Page 1

Gradzette the university of manitoba’s graduate student magazine

july 2013


Gradzette THE UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA’S GRADUATE STUDENT MAGAZINE Gradzette c/o The Manitoban Newspaper Publications Corporation 105 University Centre University of Manitoba Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 General inquiries and advertising Phone: (204) 474.6535 Fax: (204) 474.7651 Email: editor@gradzette.com Editor: Ryan Harby Copy Editor: Bryce Hoye Designer: Marc Lagace Contributors: Sheldon Birnie, Ryan Harby, Mary Horodyski Cover: Ryan Harby The Gradzette is the official student magazine of the University of Manitoba’s graduate student community and is published on the first Monday of each month by the Manitoban Newspaper Publications Corporation.

Freelance! The Gradzette is pleased to offer U of M graduate students the opportunity to get involved with their student paper. If you have a passion for writing, journalism, photography, or illustration the Gradzette is looking for individuals to get involved with the production process of the U of M’s grad student paper. The Gradzette currently offers 10 cents per word for freelance article assignments (articles can range from 400-900 words) and upwards of seven dollars per photo/graphic used within the paper. Freelancers will be added to a contact pool and emailed with potential article, photo, or graphic assignments when they become available. On average, freelance contributors will be expected to complete assignments within a seven day period, although certain assignments may be allotted a longer schedule. For applications to the freelance writer pool, please send a resume and at least two (2) writing samples to editor@gradzette. com.

2

Gradzette

The Gradzette is a democratic student organization, open to participation from all students. It exists to serve its readers as students and citizens. The magazine’s primary mandate is to report fairly and objectively on issues and events of importance and interest to the graduate students of the University of Manitoba, to provide an open forum for the free expression and exchange of opinions and ideas, and to stimulate meaningful debate on issues that affect or would otherwise be of interest to the student body and/or society in general. The Gradzette serves as a training ground for students interested in any aspect of journalism. Students and other interested parties are invited to contribute. Please contact the editor listed above for submission guidelines. The Gradzette reserves the right to edit all submissions and will not publish any material deemed by its editorial board to be discriminatory, racist, sexist, homophobic or libelous. Opinions expressed in letters and articles are solely those of the authors. The Gradzette is a member of the Canadian University Press, a national student press cooperative with members from St. John’s to Victoria. All contents are ©2013 and may not be reprinted without the express written permission of the Manitoban Newspaper Publications Corporation. Yearly subscriptions to the Gradzette are available, please contact publisher@gradzette.com for more information.


Parking plan Event day traffic an evolving topic at Investors Group Field by Ryan Harby uch has been said in the months leading up to the opening of Investors Group Field about the issue of parking on and around the campus area. Many concerns have been raised by area residents, students, faculty, and Blue Bomber fans alike as to the exact accessibility and availability of parking during event days at the new stadium.

M

Day Parking Plan would be put in place for the U of M campus, to be implemented for any occasion at the Investors Group Field expected to attract over 15,000 people. As part of the event day plan, access to the Fort Garry campus will be limited for up to 90 minutes prior to such an event, meaning only vehicles with a University of Manitoba or Winnipeg Blue Bomber parking pass After a great deal of speculation as to the logistics will be permitted entry during this time. Those with U of so much incoming off-campus traffic, June 12 saw of M passes must enter campus by way of King’s Drive the Winnipeg Blue Bombers play an exhibition game and parking will be limited to lots A, B, L, AC, and CT. Thirty minutes following the beginning of an event, against the Toronto Argonauts in what was the first full scale public event held at the U of M campus’ new access will be allowed for vehicle pick-up and drop-off crown jewel facility, drawing over 28,000 in attendance. only. Students can still get to campus by means of public While some aspects of the night’s event went off without transportation, biking, or on foot, but vehicular access a hitch, there were several noted hiccups throughout for casual parking will not become available until one the festivities – especially related to game day transpor- hour passed the end of the stadium event. tation, traffic, and parking. According to the Investors Group Field official webIn effort to help students navigate these murky waters site, events at the new stadium will not affect classes but of event day parking and traffic, we here at the Gradzette may affect how students travel and where they park, if they are planning to stay on campus past 4:30 p.m. have compiled a refresher of sorts. Earlier this year it was announced an official Event

“We’ve worked with the CFL to ensure there are no Gradzette

3


daytime games during the week. Of the 10 home games signage for available parking lots, having police officers in 2013, most are scheduled during July and August, stationed to direct traffic at major intersections, and ensuring a significant improvement in the amount of and all weekday games will begin at 7 p.m. or later.” In the months leading up to the stadium’s opening, buses running routes to and from the U of M campus Bombers COO Jim Bell relayed that local residents of during game nights.

