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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE January 2020 | Vol.25 #03

THE

AN ITALIAN ITINERARY

WARDROBE STAPLES

DECADE OF DESIGN

THOSE RESOLUTIONS

FLORENCE TO ROME

HOME DÉCOR TRENDS

WORKING MINDS WELLBEING AT WORK

FOR THE NEW YEAR

HERE WE GO AGAIN!

HEARTS OF GIBRALTAR

MONTHLY SPOTLIGHT


Festive Afternoon Tea Served in sophisticated surroundings at the elegant Rock Hotel Lounge Bar. Treat yourself to a quintessential experience.

3 Europa Road, Gibraltar Events: +350 200 73000/events@rockhotel.gi www.rockhotelgibraltar.com


from the editor

JANUARY ISSUE EDITOR’S NOTE

F

eliz ano nuevo, dear readers. We made it! I was recently whisked away to Italy for my 30th birthday surprise (this is the bit where you gasp in shock that I’m either a lot older or a lot younger than you thought). You can read all about it in our travel piece by Chris, who, as you may have guessed, is my other half (p. 69). (I don’t make a habit of going on holiday with all my contributors. Promise.)

A TIME TO SAY GOODBYE, AND A TIME TO SAY HELLO.

New year, new features! Working Minds has collaborated with The Gibraltar Magazine to bring you a series of articles, centred around the very important topic of wellbeing at work (p. 26). After all, as Henry Ford stated, “Profit is a by-product of work; happiness is its chief product”. Another new feature I’m excited to introduce is Hearts of Gibraltar. Similar to the viral Humans of New York photoblog, our lens will zoom in on a number of the vibrant people who contribute to our colourful, multi-cultural community (p. 40). Lemon, baking soda and vinegar. Do these words mean anything to you? They should! This is all you need to create all the housecleaning product you need. Chuck in some flour and an egg, and you also have the beginnings of a lemon drizzle cake. Win for the planet, win for my belly. (Alternatively, pop to the shops for a premade eco product. And pick up a lemon drizzle whilst you’re at it. Check out ‘Ocean Drops’, bought for me by my lovely mumin-law; 1 drop creates 750ml of product!) This month, the AWCP encourage us to break habits, and make new ones (p. 34). It’s one thing to have a bunch of goals for the new year, but how do we actually actualise change? Jeremy encourages us not to wait for a specific day, but to start now (p. 38)! Want to up your reading? Set aside a bit of time before bed each night, as opposed to attempting to devour an entire tome of a Sunday. Stuck for what to read? Head over to our monthly book review, where Joel offers us some shelf awareness (p. 52). Cheers to a new year, and another chance for us to get it right.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


Listen on 99.2 FM & DAB+ on the mobile Mobile App or Online at www.rockradio.gi


EDITOR: Sophie Clifton-Tucker editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com DESIGN: Justin Bautista design@thegibraltarmagazine.com REPORTER: Kristel Coombes SALES: Advertising Team sales@thegibraltarmagazine.com

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DISTRIBUTION: DHL martin@matrix.gi ACCOUNTS: Paul Cox paul@thegibraltarmagazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Eran and Ayelet Mamo Shay Jorge v.Rein Parlade Kerstin Andlaw Kristel Coombes Jeremy Gomez Alex Orfila Chris Hedley Julia Coelho Andrew Licudi Claire Spencer Jeremy Gomez Jess Leaper Reg Reynolds

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Richard Cartwright Romina Mayani Joel Francis Peter Schirmer Elena Scialtiel facebook.com/gibmag/ twitter.com/gibmag instagram.com/thegibraltarmagazine/ The Gibraltar Magazine is published monthly by Rock Publishing Ltd Portland House, Glacis Road, Gibraltar, PO Box 1114

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T: (+350) 20077748 E: editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com Š 2019 Rock Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written consent of The Gibraltar Magazine. www.TheGibraltarMagazine.com Magazine & website archived by the British Library 6

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


40 82 content

34

08 Hello There: What's your healthiest recipe?

g Spur Hatchlin

tortoises -thighed

09 What's On? 10 Around Town 12 News

50 N. A. Langdon’s Architectural Exhibition

BUSINESS

52 Bookish: Our monthly book review

19 Upgrading Gibraltar: New technologies

55 A Florentine Sonnet

23 The A-Z of Business: Restaurant franchises

LEISURE

26 Working Minds: Wellbeing at work

38 85 47

LIFE 28 The Duke of Edinburgh’s Gibraltar New Year 30 Those Resolutions… Here we go again!

