanging out with learn them the better off we are. friends and sporting events will obviously Many of us seniors have just made our be missed, but personally I will long for first true decision in life. We have chosen many other things as a direction to head in well. During soccer after high school, be Without all of the tryouts I would alit college or employchallenges I faced, I ways complain about ment. These decithe mile repeats and sions are undoubtwould have learned endless sprints that I edly important, but nothing these past was forced to do, but by no means final. now I find myself Ultimately, our paths four years wishing I could do it are our own. We are all over again. The same thing can be said by no means like train cars, doomed to about APUSH. Sure, it was a lot of work ride the tracks we are set on. We have and of course it wasn’t fun at the time, the ability to go where we want, when but I now find myself looking back on we want, so long as we are willing to that class with a smile. The sense of pride work hard, make sacrifices and strive for that is received after meeting these tough the best.


Chinstraps

& old friends Bram Peterson

“Some kids had the chinstrap, a few had the chin whiskers or the soul patch going for them, and I think a few had it all. I am talking about Grizzly Adams facial hair, having a mop on your chin. It was almost scary, but also the craziest thing ever.” I was awestruck by the concept of hair on the faces of my peers as a freshman. The first month of my freshmen year, I wrote an op-ed titled “Trench coats, rabies, and Grizzly Adams,” for The Journal, in which I marveled at all the novel encounters of my first week of high school. Sunglasses indoors, trench coats on beautiful days, and most shockingly, hair on the faces of my classmates. The comforts of my middle school team were g one, and the small middle school halls were replaced by halls full of chest-bump happy seniors. In the proverbial sea, I had been replaced as the big fish by these intimidating figures that seemed like foreign creatures. At this time, I wasn’t even thinking about being in their shoes; I was more worried about which cafeteria was the “coolest”, or how to nonchalantly make a 180º in the hallway when I realize that once again, I’m walking in the wrong direction. This was just the beginning of lessons I would learn at Guilderland. Thanks to the GHS computer labs, I know that I am now finished with my two million minutes as a high school student. I have perfected the art of procrastination, and I will unfortunately take this

skill on to college with me. I’ve endured quarterlies, midterms, finals, Regents exams and a plethora of the CollegeBoard’s finest torture devices. I have taken tests, run a mile, held conversations in a foreign language and eaten both breakfast and lunch at times I would normally reserve for sleep. High school taught me many things I would’ve preferred not to know, such as how many times I can hit the snooze button before the alarm shuts off for good, how unreliable the snow day calculator can be, and the minimum threshold of sleep one needs to function the following day. However, the past two million minutes have also offered plenty of lessons that helped define who I am and transform me from an awkward freshman into a taller, slightly less awkward senior. I had always known I wanted to write, and by a lucky coincidence I had my first piece of high school writing published. I started occasionally writing for the school paper, becoming a section editor. Whether it was sharing a movie theater with only four families in order to write a review of Alvin and the Chipmunks on a Saturday morning, or interviewing Occupy Albany protestors in their tents at Academy Park, I was always willing to take every challenge in stride. Some were more enjoyable than others, but every article has a back story that is often just as interesting as the article itself. Learning how to find and write a good

It’s important to not let any one club or group of friends define you.

story helped me become a more patient person, and has made me look deeper into everything I see. Any senior can tell you that it’s important to manage your time in high school, but I think it’s also important to not let any one club or group of friends define you. There is no group of people at GHS that likes putting out a publication, mentors freshmen, plays ice hockey and pickup soccer and basketball, and embraces the guitar, harmonica and accordion. And yet surprisingly, I made it through high school with some friends. In retrospect, one of the smartest things I did in high school was to not label myself with one group of friends. Having a diverse group of friends has prepared me to deal with all types of people in my future. If you asked me during the years, I would not have thought of high school as having too large of an impact on me.

But in reality, my two million minutes at GHS helped me determine what I wanted to do in my future, what my strengths and weaknesses are, how I spend my time away from school, and has helped me make friends that I will keep with me as I leave Guilderland. Some of the best advice I received at Guilderland was from my eleventh grade English teacher Mr. McBride, who explained that “New friends are different than old friends, and you can’t make new old friends.” Guilderland shaped me and the people with whom I’ve grown, and I plan to stay with these friends no matter where our futures take us. The past two million minutes have made me who I am today, and will help me find who I will be until the next time I don the cap and gown. The next two million minutes will continue to prepare me to make my own way in the world, but I will always keep the friends and lessons from Guilderland close to heart.

New friends are different than old friends, and you can’t make new old friends.

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Honesty

& the lunch table Austin Cornell

To think that life ends at high school, that is, important life stops after graduation day, is a one way ticket to an abyssal life of wandering. Many naïve students lead their lives to maximize social success rather than professional success in real life. I observed the mind games and brutal social warfare that existed within these walls throughout my career at Guilderland, and I chose not to partake. What a loser, right? Wrong. Since the beginning of ninth grade, my attention has been undividedly given to life beyond high school, and even beyond college. I knew that success would not derive from developing skills to reach the finish of the intangible social game, so I removed my singular piece from that barbaric board almost completely. I loathed those who put real energy into deciding the coolest lunch table to take a seat instead of thinking of the seat in a classroom that will maximize productivity. I shamefully admit that I have occasionally slid off the motivational path and have succumbed to making decisions based on conditions that lack any meaning, and I still see the consequences of my childish actions.

