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calmer), and that they’d typically dive for up to six hours. I informed him we had a latitude/longitude of the impact point of the crash and similar location of the last pinger emitted once the aircraft sank. The cost was approximately several thousand dollars per dive. This was exciting, or at least a reasonable plan to pursue. I immediately scheduled an appointment with the CG to run this by him. In a few days I was once again in the CG’s office, briefed him on all that I had learned and discussed the costs of possible rental of the deep submersible. I believe he may have made a call and discussed something with his command sargent major, but it didn’t take long before the one-star gave me the go ahead to pursue a search for up to two night’s worth of diving. I headed back to my office to call San Diego. I informed the deep submersible command we were "a go," and he indicated he would be in touch as soon as they were definitely on their way to Pearl Harbor. As February turned into March, and I was still without any contact, I was getting anxious, although I wasn’t getting pressured from above. I just felt the longer we go the less chance we would have had of finding anything. Again, naively I was thinking they’ll dive straight down from that last pinger location, do a couple of sweeps of that area, and voila, they will find the helicopter. Finally, in early April, I got the call that the deep submersible would be in Pearl Harbor the following week. The lieutenant I had spoken to said they could support our mission the Monday after the week they arrived, since they would first be helping the Barbers Point squadron. And they would be available

30 Issue 40, 2014

The DSVSS Laney Chouest, (Deep Submergence Vehicle Support Ship), hoists the Turtle (DSV-3) for a launching into the depths of the Pacific, circa 1988. Courtesy of navsource.org

through Wednesday of that week (before their Pearl Harbor dive search). I reminded him we could pay for a

maximum of two night (dives). He reminded me it was a three-man vehicle, the pilot (himself), an engineer/co-pi-

Profile for The Grog Ration

The Grog, Issue 40 2014  

A Journal of Navy Medical History and Culture

The Grog, Issue 40 2014  

A Journal of Navy Medical History and Culture

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