61 Confessions of a Beauty Addict: The clean beauty movement 66 Flying the Flag for Gibraltar 69 An Italian Itinerary: From Florence to Rome

33 Spotlight: Vicky Bishop

74 Michelangelo and a Glass of Chianti

34 A Zookeeper’s Diary: Swapping old habits for new

78 Wardrobe Staples for the New Year

38 New Year, New Me: Actualising change 40 Hearts of Gibraltar: Personal stories 42 Little Santas for Seniors

SCENE 44 Proper English: Stylistic foibles 47 Perspex Perspective: Stephanie Yeo’s interactive art Cover: Model: Victoria Garcia Bishop Photographer: David Rodriguez (www.drodphotos.com) MUA: Nyree Chipolina GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

57 A New Decade of Design: Home décor trends

REGULARS 82 Recipes: Berry Brilliance and Rosco de Anis 84 Guides and Information 86 Satire: I’m a God, Get Me Out of Here! 88 Clubs and Societies 89 #GibsGems 90 Schedules 94 Coffee Time 96 Kids Korner Don't forget to find the Hungry Monkey! 7


hello there

WHAT'S YOUR HEALTHIEST RECIPE?

Kerry Cervan, 26, Sam Clark, 45, Food Merchandiser at M&S "Summer Berry Smoothie. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries and yoghurt. Just whizz it together in a blender, pour and enjoy."

"Mango Piri Piri Salad. Mango, chicken, lettuce, spinash, avo, spring onion, vinegar. Cook the chicken with some spices of your choice, wait for it to cool and make a salad with the veg."

Beverly valbuena, 57

Cristina Stratulat, 30,

HR Payroll Administrator at M&S "Poached Egg on Avocado Toast. I love this recipe as it's filling and just as easy as it sounds. Just make sure to choose a healthy bread for the toast."

8

Assistant merchandiser at M&S

Graphic Designer at M&S "Roast Chicken Salad. Lettuce, roast chicken tomato onion and mustard. Mix it all together in a bowl, add a little bit of mustard sauce and enjoy."

Alba Aguilera, 30, Shop Assistant at M&S "My healthiest recipe has to have the right amount of proteins, carbs and vitamins, sooo... I'd go for noodles, prawns and vegetables (just choose ones you like the most). A seafood combination that gives you the energy you need for a good day."

Coco, 3, Purr Monster and Box Checker "My favourite is when my human gives me ham. Tasty, tasty ham."

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


WHAT'S ON JANUARY 2020 SATURDAY 4 JANUARY Gibraltar Rugby vs Jamaica Rugby Football Union Europa Point Stadium Free event. SUNDAY 5 JANUARY Three Kings Cavalcade Casemates Square Free event TUESDAY 7 JANUARY New Year’s Classical Concert John Mackintosh Hall, Theatre, 5.30pm - 8.30pm For further information +350 200 72134 or visit www.philharmonic.gi THURSDAY 16 JANUARY TO SATURDAY 18 JANUARY Three Day Chess Seminar University of Gibraltar For more details contact chess@ caletahotel.gi MONDAY 20 JANUARY TO THURSDAY 30 JANUARY Gibraltar International Chess Festival Caleta Hotel (All Day) For more details contact chess@caletahotel.gi MONDAY 20 JANAURY One Man: Many Talents - Art Exhibition John Mackintosh Hall For more information contact Gibraltar Cultural Services, Events Department on telephone: 20067236 or email: info@culture.gi.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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around town

Danza Academy

Annual Choreography Competition

Musicians Association of Gibraltar Christmas Social © Mark Galliano Photography

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


around town

Gibraltar Cultural Awards 2019 © Mark Galliano Photography

Gibraltar International Jazz Festival © Mark Galliano Photography

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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news ADOPT A KITTY My name is Tammy and I'm 9 years old. My mum passed away so I'm living in the sanctuary and I don't like it. I feel confused and vulnerable in a strange place. My sanctuary aunties are very kind, but it's not a home.