“We thank [our fans] immensely and ask for their the surrounding Fort Richmond neighbourhood would receive one parking pass per household in order to park patience as we all continue to work through these early on the street during restricted periods. Those without a stage growing pains,” said Bell. street parking pass could be either ticketed or towed if The Bombers also announced that they would inparked in one of the restricted zones. crease the time prior to the June 27 regular season Along with parking, one of the concerns many Win- opener game that fans would be allowed access to park nipeggers voiced following the first Bomber game was on campus, from 90 minutes to three hours prior to the the traffic generated down Pembina and other major start of the event. It is still unclear whether or not this driving routes. For students, this could be equally trou- increase in early access for event parking will continue bling as even those who opt to take the bus or carpool for all future events. to campus might be significantly delayed by the type of Following the Bomber home opener, many fans gridlock traffic fans saw earlier in June. voiced their appreciation for the significant improveAddressing concerns of congestion from their opening game, the Blue Bomber organization announced efforts to reduce the traffic at future game day events by doubling the number of parking attendants, increasing

ments in game day organization and traffic flow. With but a handful of minor setbacks, the efforts made to eliminate the traffic issues experienced at the June 12 event seemed to pay off in full.

Upcoming events at Investors Group Field: Event Date Bomber Game Bomber Game Paul McCartney Bomber Game Bomber Game Bomber Game Bomber Game Bomber Game Bomber Game 4

Fri, Jul 19 Fri, Jul 26 Mon, Aug 12 Fri, Aug 16 Sun, Sept 8 Fri, Sept 20 Fri, Sept 27 Sat, Oct 19 Sat, Nov 2

Gradzette

Event Start Time

Access to Campus without a Limited Access to Full Access to Campus Blue Bomber Season Ticket or Campus (pick-up / Approximate Start Time U of M Parking Pass End Time dropoff) Start Time

7:00pm

5:30pm

7:30pm

11:00pm

7:00pm

5:30pm

7:30pm

11:00pm

8:00pm

6:30pm

8:30pm

12:30pm

7:00pm

5:30pm

7:30pm

11:00pm

3:00pm

1:30pm

3:30pm

7:00pm

7:00pm

5:30pm

7:30pm

11:00pm

7:00pm

5:30pm

7:30pm

11:00pm

2:30pm

1:00pm

2:30pm

6:30pm

1:00pm

11:30am

1:30pm

5:00pm


A better burger

Researcher Profile: Tiffany Nicholson, RD by Sheldon Birnie

J

ust in time for grillin’ season, a University of Manitoba master’s student is preparing to defend her research into a functional food that may improve Canada’s favourite barbequed meat: the hamburger. Tiffany Nicholson is a registered dietitian who received her bachelor of science in human nutritional sciences from the department of human ecology at the U of M in December of 2010. Nicholson said that she has long been interested in nutrition and human health. Before returning to academic life after spending her early twenties working in the food service and hospitality industry, she had been interested in homeopathy or naturopathy. However, she found that pursuing such a path would have necessitated a move out of province. Nicholson eventually decided to pursue human nutrition at the U of M. While waiting to take her dietetic internship – which is necessary to become a registered dietitian in Canada -- in September 2011, Nicholson began work on her master’s under Dr. Mohammed Moghadasian, a principal investigator at the St. Boniface Research Centre. In conjunction with the George Weston Ltd Sensory and Food Research Lab at the U of M, Nicholson is researching the effects of micronization on black bean flour and whether it can be effectively incorporated into low-fat beef burgers. “We did a consumer study to see if this would have any market value,” Nicholson told the Gradzette. “We recruited almost 100 people from the U of M. We conducted this consumer study and tried just regular beef burgers and then with six per cent of different micronization levels. Then we’re going to analyze the data to see if that micronization [a heat treatment process] might have affected the flavour, or the consumer’s sensibility of the flavour.”