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And today, after four years of treacherous effort, I think I’m ready to move on. I am confident that the choices I have made throughout high school are ones that will provide prosperity and success in college, and thus in the real world. I have remained an open book of honesty and integrity, which have allowed my faults to become the medicine of personal improvement. By no means am I suggesting that replicating my style of living will ensure a flawless personality, but I believe that I did the best I could to develop a healthy lifestyle that will keep me personable and comfortable for the rest of my life. I advise that incoming students, siblings of graduates, and any others interested – though it may be few in number – follow simple guidelines. Be honest, think wisely, find a role model (a good one, please), and think beyond high school. You only have one opportunity to live life, so I humbly suggest that you make the best decisions available. Use the wisdom around you, use the wisdom within you, and apply your mind to improve the world, or at least part of it, in the most influential way possible. Guilderland High School is the best place to start.

Outros & nostalgia Clare Ladd

As senior year draws to a close, it’s easy to get lost in a sea of “lasts” – last concert, last test, last day – and everything becomes this soppy, nostalgic moment. For me, all these lasts make me fondly remember the firsts; some only a few months ago, but some way back in ninth grade. My memories of those days are a mixture of extremely clear, precise moments, and a whole lot of haziness. One thing I do remember is being uncertain, never really knowing what to expect as so many changes were happening in my life. Making friends and keeping friends during freshman year can be something of a shot in the dark, and I was lucky to fall into the amazing family that is the music department. I honestly couldn’t tell you how exactly I met half of my friends. Like most things in life, it just kind of happened. It’s not like in a movie, where the music swells to tell you that something important is about to occur. The one thing I do know is that my life would be empty without these people, and leaving them in a few months is going to be harder than I can begin to contemplate. Choir didn’t just give me new friends. Music was my way of learning to truly dedicate myself to something, and to understand the specific kind of joy you feel when you accomplish what you’ve worked so hard for. The smart, hilarious, and totally one-of-a-kind people I

befriended were just an added bonus. When I got into Concert Choir and then Chamber Choir a year later, I felt true pride in my abilities and hard work. Then Chamber and Wind Ensemble captured victory at the Heritage Festival last year, and I experienced the amazing swell of victory and love, that wash of euphoria athletes must feel when they win a game. We showed how awesome Guilderland Music is in the face of looming budget cuts and strengthened our bonds with each other at the same time. Being a music kid has given me an identity over my high school years. It’s not like everyone has to fall in a stereotypical clique, but I was just glad I had some other definition besides just “that nerdy tall girl”. And going through senior year, I’ve seen friend groups begin to intermingle more than our middle school selves would ever have imagined. People who I always thought were “cool” and would never want to talk to me are now holding friendly conversations with me on a regular basis. But I know deep down that nothing beats the unconditional love and acceptance found in the choir room, and I can only hope that every student here finds that place where they can be themselves, no matter how quirky or crazy. As I face the “lasts” and ready myself for another round of “firsts”, I know that the friends and memories I made here will always be in my heart.


Hardships Horizons

& stability & Opened Doors Justine Polonski

A lot of bad things have happened in my life since I started high school. There have been countless arguments with my parents in which a lot of awful things were said. I have had two deaths in my family since the start of high school. My mom has had multiple surgeries. My dad lost his job because our car was unreliable. My brother went into respiratory distress on my sixteenth birthday. There has been a lot of bad in just four years of my life. Even with these bad things occurring, I have always made sure that I could be proud of at least one thing: my grades and schoolwork. I have always taken pride in my accomplishments as a student. Maybe this was because I wanted that moment of pride from my mother when she opened my report card. Or maybe because I needed that one sure thing that I could always be proud of. Either way, my grades have always been important to me. High school has shown me that even when ever ything seems to be going wrong in my life, I can find stability in something, and keep myself sane. It just happened that grades were my saving grace in high school. People always wondered why I cared so much about my grades; that was why. They were my stabil-

ity, my pride, and my sense of normalcy. I also felt a need to have good grades so that I could end up at a good college, away from everything that had gone wrong in high school. My mom has always said that I had to go to college to have a better life. I knew that she was right, and I made it my mission to ensure that I would end up at a good college, away from home. I managed to get into my dream school, Ithaca College, which brought me an ultimate sense of satisfaction. I was even offered a $10,000 academic scholarship, which gave me even more satisfaction. And, even though I won’t be able to go to Ithaca until I transfer as a sophomore or a junior, I feel sure that I will graduate from my dream school, and everything will end up just the way I have always hoped it would. High school has given me the directions to start on the path that will lead me to the rest of my life. It allowed my light to shine through many hardships, and that light guided me in the direction that will lead me to the future. I may have not had a great life during high school, I will always be grateful for what it led me to, and to the friends and teachers who have helped me to where I am now, a graduating senior on the way to starting the rest of her life.

I have always taken pride in my accomplishments as a student.

Samina Hydery

inopportune diagnoses, and a cut from As I first walked into the high school the varsity team. It’s interesting how life as a freshman, I came with the definitive works out… while those doors closed, goal of getting into college. In my young bigger doors seemed to have opened. eyes, high school was like a holding pen My passions in public service and poliuntil I could finally tics emerged and opbe freed into the real It’s interesting how portunities I could world. Since then, have never imagined my horizons have life works out… while presented themexpanded beyond those doors closed, selves: a request the doors of the to speak alongside high school and into bigger doors seemed to Diane Sawyer, bethe outside world have opened. ing elected National I craved to experiChair of a political ence so much. As I sit here reminiscing, organization, and even an invitation to my mind is muddled by all the bits of the White House among them. Now, advice I wish I could have delivered to “Hydery 2036” posters lightheartedly my kindergarten self with the innocent hang in the Journal Office and my peers waterspout hairdo (ah, nostalgia). Dream lead hypothetical situations with “when big, be willing to lose, smile often, surprise you’re President.” people, wish everyone to have a nice day, be a As I walk out of the high school, I Democrat, I’d say- things that define who leave with the goal of getting into college I am today. In retrospect, however, it was fulfilled. But more importantly, I leave the journey that led me to this identity, with the understanding that this school this Samina Hydery. I needed to discover gifted me so much more than I thought it all the hard way. it was even capable of. People like to ask When things didn’t go my way, my me what is to come or even, what’s my two older sisters would always quip, next “political move”. There are so many “everything happens for a reason,” to variables; here lies a math equation that which I would roll my eyes. But they were cannot be solved, not even with a Gaussright. It’s true that interpretation can only Jordan. Maybe the dream of Hydery 2036 be left for the future. I look back at all will come to fruition. But if not, I know my so-called failures in life, things that I there is something significant out there spent days worrying about, things that that I am destined to do. Until then, I left me wondering, why me? Lost elections will keep dreaming big, keep smiling, and people reassured me would be victories, keep being a Democrat. Hakuna matata.