AMCHAM’S ANNUAL CHARITY GALA AmCham’s annual Thanksgiving Charity Gala dinner held on Thursday the 21st of November was a wonderful evening attended by both AmCham members and non-members from all business sectors in Gibraltar.

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It's starting to get cold here too. My aunties say I need a real 'cat person'. A quiet and calm home would be perfect where I can snuggle into a warm bed, knowing there's someone there for me. Are you out there, Cat Person? Please message me on Facebook: Gibraltar Cat Welfare Society or Instagram: gibraltarcatwelfare

James Lasry, President of AmCham Gibraltar, welcomed guests followed by a wonderful keynote by The Honorable Franklin E Freeman Jr, North Carolina Supreme Court. David Liston, their Gibraltar US representative, officially opened the event highlighting the importance of the Gibraltar-US relations. The Hon. Vijay Daryanani and his Worship the Mayor, John Goncalves were amongst the guests of honour.

During the evening, guests participated in an auction and raffle and all profits raised will be donated to GADS (The Gibraltar Alzheimer's and Dementia Society). To complete a fabulous event, guests enjoyed music by local band Afterhours. AmCham said: “Thank you to all who supported the event, and we look forward to welcoming you again next year”.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


news ISOLAS LITIGATION PARTNER NEIL COSTA AWARDED DISTINCTION IN MASTER OF LAWS DEGREE ISOLAS Partner and litigator, Neil Costa, has graduated from the University of Edinburgh with Distinction as part of its Master of Laws programme; an internationally recognised and respected postgraduate degree from a top world university. Neil, who recently joined ISOLAS LLP, received his Master’s Degree at a graduation ceremony last month held at The McEwan Hall

in Edinburgh. Neil undertook the majority of the course whilst serving as Her Majesty’s Government of Gibraltar’s Minister for Justice. The Master’s programme offers a wide range of subjects across many legal fields from European, international, and comparative perspectives. Neil undertook modules in, amongst others, international and European media law, the regulation of autonomous systems (known as the law of robotics), international corporate compliance and ethics, and international climate change law. In particular, Neil focused on the international human rights law aspects of these courses. His dissertation critically examined employees’ privacy rights in the work place, especially, in the private sector in the light of the

most recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights. After eight years as a Minister in Her Majesty's Government of Gibraltar, Neil joined ISOLAS, resuming his legal practice in employment, family, common-law, general commercial, and civil and criminal litigation, with a particular emphasis on human rights law. Neil also supports ISOLAS' wider litigation practice, which focuses on complex, high-value multijurisdictional commercial litigation, shareholders' disputes, and insolvency litigation.

50 wines by the glass 40 small dishes of Mediterranean cuisine 30 John Mackintosh Square GX11 1AA Gibraltar. Tel: 200 70201 info@vinopolisgastrobar.gi www.vinopolisgastrobar.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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news EASYJET ANNOUNCES NEW ROUTE FROM GIBRALTAR TO EDINBURGH eeasyJet, Europe’s leading airline, has announced it will launch a new route from Gibraltar to Edinburgh, the first direct connection between Gibraltar and Scotland. This will become the fifth route easyJet now operates from Gibraltar, joining existing services to London Gatwick, London Luton, Manchester and Bristol.

Seats are now on sale with great value fares available from just £15.99. Nicky Guerrero Chief Executive Gibraltar Tourist Board, the Hon Vijay Daryanani and Ali Gayward easyJet’s UK Country Manager Ali Gayward, easyJet’s UK Country Manager commented: “We are delighted to confirm we will be launching a new route from Gibraltar to Edinburgh today and to reaffirm our commitment to serving our customers in Gibraltar, as well as allowing even more people to visit and experience this fantastic destination.

Flights to Edinburgh will operate twice a week throughout the year and will provide business and leisure travellers alike with a direct and easy route between two popular destinations both known for their famous festivals, iconic castles and rich heritage.

