Page 1

EE FR

Shipshape summer 2012

www.shipshapebristol.co.uk

ARTS,EVENTS, HARBOURSIDE & HISTORY Regeneration | Foraging | Harbour Festival

COVER(actual).indd 1

25/05/2012 09:44


CONTENTS Summer

38

As we write, the weather has taken a turn for the better – a serendipitous development as we shift our focus to the great outdoors. It all begins, naturally, with a good meal as we learn the art of foraging with Glassboat’s K irstie U rquhart and Charlie Hurrell (p22). Suitably sated, we take a stroll around the Harbourside to discover what’s in store in the next round of developments (p16). Looking ahead, we hail the return of the Bristol Harbour Festival in J une and – as ever– give you a rundown of all the other events set to keep you busy over the summer (p7). We hope you enjoy the magaz ine.

News & views 04 Books, big ideas and the return of Bristol’s mermaid

Events 07 This summer’s to- do list: ballet, barbecue and more

Developments 16 The Harbourside regeneration continues apace

Harbourside Map 20 Start to plan your route around the waterside

Foraging 22 Finding edible delights in surprising places

Bristol Ferries 26 A potted history of the yellow &

blue beauties

Kids’ stuff 29 10 ways to keep your children entertained

Waterside wildlife 31 Foxes and wagtails and deer – oh my!

Shipshape directory 32 The latest news and offers from our friends

22

16 s h i p s h ap e m agaz i n e i s s ue 1 0 summer 2012 w w w . shipshapeb r ist o l . c o . u k

10 published by t he g r o u p o f sev en editorial, design &

production: t heg r o u po f sev en . c o . u k

editorial suggestions: ed it o r @ shipshapeb r ist o l . c o . u k

I ❤ Harbourside 38 Mayoral candidate George Ferguson

past issues &

galleries: shipshapeb r ist o l . c o . u k

advertising enquiries: in f o @ t heg r o u po f sev en . c o . u k distribution: in f o @ shipshapeb r ist o l . c o . u k

D i s c lai m er The information contained in this publication is provided as a general guide only. While every care is taken to ensure that the details are as accurate as possible, we make no warranty or representation, express or implied, about the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this publication. The views or opinions expressed in this publication are strictly those of the authors. The publishers and/ or any of its associated companies or business partners accept no responsibility for damage or loss, howsoever caused, arising directly or indirectly from reliance upon any information obtained from this publication. © The Group of Seven Ltd 2012. Shipshape

pp3_Contents_6je.indd 1

25/05/2012 15:53


NEWS & VIEWS

Point of view

THE BIG IDEA

Stacey Hobbs, Estate Services Manager at Bristol Harbour ffice, tells Shipshape what she thinks about the Harbourside’s ongoing redevelopment I do believe that recent developments have enhanced the area for users as they have taken sites that were previously derelict or underused and have regenerated them into areas that people can live, work and visit. Over the last decade or so there has been massive regeneration around the harbour and this has seen a huge increase in the use of the area by both residents and visitors. The public impression of the harbour as a nice place to visit has definitely improved as a result. There are a wide variety of things to do as there are lots of tourist attractions plus ferries, boat trips and water- based sports and activities. In addition, lots of people enjoy walking, cycling and jogging around the harbour – this is much easier and more appealing now that we have a signposted ‘Harbourside Walk’ and maps available. Obviously, we would always be keen to see more activities in and around the harbour to encourage more visitors. This is why a lot of the developments have some sort of active use planned at ground floor level. U nfortunately, the current economic climate is not ideal for starting up or expanding a business so there are some units that still remain vacant, which is a shame. But this shouldn’t discourage future developers as this type of active use will help to

Ways in which we could improve the Harbourside 1 HARBOUR FESTIVAL

Move Bristol Harbour Festival to October making it the last stop for a variety of vessels that could then moor in Bristol through the winter 2 DRIVE-IN

Make use of the large screen at Millennium Square with a night-time drive-in – horror films, preferably 3 BANDSTAND

promote the area and ensure that we have a diverse mix of activities and users. n five years’ time, would like to see even more recognition for the harbour as being a fantastic place to live, work and visit, and I would like to see more focus and promotion of maritime skills and the organisations that carry out this type of work. s T ur tn ot hef eat ur e,Se eC hange ,onpage 16t or m or eabout how t heH ar ourb side i sc hangi ng…

ead

Pay a visit to B ri s t ol A q uari um ’s toxic new arrivals. Its new display features a variety of exotically named amphibians, including the poison dart frog, bumblebee poison arrow frog and – Shipshape’ s favourite – the banded rubber frog (left). More bristolaquarium.co.uk

Summer offers 20% off your food bill at Cathay Rendezvous ... two-course lunch for £8.95 at Myristica ... free glass of champagne at Glassboat ... free glass of sparkling rosé at Lido … free glass of sangria at Spyglass T ur nt

ot

heShi pshapedi r ec t or y onpage

four

pp4-5_news_7je.indd 2

s32t

o37f

Introduce a floating bandstand by Bush Corner (outside Arnolfini) on which local bands or theatre groups could perform 4 CHRISTMAS CARNIVAL

Reintroduce the old illuminated water carnival into the Harbourside calendar at Christmas time – very festive 5 PIRATE FESTIVAL

We’d love to see an annual Bristol Pirate Festival take place around the water, with everyone dressed in piratical attire 6 SHIP IN A BOTTLE

Could Bristol have its own version of Yinka Shonibare’s HMS Victory in a bottle, which was unveiled on the Fourth Plinth in London’s Trafalgar Square? How about the ss Great Britain, or The Matthew? Insane, absurd or inspired: we would like to hear your ideas for a better Harbourside. Email us at info@shipshapebristol.co.uk

or m or ede t ail s( T & C sappl y ) Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:54


SPRING NEWS

The Bristol mermaid returns As water quality improves, a mysterious visitor is spotted sunning herself on the Harbourside

For many years now, Bristol’s harbour users have known that the water quality has been getting better and better. Indeed, most days of the year, it is now up to U K bathing water standards. The improving water quality has led to an increasing range of natural users too. You can regularly see swans, ducks and geese, and last year the BB ran a story about otters returning to the Floating Harbour. However, this year is going to be something really special. r obert hapman, an expert in sirenology (the study of mermaid mythology), has been tracking the return of

the Bristol mermaid. r hapman says he Bristol Mermaid was here a long time ago, and many stories abound about her beauty, bringing good luck to those who spotted her. I think she has come back now that Bristol is looking after its harbour properly.” The Bristol Mermaid was recently spotted on the R iver Severn near Portishead. A video clip of the sighting was posted online: see it at http bit.ly o . r hapman is sure that Bristol is now home to the mermaid again, and says that you may be able to see her sunning herself on the side of the Avon

Gorge or in the Floating Harbour. Anyone able to capture photographic evidence of her existence is in with a chance of winning a pair of tickets to Bristol’s Big Green Week. Send your photographs to darren.hall@ bristolgreencapital.org to be in with a chance of winning the priz e. You can read more about the Bristol ermaid on r hapman’s blog ht t p: / / br ist ol m er m aid. w or dpr ess.c om / or on t w it t er @ br ist ol m er m aid. s B ig G r een W eek t ak es pl ac e f r o m 9 - 1 7 J u n e at v en u es ac r o ss t he c it y . T u r n t o pag e 8 f o r m o r e

ss Great Britain Manual Brunel’s steamship gets the Haynes treatment Haynes, Somerset- based publishers of the iconic owner’s workshop manuals for over 4 00 models of car and motorbike, has just expanded its repertoire into shipping with the publication of the ss Great Britain Manual – the true story behind Bristol’s world- renowned engineering miracle. Brunel’s ship, launched in 18 4 3 , became the world’s largest ship and the first iron hulled passenger vessel. It was a hugely ambitious project, and thousands flocked to her launch in Bristol, with many doubting she would even float. onfounding the doubters, the ss GB became a huge success, travelling 3 2 times around the globe and clocking up nearly a million miles at sea. Shipshape

pp4-5_news_7je.indd 3

Haynes’ manual, written by National Maritime Museum curator Brian Lavery, tells the story of the ship’s design and creation, her passengers and crew, and her illustrious shipping career. Says Lavery: “I have endeavoured to include something for everyone – to satisfy both the curiosity of the casual reader and the thirst for detail of the committed engineering, maritime or Brunel enthusiast.” Available from all good bookshops – and, of course, aboard the ss Great Britain herself. s M o r e: ssg r eat b r it ain . o r g five

25/05/2012 15:54


BRISTOL MUSIC TRUST ‘putting music at the heart of Bristol life’

bournemouth symphony orchestra: the planets thursday 4 october

7.30pm. tickets £31, £26, £21, £15, u26s £8, u18s £1, BSO Vibes £5

Conductor Kirill Karabits Mozart Symphony No. 41 Jupiter Holst The Planets Kirill Karabits opens the 2012-13 season with an eye to the heavens as high-octane Holst meets monumental Mozart.

The perfect Italian experience

box office +44 (0)117 922 3686 www.colstonhall.org

2 SPYGLASS BURGERS FOR THE PRICE OF 1*

Join us in Filini restaurant and enjoy a tour of Italy. Experience 4 special regional promotions from Sardinia, Northern Italy, Mid Italy/Rome and Southern Italy. Please contact us to make your table reservation and for more information

2012 You’ll find at Radisson You’ll find FiliniFilini at Radisson Blu Hotel Blu Hotel Broad Quay, Bristol Broad Quay, Bristol BS1 4BY, United Kingdom BS1 4BY, United Kingdom tel +44 (0) 117 934 9500 / www.filinirestaurantbristol.co.uk tel +44 (0) 117 934 9500 www.radissonblu.co.uk/hotel-bristol www.radissonblu.com/hotel-bristol www.filinirestaurantbristol.co.uk

BRISTOL’S SUMMER BBQ RESTAURANT Welsh Back Bristol BS1 4SB Tel 0117 927 7050 www.spyglassbristol.co.uk *Monday to Wednesday all day, Thursday to Friday 12-4pm


SUMMER EVENTS CELEBRATE

Bristol Harbour Festival EAT CATHAY RENDEZVOUS New management, new chef, new menu, extensive refurb: it’s all change at King Street’s long-established Chinese restaurant. Step inside the beautiful building (it started life in 1748 as the UK’s first purpose-built public library) and sit down to a choice of cuisine from China’s three main culinary styles: Mandarin, Cantonese and Szechuan. You can even sample the new Cathay way in the comfort of your own home: a take-away service is now available, with 20% off any order over £25. www.cathayrendezvous.com

MORE:

EAT FILINI Pitch up at Filini Restaurant at the Harbourside’s Radisson Blu Hotel and you’ll find yourself whisked off on a culinary Grand Tour of Italy. You’ll be able to sample tasting menus from four different Italian regions – Sardinia is underway already, with local delicacies including lamb prosciutto and cassola, a delicate fish casserole. Across the next few months, as Northern Italy, central Italy/Rome and the South all take their turn, find dishes like whole baked sea bass with grilled gamberoni (shrimps) and a delectable chocolate fondant. MORE:

filinibristol.co.uk

Shipshape

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 3

The biggest and perhaps the best- loved single event in Bristol’s cultural calendar returns for its 4 1st instalment from 20- 22 J uly. As always, you can expect a line- up bursting with top- drawer circus, dance, music, theatre, kids’ entertainment, markets and more Last year’s landmark 4 0th fest was a midsummer triumph, featuring headline sets from top Bristol music talent including jaz z / funk/ soul diva Lady Nade, eightstrong urban reggae collective Laid Blak, sublime soul/ gospel rockers Phantom Limb and septuagenarian tune- spinner and oneman reggae encyclopaedia DJ Derek. The festival is remaining tight- lipped about this year’s headline acts but you can safely expect some leading lights from the jaz z , funk, reggae, soul and world spectrums to grace the Harbour Fest’s main stages. But the weekend has much more to offer than the odd big- name set. For one thing, the beautiful, tree- lined Q ue enSquar e will again host the Continental Market, with brilliant food and deli stalls from across Europe as well as French and Italian gift stalls. Other markets around the site include a handmade market on Welsh Back, local crafts, clothing and jewellery on Waterfront Square next to the Amphitheatre, and an art market outside Watershed and Bordeaux Q uay. T he A m phit heat r e itself becomes a kind of village- cum- marketplace for green, local and sustainable food, drink, trade and ideas. This is the place to grab yourself some local food and a craft ale or two, and learn how to future- proof your house or lure more wildlife to your urban garden. Also returning to the action is C ast l eP ar k , which made its festival debut in 2010. A mix of circus, street theatre and family fun is the name of the game here: the entertainment will be programmed by Bristol’s supremely well- connected performance troupe Cirque Bijou, who last year lured comic Boothby Graffoe and Bristol street- theatre veterans Desperate Men to the waterside. Another recent arrival coming back for more is B r une l ’ ss sG r eat B r it ain – it will once again host a free music stage on Brunel Square, featuring some of the brightest names in folk, jaz z and world music. Further sweet music will emanate from the C asc ade St eps stage at the harbour’s northern tip. This stage is programmed by Bristol’s J elli R ecords, the team behind the city’s much- loved Acoustic