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Applications,

Seniority, & cookies

Sharon Lin

strong as we, the “kings” and “queens” I know this is going to sound bor- of high school, walked proudly in the derline-cliché, but college applications hallways of the building we would leave literally consumed me. The past year in a year. From the shirts that announced was almost entirely dedicated to me pick- our “seniority” in the beginning of the ing and choosing colleges that I liked, year to the free blocks that were given teachers and parents often stopping to us (either by the administration or by mid-conversation to ask me what college ourselves – it was still a free block in our I liked the best, and pouring my soul over eyes), we were proud to be the ones that the Common Application. everyone else looked up to. Seniors with I worked endlessly with my parents, cups of coffee or hot cocoa in their hands whittling my college list down from 30 would mosey their way in as the bell schools to the final 11. I spent every mid- resonated for second block. The younger night hour I had punching keyboard keys kids were forced to tilt their heads back as letters appeared just to get a glimpse to form my college of their superiors Senior year is essays, as I stared at (okay, I admit, that more than just college sentence isn’t comcollege essays that made it to Harvard. pletely true). And, applications, even if And then, when I alas, we will never it may not seem that saw my best friend forget: the Senioriway. receive the email of tis Plague that took his dreams in middown each of us in December, I hoped for three months turn. The desire to just sit and relax and that a similar fate would be bestowed not worry about anything school-related upon me. But senior year is more than was something that affected each and just college applications, even if it may every one of us, and let me be honest: not seem that way. School spirit ran it was a really, really, really good feeling.

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Many of my friends tell me that they “can’t wait to get out of this school.” Yes, I’ll admit that I feel this way too, more often than not. Let me tell you something, though. There will be a time that you’ll say “I wish I made more use of my high school years.” You might not think that you’ll say it, but you will. Trust me. Life after high school is so different that you won’t be able to help but miss those years where school work was still manageable (albeit extremely difficult and lack-of-sleep-inducing at times), friends you knew for the past thirteen years were still with you every day of your life, and returning to a nice warm snack at home was still a daily occurrence. Freshmen, sophomores, juniors – take note of this. Wherever we take ourselves next year, whether it be college, work, or the military (or somewhere else, who knows!), we will always be proud Dutchmen. We will always remember our classmates that we

spent our last thirteen years with (even if there may be that one kid that you wish you never met). Those good times in Guilderland will never truly leave us, especially the football games and the Pops Concerts and the warm three cookies that you could get for just one dollar and the parties in advisory and everything and anything. I know for a fact that I’ll miss the amazing friends that I have made here, the spectacular teachers that have guided me through tests and homework, and the memories, good and bad, that have shaped my life and created the person I am today. Guilderland High School Class of 2012, I wish all of you the best of luck. Whatever path you take will lead to success, I’m sure of it. This is my time to say good bye. I will miss all of you, even if I may not know you by name, and I will look forward to our 50 year reunion.

Whatever path you take will lead to success, I’m sure of it.


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Guilderland Class of 2012

48

are majoring in Business

12% 15

are entering employment

5 25 9

are Undecided on a major

are majoring in Biology

are joining the military


49%

are attending a SUNY School

77% 20

are staying in New York

are majoring in Engineering

10


11


John Wooden & conjugation Shelby Iapoce Over my four years of high school I’ve learned how to conjugate spanish verbs, take derivatives, how to determine what word is the direct object pronoun, what you need to make a silver bottle, why many powerful empires all around the world fell, and countless other things

that I may or may not ever need to use again in my lifetime. I think that the most important things that we as students should learn during those four years are the lessons that may not be taught by teachers, but from each other, and from the experiences of ourselves and those around us.

Things won't always go the way you want them to, the way you expect them to, and the way they deserve to. As 50 Cent says in his song “Many Men”, "Some days wouldn't be special if it wasn't for rain, joy wouldn't feel so good if it wasn't for pain." Be more concerned about your character than your rep; as John Wooden says, "Your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are." Put things in perspective; when you start complaining about having a bad hair day, be grateful that you actually have hair to cause you a problem. There are going to be a lot of things in your life that you can't control no matter how badly you want to. When things don't go your way, accept your circumstances, and make the best out of the situation. Help others because its the right thing to do, not because you want good karma. If one person has a problem with you, ask them why. If multiple people have problems with you, ask yourself why. True character is only revealed by how we react after we've been kicked behind the knees and our hearts have been broken. "The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary." -Vince Lombardi It's perfectly okay to grieve; crying has never meant that you're weak. Ever since you were born crying has been a sign that you're alive. We all want to make an impact on the world. By being kind, innovative, and smart, you can. If we change the way people see the world and see themselves, we can create an environment that we love to live in.