“If we can incorporate a pulse like a black bean flour, which is lower in fat, higher in fibre, but not affect the taste or desirability, that will benefit Canadians.”

Nicholson’s research continues similar research that U of M’s Dr. Michel Aliani recently completed with another master’s student, which focused on incorporating chickpea and According to Nicholson, “Canadians consume a large lentil flour into hamburgers. “We wanted to look at black bean flour, [because] beans number of hamburgers [per year]. Compared to chicken, fish, pulses and alternatives like tofu, beans and that, we still are much more popular in North America than chickpeas or eat predominantly red meat. Out of red meat, about 35 per lentils,” Nicholson explained. “Some people don’t even recognize a lentil!” cent of that is in hamburger form.” With her thesis defense coming up in August, Nicholson By including an alternative protein supplement—black beans, in this case—to burger patties, producers could offer is close to finishing her analysis. consumers a healthier product. Nicholson’s research, in part, “So far, with the instrumental analysis we’ve found signifis attempting to determine if such a substitution is palatable icant difference between the all-beef control and once you to consumers. add in the pulse flours. You’re seeing better fatty acid profiles,

5

Gradzette


better pH values, better water retention capacity. That means you’re having less drip loss.” Nicholson added, “When [most people] make a burger you add some sort of binder, egg or wheat flour or something. We actually used a wheat flour control as well. Certainly an all-beef patty kind of becomes like a ‘hockey puck.’ It loses a lot of water, becomes really rubbery.” Nicholson explained that when she began her research, she had long been interested in husbandry practices, such as organic farming and grass fed beef compared to conventional modern practices.

cess of micronization affects enzyme activity. Those enzymes that are supposed to cause that ‘beany’ flavour that can turn consumers off. “ Nicholson has yet to analyze the data from consumers, so the jury is still out as to whether black bean flour is a suitable additive to our backyard barbeques. Whatever the results, there is more to discover in the field of functional foods. “We’re looking at effects of these really high heat treatments, up to 140 degrees Celsius. It’s out of the range of my masters’ project, what vitamins and minerals you’re destroying at that temperature.”

“If we can incorporate a pulse [to burger patties] like a black

bean flour, which is lower in fat, higher in fibre, but not affect the taste or desirability, that will benefit Canadians.” – Tiffany Nicholson

“I did an initial pilot project during my undergrad comparing the different fatty acids profiles of different types of meat and the different things they were fed and the ways they were raised,” she said. That background in fatty acid and lipid extraction was brought to fore in her current masters’ research. “We kind of combined that with the sensory aspect, looking at fatty acids, looking at enzyme activity to see if that pro-

Is Nicholson planning on continuing her research at the PhD level at this point? “My main interest is clinical dietetics. I’ve been in school for seven years,” she tells the Gradzette with a chuckle. While not completely closing the door on furthering her academic life, Nicholson says she does have priority after completing her master’s. “I’d like to find a job!”

Get your research featured in the

Gradzette

Are you a graduate student eager to promote your research and provide exposure for your work in the master’s or doctoral program? The Gradzette is looking for individuals interested in participating in our ongoing “Researcher Profile” column, which seeks to showcase important and exciting U of M research for a larger audience. Subjects of a “Researcher Profile” will be interviewed by a Gradzette staff member regarding their ongoing research project. Once the column has been put together, the information will be published online both on the Gradzette website and within the PDF version of the monthly Gradzette magazine. Both versions are free to share with coworkers, acquaintances, professors, etc. If you would like to be featured in an upcoming “Researcher Profile,” please contact editor@ gradzette.com with details regarding your field of study, a short blurb about your current research, and any pertinent contact information for interview purposes.

Gradzette

6


Look, Listen, Learn

Researcher Profile: Josée Boulanger by Mary Horodyski

J

osée Boulanger, a graduate student in the interdisciplinary master’s program in disability studies, says “I went to university to become a social activist.” Boulanger began her studies at the University of Ottawa with an honours degree in communications and recently defended her thesis at the University of Manitoba.

of the Legislative Building to protest the government’s announcement to provide $40 million to keep the Manitoba Developmental Centre, a large institution for people labelled with intellectual disability, then in operation. At the time of the protest many from the disability community considered the Developmental Centre to be an outdated system of care that kept its residence from contributing to a community setting.