Festival, so you can expect two days of the finest local acoustic, world, folk and singer- songwriter talent. With its views down St Augustine’s R each into the Floating Harbour, the Cascade Steps stage is also one of the best places to catch all the waterside action – which, as ever, will include guest appearances from tall ships and historical vessels. At the western end of the harbour is G r ainB ar ge , the Bristol Beer Factory- owned ship and purveyor of live music. Find an outdoor stage with a programme of folk, blues, leftfield, rock, roots, ja and world sounds. It’s a great spot to escape from the crowds and soak up the relaxed atmosphere. Dance has always been one of the festival’s strongest suits: 2011 featured performances from some hugely- respected names on the world dance scene. This year’s programme features a typically impressive variety of styles from across the globe, from African, ballet and contemporary to salsa, swing and street dance. T he D an c e V il l ag e is also a fine place to try some moves of your own, with free participation workshops taking place across the festival weekend. s e ri tol ar our e tival o ficial pr ogr am m ew il l be av ail abl et obuy f r om l at eJ une , co ting . ou can fin it in all our avourite H ar bour side e st abl ishm ent sas w el l as s hops , r est aur an t s,bar sandgal l er iesac r os st hec it y .F ind ac om pr ehens iv el ist of r et ail er sonl ine c l os er t ot he publ ic at iondat e.M or e: br ist ol har bour f est iv al .c o.uk seven

25/05/2012 15:56


SUMMER EVENTS VISIT

Bristol’s Big Green Week For anyone interested in green and sustainability issues, this summer in Bristol features a few key dates First up is the return, after a successful debut last year, of Bristol’s Big reen eek the ’s first ever international festival of environmental ideas, arts and culture. Taking place on 9- 17 J une, the second Big Green Week will feature some 100 events across nine days at venues including Colston Hall, atershed, Arnolfini, hed and Bristol athedral. As well as a world- class speaker series, including many of the U K ’s top sustainability thinkers and decision makers, you’ll find a wealth of family activities, music, art, film and more plus a giant street market, a ark treet playground, some poets and a couple of national circuit comedians. The week also hosts a couple of annual Bristol favourites: the Festival of Nature (16- 17 J une) and Bristol’s Biggest Bike R ide (17 J une), not to mention the world’s first electric bike world championship. peakers on a wealth of green and sustainability issues include fashion designer V ivienne Westwood, home style presenter evin c loud, reen Party leader Caroline Lucas and TV chef Prue Leith. A series of debates, meanwhile, will address such pressing issues as ‘2012: Greenest Olympics?’ and ‘Are we suffering from ature eficit isorder ’ Around half of the week’s events and attractions are free; most ticketed events come in at under £ 15 . “Bristol is known for doing things a bit differently, leading the way on creativity, innovation and sustainability,” says Lucy Warin from the BGW team. “Big Green Week is all about inspiring change and finding the ne t generation of great green ideas. “We try to take the whole concept of ‘green’ beyond the usual cliché s. The week is, primarily, a fun festival of ideas showing the general public that there is more to green than dogged, hemp- shirt environmentalism. By assembling a diverse group of people in a culturally rich, fun environment, we hope to incubate the ne t generation of great green ideas.” he festival is the flagship event for Bristol’s bid to become European Green Capital in 2014 – a bid that has already made considerable progress. At the time of going to press, Bristol has reached a shortlist of three alongside

Environmentalist Jonathon Porritt speaks on Sat 9 & Sat 16 June

Copenhagen and Frankfurt, having edged out 15 other cities including aris and ienna. he three finalists will give a presentation to the jury in Brussels on 8 J une, and the winner will be announced three weeks later. Evaluating all 18 cities that entered the competition, uropean ommission e perts ranked Bristol second overall, and number one in three areas – climate change, air quality and noise pollution. The Bristol Green Capital team is hoping to get the whole city backing the bid, and you can register your own support at bristolgreencapital.org/ support “If Bristol wins the award, it will be a great way of celebrating our environmental achievements and boosting our profile across urope, says uy oultney, Bristol ity ouncil abinet ember for estivals and Communities. “It will give us a platform to showcase the green actions going on in our schools, communities and businesses, as well as boosting tourism and encouraging business investment in the city.” s M o r e: b ig g r een w eek . c o m an d b r ist o l g r een c apit al . o r g

Gri lls t oc k , Bristol’s summer music and barbecue weekender, returns to the Harbourside from 30 J une1 J uly. Find music from A lab am a 3 , C h arles B rad ley and others, as well as barbie demos, cook- offs, e hibitors and more sublimely chargrilled flesh than you can possibly digest. M or eat gr il l st oc k .c o.uk eight

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 4

SEE SUMMER AT LIME TREE Overlooking the water on Hotwell Road, Lime Tree Gallery is one of our favourite Bristol art spaces, with some excellent exhibitions featuring the best in contemporary landscape and portrait painting. Lime Tree welcomes in the sunshine with a typically fine-looking Summer Exhibition (14 June-14 Aug), featuring work by Bristol’s Rachel Milne (‘Tuscan Street’, pictured) as well as new works by Peter Wileman FRSA, widely known for his marine paintings. MORE:

limetreegallery.com

VISIT ROBO WORLD CUP From 20–25 August At-Bristol will be the proud host of the Robo World Cup: a six-day event in which you’ll find legions of robots competing in a variety of events, all the while showcasing the very latest artificial intelligence technology. Run by the Federation of International Robot-Soccer Association since 1996, the RWC will make its UK debut this year: the Bristol event is being run by Bristol Robotics Laboratory, a collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of the West of England. MORE:

brl.ac.uk

Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:57


SUMMER EVENTS EAT ZA ZA BAZAAR Za Za Bazaar, the Harbourside’s vast globalfusion restaurant, has refreshed its menu in time for the summer. You’ll find a selection of fruits and fresh salads alongside a vast array of cold starters. The Chinese kitchen will be getting the barbecue bug with various dishes on mini-skewers, while the Indian stall features street food from the subcontinent. Keep an eye on the website for news of featured cuisines each month. MORE:

zazabazaar.com

EAT & DRINK GLASSBOAT Rum and dessert make perfect bedfellows at Bristol’s Glassboat restaurant this summer. The GB team has matched up Zacapa 23, a premium Guatemalan rum aged 7,500ft above sea level, with a sublime honey parfait and chocolate mousse with honeycomb and dark chocolate tuile. Other seasonal delights will include seared sea trout, fish cakes in a sorrel butter sauce and a broad bean and pecorino risotto. Also check out some of their other inspired food/ wine pairings, such as a wild prawn, parsley and garlic starter paired with a glass of La Gitana fino sherry. MORE:

glassboat.co.uk

Shipshape

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 5

SEE

‘Superpower’ at Arnolfini he e hibitions programme at Arnolfini is never less than adventurous, and this summer’s major show is a perfect e ample. Supe r pow er : A f r ic ai nSc ienc e F ic t ion until uly looks at how the African continent has been used as a backdrop for many narratives, both in art and film, that draw on the concerns and conventions of science fiction. Africa has had a rare yet distinct place in popular science fiction from the opening scenes of tanley ubrick’s iconic 201: A Spac eO d y ssey , depicting the mysterious appearance of a black monolith in the cradle of civili ation, to the recent success of eill Blomkamp’s outh African set sci fi thriller D ist r ic t 9 . Among the arresting, often otherworldly images on view is I c ar us 13 , iluanji ia Henda’s photograph series that uses Angola’s faded oviet architecture to imagine the country’s preparations for the first ever e pedition to the sun. Accompanying films include A f r ic aP ar adi s at une , ylvestre Amoussou’s feature filmed in Benin, est Africa, which imagines a future urope in crisis,

while a united Africa thrives. n this scenario, a rench couple decide to emigrate to the nited tates of Africa in search of a better life. rom then on, their life, and the world, is turned upside down as they e perience life on the margins as illegal immigrants, precarious labourers and victims of political e ploitation. s More: arnolfini.org.uk

This summer tastes of Sweden at the S h ak es p eare T av ern , Prince Street, where two fine bottled ciders have joined the drinks offer the cloudberry flavoured K op p arb erg and R ek ord erli g, made from strawberry and lime. VISIT

Creative Common Head down to he uare, emple uay this summer and you’ll find a brand new space for leisure, arts, eating and drinking. esigned by various Bristol community enterprises and launched on une, reative ommon is hosting a programme of markets and creative arts throughout the summer and beyond. ts Big op will be home to a range of top drawer circus, music, theatre, cinema and community events, with key cultural players including ircomedia and the nvisible ircus

already on board. lsewhere on site, at rink reative ommon opening at the end of une will serve locally sourced food from the team behind hew agna’s award winning ony and rap pub. reative ommon is planned to remain in situ for the next three years, with the Big op on site until the end of ctober each year, followed by a further events space during the winter months. s More: creativecommon.co.uk nine

25/05/2012 15:57


SUMMER EVENTS CELEBRATE

Watershed’s 30th atershed, Bristol’s venerable and hugely influential arts and multimedia centre, celebrates its 30t h birthday on Thursday 7 J une – and everyone’s invited to help celebrate A special Open Day (12pm- late) will feature a range of audiovisual events marking Bristol’s ever- fermenting creativity. The ’shed will be screening 3 0 hours of ade in Bristol’ film and highlights as a snapshot of Bristol output, alongside work coming out of the Studio and a night of music and projections. “Watershed and a team of advisors have put the programmes together, and it’s a great big scoop of Bristol brilliance – but it’s by no means a comprehensive list – to do that we’d need many more screens!” says Watershed’s Head of Programme, Mark Cosgrove. “It’s been such a voyage of discovery putting this together – there were constant gasped exclamations of ‘I didn’t realise that had been made in Bristol!’ We hope you share our sense of wonder, joy, and more than a little pride when watching it all, from Michael Moore to Morph, David Attenborough to the Bristol Sound.” Highlights include a preview screening of 8 M in u t es I d l e the first film to come out of i eatures, a Bristol based digital film initiative launched in 2009 that has supported the creation of three feature films set in the city. Based on the novel by Bristol raised author Matt Thorne, it’s a dark, surreal comedy about a man whose life is so awful, he moves into the call centre where he works but finds that life gets no simpler there. Elsewhere on the bill is M o r ph’ s H o m e M o v ies (1977), an early episode from the career of the little orange Plasticine chap created by Aardman Animations. You can also catch T he O l d L ad y an d t he P ig eo n s, the 1997 directorial debut of Sylvain Chomet, later to find fame with B el l ev il l e R en d ez v o u s. Chomet’s Oscar- nominated debut tells the story of a hungry policeman who dresses up as a pigeon and tricks an old lady to feed him, and was developed and produced by Colin R ose at BBC Bristol. That evening from

Watershed’s box office in the mid-1980s

Summer at Spike Island is given over to an intriguing exhibition pairing a postwar Pop Art pioneer with a contemporary Glaswegian artist. ‘Pull Everything Out’ (30 June-26 Aug) features work by Corita Kent, an Iowan-born artist and activist who, while working as a nun and teacher in Los Angeles, collaborated with students to produce artwork in response to the Vietnam War and Civil Rights movement. Also showing is Ciara Phillips, a Scottish artist whose work shares Kent’s exploration of materials, method and process.