Experience & Phishing Matt Simon

I have three days left of high school. Sixteen days until graduation, and one hundred and five until college. Thirteen and a half hours before I have to be back in first block. This is the type of math that often ran through my head during high school. But if four years as a student at Guilderland has taught me anything, it’s that this is a very dangerous form of thinking. There is only one moment we can ever experience, and it is the present. Block scheduling has its pros and its cons. Its greatest flaw comes with the fact that eighty five minutes of class can be very, very boring. It’s easy to space out and try to place your mind elsewhere; your bed, the park, the future. I’ve developed this tendency to spend most of fourth quarter daydreaming about the summer. This may not seem like a huge problem; all I lose is the attention of a few minutes in class. Daydreaming is fun, and I might be getting a lot of satisfaction out of counting the hours until summer. But what I’m giving up is much more valuable. It is the ability to experience the present. After developing such a knack for daydreaming, it was hard to shed the chains of the illusory future. I first realized this was an issue at a Phish concert. In the middle of a song, I wondered to myself what the band would play for an encore. Here I was, a band I love playing music I love right before me, yet my mind was off imagining things. I had always thought imagination was a very important pursuit of mind. It

certainly is, but when it takes away from experience, it can be harmful. The only notes I ever hear are the ones played in the present. To really hear and feel those notes is an amazing thing, more beautiful than any speculation or reflection. To do so, you have to be immersed in the present, and this takes practice. Thoughts about all the fun stuff I can do when I get home might take the edge off the boredom during math class, but they also dull my ability to experience. The present is the present. You have to live it, and if you can’t live it, you better change it. To experience a mundane class is still to experience, and it often has more value than thoughts about what will be experienced later. Seniors, a lot of us,will be starting our own, independent lives next year. We will have even more responsibility over our selves. When you’re sitting through that long Friday lecture, don’t dwell on the party that you’re going to later. There will be plenty of time for that during the night. If your mind doesn’t know how to live in the present, you might find yourself at that party thinking about the essay you have to write that weekend. You might waste your college years thinking about what to do when you get out. You might end up on your deathbed, hoping something will come next and realizing that you never noticed anything that happened at all. But if you live your life feeling each breath and appreciating each moment, you’ll get a lot out of it; such is life, and it is meant to be lived. 12


Blessing & curses

Christian Meola

I always knew I wanted to present a senior speech at graduation. Many people were surprised and upset about this, telling me that nobody wants to hear the epitome of anti-school spirit speak in front of all my fellow classmates, teachers, parents, and administrators. After consideration, I realized this was true. However, that wasn’t going to keep me silent. It is obvious to me that I never truly fit in with a group of friends at GHS. When I look around our school cafeteria,

13

the overwhelming amount of cliques that unite and divide all students is startling. And yet, I remember the days when I desired to attach myself. This is before I realized that I would be emulating a parasite. It wasn’t until half way through that I started going my own way. Not too many noticed, and I didn’t expect them to do so. All I was searching for was a way to make my time as a teenager worthwhile. Just because I was forced to spend four years at Guilderland High School didn’t mean I was going to waste my limited time. Instead of dwelling on the

frustrations I encountered at Guilderland, we should be spending while we still have I found other ways to make my mark minimal responsibilities are often taken on my surroundings. I made a Bucket out of our reach by society’s standards. I List of things to accomplish in my life- always wanted to take new risks, meet new time, with items that people, and travel on ranged from skydivadventures while I Being a high ing to creating a time was still young, and I capsule to bury in truly hope my classschool senior could my backyard. I cremates share the same possibly be life’s big- philosophy. Regardated a movie review blog to share with less of where our gest blessing and friends online, and individual paths lead curse. wrote a play satius, I urge my friends rizing stereotypical and enemies to make high school life to provide laughter to a difference in the world through comthose who can relate. I made it my mis- passion, intelligence, and respect. Don’t sion to compliment at least five people come back to the ten-year reunion in a day, despite my tendency to be overtly hopes that you’ll rekindle the flame with honest. In addition, I probably stopped your current boyfriend or girlfriend. more hallway bullying incidents than the Instead, brag about how many items on administration. your bucket list you’ve crossed off. At Being a high school senior could pos- least that’s my plan. sibly be life’s biggest blessing and curse. While we are at an age where time seems “The only greatness for man is imincomprehensible and plentiful, the hours mortality.” –James Dean


Senior Destinations Guilderland High School Class of 2012 Atika Abdullahi

Clark Atlanta University

Mass Media Arts

Austin Burnham

Union College

Biology

Carrie Ableman

SUNY Brockport

Biology

Marissa Buyck

SUNY Geneseo

Biology

Tyler Adamczak

HVCC

Business Marketing

Meghan Cahill

College of St. Rose

Social Work

Gregory Adams

College of St. Rose

History Education

Kelly Camardo

Fairfield University

Undecided

Anthony Albanese

SUNY New Paltz

History

Jessica Cameron

Military

Marines

Samantha Aldrich

HVCC

Independent Studies

Ian Campbell

Emerson College

Undecided

Daniel Alejandro

HVCC

Undecided

Kaitlin Campbell

Nazareth College

Physical Therapy

April Alfieri

Siena College

Biology (Pre-Med)

Alexander Campione

Employment

Employment

Brandon Alger

Military

Air Force

Francisco Cancedda

HVCC

Engineering

Sarah Alloush

SUNY New Paltz

Accounting

Melissa Cannistraci

HVCC

Human Services/Social Work

Zaid Alwakfi

Elmira College

Business and Management

Michael Capone

Drexel University

Sports Management

James Baldwin Jr.