“Gibraltar is an important destination for easyJet and we’re focused on building our network sustainably and providing our customers with an excellent service through great value fares, a convenient schedule and more choice when they travel.”

The new service is expected to carry over 27,500 customers in its first year, with flights set to launch on 31 March 2020.

To book and for more information at easyJet’s Gibraltar network visit www.easyjet.com

MINISTRY OF EQUALITY AND GFSB PROMOTE DISABILITY AWARENESS Last month the Ministry of Equality gave a presentation, as part of its Equality Means Business strategy, to members of the GFSB as part of the GFSB’s Breakfast Club initiative. The Minister for Equality, the Hon Samantha Sacramento, MP, said: “Gibraltar has a collective responsibility to be as socially inclusive as we possibly can. This seminar is a useful customer care learning tool that will help attendees focus on what they can do to make themselves and their businesses more inclusive to people with disabilities rather than focus on the limitations they perceive to have in achieving this. I am grateful to the GFSB for being proactive & promoting our offer of providing training to its members. In addition to it being the right thing to do, equality and inclusion also makes good business sense”. For its part a GFSB spokesperson said, "We are extremely happy to partner with the Ministry of Equality to make Gibraltar a more understanding and inclusive community especially amongst our members. As the Minister quite rightly points out apart from being the right thing to do, equality and inclusion also makes good business sense. We would encourage our members to take full advantage of the kind offer and sign up for the training as soon as possible. Together we can make a bigger difference than apart”.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


news HASSAN CENTENARY TERRACES PURCHASERS GIVEN CHANCE TO UPGRADE The Government is giving an opportunity to purchasers in Hassan Centenary Terraces to upgrade to a larger flat if they so wish. The choice will be offered in the order in which the original applications allocation were made, starting with those in Category 1 and working through the order until flats have been exhausted. There is no need for prospective purchasers to take any action. Applicants who have already chosen a flat will be contacted by Gibraltar Residential Properties (GRP) and offered the opportunity to upgrade. The Government is very pleased with the way in which the allocation of these properties continues to progress and looks forward to a successful conclusion of the process.

BOOK ON BORDER CLOSURE TO BE DISTRIBUTED TO SCHOOLCHILDREN

WE'VE HIDDEN A

SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE MAGAZINE...

CAN YOU FIND HIM? send us an email to

monkey@thegibraltarmagazine.com with his location by 20th January

AND YOU COULD WIN A HUNGRY MONKEY VOUCHER!!! Last month's winner:

Kimberley Mitchell hungrymonkey.gi | info@hungrymonkey.gi | +(350) 200 78814

border closure. It then goes on to describe and document the intensification of restrictions against Gibraltar by the Franco regime, by land, by air and at sea. There is a section on the 1967 referendum, on the new Constitution and the actual

/hungrymonkey.gi/

closure of the gates. The story is told through an explanatory chronology of events, photographs taken at the time, press cuttings and testimonies on the part of people who lived through the whole experience.

The Government will shortly commence the distribution of a commemorative book, printed to mark 50 years of the closure of the land frontier with Spain by General Franco in 1969, to schoolchildren all over Gibraltar. The book tells the story of the troubles with Spain at the United Nations which culminated in the

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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news

Last month, broadcaster, journalist and former deputy editor of the Gibraltar Chronicle Alice Mascarenhas launched her book, Alice's Table: Voices from Gibraltar at the Fine Arts Gallery. Published by The Gibraltar Chronicle Newspaper Ltd, the book is a collection of in-depth interviews with local personalities published in the Gibraltar Chronicle in the first year of the Saturday Column ‘Alices Table’. The proceeds from the book will go towards helping fund a summer journalism internship at the Gibraltar Chronicle.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

Dominique Searle, former Editor of the Gibraltar Chronicle, Alice,

and current Editor Brian Reyes.