10pm until midnight, meanwhile, BEAM Party – a collaboration between cott Hendy and filmmaker J ohn Minton – will re- awaken 3 0 years’ worth of audiovisual memories, iconic action and killer tunes from down the decades. In addition to the Made in Bristol screenings on the big day itself, Watershed will also be screening seminal feature films with a Bristol connection, every Saturday and Sunday throughout J une. These range from Banksy’s E x it T hr o u g h t he G if t Sho p (Sat 9 J une) and H is G ir l F r id ay (Sat 23 , starring Cary Grant, aka Horfield born Archie each to C ape F ear (Sun 17), whose director . ee hompson was born in Bristol, and the influential road movie R ad io O n (Sat 16), which finishes its journey in our fair city. s M o r e: w at er shed . c o . u k / 3 0

To celebrate the bicentenary of the birth of poet E d ward L ear, actor and ear devotee C h arles L ews en will discuss dward ear oology, andscape, onsense and the emon of pilepsy’ at Elmgrove Centre Hall, R edland R oad, Bristol on Fri 15 J une at 7.3 0pm. M o r e: b r id g ef o u n d at io n . o r g . u k ten

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 6

SEE SPIKE ISLAND

MORE:

spikeisland.org.uk

RELAX LIDO While away the coming summer afternoons at the Lido, Clifton’s supremely relaxing pool, spa and restaurant ensemble just a short walk from the Harbourside. Follow them on Twitter @lidobristol for alerts on when they’ll be firing up the terrace barbecue – or simply pop in for a glass of rosé by the pool, which stays open until 10pm. MORE:

lidobristol.com

Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:57


SUMMER EVENTS LEARN KNOW YOUR PLACE This fascinating exhibition, at Bristol’s Record Office until 29 June, reveals much about how Bristol’s various communities have expanded over time. The show features a wealth of archive material, including census records and photographs, that trace the development of our city. It also introduces the superb Know Your Place interactive website, which offers free access to Bristol’s historic maps, allowing you to search for information and records on everything from historic cinemas to conservation areas, as well as comparing old and modern maps to trace the development of each suburb. MORE: bristol.gov.uk/ page/know-your-place

SAMPLE TAPAS AT HARVEYS Summertime is tapas time at Harveys Cellars, the atmospheric restaurant built into the former Harveys wine cellars in the centre of town. This summer’s tapas menu includes gazpacho with basil oil, chorizo braised in rioja, herbs and garlic, and an octopus and sun-blushed tomato salad. You’ll also find live music at weekends – and even an art gallery in the foyer, programmed by ace Harbourside art space View. MORE:

harveyscellars.co.uk

Shipshape

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 7

SEE

Nowhereisland This summer, the U K ’s south- western coasts welcome an extraordinary visitor Nowhereisland, a tiny self- governing island state formed from the Arctic’s retreating icecaps, will arrive in Weymouth as a visiting nation on 25 J uly – in time for the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic sailing events. Thousands of people from 8 3 countries across the globe have already signed up to become citiz ens of Nowhereisland, which will travel 5 00 nautical miles around the South West this summer, visiting communities and finishing up in Bristol for the weekend of 7- 9 September. The island’s extraordinary story began back in 2004 , when Devon installation artist Alex Hartley discovered an island that had been revealed by the melting ice of a retreating glacier in the High Arctic. The enterprising Hartley promptly sailed a portion of the island into international waters outside any national jurisdiction, where it was declared a new nation – Nowhereisland – before its journey southwards. eveloped by Bristol’s award winning art producers Situations, the island has since become a moving art project- cum- experiment in nation building. Watch the film of its creation at nowhereisland.org about

The island will be accompanied on its journey around the South West by the Nowhereisland Embassy, a mobile museum parked up on nearby cliffs and staffed by Ambassadors. Each town along the route will welcome the tiny nation state in its own way – in Mevagissey, Cornwall, it will be sung into port by the town’s resident choir, while in Newquay a platoon of surfers will escort it to land. After its epic coastal journey, Nowhereisland will journey up the Avon Gorge and under the Suspension Bridge, arriving into umberland Basin weather permitting at lunchtime on ri ept for the final weekend of its journey. You’ll be able to become a citiz en, contribute to the constitution and hear about the origins of the world’s newest nation. Alongside free events and activities at the Embassy, The Last Days of Nowhereisland, a special programme of talks, performances and artist films, will be running in Harbourside locations throughout the weekend. Come and welcome this migrant from the world’s northernmost landmass. s M o r e: n o w her eisl an d . o r g

WATCH

Show of Strength his summer, Bristol theatre company Show of Strength will be cooking up a storm with its new show designed specifically for performance in restaurants. D in e w it h t he C r ad o c k s (pictured), which tours a handful of Bristol establishments from Fri 20- Sat 28 J uly, features SoS regulars K ate McNab and J ohn Telfer playing Fanny Cradock, the iconic 195 0s- 70s TV chef, and her long- suffering husband and co- presenter J ohnnie. During the show the audience will enjoy a two- course meal a

la Cradock – kicking off with Fanny’s signature starter, prawn cocktail, and continuing with Diamond J ubilee Chicken (veggie options available). Over the course of the evening the Cradocks will demonstrate, argue, namedrop, insult, speak dodgy French and bicker – just like the real- life duo did on our screens all those decades ago: £ 20 gets you two courses and a fine evening’s comic theatre. Your nearest Harbourside ports of call will be CR EATE, Smeaton R d (Fri 20);

riverstation, The Grove (Sun 22); and the Hen and Chicken, North Street (Fri 27 & Sat 28 ). s M o r e: sho w o f st r en g t h. o r g . u k

eleven

25/05/2012 15:57


SUMMER EVENTS EXPLORE BRISTOL FERRIES

SEE

Bristol Urban Sport Strollers around the Harbourside one sunny day back in late April will have witnessed an eyecatching sight – a Bristol R owing Club boat, a 198 0s Seebold powerboat and a 194 7 Formula 3 Bristol- built racing car all being craned into the exhibition spaces at M Shed. To tie in with this summer’s Olympics fever, M Shed has programmed ‘Bristol U rban Sport’ (to 9 Sept), a vast multimedia exhibition that explores the incredible range of sports, both mainstream and alternative, practised here through the decades. Highlights include an introduction to Bristol’s hugely important skateboarding and BMX subcultures, and an account of 1979’s Suspension Bridge bungee jump the first modern bungee jump, records agree) by four intrepid members of the Dangerous Sports Club. There’s also a look back at the powerboat

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 8

MORE:

bristolferry.com

SEE TREVOR HADDRELL

races that were a major, and glamorous, fi ture on the docks throughout the 1970s and 8 0s, and the story of the Easton Cowboys, a community football club born from 198 0s kick- about sessions that has gone on to tour the world. s M o r e: m shed . o r g

From J uly, B ri s t ol O ld V i c starts the process of waking up its newly refurbished theatre with a series of special one- off shows, readings, gigs, talks, tours and events. ancy being first through the door? R egister your interest at b r ist o l o l d v ic . o r g . u k / sec r et s. We’ll have a full feature on BOV ’s grand re- opening in our autumn issue twelve

Summer is a busy time at Bristol Ferries, with a wealth of fine public boat trips around the harbour and further afield. A Shipshape fave is the Lazy Sunday River Cruise upstream to the leafy, riverside Beeses Bar & Tea Gardens for a cracking cream tea. Next trips are 10 June/24 June/8 July/29 July, but check the website for full listings. And, if you fancy travelling en masse, Bristol Ferries are now offering 10% off for groups of 10 or more on all Public Trips. Call 0117 927 3416 to secure your discount.

A short stomp up Park Street, the Royal West of England Academy is currently showing gorgeous work by Trevor Haddrell, engraver of atmospheric Bristol cityscapes. Bristol and Beyond (to 8 July) features relief engravings from across the past two decades: Haddrell has produced one new panorama of Bristol and surrounding towns each year, and will be showing them together for the first time. MORE:

rwa.org.uk

Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:57


SUMMER EVENTS WATCH

Bristol BrouHaHa EAT SPYGLASS Summertime in Bristol is Spyglass time. Head down to the lovingly converted barge on Welsh Back for a taste of their sublime salads, dips, flatbreads and daily fresh fish from the south coast. Make room, too, for the Spyglass Burger, made with 28-day-aged beef and served with a superb cornichon, caper and dill mayonnaise. Head down anytime Monday to Wednesday, or Thursday and Friday lunchtimes, and you’ll get two for the price of one. See you on board! MORE:

spyglassbristol.co.uk

WALK URBAN WANDERINGS You shouldn’t need an excuse, during summertime in our gracious city, to swivel your eyes upwards and take in the buildings around you: but if you do need a little prompting, this month’s Love Architecture festival (15-24 June) should provide the spur. A nationwide celebration of our built environment, LA’s local events include ‘Urban Wanderings’ (19 June, 6pm, meet Architecture Centre, Narrow Quay), a 90-minute walking tour of some of the city centre’s architectural gems. MORE:

lovearchitecture.org

Shipshape

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 9

he month of uly will ring to the sound of laughter along orth treet, Bedminster, as the area’s top notch comedy festival Bristol BrouHaHa makes its annual return hared across two fine venues the obacco actory heatre and the omedy Bo above the Hen and hicken pub , and programmed over nine days uly , the BrouHaHa lures some of the ’s very best established and emerging comics to south Bristol. alling just a few weeks before the dinburgh estival, the make or break moment in every comic’s year, the festival allows the nation’s funny men and women to road test their new shows, as well as giving Bristolians a concentrated dose of top division, highly affordable stand up. ur pick of the festival is a very fine looking sketch comedy double header at the obacco actory on on uly. t features a set from the inimitable appy’s pictured three da lingly inventive ondoners whose high energy shows mi uick fire gags, recurring characters and snappy songs, all laced with oon how style surrealism. hey’re joined by the similarly splendid he oise e t oor five guys in technicolour ties who, like appy’s, ply a fine line in uicksilver

sketch comedy, this time with the emphasis s uarely on improv and audience suggestions. ther BrouHaHa dates for your diary include a visit from Bristol’s own rising star ohn obins ri , Hen and hicken , a master spinner of surreal and wryly amusing tales of modern city life. A little later there’s a rare Bristol visit from one of hipshape’s faves, Hal ruttenden ed , obacco actory , from whom you can e pect much middle class liberal moaning washed down with lashings of hypocrisy. He’s joined on the night by hris c ausland, the ’s only blind professional comic and a master of uiet self effacement with a twist of cheek. he following night, also at the obacco actory, the winsome and relentlessly upbeat mran usuf is joined by ucy orter, who bounds onstage all smiles and puppyish enthusiasm but who will throw you for a loop with some of her earthier observations. s M or e: br

ist ol br ouhaha.c

om

SHOP

Harbourside Market Bristol’s Harbourside Market continues to flourish along the western side of t Augustine’s each. Around traders now line the pavements outside atershed each aturday and unday from am pm, plying all manner of locally sourced and created food, arts and crafts. osey on down of a weekend and you’ll find everything from hai street food and scrumptious American sweet pies to handmade jewellery, te tiles and crafts there’s also a multi cultural toy stall to keep the nippers happy, and lots of second hand books. he market will also be running a series of family friendly workshops and cooking demonstrations throughout the year visit the website below for info, news and events. at une, meanwhile, is a red letter day for shoppers and stallholders alike. As well as the regular

session, Bristol’s B arket, as it’s being dubbed, will host two one off specialist markets across the water on arrow uay. A Book, ecord and lothes arket will be in full flow just by ero’s Bridge from am pm, and the day will also see the launch of Bristol’s first uitcase ale am pm . odelled on the hugely popular flea markets of aris and elsewhere, the will feature stallholders selling their second hand and handmade goods, gifts, te tiles, bric a brac, clothes, cakes and more from suitcases up and down the uay. s M o r e: t hehar b o u r sid em ar k et . t u m b l r . c o m thirteen

25/05/2012 15:58


SUMMER EVENTS SEE

Raw Materials WATCH LIVE BALLET

After this spring’s stunning display of drawings by Leonardo da V inci, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery sees in the summer with another high profile exhibition drawing on some key players in the history of art – in particular, from the thought- provoking, message- driven school of Conceptual Art. R aw M at er ial s: F o u r A m er ic an A r t ist s, 1 9 7 2 - 2 0 0 7 (3 0 J une- 23 Sept) showcases a quartet of American art icons – J enny Holz er, Bruce Nauman, Ed R uscha (pictured) and Lawrence Weiner – whose work has e erted a major influence on today’s art scene. he show features key pieces by each artist, including Nauman’s famous neon works, Holz er’s early street posters and wall texts by Weiner. Last but not least, you’ll find works from across the year career of R uscha (the man who famously observed that “Art has to be something that makes you scratch your head , with its influences including urrealism, op Art and the Beat Generation. M or e: br

ist ol .gov

.uk

/ node

Catch some live ballet on the big screen in Millennium Square this summer. The Royal Ballet’s Metamorphosis: Titian 2012, an evening of exciting contemporary dance inspired by the Renaissance master painter, will be broadcast live to 27 locations including Bristol on Mon 16 July at 7.30pm. roh.org.uk/ bpbigscreens

MORE:

/ 2904

WATCH

Summertime at Colston Hall hree highlights leap out at us from the summer programme at Colston Hall. irst up, un ue une sees the return of the Elektrostatic Festival, Bristol’s much- admired celebration of contemporary music. his year’s festival welcomes the great composer ir eter Maxwell Davies, with a one- off

twelve

pp7-15_events_8je.indd 10

unique programme showcasing si decades of his influential work across the three days. A little later on, comedy takes centre stage with St an d U p f o r Sl apst ic k un une , a benefit gig for Bristol’s Slapstick Festival featuring slots from big- name comics including Barry Cryer, Marcus

Brigstocke, R ory Bremner, Arthur mith and ucy orter pictured below, L- R ). And the funny business continues with a visit from R hys Darby (Wed 4 J uly), better known as Murray from the cult sitcom F l ig ht o f t he C o n c ho r d s. More: colstonhall.org

VISIT FOODIES FESTIVAL This new touring food festival visits seven UK venues this summer and Bristol’s Harbourside gets its, um, slice of the action from 1315 July. You’ll find a mix of food and drink masterclasses, as well as a Chef’s Theatre manned by various wellknown TV foodies including Saturday Kitchen’s Martin Blunos, formerly of this parish. MORE:

foodiesfestival.com

Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:58


£10 LUNCH MAIN COURSE PLUS DRINK*

2012 BRISTOL’S SUMMER BBQ RESTAURANT Welsh Back Bristol BS1 4SB Tel 0117 927 7050 www.spyglassbristol.co.uk *Monday to Friday 12-4pm

Swim & Breakfast Enjoy a swim from 9am to 10am followed by breakfast. Choose from Turkish poached eggs; wood fired kipper or a sourdough, bacon and dandelion sandwich. The perfect way to set you up for the day. £25 per person.