Employment

Employment

Casey Carpenter

College of St. Rose

Business Administration

Brianna Barr

SCCC

Business/Early Childhood

Joelle Caroll

Canisius College

Marketing

Delainie Bart

SUNY Buffalo

Nursing

Albert Cartagenes

HVCC

Architecture Technology

David Bauer

Saint Joseph’s University

Risk and Management and Insurance

Taylor Cassisi

HVCC

Political Science

Jessica Becker Moriset HVCC

International Relations

Morgan Castilla

SUNY - FIT

Advertising & Marketing Communications

Meranda Bell

Trade School

Nursing

Alessandra Cerio

Worcester Polytechnic Institute Biology

Kathleen Bender

Siena College

Communication Studies

Francesca Cerio

Worcester Polytechnic Institute Bioinformatics, Genetics, Biochemistry, German

Alexander Benninger Arizona State University

Asian Languages- Chinese

Monica Chappidi

SUNY - Binghamton

Neuroscience and Philosophy

Jacob Benninger

SCCC

Music Therapy

Sahana Chaudhry

Boston University

Business Administration and Management

Joseph Bentley

HVCC

Auto Mechanics

Jiamin Chen

HVCC

Accounting

Cristal Benton

Johnson and Wales University

Event Management

Yogesh Chettiar

SUNY - Binghamton

Bio Engineering

Belen Betancourt

Clark University

Int’l Development and Social Change

Naeem Gibson-Ancrum North Carolina A&T State

Nanoscale Engineering

Cydney Betton

SUNY Buffalo

Business Administration

Michael Chevalier

SUNY - Plattsburgh

Entrepreneurship

Jenna Bickel

Penn State University

Early Childhood Education

Courtney Chludzinski

Employment

Employment

Samantha Biondo

University of Rhode Island

Nutrition and Dietetics

Kendall Cietek

Villanova University

Chemical Engineering

Olivia Bishop

SCCC

Social Work

Mackenzie Cietek

Villanova University

Pre Law

Matthew Blair

Castleton State College

Social Work/Sociology

Rosamaria Cirelli

University of Vermont

Neuroscience

Zachary Bobersky

Quinnipiac College

Business

Chancellor Cobb

SUNY - Brockport

Business

Thomas Bradley

Hofstra University

Political Science/Economics

John Russell Cochran

HVCC

Electrical Trades

Jackqueline Brassard

Syracuse University

Biology

Jessica Cohen

University of Vermont

Elementary Education/Special Education

Matthew Breton

Western New England University Sports Management

Zachary Cohen

Marist College

Psychology

Glen Brittell

SUNY Purchase

Graphic Design

Alexandra Cole

UNC at Greensboro

Chemistry

Brigid Broderick

SCCC

Undecided

Dylan Collett

Keene State College

Business Management

Caitlin Brogan

Employment

Employment

Leah Condemi

University of Vermont

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Conor Browne

SUNY Purchase

Undecided

Nicholas Connolly

Vassar College

Undecided

Christina Bruno

HVCC

Nursing

Heather Corbett

HVCC

Undecided

Hannah Buckey

Hartwick College

Undecided

Austin Cornell

Purdue University

Mechanical Engineering

Sara Buckley

University of Hartford

Biology

Brandon Courtney

SUNY - Oswego

Business Administration

Seth Buono

HVCC

Undecided

Angelina Cox

Siena College

English Education

Michaela Burbank

SUNY Albany

Chemistry

Warren Cozine

Paul Smith College

Forestry

Shelby Burby

SCCC

Hotel and Resturant Management

Jacqueline Cramer

SUNY Plattsburgh

Nursing

14


Rosemary Crowley

Elmira College

Nursing

Courtney Follan

SCCC

Undecided

Michael Crupi

Boston College

History

Evan Fraher

HVCC

Electrical Construction and Maintenance

Marissa Cubillos

Roger Williams University

Biology

Cody Francis

Military

Marines

Tyler Cullen

Cazenovia College

Business

Tyler Fronte

Siena College

Business

Andrea Cunningham HVCC

Early Childhood Education

Steven Gaines Jr.

University of New Haven

Civil Engineering

Lea Cure

Salve Regina University

Justice Administration/English Communications

Andrew Gallagher

St. John’s University

History

Kevin Curry

SCCC

Music Business

Kevin Gallagher

Clinton Community College

Undecided

Amanda Dame

Oberlin College

Biology/Flute Performance

Joseph Gallo

SUNY Oswego

Business Administration

Kailin Dausch

Western New England University Marketing Communications/Advertising Jia Gao

SUNY FIT

Communications Design

Max Davidoff

University of Tampa

Brandon Garcelon

HVCC

Construction

Caitlyn Dean

Philadelphia Community College Undecided

Michael Garcelon

HVCC

Business

Rachael Degnan

SUNY Cobleskill

Social Science

Arianna Geier

SUNY Plattsburgh

Undecided

Matthew Del Brocco HVCC

Business

John Geis

HVCC

Computer Information Sciences

Nikolas Del Signore

Siena College

English Education

Alexis Geisel

Paul Mitchell School

Cosmetology

Emily DerArakelian

Employment

Employment

Marisa Gentile

University of Maryland

Psychology

Kapil Desai

HVCC

Engineering

Daniel Gerety

HVCC

Undecided

Vijaykumai Desai

Employment

Employment

Adam Gersowitz

University of Connecticut

Business

Breanna DeVito

University of Vermont

Zoology

Ryan Ghizzoni

College of the Holy Cross

Economics

Leah Devlin

Eckerd College

International Relations

Anisha Ghosh

Northeastern University

Psychology

Catalena Diamente

Utica College

Physical Therapy

Daniella Giardina

New York University

Neuroscience

Marisa DiMarzio

University of Connecticut

Animal Science

Olivia Gismervik

SCCC

Culinary

Emily Doak

HVCC

Nanoscience/Semiconductor Manufacturing Brian Gleason

HVCC

Undecided

Cameron Dobbs

Johnson C. Smith University

Sports Management

Amanda Gnirrep

SUNY Geneso

Biology

Kayla Domalewicz

Employment

Employment

Eric Golderman

SUNY Oswego

Physician Assistant, Nursing, Education

Chelsea Donnelly

SUNY Brockport

Accounting/Finance

Chen Gong

New York Univeristy

Undecided

Kelsey Dorado

SUNY Oneonta

Math Education

Zachary Gorman

HVCC

Auto Body

Hannah Dordick

University of Hartford

Illustration

Katherine Govin

SUNY Alfred

Art

Jessie Doyle

James Madison University

Biotechnology/Pre-Veterinary Studies

Zachary Grant

Employment

Employment

Michael Doynow

HVCC

Business

Steven Greene

HVCC

Undecided

Patricia Drake

Albany College of Pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Mario Guzzo III