ALICES TABLE


news TNP LAUNCHES FOOD DISPENSERS AT EROSKI CITY It was an honour for The Nautilus Project to launch the brand new food dispensers at Eroski City in Midtown early this morning. A journey that started two years ago, has seen the introduction of Gibraltar's first step towards major plastic reduction. A further three TNP accolades are eligible for these sustainable changes: Loose fruit and veg #Loose2Reduce Paper and cloth bags #Plastic2Paper Food dispensers #PlasticReduction TNP congratulate Eroski Gibraltar on their constant insight towards reducing our plastic footprint. It is always a pleasure for TNP team to collaborate with Eroski as they set the standard across the board.

EASY ECO TIPS FOR 2020 •

Bring your own shopping bags.

Get your takeaway coffee in a reusable cup.

Take a packed lunch to work.

Say no to straws! (Or buy a reusable.)

Refuse plastic wherever possible.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

Make your own cleaning products, or buy refillables.

Sort your recycling.

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PHILLIPS - WE ARE ALWAYS IN YOUR CORNER COMMERCIAL LAW - MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE - PERSONAL INJURY - FAMILY - EMPLOYMENT CRIMINAL DEFENCE - LANDLORD & TENANT - PUBLIC LAW - PROPERTY & CONVEYANCING - PRIVATE CLIENT

WWW.PHILLIPS.GI


business

UPGRADING GIBRALTAR 7 technologies Gibraltar could do with…

T

echnologies are constantly transforming our lives in almost every aspect. Yet often we are so involved in our day-today tasks and concerns that we forget to ‘step outside the box’ for a moment and explore what technologies out there can improve how we do things. As Innovation Consultants, we at Benefit Business Solutions have explored some of the latest innovations out there that Gibraltar can definitely benefit from:

1

Report a fault: Ever walked down your street and noticed a gaping pothole? Or found it difficult to see at night because a streetlight (or two) was broken? Thanks to a new wave of mobile apps that connect people with their local authorities, you’ll never again have to wait helplessly for your neighbourhood problems to get fixed. Creating a twoway communication channel is very important for a city to be smart. It’s not just a oneway thing, either. With fault reporting apps, authorities can easily communicate with their GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

residents, creating a far more interactive process. Staff can respond directly to the reporter by simply clicking ‘reply’ – just like they would with any other digital messages. As well as benefitting the app’s users, the authorities, in cities where similar solutions have been implemented, also reap the rewards as users are effectively ‘on-the-ground scouts’, feeding in far more information about the local community than the council’s own staff could gather. The result is a streamlined, uncomplicated process that encourages more efficient improvements of a city – through collaboration. Similar apps have also been adopted by estate management companies, where residents of a building or an estate can easily communicate with the management company reporting any faults or disturbances.

Ever walked down your street and noticed a gaping pothole?

2

Find a parking spot: Ever driven to Midtown car park in the morning just to find it full? Or driven around town to find a Pay & Display space available? There are plenty of mobile apps that use crowd sourcing to show you as many available parking spots as possible, so before you even start your journey, you can check whether there is still parking available in the car park or anywhere else. These apps boast a library of over 70 million parking spots across 15,000 cities. They can also show Resident Permit parking spaces, prices for parking lots in various paid car parks as well as free parking spaces. It’s time for Gibraltar to have one of these apps too.

3

Lab results to your mobile: Healthcare communication is one of the most growing segments in public healthcare provision. Imagine receiving your blood test or X-ray results directly to your mobile or email without having to chase the doctor for it? Or simply renewing 19


business your prescription or getting a GP appointment with the press of a button? Even better, the prescription can be sent directly to your mobile for your pharmacist to scan and supply you with your medicine. No more queuing up at the ICC just to get or renew a prescription. Such solutions are already widely deployed in many countries, making life easier for millions of patients.

4

e-Gov: We’ve all heard the promise of e-Gov, yet paperwork is still crippling businesses and individuals alike. With a population of 1.3 million, Estonia is probably the only country in

has reached an unprecedented level of transparency in governance and built broad trust in its digital society. According to the Estonian authorities, as a result, Estonia saves over 844 years of working time annually and has become a hassle-free environment for business and entrepreneurship. Surely Gibraltar, with a population that is 2.5% that of Estonia, should be able to deploy similar solutions swiftly.