Swim & Lunch Swim and relax from 11am to 12pm, before sitting down for a 2 course a la carte lunch. Available 7 days a week. £30 per person.

Afternoon Tea & Swim Make full use of the Lido pool and spa facilities from 12pm3pm, followed by smoked salmon on toast with a glass of prosecco & a cream tea. Available 7 days a week. £35 per person.

Swim & Dine This includes a 2 course meal from the a la carte menu, available from Monday to Saturday (Timing restrictions apply). £35 per person. All prices are inclusive of a 12.5% discretionary service charge

lidopromotions www.lidobristol.com

restaurant, spa & pool


See chang feature

V isitors to Bristol frequently cite the Harbourside as the city’s best feature. T om B ur ne t t finds out how the ne t stage of harbour development is going to shape the city for generations to come

The creation in 18 09 of what was to become known as the Floating Harbour came just too late for Bristol’s harbour economy. Overcrowding in the docks was forcing many boats to find alternative portage and larger ships demanded more space than the narrow, tidal Avon would allow. Although still important to the city for much of the ne t two centuries, the harbour gradually declined until it was closed as a commercial port in . But when 8 0 acres of tidal river were impounded with the intention of creating more space for larger ships and a permanently water filled harbour, civil engineer illiam essop wouldn’t have dreamed that his designs for a busy working harbour would one day become a great draw for two other reasons - homes and tourism. After lying in disrepair for much of the s, the Harbourside began something of a renaissance when Lloyds built its national high street banking head uarters on anon’s arsh in . n time, there followed a new river crossing at Pero’s Bridge and the multi million pound At Bristol comple , along with the first stages of redevelopment of some of the warehouses on the waterfront for flats and the lower rise housing found at the Hotwells end of the harbour. GRAND REDESIGNS

From rundown waterfront to bustling tourist attraction, the city’s docks have been reinvented to such a degree that many older Bristolians hardly recognise them. But the hordes of tourists speak for themselves, as they board the ferries, mi with sixteen

pp16-19_DevelopFeature_7je.indd 2

locals at Brunel’s Buttery and ride the steam train up and down the dockside. As you walk the harbour loop, you get a sense of the harbour’s development through time, a mi and match of building styles and uses, from the warehouses on edcliffe Backs, to the remodelled buildings around the ss reat Britain, with working boatyards and water based leisure filling in the gaps. However, with the development of rest Nicholson’s ‘Harbourside’ on the remaining vacant land of anon’s arsh, the harbour’s story took a new direction. here new buildings once attempted to resemble the warehouses of old, this new development looked to the great ocean liners and art deco iami as their reference point all pastel colours, sheet metal balconies and sharp corners. So it’s with bated breath that Bristolians await the next round of Harbourside development. he following pages outline the plans what do you think Continued on page 18...

Main pic: artist’s impression of the East Purifier building and (above, inset) as it currently looks. Left: Harris Wharf (see page 19 for details). Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:58


e nge

East Purifier Located just south of Anchor Road and currently held together by green exoskeletons, the East and West Purifier buildings once formed part of the Bristol and Clifton Oil Gas Company. The West building is owned by the Soil Association, and is set for redevelopment in the future. Linden Homes, responsible for the new buildings around the ss Great Britain, which lies opposite the site, has recently bought the East Purifier site. Timeframes: Work began at the end of March, with the completion date set for April 2013. What to expect: East Purifier will be converted into 28 residential units, a retail unit and a restaurant/café. A new three- to four-storey building next door, which will resemble a boathouse, will provide 10 residential units, and a further shop and restaurant/café. Both buildings will utilise the new waterfront created opposite the ss Great Britain. They say: “The site has been vacant for some time. Redevelopment will bring a use back to this part of the harbour. Our development at the ss Great Britain was mentioned by many as a good design responding to its settings – we’re aiming to replicate this on the other side of the river.” Andy Godden, Linden Homes.

“It seems to me there are more and more places to live, but not enough for people to do. The danger is we’ll have a river surrounded by flats with nothing to occupy the people who live in them. The Grain Barge, the Apple and Spyglass are so uniquely Bristol – it’d be great to have more of these at the Cumberland R oad end of the docks” J u d e L ev y , in v o l v ed H ar b o u r sid e r esid en t Shipshape

pp16-19_DevelopFeature_7je.indd 3

fifteen

25/05/2012 15:59


feature

Wapping Wharf U ntil recently, part of the huge site between the New Cut and M Shed housed a fabulous reclamation yard, but the site is now used as a car park. The sinister looking gaol gate still stands to the south of the site, the only remaining part of an extensive complex that was partly destroyed in the Bristol riots of 18 3 1. Work was due to start in 2007, but the recession put plans on hold. This May, an archaeological dig is due to start on the site of the first phase of development the route between aol erry Bridge and the hed. he first phase is due for completion in late 2014 . WHAT TO EXPECT: he first phase of development will include 18 0 apartments, including 3 1 affordable homes, along with retail units and public spaces. Planning permission has been granted for up to 625 homes in total, a 15 0- room hotel, 20,000 m2 of commercial offices, plus restaurants and shops. THEY SAY: “We’re aiming to create value in a holistic way, with realistic retail rents, local traders, hopefully a dentist or doctor’s surgery. Mud Dock is already developing a building on the site, and may also set up a bike shop that’s the kind of business we want to work with. We’ll respect the dockside heritage in the materials we use and architectural styles - stone, brick, pitched roofs.” St u ar t H at t o n , W appin g W har f ( U m b er sl ad e) L t d TIMEFRAMES:

“We’re keen to avoid saturating the Harbourside with residential buildings so, as you walk around the harbour, the aim is to have something of interest to do or look at every few hundred metres. We need to help people move around what is a huge space, with improved signage, another river crossing point and bike hire these are all options Z oe Se ar , H ar bour

side P r oj ec t M

anage

r ,D

est inat ionB

r ist ol

McArthur’s Warehouse When doing the ‘harbour loop’ clockwise, as you come to the ss Great Britain you’re forced to detour away from the harbour and around the decaying structure that is McArthur’s Warehouse. Another site that has stood derelict for decades, these buildings were part of a working malthouse in the late 19th century. R edevelopment plans initially involved saving the current redbrick buildings, but further deterioration over the past decade has made this unsustainable and the old buildings are likely to be pulled down so the site can be completely redeveloped. eighteen

pp16-19_DevelopFeature_7je.indd 4

TIMEFRAMES: Linden is currently carrying out a consultation until the end of August. The aim is to start on site in the summer of 2013, w ith work taking 24- 30 months. WHAT TO EXPECT: The scheme has yet to be drawn up, but will be a residential led scheme with some commercial space, landscaping and car parking. THEY SAY: “The site has been empty for a long time and has never been viable due to the schemes to date being commercially led. Our proposals will provide a residential led scheme, designed in keeping with the surrounding historic maritime and industrial uses.” A n d y G o d d en , L in d en H o m es Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:59


feature

Bristol General Hospital Bathurst Basin once provided smaller boats with an entry point from the New Cut into the Floating Harbour, but is now a quiet backwater away from the hustle and bustle of the Harbourside. Looming over it is the imposing Bristol General Hospital, which finally closed to patients early in 2012. The sse firm ity and ounty are taking on the redevelopment of the buildings, a jumble of chapels, towers and balconies.

TIMEFRAMES: City and County are hoping for a J uly start, subject to necessary planning conditions, and estimate the project will take six years to complete. WHAT TO EXPECT: The proposals submitted to Bristol City Council are for between 172 and 18 1 houses and apartments, with a reinstated pedestrian walkway - historically known as French Yard - dividing the site in two. Lower Guinea Street will be one way, with pedestrians given priority in order to utilise

the commercial spaces that will be situated in the vaults beneath the buildings. The main roof, bombed during the war, will be reinstated. THEY SAY: “The proposals are a combination of sensitively designed residences which retain the historic features of the building and sympathetically designed new build apartments which are key to the success of the scheme as they fund the expensive restoration works to the listed buildings.” R ic har d W in sb o r o u g h, C it y an d C o u n t y

“One of the reasons the Floating Harbour feels so alive is that it is linked to the sea at one end and the inland waterways at the other. It’s a bit like a busy street with well used pavements on either side. With regards to the redevelopment of Canon’s Wharf, architecture is down to personal opinion, but in terms of a project in regeneration, the development has worked quite well” R ic har dH

ol de n,

C it y D esignG

r oup,B

r ist ol C it y C ounc

il

Harris Wharf Since Pero’s Bridge was opened in 1999, the pedestrian thoroughfare linking Q ueen and Millennium Squares has become one of the busiest in Bristol. In warehouses close to the bridge, on the corner of Farr’s Lane and Narrow Q uay, the Harris family have run a textiles recycling business since 18 5 5 , but are now turning the property over for development. TIMEFRAMES: Planning applications are being handed in at the end of May, and, all being well, construction will start in early 2013 with completion in the autumn of 2013 . WHAT TO EXPECT: There will be 13 apartments – two one- bed and 11 two- bed – that will vary in siz e from 4 4 0 to 900 square feet. Some parking and a retail unit will also be included on the ground floor. WHAT THEY SAY: “The main priority is saving the buildings by giving them a viable use in the future. The new elements are an opportunity to design a distinctive and contemporary addition to the harbourside environment, whilst restoring the existing buildings.” A l ast air C ar sw el l , F er g u so n M an n A r c hit ec t s

Shipshape

pp16-19_DevelopFeature_7je.indd 5

nineteen

25/05/2012 15:59


harbourside map

Map & ferry timetable J ump on one of B r ist ol F er r y B oat C o’ s distinctive yellow and blue boats and see the Harbourside from a whole new perspective... Hotwells route This service is daily from April 2012 (weekend service throughout March - see bristolferry.com for details) City centre

10.30

11.10

11.50

12.30

13.10

13.50

14.30

15.10

15.50

16.30

17.10

Millennium Sq./Arnolfini

10.35

11.15

11.55

12.35

13.15

13.55

14.35

15.15

15.55

16.35

17.15

ss Great Britain/New Marina 10.40

11.20

12.00

12.40

13.20

14.00

14.40

15.20

16.00

16.40

17.20

Pump House

11.30

12.10

12.50

13.30

14.10

14.50

15.30

16.10

16.50

17.30

10.50

Nova Scotia

10.50

11.30

12.10

12.50

13.30

14.10

14.50

15.30

16.10

16.50

17.30

Cottage

10.50

11.30

12.10

12.50

13.30

14.10

14.50

15.30

16.10

16.50

17.30

Mardyke

10.55

11.35

12.15

12.55

13.35

14.15

14.55

15.35

16.15

16.55

17.35

Marina

10.55

11.35

12.15

12.55

13.35

14.15

14.55

15.35

16.15

16.55

17.35

ss Great Britain

11.00

11.40

12.20

13.00

13.40

14.20

15.00

15.40

16.20

17.00

17.40

City centre

11.10

11.50

12.30

13.10

13.50

14.30

15.10

15.50

16.30

17.10

Temple Meads route This service is daily from April 2012 (see above) Temple Meads