HVCC

Undecided

Carly Drislane

Hartwick College

History

Emily Hale

SUNY Cortland

Criminal Justice/Psychology

Connor Drislane

Ithaca College

Physical Therapy

Nicholas Haluska

Clarkson University

Civil Engineering

Kaleb Dubin

Bentley University

Marketing

Natalee Handron

SCCC

Undecided

Liberal Arts

Dejana Harris

Lafayette College

Engineering

Christopher Duell Jr. HVCC

Undecided

Marissa Haslett

Jacksonville University

Business

Michael Dvorscak

SUNY Purchase

Studio Production

Marie Hausgaard

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Roman Early

HVCC

Computer Information Systems

Charlotte Hayden

Clarkson University

Engineering and Management

Andrew Ehlinger

HVCC

Business

Tyler Herbst

Employment

Employment

Enaw Elonge

Mansfield University

Music Education

Michael Higgins

Worcester Polytechnic Institute Biomedical Engineering

Tsz Keung Eng

SUNY New Paltz

Biology

Joseph Hoffman

SUNY Oswego

Marketing

Giovanni Falciano

Asthetics Science Institute

Aestheticians

Alyssa Hopsicker

Albany College of Pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Ryan Fanuele

HVCC

Computer Information Science

Shane Horan

University of Missouri

Fine Arts/Dance

SUNY Binghamton

Biomedical Sciences

Taylor Dubose

Western New England University

Marketing

Cameron Farina

Endicott College

Biology

Ramy Houacine

Cooper Farina

University of Vermont

Undecided

Jennifer Houck

Maria College

Undecided

Zachary Fashouer

Manhattan College

Economics

Ryan Hourihan

HVCC

Nanotechnology

Alexis Fehervari

University of North Carolina

Undecided

Megan Howland

SCCC

Culinary Arts

Michael Field

SUNY Cobleskill

Trade School

Ashleigh Huber

HVCC

Dental Hygiene

University of Pennsylvania

Economics and Political Science

Devin Fisher

Bentley University

Animal Science

Samina Hydery

Angelina Fiumara

HVCC

Human Resources

Nicholas Iapoce

St. Lawrence University

Biology

Jonathan Foley

HVCC

Undecided

Shelby Iapoce

Fairfield University

Undecided

15


Austin Ingalls

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Ryan Long

HVCC

Business

Hannah Ingoldsby

Roger Williams University

Communications

Daniel Lonky

SUNY Oswego

Communications

Nicholas Iuorno

College of St. Rose

Business Management

Trevor Losee

Albany CTE

Welding/Metal Fabrication

Tara Jackson

SUNY Binghamton

Neuroscience

Colleen Lovely

Union College

Classics

Zeph Jackson

SCCC

Computers

Logan MacGilfrey

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Shauna Janiszewski

Finger Lakes Community College Criminal Justice

Jessica Madsen

Daytona State College

Business

Matthew Japikse

University of Rhode Island

Ocean Engineering

Brian Magnan

SCCC

Music

Bernard Javier

SUNY Cortland

Psychology

Jordan Macken

Cazenovia College

Undecided

Matthew Jones

Bryant University

Accounting

Austin Malerba

RIT

Electrical Engineering

Derek Jorgensen

Employment

Employment

Michael Mancuso

Employment

Employment

Savannah Joseph

HVCC

Undecided

Samuel Mancuso

Siena College

Liberal Arts

Anya Joynt

University of Rochester

Molecular Genetics

Amanda Markessinis Keuka College

Social Work

Courtney Kappes

HVCC

Individual Studies

Logan Marshall

Cazenovia College

Business/Sports Management

Helena Kaszluga

HVCC

Fine Arts

Tyler Mattson

New York University

Philosophy & Literature

Erik Keating

SUNY Purchase

Theater Design/Technology

Michaela Maybee

St. Lawrence University

Business Administration

Devin Keenholts

HVCC

Photography

Justin Maynard

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Stephanie Keller

Bentley University

Finance

Taheim McCain

HVCC

Undecided

Amanda Kernozek

SUNY Albany

Human Biology

Brooke McCullen

SUNY Oneonta

Food Service/Restaurant Administration

Lucas Kerr

HVCC

Electircal Construction/Maintnence Michael McGill Jr.