Boulanger’s tool for social activism is vidAs Boulanger filmed the eo storytelling. activists holding up signs She chose video and making speeches, for its “ability to she realized “these people give the illusion were not weak, they were of reality and not victims, they were its capability to tough!” Despite the freezreach people reing temperature, and being gardless of their seven months pregnant, level of literacy.” Boulanger recalls feeling Her thesis, titled “energized by their open “Look, Listen, resistance.” She says she Learn: Collabfeels “lucky to have had orative Video the opportunity to work Storytelling By/ with people who were pasWith People sionate and committed” to Who Have Been Labelled With An Intellectual Disability” describes her their cause. video collaborations and the feature-length documenBoulanger’s understanding of intellectual disability is tary she co-directed with members of the self-advocacy informed by the social model of disability. group People First. “[I have come] to understand intellectual disability Boulanger and her co-directors began The Freedom as a construct largely defined by a medical perspective Tour in 2006. With financial support from the National that pathologizes difference. The value and the meaning Film Board of Canada and People First of Canada, their we, as people, attribute to difference is based on our culfilm idea grew from a Manitoba focus to a Prairie-wide tural beliefs and interpretations and lived experiences.” project. It was released in 2008, bringing critical acFor Boulanger, challenging notions of intellectuclaim to Boulanger and the People First co-directors, as well as raising awareness of the experiences of people in al disability has an immediate connection because her younger brother, Stéphane, has this label. Canadian institutions.labelled “For me, it’s personal: C’est une histoire de famille.” Boulanger spoke to the Gradzette from her fami“When people who have been labelled receive the ly-owned farm in Vars, Ontario, a town just outside Ottawa. She has vivid memories of her first encounter with support and have the power to tell their own stories usmembers of People First of Manitoba. One cold evening ing an accessible medium such as video, social stereoin February, 2005, People First staged a rally in front types may be shattered since they do not fit the varied Gradzette 7


and complex realities of people with so-called ‘intellec- nurtured her desire for social justice as well as her curiosity about human behaviour. Now that she has comtual disabilities.’” After her degree at the University of Ottawa, Bou- pleted her thesis, Boulanger feels that she is still far from langer worked with Freeze Frame, the Media Arts Cen- finishing her mission. She compares the experience of tre for Young People, to teach media production to students throughout Manitoba in both French and English. In 2004, while helping her mother find disability-related information on the internet, Boulanger stumbled across the University of Manitoba’s interdisciplinary master’s program in disability studies. Finding this program was “a real eureka moment,” says Boulanger. “The pieces of the puzzle seemed to fall into place.” “It dawned on me that this program might allow me to explore the theory related to disability, so that I could help people make videos that would destabilize accepted ideas about people labelled with intellectual disability.”

As Boulanger filmed the activists holding up signs and making speeches, she realized “these people were not weak, they were not victims, they were tough!”

In her thesis, Boulanger adopted an autoethnographic approach to reflect the same process of experience-based story-telling that she encouraged in others. Her advisor, Dr. Nancy Hansen, director of the interdisciplinary master’s in disability studies, says Boulanger’s thesis is “the finest example of this type of participatory action research and autoethnography that I have ever seen.”

writing a thesis to travelling.

“Just when you begin to feel comfortable and confident with the language you have acquired, the trip is over and it’s time to go home! Finishing my thesis was just the beginning. I feel that I have just scratched the surface. There are so many more stories that need to be told from the experience of people who have been la“[She is] the finest example of the academic activist,” belled with an intellectual disability.” says Hansen. “Her work illustrates the best ways that the The videos Boulanger created with members of Peoacademy and people with intellectual disabilities can ple First can be seen on the Label Free Zone / Zone sans work together to facilitate meaningful social change.” étiquettes on YouTube. Copies of The Freedom Tour can Boulanger says that being a sister to Stéphane has be ordered from the People First of Canada website.

The Manitoban is the official student newspaper of the University of Manitoba. It is published monthly during the summer and each week of regular classes during the academic year by the Manitoban Newspaper Publications Corporation. The Manitoban is an independent and democratic student organization, open to participation from all students. It exists to serve its readers as students and citizens. If you would like to volunteer for the Manitoban, please email all inquiries to volunteer@ themanitoban.com. Gradzette

8

July, 2013 Gradzette  

The July, 2013 edition of the Gradzette, the University of Manitoba's Graduate Student Magazine.