10.10

11.10

12.10

13.10

14.10

15.10

16.10

Castle Park

10.15

11.15

12.15

13.15

14.15

15.15

16.15

Welsh & Redcliffe Back

10.18

11.18

12.18

13.18

14.18

15.18

16.18

Bathurst Basin

10.23

11.23

12.23

13.23

14.23

15.23

16.23

Millennium Sq./Arnolfini

10.25

11.25

12.25

13.25

14.25

15.25

16.25

City Centre

10.30

11.30

12.30

13.30

14.30

15.30

16.30

Millennium Sq./Arnolfini

10.35

11.35

12.35

13.35

14.35

15.35

16.35

ss Great Britain/New Marina 10.40

11.40

12.40

13.40

14.40

15.40

16.40

Millennium Sq./Arnolfini

10.48

11.48

12.48

13.48

14.48

15.48

16.48

Bathurst Basin

10.50

11.50

12.50

13.50

14.50

15.50

16.50

Welsh & Redcliffe Back

10.57

11.57

12.57

13.57

14.57

15.57

16.57

Castle Park

11.00

12.00

13.00

14.00

15.00

16.00

17.00

Temple Meads

11.10

12.10

13.10

14.10

15.10

16.10

17.10

No.1 Harbourside – ethical

Watershed – multimedia arts

MORE Including public trips and private hire, visit bristolferry.com Za Za Bazaar – global food

Grain Barge – great views

Pump House (for Suspension Bridge)

Nova Scotia (for Create Centre, and Tobacco Factory)

Brunel’s ss Great Britain (for Spike Island)

Mardyke

CROSS HARBOUR FERRY

Marina

New Marina Bristol Aquarium – huge fun

Bristol Packet HQ

The Cottage Brunel’s ss Great Britain At-Bristol – interactive science

Spike Island – creative hub twenty

pp20-21_map_7je.indd 2

Shipshape

25/05/2012 15:53

Mille (for Brist


Turn to the Shipshape directory on page 32 for opening times, offers and more on all of the destinations highlighted on this map

harbourside map

SUMMER FESTIVALS FESTIVAL OF NATURE

Harbourside, 16-17 June, bnhc.org.uk Interactive exhibitions, expert talks, a food market, live entertainment and more at the UK’s biggest free festival dedicated to Mother Nature. Visit the website if you’d like to volunteer. FOODIES FESTIVAL

Cabot Circus – shopping

Harbourside, 13-15 July, foodiesfestival.com Sharpen your culinary skills at this dedicated food festival with workshops and talks, restaurant tents, cooking tips for kids, street food, music and more. BRISTOL CIDER FESTIVAL

Wongs – opulent Chinese Foyles – fantastic bookshop

Castle Park (for Cabot Circus, Broadmead)

Brunel’s Old Station, 3-4 Aug, ciderfestivals.co.uk As the name suggests, it’s an unabashed celebration of ciders and perries. Find award-winning examples from across the South West, Herefordshire, Hampshire and South Wales.

Colston Hall – landmark Cathay Rendezvous

City Centre (for Colston Hall, Wongs, Cathedral, Park St and main bus routes)

Glassboat – fantastic views

Temple Bridge Welsh Back (for Old Vic)

Temple Quay (for Temple Meads train station)

Redcliff Backs

dia arts

fun

The Apple

Tourist Information Centre

Spyglass – barbecue boat

Shakespeare Tavern – cosy

Bordeaux Quay

Architecture Centre Severnshed

Arnolfini Millennium Square (for At-Bristol and Bristol Aquarium)

Mud Dock

Thekla riverstation Myristica – fine Indian dining

Bathurst Basin The Ostrich

Arnolfini – arts centre

nce

CITY SIGHTSEEING Fancy seeing our fair city from the vantage point of an open-to bus? City Sightseeing Bristol runs tours of the city’s most historic districts in its distinctive red two-storey buses, with a team of friendly and expert commentators to give you the lowdown on Bristol’s eventful past. Tours run daily until September. They last 75 minutes, but you can hop on and off as you please. Harbourside stops include Create, Baltic Wharf, Brunel’s ss Great Britain, At-Bristol, Prince Street, Bristol Bridge, Welsh Back and Arnolfini. CSB is now running ace-sounding pirate and storytelling bus trips for families. With a bus/boat combo two-day ticket, one child travels free with a fare-paying adult. MORE:

citysightseeingbristol.co.uk

M Shed – must-visit museum

Shipshape

pp20-21_map_7je.indd 3

twenty one

25/05/2012 15:53


feature

Where the wild things a oraging, wild food, food for free call it what you will, it’s big business in the outh est thanks to landscapes like the endips, uantocks and even Bristol’s harbour providing some of the ’s best natural larders. M ar k Say er s goes for a rummage

Bristol and its surroundings are home to some high profile foragers including Andrew Sartain, based in Axbridge, who has been running wild food and fungal forays across the outh est since . ven closer to home, there’s Bristol forager and sustainability e pert and BBC A u t u m n w at c h foraging e pert Andy Hamilton, based in Netham, who leads a variety of foraging walks around town, from astle ark to t erburghs. And local herbalist a rake leads regular herb and edible plant walks around the harbour ne t walk at une, A , pm, visit urbanfringe.org . As Hamilton and rake will tell you, even within Bristol’s built up centre you can find plenty of good, nutritious fare along with plenty that you should avoid . ity centre foraging can yield the likes of elderflower, which grows everywhere, and can be used to make cordials, syrups, wine and even marmalade. r apanese knotweed, an invasive plant that has choked many a suburban garden but which, Hamilton points out, tastes a little like rhubarb and can be made into a fool or crumble. ild garlic or ramsons covers the floors of woods around Bristol during the spring, and makes in smallish uantities a splendid, pi uant soup, while its sweet flowers can liven up any salad. FORAGING CHEFS

Head chefs at two of Bristol’s best and most twenty two

pp22-25_foraging_7je.indd 2

enterprising restaurants place foraging at the centre of their cooking ethos. harlie Hurrell, head chef at Glassboat restaurant, grew up in omerset’s uantock Hills and is very much at home in nature’s larder. or Hurrell, autumn and especially its star mushrooms, like girolles, blewits and ceps is the red letter season. ushrooms are my thing, he tells hipshape. ’ve just been to eigh oods to pick up a whole bag of t eorge’s mushrooms so called because they traditionally first appear around t eorge’s ay, April . eigh oods and the cycle paths through the Ashton Court woods are great stomping grounds for mushrooms and wild garlic. Hurrell also enjoys a spot of coastal foraging, looking for sea beet, spinach, mussels and other small molluscs along the ornish coast where the water is that much cleaner than further up the Bristol hannel . henever ’ve got a day off like to get on my bike, wander around and see what’s about. f course, you have to be very aware of what you are picking, especially on an autumn mushroom walk, as some things are lethal. always carry a few books the classic is

ichard abey’s F o o d f o r F r ee. he fruits of harlie’s labours end up either on the table at home or, of course, on the menu at lassboat. hose t eorge’s mushrooms, for instance, will be pickled see recipe and made into a terrine others will form part of a veal dish on lassboat’s new summer menu. Continued on p25… Shipshape

25/05/2012 16:00


feature

e s are

feature

feature

Kirstie Urquhart and Charlie Hurrell from Glassboat Restaurant headed out to Hanham Locks to look for St George’s and Jew’s ear mushrooms. Says Kirstie: “The woodland areas were flooded so pickings were slim. However, we did manage to find wild garlic (which we’ve had on the menu as soup), goose grass, nettles, comfrey, borage, wild cress, violets, young beech leaves, dandelion leaves and primrose. We also picked some haw buds, which we’re pickling to see if we can make a kind of caper!” And all this in just one hour.

s

pp22-25_foraging_7je.indd 3

25/05/2012 16:00


PUBLIC TRIPS 2012

BRISTOL

FERRY

TRIPS Learn, explore or simply relax! Hear the harbour’s incredible stories, meet its wildest inhabitants or just kick back and relax with a Cream Tea. See the Suspension Bridge or take a leisurely cruise to an idyllic riverside pub. Whatever floats your boat, our fantastic range of Public Trips have something for everybody!

It couldn’t be easier to book your tickets. Call our friendly staff on 0117 927 3416 or visit www.bristolferry.com to book online.

BOAT CO.

Groups of 10 or more

GET 10% OFF!


feature

TIMING IS EVERYTHING

U p at the Lido restaurant in Clifton, chef Freddy Bird also draws inspiration from nature for his menus. “For me, it’s more a case of foraging at the right times of the year,” he says. “At certain times of the year there’s not that much out there that tastes that great. For instance, in November, I wouldn’t be thinking, ‘I m u st have something foraged on the menu,’ because your options are more limited. There’s a wild winter cabbage called charlock that some people love – but I can’t get on with, it tastes like cow food to me! But spring and summer are great times for picking elder, mushrooms, and also shoreline plants like sea beet, samphire and sea aster.” For Bird, foraging also serves as a useful reminder of what’s out there at any given time. “It reminds me of the seasons and helps me to write my menus. I follow the mushroom season carefully – morels and St George’s throughout May, girolles from J une onwards, ceps and blewits in the autumn.” So where should the foraging novice begin their search, and what should they look for? “You can get wild onions on the owns, elderflower all over town, ground elder and pennywort in Leigh Woods,

Foraging is easier than it looks, says Kirstie. “Just start off with one thing that you find easy to recognise and go from there. It’s amazing how much there is to pick up. We’re no experts but we still manage to find lots! We go foraging quite often – the more you go out, the more you learn.”

WHY NOT TRY… PICKLED ST GEORGE’S MUSHROOMS From Charlie Hurrell, head chef at Glassboat Restaurant “I often return from a day out with freshly picked St George’s mushrooms. Pickled, these provide a great staple for the store cupboard and can be served with meats, fish, pates, salads or fresh bread.” INGREDIENTS

mushrooms all through Ashton Court and Leigh Woods, nettles anywhere,” says Bird. urther afield, ’ll go over the Bridge towards Chepstow and Monmouth for mushrooming; Blagdon and Burrington are also a good stamping- ground for sloes, blackberries, wild blueberries and cob nuts. But you don’t know what you might find where you may find wild fennel sprouting up in a suburban hedgerow, for example. That’s the joy of foraging – anywhere where nature has been left to itself, you can find something.

500g St George’s mushrooms (or other hardy mushrooms such as blewits, chestnuts or girolles) 500ml good white wine 500ml good white wine vinegar 2tbsp salt; 2tbsp sugar; 2 star anise; 4 bay leaves; 1 bulb of garlic RECIPE

Infuse the liqueur with the aromatics for 10 mins over a low heat. Add the salt and sugar. Clean your mushrooms with a brush and blanch in the infused pickle liqueur for 2 mins (depending on size), strain mushrooms and drain on a tray and cool. Once dry, add mushrooms to a sterilized Kilner jar. Pour over extra virgin olive oil to cover and add the aromatics from the pickling liqueur. Store for up to three months.

Top 5 Ethical eateries Not foraged but still free range, locally sourced and sustainably caught: five restaurants with one eye on nature Spyglass All of the chicken is free range and all fish and shellfish are sustainably caught, generally from waters around the South West. Mussels are sourced from the Exe. All ice creams are prepared from scratch on the premises. Arnolfini One of its favourite growers is The Severn Project (thesevernproject. org), a brilliant initiative where clients engaged in drug and alcohol recovery grow herbs, leaves and other vegetables. The

Shipshape

pp22-25_foraging_7je.indd 5

beers and ciders come from local brewers Zerodegrees, Bristol Beer Factory, Cheddar Ales and Bristol Ciderworks, and the soft drinks from Barrow Gurney’s Lovely Drinks. Watershed Works with Phil Haughton, founder of the Better Food Company, to develop its Plot to Plate policy, which is all about supporting the local economy, reducing carbon footprint and respecting producers, animals and the quality of the land. Meat comes from Gatcombe Farm on Devon’s Jurassic Coast, using animals that are pure bred, free range and reared on pastureland by natural growth and feed. Fruit and vegetables come from Kidners Organics and

The Community Farm, both Soil Association-certified companies. Fish comes from Cornish fresh fish supplier Wing of St Mawes, which supports ethical sourcing and protecting Cornish fish stocks. No.1 Harbourside Champions of local culture, producers and people, No.1 sources its produce as locally as possible. Fish comes from Cornwall’s Wing of St Mawes – the kitchen team call them each morning to find out what the catch has been and plan that day’s menu accordingly. Meat comes from Herefordshire (beef) and Somerset (pork), and Gloucestershire’s Shipton Mill supplies

the organic flour for the fresh bread baked daily on the premises. ss Great Britain: Dockyard Café Bar Sources its food locally (its bread, for example, comes direct from Bristol master bakers Herberts), and bakes its own cakes onsite. Local and seasonal products are sourced wherever possible, including ales from Butcombe and Great Western Breweries.

twenty five

25/05/2012 16:00


feature

Yellow & b beauties As Bristol Ferry Boat Company turns 35, co- founder R obSal v idge gives us a potted history of our beloved Harbourside ferries