Employment

Employment

Khushboo Alam Khan HVCC

Liberal Arts/Science

Connor McLachlan

Mercy College

Business Administration

Maria Khazova

SUNY Albany

Psychology

James McLaughlin

Utica College

Communications

Alexa Kilcher

SUNY Cobleskill

Diesel Mechanics

Carley McLean

Albany College of Pharmacy

Human and Health Sciences

Shayna Kimmerer

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Erin McNamara

Hofstra University

International Business

Lauren Kindlon

HVCC

Business/Marketing

Asif Mehdi

HVCC

Pre-Med

Ryan King

St. Bonaventure University

Business

Sheila Mehling

SCCC

Education

Ty-Jaan King

Tompkins Cortland CC

Liberal Arts

Ishan Mehra

New York University

Economics

Caroline Kleitgen

HVCC

Human Services

Christian Meola

Florida State University

Acting

Sean Klim

Ithaca College

Business

Helen Merkley

Hartwick College

Pre-Med

Bryan Komaromi

HVCC

Auto Body Collision Repair

Chelsea Merrill

University of North Carolina

Undecided

Valerie Kontakos

SUNY Albany

Criminal Justice

Jesse Mesick

Military

Navy

Alexander Kornilin HVCC

Dental Hygiene

Glenn Messier

SUNY Oneonta

Biology

Brian Kowalski

SUNY Albany

Business Management

Megan Meyers

Siena College

Political Science

John Kowalski

College of St. Rose

Undecided

Kelsey Michele

SUNY Binghamton

Accounting/Finance

Zachary Kronick

McDaniel College

Excercise Science

Austin Miller

HVCC

Engineering Science

Clare Ladd

Tufts University

Humanities

Brianna Miller

SUNY Oneonta

Undecided

Marissa LaFave

Boston University

Undecided

Emma Miller

HVCC

Undecided

Alexander Laing

Hamilton College

Physics

Laura Miller

College of Saint Rose

Undecided

Sujin Lapinski-Barker Fairleigh Dickinson University

Undecided

Samuel Mohr

HVCC

Undecided

Megan Lauzon

Trade School

Cosmetology

Ryan Mitchell

SUNY Cobleskill

Wildlife Management

Jin Lee

SUNY Buffalo

Business Administration

Michael Morawski

HVCC

Business Administration

Taylor Lee

SUNY Oneonta

Chemistry

Casey Morris

SUNY New Paltz

Theatre Performance

Julianne Legnard

SUNY Fredonia

Childhood Inclusive Education

Ryan Morrissey

HVCC

Undecided

Nicole Leonard

SUNY Albany

Undecided

Jonathan Muamba

HVCC

Business

Nicole Levine

University of California- Berkeley Molecular and Cell Biology

Nadya Munsie

SUNY Plattsburgh

Nursing

Peter Libertucci

Siena College

Business Administration

Jacquelynne Murphy HVCC

Gallery Management

Sharon Lin

SUNY Buffalo

Biomedical Engineering

Malcolm Nelson

Ithaca College

Preprofessional Health

Adam Link

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Nicholas Nelson

HVCC

Undecided

Joseph Livingston

Employment

Employment

Corey Nicklas

HVCC

Accounting

Karah Lizotte

North Carolina State University

Criminology

Casey Nunamacher

Makeup Designery School

Makeup

Jordan Lloyd

SUNY Brockport

Dance

Konrad Odhiambo

New Mexico Military Institute Logistics

16


Hannah Olson

SUNY Oneonta

Nutrition

Adam Richards

Joshua Owens

HVCC

Undecided

Sydney Ritchie-Liddle HVCC

Humanities and Social Science

Meghan O’Brien

SUNY Buffalo

Business Management

Alexander Ritmo

HVCC

Electrical Construction/Management

Kelsey O’Connor

Fordham University

Biology

Gianno Rodino

Siena College

Social Work

Timothy O’Connor Fordham University

Biological Sciences

Daniel Rogers

St. John Fisher College

Undecided

Brian O’Hanlon

Alfred University

Ceramic Engineering

Brian Root

Clarkson University

Chemical Engineering

Dimitri O’Hea

HVCC

Undecided

Michael Rophael

SUNY Albany

Undecided

Houston O’Hea

HVCC

Physical Education

Shannon Ross

SUNY Oneonta

Education

Angelo Pacifici

SCCC

Nanotechnology

Kaitlyn Rougas

Ohio State University

Business Marketing

Samantha Padula

SUNY Plattsburgh

Pre-Med

Desiree Ruiz

HVCC

Individual Studies

Alexandria Page

Clarkson University

Biology

Tori Russo

North Country CC

Massage Therapy

Hannah Palmeri

Employment

Hair Salon

Darya Rutina

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Lacy Palmiotto

HVCC

Undecided

Kelsey Ryan

SUNY New Paltz

Political Science

Anjali Panackal

Siena College

Biology

Justine Salerno

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Bailey Pangman

SUNY Brockport

Nursing

Daniel Santandrea

Le Moyne College

Biology

Jacqueline Paratore HVCC

Business/Sociology

Peter Scatena

Union College

Undecided

Jung Min Park

Employment

Undecided

Kayla Scheidel

SUNY FIT

Communications Design

Maxwell Parker

Southern Vermont College

Sports Management

Rachael Schenkel

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Mount Holyoke College

Animal Sciences

HVCC

Computer Informations Systems

Lucas Pasquerella

Quinnipiac College

Business

Jessica Schiller

Matthew Pasquini

Harvard University

Mathematics

Emily Schlierer

SUNY Albany

Criminal Justice

Abhishek Paul

SUNY Binghamton

Undecided

Jonathan Schlutow

SUNY Cobleskill

Undecided

Jaimie Peck

Paul Mitchell

Cosmetology

Clarissa Schmidt

Adelphi University

Journalism

Animal Sciences

Sadie Schroeter

Johnson and Wales University

Criminal Justice

Alexandra Pellman Paul Mitchell

Cosmetology

Kenneth Schumacher Nazareth College

Physical Therapy

Alora Peplowski

HVCC

Nursing

Jordan Scott

New York University

Undecided

Paige Perez

SCCC

Early Childhood Studies

Nathan Scott

Rochester Institute of Technology Biomedical Sciences

Gabrielle Perrault HVCC

Liberal Arts

William Scotti

SUNY Oneonta

Bram Peterson

Boston University

Journalism/Economics

Tucker Seinberg-Hughes Lyndon State College

Peter Pezzulo Jr.