People have pottered around Bristol’s harbour in small boats for centuries. It’s entirely possible that J ohn Cabot, full of craz y notions about exploring for new lands, crossed the river by rowing boat before setting sail on his famous Atlantic voyage of 14 97. It’s easy to imagine the wedding party of the great poet Coleridge taking a trip along the Avon by boat before the ceremony in St Mary R edcliffe Church in 1795 . And from the days of the great V ictorian works on quays, wharfs, trains and cranes, the preferred method of transport for workers, dockers and sailors has been the ferry boat. U ntil the mid- 1960s hundreds of shipwrights and metal workers were still crossing from the Mardyke Steps in Hotwells to the Charles Hill shipyard - and there were really only a few years when the city virtually turned its back on the water and no boats plied for public trade. Downriver at Crockerne Pill, now a rather muddy creek but for centuries a thriving port to boat builders and the legendary Bristol Channel Pilots, the last ferry crossed to Shirehampton in the early 1970s as the mighty M5 m otorway bridge was opened and the newly affluent took to their cars in droves. Why wait in the wind and rain and risk a face full of brown Avon spray when you could cross from home to Avonmouth in comfort by road? Then a few people decided there was charm, character and value in the rusting old cranes, leaking old sheds and laid- up old barges. They scuppered the modernising aspirations of planners and property men by reusing certain bits and pieces of Harbourside paraphernalia, like the steam train and the cranes. Ideas of closing up part of the waterway disappeared as little harbour ferries started to appear again. twenty six

pp26-27_ferry_7je.indd 2

MARGARET’S RESCUE

he first and to many people’s eyes still the prettiest of the newborn generation was Margaret, rescued from the mud in Pill and given a bright new yellow coat of paint. Before long a doz en people would hop on board, save their legs and make the three- quarters of a mile journey from Hotwells up to the centre. Sometimes it was a scramble up a ladder or across an old hulk to get ashore, then someone persuaded the harbour master and council to fork out for landing platforms here and there. Now there are quite smart pontoons and landing stages at all the main points of interest around the harbour. Legendary dock character Ian Bungard turned what seemed like a quaint idea into a properly timetabled service, found a few more nice old boats that didn’t need much more than a lot of TLC, and was soon commander of a sprightly fleet of yellow and blue beauties that, as much as anything, defined the resurgent spirit of Bristol harbour as a place for boats, voyages and adventures.

Many Bristolians over the past 30 ye ars have made their first ever journey by water on one of the Bristol erry Boats some have gone on to sail the world. he flotilla has e panded and modernised a bit with wider comfortable steel boats like Brigantia and Matilda joining in with Emily and Independence and Margaret and Eliz abeth. The latter is there for special occasions, weddings anniversaries, reunions and trip to Beese’s Bar and Tea Gardens (you’re not proper Bristolian until you’ve taken the pretty ride up towards Hanham and enjoyed an Earl Grey tea and homemade scone at the institution). So as Bristol continues to expand and Shipshape

25/05/2012 16:05


feature

blue

Main pic: a Bristol Ferry Boat glides around the buzzing harbour. Right: the company houses a workshop at Underfall Boatyard. Left: making waves and headlines

develop, it no longer shuns the waterway meandering through the heart of the Temple Q uay business area or the wider expanse down past M Shed towards the ss Great Britain. All the delights that look out onto the water can be explored and visited by boat. CARE AND REPAIR

There’ve been plenty of challenges. Boats need constant care and repair, but the Bristol Ferry Boat Company is now an active supporter of the marvellous, historic U nderfall Boatyard and houses its own workshop there. There’s also a lot of competition for the tourist pound so being able to pop in and

meet a smiling employee at No.1 Harbourside to discuss a trip or buy a ticket is a good thing. So, if you’re wandering around the harbour and you fancy a break, stop by a landing stage, hail a yellow and blue ferry and you’ll be transported for a couple of quid into your own maritime adventure. Imagine you’re Cabot about to join the Matthew, or that you’re Coleridge preparing for his nuptials at St Mary R edcliffe. Or imagine simply drifting down the river to the Nova Scotia and enjoying a pint as the sun sets over the Avon Gorge. s

Shipshape

pp26-27_ferry_7je.indd 3

25/05/2012 16:05


Proud to be working on Bristol Harbour Festival 2012 Event Organisers of the Year 2006/2007/2009 Carefully. Creatively. Meticulously.

Richmond Event Management Ltd 59 Prince Street Bristol BS1 4QH Tel 0117 9276614 Fax 0117 9221497 Email info@rem-events.com www.rem-events.com

P R O U D T O B E PA R T O F T H E Q U E E N ’ S J U B I L E E C E L E B R AT I O N S

TRIPS 0117 927 6868

l

HIRE

l

C O R P O R AT E F U N C T I O N S

i n f o @ m a t t h e w. c o . u k

w w w. m a t t h e w. c o . u k


feature

1. TAKE A TRIP

City Sightseeing Bristol (inset) steps up a gear with new storytelling and piratethemed tours. On Sat 14 J uly, storyteller Martin Maudsley will lead families on an open- top journey weaving tall stories into Bristol’s cityscape. On Thur 2 and 9 Aug performer Chris Brown (aka Captain Barnacle) will lead a swashbuckling adventure complete with tales of the high seas, dastardly pirates and ghostly sailors. Both trips last 75 mins and cost £ 5 .3 0 adults/ £ 3 children, 5 .3 0pm depart outside Colston Hall: advance booking recommended. M o r e: c it y sig ht seein g b r ist o l . c o . u k / pu b l ic - t r ips/ t ic k et s. php

Kids’stuff atch a film, make a kite, take a ride, laugh out loud the top 10 things your offspring should be doing this summer

2. MAKE A TV PROGRAMME

This summer workshop, run by young artists for young people, is set in a 1970s- style TV studio. Find out more about how young people were invited to become a part of Open U niversity TV programmes in the Seventies. You can also direct and film your own episode using Arnolfini’s current ise arly, Be ndustrious’ exhibition as a stage. Sundays throughout August, 2- 4 pm: free, but booking essential. More: arnolfini.org.uk 3. VISIT THE PIRATES’ SHIP

Staying with all things piratical, fans of Aardman’s latest high- seas adventure yarn T he P ir at es can get up close with one of its biggest stars: the ship. The four- metre replica pirate ship – held together with cricket bats, brooms and the like – is on view at M Shed until September. M o r e: m shed . o r g 4. CREATE A KITE

A wealth of family- friendly events centred around this very fine looking e hibition include two kite- making workshops on Wed 8 & 22 Aug. The hands- on workshops come courtesy of Avon K ite Flyers, and are recommended for ages four and above. Before that, a Skates and Bikes Weekend (Sat 16- Sun 17 J une) will feature have- a- go activities, competitions and demos by Crucial BMX and Bristol skate store ifty ifty. ecommended ages eight and above. M o r e: m shed . o r g Shipshape

pp29_kids_5je.indd 3

5. TAKE A PICTURE

Step back in time to the ss Great Britain’s V ictorian heyday with the launch of new e hibition lash, Bang, allop ’ he show recreates a V ictorian photographic studio, complete with period garb, including fancy bonnets and stovepipe hats: you’ll be able to imagine you’re in a Melbourne photographer’s studio in 18 5 2, having just stepped off the ship after the 8 0- day voyage from Liverpool. Then upload your V ictorian snaps to the Facebook page (facebook.com/ ssgreatbritain). M o r e: ssg r eat b r it ain . o r g

8. JOIN WOMAD AT THE ZOO

Legendary world music festival WOMAD – celebrating its 3 0th birthday this year – returns for a second annual date at Bristol Z oo Gardens this summer. V isitors on the evening of Sat 3 0 J une will find a programme of music and dance from around the world – plus children’s workshops, stalls and entertainment. Doors 6pm: tickets £ 20 adult/ £ 5 child/ £ 4 5 family/ under 5 s free. M o r e: b r ist o l z o o . o r g . u k 9. GO FOR GOLD

6. PERFECT YOUR DRAWING SKILLS

Put pencil to paper with these fun, informal Saturday drawing workshops, led by artist Anouk Mercier. Mercier’s monthly sessions are ideal for anyone wanting to develop or practise their drawing skills. All ages and abilities welcome. Next sessions 9 J une/ 14 J uly/ 4 Aug/ 1 Sept, 10.3 0am- 1pm: book in advance or just drop in on the day (space permitting). M o r e: r w a. o r g . u k 7. HAVE A LAUGH

An hour of stand- up comedy for kids aged six to 11, performed by a trio of circuit comedians. Providing the laughs will be comics Tiernan Douieb, Luke Toulson and Stuart Goldsmith (left), a high- energy funnyman whose street- performer past should stand him in good stead here. Sat 21 J uly, 4 pm at the Tobacco Factory Theatre. M o r e: t o b ac c o f ac t o r y t heat r e. c o m

At- Bristol has a suitably sporting summer lined up as Olympics fever takes hold. Summer e hibitions include oing for old’ from J uly), a brand new family show exploring the extraordinary feats of the human body, sporting and otherwise. After that, limber up for the TryAthlon (27 J uly- 3 0 Aug), where you can have a crack at a range of sporty activities ranging from the easy to the downright impossible. M o r e: at - b r ist o l . o r g . u k 10. GET ON YOUR BIKE

he final day un une of Bristol’s Big Green Week sees the return of Bristol’s Biggest Bike ide. his year’s BBB features a choice of cycle routes out of town, from nine to 3 8 miles, suitable for all ages and abilities. Whichever route you take, you’ll head off under the Suspension Bridge and into the beautiful countryside beyond, and all routes will be traffic free for the day. ou can turn up on the day and just ride, but you’re best off registering by Fri 15 J une to avoid the queues. M o r e: b et t er b y b ik e. in f o / b ik er id e s twenty nine

25/05/2012 16:02


EVENTS at GLASSBOAT Whatever the celebration, small or large, with work or with loved ones, Glassboat remains the considered waterside restaurant of choice for your event.

Public Relations Marketing Business Development

Find us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn

We have 3 distinct and characterful areas of the boat available for hire or take the whole boat for an exclusive event: LOWER DECK P R I VAT E D I N I N G S PA C E O N S E PA R AT E F L O O R , M A X S E AT E D 4 0 P E R S O N S AFT DECK FULLY GLAZED SECTION, STUNNING VIEWS, M A X S E AT E D 4 0 P E R S O N S LOUNGE BAR P E R F E C T F O R C H A M PA G N E A N D C O C K TA I L E V E N T S , O C C A S I O N A L S E AT I N G O N LY

For full details and a check on availability please do contact us as below WELSH BACK

BRISTOL

BS1 4SB

TEL 0117 929 0704 E V E N T S @ G L A S S B O AT. C O . U K W W W. G L A S S B O AT. C O . U K

Bud UK Ltd. T: 01225 317175 M: 07866407657 E: nigel@bud.uk.com / christina@bud.uk.com W: www.bud.uk.com


feature

HERRING AND LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS

Love them or hate them, gulls are hard to miss around the harbour. Watch for hundreds coming to bathe in front of M hed and Arnolfini. n hot, sultry days when flying ants emerge, they will soar in large numbers above Bristol, feasting on these bite si e insects. any gulls leave the city in late summer, only to be found a few months later sunning themselves off the Portuguese coast, feasting on sardines.

Pictured: foxes, peregrines, gulls and damselflies can be seen around the harbour – as can Ed Drewitt (inset)

Animal attraction Be a wildlife detective this summer and see for yourself the animals you can encounter or discover around the Harbourside, says E dD r ew it t

ROE DEER

f you’re travelling on a boat down the Avon Gorge or looking out across the R iver Avon from eigh oods or lifton own, watch out for what at first looks like a big dog swimming across the river. ook closer and you’ll see that it’s a roe deer. hese secretive animals unlike the tame red and fallow deer at Ashton ourt occasionally feel the urge to swim although often give up and turn back

Hopping on and off the harbour ferries, look out for their bright blue, green and red colours hovering around the marshy plants opposite the ss Great Britain, Cumberland Basin and emple uay. he dragonflies’ and damselflies’ young spend up to four years feeding in the muddy depths of the harbour. amselflies rest with their wings held along their body while the larger dragonflies settle with their wings sticking out.

evening, it’s not unusual to spot a fo slipping past. or a snoo ing fo , take a boat trip or bike ride down the Avon orge and keep your eyes peeled on Horseshoe Bend near hirehampton where you may see one curled up.

ANYTHING ELSE?

f you are very lucky, uieter parts of the harbour may reveal a secretive otter before it slips underwater, while bats will be busy hawking insects over the water and around trees at sunset. s

GREY WAGTAILS

PICS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP): PAUL WILLIAMS/BERTIE GREGORY/ED DREWITT/LIZ SHAW

As you sit with a drink outside a harbour bar or gently stroll through astle ark, look out for a flash of lemon yellow skirting past. his will be our friend, the slender, tail wagging songbird, the grey wagtail.

FOXES

Bristol has a tame population of fo es and whether you’re out during the middle of the day or enjoying a drink late into the

PEREGRINES

f you keep looking up around Bristol, you’ve got a good chance of spotting Britain’s fastest bird of prey, the peregrine. ou’re most likely to see them perching on t ary edcliffe hurch and tall office blocks near abot ircus as well as flying around astle ark and out across the Avon Gorge. eregrines feed on a variety of birds, which they catch in flight. hey even hunt at night, using light from street lamps to see their take away food. DRAGONFLIES AND DAMSELFLIES

he summer months are the time when colourful dragonflies and damselflies emerge from the water. Shipshape

pp31_wildlife_6je.indd 3

thirty one

25/05/2012 16:02


Shipshape directory

The Shipshape Directory Find all the information you need to know about Shipshape’s friends across the Harbourside, from contact details to exclusive offers and more…

16 Narrow Quay, BS1 4QA 0117 917 2300/01, arnolfini.org.uk Opening times: Exhibition Spaces: Tue-Sun 11am-6pm & Bank Holidays; Bookshop: Tue 11am-6pm, Wed-Sat 11am-8pm, Sun 11am-7pm; Café Bar: Daily from 10am

AT-BRISTOL

Anchor Road, Harbourside, BS1 5DB 0845 345 1235, at-bristol.org.uk Opening hours: weekends and holidays 10am-6pm; weekdays during term-time 10am-5pm. Open every day except 24-26 December

thirty two

pp32-37_directory_9je.indd 2

Based at the heart of Bristol’s Harbourside, in a fantastic waterside location, Arnolfini is one of Europe’s leading centres for the contemporary arts. Arnolfini features a regularly changing programme, presenting visual art, live art and performance, dance, music, cinema, poetry and literature events and a busy education programme of tours and talks. It also boasts one of the best arts bookshops in the country and a stylish, lively café bar featuring an Italian-inspired and children’s menu. Free admission to the building, exhibitions and café bar.

With hundreds of action-packed exhibits, explosive science shows and a Planetarium, At-Bristol is one of the UK’s most exciting interactive science centres and a whole day’s play! This summer sees the launch of ‘Our World – No More Waste’ in July: present a weather forecast in the future and play with interactive critters. Explore the world of sports with ‘Going for gold!’ and ‘Try-athlon’ and see FIRA’s Robo World Cup come to town. Plus check out the Big Screen on Millennium Square, Bristol’s official 2012 Live Site, for a packed programme of outdoor events!

NEW FOR JULY! OUR WORLD

PIC: MARTIN CHAINEY

ARNOLFINI CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS

Shipshape

25/05/2012 16:03


PIC: MARTIN CHAINEY

Shipshape directory

Anchor Road, BS1 5TT 0117 929 8929, bristolaquarium.co.uk Summer opening times: 10am-5pm (last entry at 4pm). Open every day except December 25. Check website for latest details on special opening hours. Displays subject to change.

BRISTOL FERRY BOAT CO. For full details visit: bristolferry.com For a map of the service – complete with ferry stops and our new timetable – turn to pages 20 & 21 WHY NOT FERRY-IT! Are you visiting one of the many attractions around the docks like Brunel’s ss Great Britain, M Shed and At-Bristol? Or perhaps you’re coming to one of the harbour’s famous events like the Harbour Festival or Big Green Week? If so, why not ferry-it? Check out their timetables and hop on!

BRUNEL’S ss GREAT BRITAIN Great Western Dockyard, BS1 6TY 0117 926 0680, ssgreatbritain.org Opening times: from 10am. Closing times are seasonal, with last ticket sales one hour before closing Open every day except December 24 and 25, plus second Monday in January

CATHAY RENDEZVOUS 30 King St, BS1 4DZ 0117 922 6161, www.cathay-rendezvous.com READER OFFER Cathay Rendezvous are offering readers of Shipshape 20% off their food bill when they dine from the A La Carte menu before 8pm any evening, upon presentation of the advertisement on page 15 Terms and conditions Diners must present the advertisement upon arrival: 20% applies to the food element of the bill when dining from the A La Carte menu. Not available with any other offer. Dine before 8pm any night. Expires 30/09/2012. Bookings advised.

Shipshape

pp32-37_directory_9je.indd 3

Located in the heart of Bristol’s Harbourside, Bristol Aquarium is home to a magnificent array of aquatic wildlife. The centrepiece of the Aquarium is the enormous Coral Sea and it’s here that you’ll be able to admire over 250 marine animals, including sharks, stingrays, pufferfish and more. If wrasse and gurnard are your thing, head to the botanical house and its 60,000-litre seabed or step out into the harbourside area to say hello to Velcro – the Aquarium’s famous giant Pacific octopus. The Amazon display gives you a glimpse of life inside the great river while the Native Displays celebrate those species closer to home.

These distinctive yellow and blue boats offer relaxed, cosy round trips and an efficient ferry service on two routes; one between Temple Meads and the City Centre (calling at Cabot Circus), the other from the City Centre to the Hotwells area. With better prices and fabulous private hire options, Bristol Ferry Boat Co. is the go-to place for your parties and events. Enjoy a Harbour Pub Tour or River Trip to Beeses Bar & Tea Gardens, sail into the Avon Gorge and under Brunel’s Suspension Bridge or take your class on a journey of discovery with an Educational Package. Whatever the event, Bristol Ferry Boat Co. covers it all.

BRISTOL’S FRIENDLIEST FERRY SERVICE!

Descend under the glass ‘sea’ and step back in time in the Dockyard Museum! See, hear, touch and smell what life was like for Victorian passengers on board Brunel’s ss Great Britain. There’s plenty to do to keep everyone entertained at this multi award-winning attraction. In 2012 Brunel’s ss Great Britain invites you to explore the ship’s new displays, including a new sound-scape for the First Class Dining Saloon and dressing up, with themed events included in admission. Tickets provide free unlimited return visits for one year. Go to ssgreatbritain.org/whatson.

Cathay Rendezvous in King Street is under new management and has recently undergone a refurbishment. There is also a new chef and menu to complement the décor. Diners will enjoy the finest Chinese cuisine within this fascinating historical building, which started life in 1748 as the first purpose-built public library in the UK. The menu draws inspiration from the three main culinary styles of Chinese cuisine, Mandarin, Cantonese and Szechuan, and offers everything from a light meal to a full banquet alongside many more unusual dishes and daily specials.

PIC: MARTIN POYNOR

BRISTOL AQUARIUM

OFFER 20% OFF YOUR BILL

thirty three

25/05/2012 16:03


Shipshape directory

CITY SIGHTSEEING Information Hotline: 09067 112191 Open daily 11am-4pm (summer times may vary), calls are charged at 50p a minute plus network extras www.citysightseeingbristol.co.uk Buy tickets online: www.citysightseeingbristol. co.uk/timetabled-service/tickets.php Tel: 01930 830050

COLSTON HALL

Colston Street, BS1 5AR 0117 922 3686, colstonhall.org Opening hours: Box Office: Mon–Sat 10am6pm; H Bar café: Mon-Fri 8am-11pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 10am-9pm; H Bar Bistro: Daily 11.30am-3pm and 5-11pm

FILINI BAR AND RESTAURANT The Radisson Blu Hotel Bristol Broad Quay, BS14BY 0117 934 9500, info.bristol@radissonblu.com filinibristol.co.uk Opening hours: Lunch – noon-2pm (Mon-Sat) Dinner: 5.30-9.30pm (Mon-Sat). Last orders at 9.30pm. 12.30-2.30pm (Sun)

FOYLES BOOKSHOP 6 Quakers Friars, Philadelphia St, Cabot Circus, BS1 3BU cabotcircus@foyles.co.uk 0117 376 3975 foyles.co.uk Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm, Sun 11am-5pm

thirty four

pp32-37_directory_9je.indd 4

Hop on one of the bright red City Sightseeing buses for an entertaining and illuminative tour with one of their popular, local guides. Share their passion for this diverse city; hear tales of pirates and princes, discover churches, the breath-taking Avon Gorge, street art and the exciting Harbourside. Hop On and Hop Off; visit Brunel’s ss Great Britain, Bristol Zoo, Clifton Village and much more! 1, 2 and 3 Day tickets, plus a 2 Day Bus/Boat Combo ticket – all available online. Buses operate daily every 30, 45 or 90 minutes. Tickets also provide discounts at many attractions and eateries.

Colston Hall is Bristol’s premier live music venue and has seen the likes of the Manic Street Preachers, London Symphony Orchestra, Penguin Café, Staff Benda Bilili and Ricky Gervais perform in the past year. The city centre venue also offers plenty of eating and drinking options: H Bar Café serves a variety of wines, beers, cocktails, spirits and hot drinks, with its tasty Mediterranean food earning the café a spot in The Guardian’s top ten Bristol budget eateries. For a more formal experience, there’s H Bar Restaurant with its mouthwatering mix of Latin American and Mediterranean flavours cooked up by Humberto Benevenuto.

This stylish modern Italian restaurant and bar, set inside the elegant Radisson Blu hotel, offers the very best in contemporary, seasonal and fresh Italian cuisine. Flavour is the watchword on the menu, which uses a judicious mix of locally sourced produce and the best ingredients from Italy’s vast natural larder. Another strong suit is the restaurant’s impressive wine selection, with up to 360 bottles sourced from Italy’s various winemaking regions. Elegant wooden floorboards, huge picture windows and a feature glass staircase ensure that all that delicious food and wine is served in a suitably stylish setting.

Independent booksellers Foyles have settled into their new home in Quakers Friars, Cabot Circus - their first and only shop outside London. Foyles offer the widest possible range of books, so whether you’re looking for the latest best-seller or something a little more unusual, their expert, local staff will be able to help. On the second floor you’ll find more to read plus a cosy events and exhibitions space, which hosts a regular programme of talks, concerts and signings. Visit their website for more information or drop in and say hello!

Shipshape

25/05/2012 16:04


Shipshape directory

GLASSBOAT Welsh Back, BS1 4SB 0117 929 0704, glassboat.co.uk Opening hours: Lunch – Tues-Fri 12-2.30pm; Dinner – Mon-Sat 5.30–10pm; Sunday lunch – 12–4pm SUNDAY LUNCH OFFER Sunday lunch costs just £20 for three courses from 12-4pm. Mention Shipshape for a complimentary glass of NV Henriot Champagne to start your Sunday in style. Offer until the end of August 2012. Reservations required.

GRAIN BARGE Mardyke Wharf, Hotwell Rd, BS8 4RU 0117 929 9347, hello@grainbarge.com grainbarge.co.uk Opening hours: Mon-Thurs: 12-11pm; Fri-Sat: 12-11.30pm; Sun: 12-11pm BRISTOL HARBOUR FESTIVAL Turn to page 7 to see what plans the Grain Barge has for the festival weekend

LIDO RESTAURANT, SPA & POOL Oakfield Place, BS8 2BJ 0117 933 9530, lidobristol.com Opening hours: restaurant: 12-3pm and 6-10pm; spa: 7am-10pm; poolside bar: all day POOLSIDE BBQ Free glass of sparkling Lambrusco Rose when you mention Shipshape at one of their BBQ events. Follow them @lidobristol to check when they’ll be firing up this summer.

M SHED Princes Wharf, Wapping Rd, BS1 4RN 0117 352 6600, info@mshed.org, www.mshed.org Opening hours: Tuesday-Friday, 10am-5pm Closed Monday (except Bank Holidays) Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holiday Mondays: 10am-6pm Don’t miss the well-stocked shop and the stunning Harbourside views from its cafe and terrace. Ride the dockside train, boats and cranes every weekend until October.

Shipshape

pp32-37_directory_9je.indd 5

Located on the floating harbour in the heart of Bristol, Glassboat affords spectacular views of the city: bridges, churches and of course the swans on the water itself. Whatever the celebration, small or large, with work or with loved ones, Glassboat remains the considered waterside restaurant of choice for Bristolians young or old. Glassboat uses only the best local suppliers and cooks classic dishes simply: radishes; sea trout; broad beans and Cornish Earlies will all feature this season. Groups of up to 40 can be comfortably accommodated on the lower deck, the ideal private space for your event.

SUNDAY LUNCH OFFER

The historic Grain Barge, moored on Hotwell Road, has a panoramic view of Brunel’s ss Great Britain down to Cumberland Basin, both from its main harbourside bar and dining area, and from its ‘alfresco’ deck. The lower Hold Bar provides a great venue for live music and can also be hired for private parties. At the Grain Barge they don’t believe in speed dating - they don’t believe 3 minutes is long enough to decide whether you like someone or not, so they’ve come up with Slow Food Dating: a 5-course meal, with 5 different people, only £25. Email the Grain Barge team at hello@grainbarge.com to find out more.