SCCC

Music

Matthew Seita

Rochester Institute of Technology Computer Science

Austin Phillips

HVCC

Undecided

Phillip Sellie

SUNY Cobleskill

Cullinary Arts

Brianna Phillips

SUNY Cortland

Physical Education

Danielle Sentz

James Madison University

Dietetics

Shawn Phillips

Siena College

Pre-Med

Danielle Shealy

SUNY Albany

Psychology

Anna Pickett

High Point University

Accounting

Denis Sheehan

SUNY Cobleskill

Culinary Arts

Anthony Pitkin

College of Saint Rose

Music Industry

Ian Sheridan

SUNY Oswego

Engineering

Garrett Plant

HVCC

Undecided

Nigel Simmons

Ithaca College

Physical Education

Emma Platek

Boston University

Film/Television

Matthew Simon

Stanford University

Philosophy

Justine Polonski

SUNY Oswego

Journalism

Tyler Simpson

HVCC

Construction

Noah Poskanzer

Ithaca College

Physical Therapy

Prabjot Singh

SUNY Binghamton

Pre-Medicine

Allison Potolski

University of North Carolina

Biology Pre-Med

Rantej Singh

New York University

Undecided

Alyssa Purdy

HVCC

Nursing

Matthew Siskin

University of Michigan

Biology, Economics, History

Kiernan Puvogel

HVCC

Education

Lauren Sitterly

SUNY FIT

Communications Design

Cydney Quinn

Elmira College

Nursing

Raymond Siu

HVCC

Business

Alexis Rabadi

Pace University

Musical Theatre

Aaron Sklar

HVCC

Engineering

Christopher Raber SUNY ESF

Natural Resources Management

Alexandria Smith

SCCC

Culinary

Joshua Rainer

SUNY New Paltz

Undecided

Cameron Smith

Union College

Biology

Dominic Rapp

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Joshua Smith

SUNY Buffalo

Media Study

Helen Ratner

New York University

Graphic Design

Geoffrey Snow

SCCC

Performing Music

Jacob Raucci

HVCC

Engineering

Matthew Sobieski

HVCC

Autobody

De’Essence Reed

HVCC

Chemistry

Won-Ki Sohn

University of Wisconsin

Business

Robbi Ribner

University of Dayton

Business

Kara Sour

Siena College

Liberal Arts Business

Jessica Peck

17

St. John Fishers College

Business Management Illustration/Animation


Steven Spaccarelli

Siena College

Political Science

Ashley Williams

Roger Williams University

Business

Erin Stack

SCCC

Hospitality and Hotel Management

David Willis III

HVCC

Business Administration

Anthony Stanish

SUNY Stony Brook

Undecided

Patrick Wood

SUNY Stony Brook

Finance and Accounting

Adam Starkman

Geroge Washington University Arts and Sciences

Richard Wood

Albany Career and Technical Center Welding

Alexandria Staroba

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Toby Wykes

SUNY New Paltz

Geochemical Science

Marissa Starr

SUNY Oswego

Marketing

Rachel Young

SUNY Binghamton

Vocal Performance- Classical

Dierdre Stevens

Misericordia University

Occupational Therapy

Valerie Zajac

SUNY New Paltz

Art

Emily Stevens

Fairfield University

Child Psychology

Ross Zuk-Pafumi

SCCC

Business

Alexandra Stockman

SUNY Plattsburg

Hotel Tourism Restaurant Management

Scott Zwinge Jr.

HVCC

HVAC/R

Erin Sullivan

High Point University

Elementary Education

Jacob Zyskowski

SUNY New Paltz

Business Administration and Management

Brittney Svingala

HVCC

Biological Sciences

Alicia Switser

SUNY Oneonta

Undecided

Kayin Sykes

HVCC

Electronic Arts

Christopher Szady

SUNY Stony Brook

Biology

Madelaine Taylor

SUNY Purchase

Visual Arts

Morgan Ten Eyck

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Business and Management

Taylor Ten Eyck

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Business and Management

Kayla Thorton

SCCC

Undecided

Nicole Toich

Herkimer County CC

Fashion Buying and Merchandising

Arielle Tonge

HVCC

Marketing

Donald Tourtellot

HVCC

Environmental Sciences

Hallisey Travers

University of Michigan

Literature Arts and Sciences

Casey Trejo

Cazenovia College

Criminal Justice

Matthew Trestick

SCCC

Undecided

Nico Turek

Northeastern University

Finance

Boston College

Biology

Amanda Van Auken

Hartwick University

Nursing

Ashlyn Van Buren

University of New Haven

Forensic Science

Kelly Van Epps

Rochester Institute of Technology Business

Anna Van Patten

Santa Clara University

Undecided

Nicholas VenEck

University of Michigan

Computer Science

Adison Vanina

Western New England University Mechanical Engineering

Jeremy Veldhuis

The Art Institute of Boston

Fine Arts

Samantha Veloce

SCCC

Humanities and Social Sciences

Taylor Vigay

Maria College

Nursing

Tin Vo

SCCC

Music

Harleigh Voss

Paul Mitchell

Cosmetology

Zachary Wacksman

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Chris Wagner

SCCC

Undecided

Kagni Wang

Albany College of Pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Nicholas Watt

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Xing Yu Wei

Brown University

Chemical Engineering

Michael Weijola

Le Moyne College

Accounting

Christopher Weimer

Military

Marines

Kim Weinberg

St. Lawrence University

Business Administration

Eric Wells

SCCC

Fire Science

Anson White

SCCC

Computer Information and Systems

Justin Whiting

HVCC

Undecided

Marlana Wier

HVCC

Individual Studies

Troy Vagianelis

ROBINSON

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The

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Journal

Photos by Mike Dvorscak & Madelaine Taylor / The Journal


Volume 63 Senior Issue