The Lido is a veritable oasis tucked within a courtyard of Georgian terraces in the backstreets of Clifton. A unique location where chef Freddy Bird presides over 2 floors of poolside dining. Feast on wood-roast scallops, brill or lamb in the first floor restaurant or enjoy the outdoor pool and soak up some summer sun on the Terrace, where they will be hosting BBQ evenings on warmer evenings. The ground floor bar spills out on to the poolside in suitable weather; open for breakfast and for hot and cold tapas from midday every day.

M Shed, Bristol’s newest museum, has had a successful first year attracting over half a million visitors. The museum has three public spaces – Bristol People, Bristol Places & Bristol Life plus a special exhibition gallery – and is splendidly housed in a building crucial to that history – a former 1950s transit shed rich in its own dockside stories. Inside, you can take an interactive tour of Bristol’s past from prehistoric times to the present day. Big draws include an exhibition of Bristol’s experience of World War II and an inventory of its many brilliant creations down the ages, in music, art, science, technology and more.

FREE DRINK AT THE BBQ

FREE ENTRY EVERY DAY!

thirty five

25/05/2012 16:04


Shipshape directory

When in Bristol check website for mooring location 0117 927 6868, matthew.co.uk

MYRISTICA 51 Welsh Back, BS1 4AN 0117 927 2277, myristica.co.uk Opening hours: Mon-Fri 12-2pm (lunch), Mon-Sat 5.30-11.30pm (dinner), Sunday 5.30-10.30pm (dinner, last orders at 10pm) READER OFFER Enjoy lunch throughout summer and get two courses and a glass of wine for £8.95. Must mention Shipshape when dining. Not available evenings, in conjunction with any other offer or for takeaway/delivery. The two courses can either be a main and a dessert, or a starter and a main. Soft drink alternative available. Offer available throughout June, July and August.

THE SHAKESPEARE TAVERN

68 Prince Street, BS1 4QD 0117 929 7695 Opening hours: Mon-Thur 11am-11pm, Fri-Sat 11am-12am, Sun 12pm-11pm

SPIKE ISLAND

133 Cumberland Road, BS1 6UX 0117 929 2266, spikeisland.org.uk Galleries open 11am-5pm Tues-Sun Café open Mon-Fri 8.30am-5pm, Sat and Sun 11am-5pm

thirty six

pp32-37_directory_9je.indd 6

A magnificent replica of a Tudor merchant ship that recreated the Atlantic crossing by explorer John Cabot. He was searching for a sailing route to Asia but ended up “discovering” Newfoundland. Get the best views of Bristol harbour from the deck on one of their regular public cruises – fish and chip suppers on board are extremely popular – or you can venture down the scenic Avon Gorge under the Clifton Suspension Bridge. There are also offshore sailing opportunities and the ship is available for private hire – check website for sailing programme.

Gazing serenely over Welsh Back, Myristica is one of the highlights of the harbour’s impressive dining landscape. The menu features a range of beautifully crafted dishes from across the Indian subcontinent. Why not kick off with baby squid deep-fried and tossed with bell peppers, chilli flakes and honey, before moving on to pista murgh (breast of chicken in a mild cream sauce with ground pistachios and saffron)? Then round things off with a luxuriant chocolate samosa dessert and ice cream. Don’t forget to try Myristica’s new mouth-watering summer menu – available now.

£8.95 LUNCH OFFER

The new spring/summer menu at this venerable old harbour boozer features an appetizing mix of traditional dishes, sharing platters and tapasstyle offerings. The Shakey’s popular lunch deal (sandwich, chips and drink: £5.95) continues throughout the summer too. Behind the bar, the pub’s very own Shakespeare cask ale is being consumed by the barrel-load, while new arrivals for the long, sun-soaked afternoons include two bottled ciders: Kopparberg (cloudberry) and Rekorderlig (strawberry and lime). Elsewhere, it’s business as usual at this handsome wood-panelled pub.

Spike Island is a centre for the production and exhibition of art and design based in an 80,000 square foot former Brooke Bond tea-packing factory. Its year-round public programme features free exhibitions by local, national and international artists, as well as regular talks, events and activities for all. Spike Café is open seven days a week, serving hot and cold drinks, snacks and homemade meals in a relaxed setting overlooking the river. Spike Island is also a busy working building, home to a range of artists, designers, students, creative businesses and other arts organisations.

PIC: STUART WHIPPS

THE MATTHEW

Shipshape

25/05/2012 16:04


PIC: STUART WHIPPS

Shipshape directory

SPYGLASS Welsh Back, BS1 4SB 0117 927 7050, spyglassbristol.co.uk Spyglass has a non-reservation policy for groups of less than 8. To book a table for a group of 8 or more please contact groups@spyglass.co.uk Opening hours: Everyday from 12 midday READER OFFER Free glass of sangria or tumbler of house wine for all guests who mention Shipshape.

TOBACCO FACTORY SUNDAY MARKET

10am-2.30pm every Sunday tobaccofactory.com facebook.com/tobaccofactorymarket

WATERSHED

1 Canons Road, BS1 5TX 0117 927 5100, info@watershed.co.uk, watershed.co.uk, dshed.net Cafe/bar opening hours: Mon 10am-11pm, Tues-Thur 9.30am-11pm, Sat 10am-midnight, Sun 10am-10.30pm

ZA ZA BAZAAR Opening hours: Lunch: 11am-5pm; Dinner: 5-11pm; Bar: 11am-1am (closed Christmas Day) Bristol Harbourside, Canons Road, BS1 5UH (Located next to Pero’s Bridge) 0117 922 0330, ZaZaBazaar.com enquiries@ZaZaBazaar.com facebook.com/ZaZaBazaar @ZaZaBazaar READER OFFER Celebrating a birthday, arranging a stag or hen do, or planning a work night out? For parties of six or more, one person can eat free. T&Cs apply.

Shipshape

pp32-37_directory_9je.indd 7

Their 10th anniversary season sees the offering at Spyglass reinvigorated. A rotisserie has been installed to relieve the pressure on the BBQ; a counter kitchen for the preparation of chopped salads, dips, flatbreads and ice creams will now all be proudly churned on the premises. The joy of eating simple, well-sourced food with no concerns over getting hands dirty or making a mess. Bones and shells should litter the table and they’ll supply crayons and entertainment for the kids. Spyglass is the perfect venue for family celebrations this summer.

FREE DRINKY

FOR EVER DINER

The Sunday market is a cornerstone of the buzzing Southville community, with up to 40 stalls offering locally made bread, fresh farm food, homemade cakes, cheese, chutneys, books, records, flowers, clothing, jewellery… and much more, including a resident bike mechanic and children’s entertainment. The first Sunday of every month features ‘Retroville’, with vintage & retro stalls alongside the regular market. With its welcoming atmosphere, plenty of seating and delicious food and drink on offer, the market is a great place to shop and to meet up with friends and family.

Watershed is the perfect social space on Bristol’s historic Harbourside, showing the best independent films from across the world. With three cinemas to choose from and a welcoming, relaxed café/bar enjoying unique waterside views, it’s the ideal place to meet friends, grab a tasty coffee or drink, enjoy a meal and watch a film. Come and try their Plot to Plate organic menu showcasing the tastes of the South West, or treat yourself to a drink before or after a film in the buzzing bar. For current film and events listings, visit watershed.co.uk.

Find delicious seasonal delights at Za Za Bazaar this summer. To celebrate the start of the new season, Bristol’s buzzing global-fusion restaurant is introducing summery bites to its international menu. Find a selection of fruits and fresh salads alongside a range of cold starters. Za Za will also be breaking out the barbecue in time for the sunshine as the Chinese kitchen serves up dishes on mini skewers. Meanwhile, over on the Indian island, chefs will be taking their influence from the street foods of the subcontinent with snacks like chaat and gol gappa proving irresistible.

ONE PARTY MEMBER EATS FREE! IN GROUPS OF SIX OR MORE

thirty seven

25/05/2012 16:04


feature

Hello George. How are you? I am feeling on top of the world, thank you. I thrive on challenges and we have a few ahead! Let’s first talk about the mayoral referendum. Why is an elected mayor a good thing? Bristol has done itself a real favour going for an elected mayor at the referendum – and we shall reap the benefits, so long as we get the right mayor! The whole point is to shake up a system that does not serve us well. While I do believe there are some good people on the council, they are always looking over their shoulders as the next election approaches. An elected mayor will be elected by all, will represent the whole city rather than a ward, and will have the recognition and authority to beat the drum for Bristol – and hopefully inspire generosity of spirit and ambition to make it one of the very best cities in Europe.

“It runs in my veins”: George Ferguson takes in the views at Bristol harbour

I ❤ Harbourside Architect and entrepreneur George Ferguson has emerged as the bookmakers’ favourite to become Bristol’s first elected mayor. Shipshape talks to him about his plans to make Bristol a “more united and happier city”

PICS: JAMES@THEGROUPOFSEVEN.CO.UK

There seemed to be a lot of confusion and/or apathy running up to the referendum. Why do you think this was the case? Considering the confusion, I thought the turnout was surprisingly high – I had predicted no more than 20% [one in four voted]. However, now we are to have an election with real and recognisable candidates, I do believe there will be a much higher level of understanding and interest. The aim must be to try to double the referendum turnout. You’ve announced you’ll run for mayor. What can we expect from you, if elected? You can expect a more united and happier city; a greener and more beautiful city; a city that builds on its remarkable history and that embraces its talent for the greater benefit of the all. As a city we have to make ourselves as resilient as possible to the economic and environmental threats around us. We should be generating more of our own energy and growing more of our own food. We should be working with social entrepreneurs to bring real ‘people based’ regeneration to our communities. Above all, it is a matter of inspiring pride in our city and our communities. thirty eight

pp38_heart_6je.indd 2

You’re passionate about championing independent businesses – will these organisations benefit from your policies? I am passionate about enabling independent businesses to start up, to survive and to prosper. This is what will give us a resilient economy and much richer high streets. Bristol is in many ways perfectly placed to prosper from a knowledge economy, with local entrepreneurs and creative businesses working closely with or in our universities. Is the next ‘Facebook’ being created in Bristol? Do you feel a particularly strong connection to the Harbourside? The City Docks, as I still like to call them, having been part of the action to save them in the 1960s and ’70s, are an integral part of my life. The story of a group of us buying the cranes in order to save them from the scrapyard, selling them back to the city and using the money to set up the Ferry Company is apocryphal. My connection started with me living overlooking the docks in the late ’60s when I was a student, being woken up every morning by the beating of steel in Hill’s shipyard – now the marina. It has been painful watching some of the crass development replacing the timber yards, the filling in of some of the dry docks, and the missing of some wonderful opportunities

to make what should have been the best city centre harbour redevelopment in the world!

Are there any future redevelopments you’re particularly excited about? I would like to be more excited. While there are worthy developments planned for Wapping Wharf and McArthur’s, they do not set me alight. I am hoping for a brilliant new place for the Soil Association, incorporating part of the old Gasworks (below); something spectacular and of significant public benefit on the empty site of the Centre for the Performing Arts (adjacent to the Lloyds building); and something light and magical in the gap next to the Arnolfini. However, what could be better than an elegant pedestrian crossing east of the ss Great Britain? It would be a great symbol and service connecting north and south Bristol and an appropriate completion of the Brunel Mile. What one thing would significantly improve life around the Harbourside? Filling the empty buildings and dead spaces with activity. This was the purpose of starting the Harbourside market, which I hope will grow and influence others to inject other activities and ideas. How often do you visit the harbour? Frequently – it being between my home and my work! It runs in my veins. Do you have a favourite place to eat or drink? The Grain Barge at Mardyke Wharf and No.1 Harbourside – but then I am biased! I should also mention the little ‘honeypots’ like Olive Shed and Brunel’s Buttery that really bring the place to life. s Shipshape

25/05/2012 16:06


WAPPING WHARF

CAR PARK Cheap City Parking Monday to Friday Up to 1 hour

Saturday 80p

1-2 hours

£1.50

2-4 hours

£3.80

Over 4 hours

£7

Week

£28

Month

£85

Any period

£2.50

Sunday & Bank Holidays Any period

£1.50

Special corporate rates available for 5 cars or more. Monthly season ticket enquiries: 0207 563 3000

To all our customers, Please note that the car park will remain open and fully operational for at least the next two years whilst we build phase one of the Wapping Wharf Development. We will keep you informed of progress.

SAT NAV: BS1 4RW www.wappingwharf.co.uk/cheapparking


Shipshape 10 - Summer 2012  
Shipshape 10 - Summer 2012  

Celebrating the very best of Bristol's historic harbourside.

Advertisement