No more queuing up at the ICC just to renew a prescription. the world where 99% of the public services are available online 24/7. From business licencing to residency and work permits, tax filing and even booking allocations in sporting facilities-nearly everything can be done online. E-services are only impossible for marriages, divorces and realestate transactions - you still have to get out of the house for those. Thanks to a safe, convenient and flexible digital ecosystem, Estonia

5

Order a taxi: While in most countries, Uber and other similar taxi services can be ordered in seconds from the comfort of your mobile, in Gibraltar we still need to call up and order a taxi. There are

SENIORS TEA FOR TWO A Little English/B2 Projects initiative to help combat seniors' loneliness

Live M usic

BBQ

Music, hot & cold drinks, sandwiches, cakes & socialising. Every 2nd Tuesday of the month, at 2pm. Calpe Rowing Club seniorsteafortwo@gmail.com +350 54008999

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


business

7

Customised tourism: With millions of visitors arriving in Gibraltar every year, this is one sector where the power of Big Data should really be utilised by both tourism bodies, retailers and tourism related providers in Gibraltar. Solutions enabling push messages on special offers and events to be sent to visitors’ mobiles and the ability for visitors to customise their experience of Gibraltar by offering tailored mobile appbased itineraries based on visitor’s preferences. Post-trip reviews and collaborating and sharing experiences should also be made easy in an age when online social networking is such an important component of every trip.

It will move Gibraltar closer to becoming the ‘Silicon Rock’. plenty of mobile app solutions there to enable not only ordering a taxi with the press of a button, but also to tracking whereabout the taxi is and receiving alerts when the taxi has arrived to pick you up, saving you the need to wait outside in the rain or heat. With only about 125 taxis around in Gibraltar, this could be a welcomed boost to the level of service.

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More than online shopping: The threat that online shopping poses to high street retailers is not new, and some retailers in Gibraltar have already developed online e-commerce capabilities. However, there is much more out there in terms of technologies GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

that retailers can implement to compete with global e-commerce sites. Some examples are Smart Mirrors that are installed in shops providing customers with a 360-degree view of how a piece of clothing, say, a dress, looks on, without the hustle of having to actually try it on. For bulkier items like furniture, the answer is Augmented Reality (AR) apps that let customers get a visual representation of how an item would look in their homes, or how a home improvement project will look like. Supermarkets can implement self-checkout facilities to reduce queuing time at cashier and to reallocate their existing staff more efficiently. Hairdressers and cosmetic shops can implement facial simulation technologies for before and after comparisons. There are also plenty of solutions out there that can assist retailers in gathering and analysing customer related data and sales statistics to improve both store offering and visitors to shoppers conversion rates.

Obviously in each of the above categories, there are many providers who can deliver these solutions. Our technology scouting services can help you find the most suitable solution provider for your needs and offcourse, can recommend solutions you didn’t even know existed.

ERAN SHAY, Managing Director & AYELET MAMO SHAY, Business Development Director of Benefit Business Solutions Ltd. (+350) 200 73669 general@benefitgibraltar.com

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


start-ups

THE A-Z OF BUSINESS

In my last article we discussed in length about how to open a restaurant, and we went into some detail of this most interesting business of hospitality. In this new one we shall look into an entirely different option: the restaurant franchise business.

A

re you keen to open up a restaurant, but cannot quite make up your mind whether to do a straightforward start-up or so-called 'green field business', or do it via a franchise operator? This is not an easy choice to make. As a former master franchisee of a successful casual dining pizza restaurant brand, one can probably give the new hospitality entrepreneur an idea of how it works. A franchise restaurant is like any other business. There are some very good ones, and others that are not as good. Top brands can be very costly and most difficult to obtain, easily exceeding the half-million mark – or double. And bear in mind no success is guaranteed. In our particular case it was a horse of a different colour. We always wanted to have our own restaurant. Since the age of eighteen I was very fond of this London chain of pizza and Italian food restaurants. It was casual dining, not fast food. During the early part of the new century we wanted to make a move from property development which had been our core business. The idea was quite simple. The London

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

chain was, and still is, without a doubt the best pizza chain in existence, offering home-baked pizza of high standards as good, if not better, than those you may find in Naples or Palermo. The Englishman that started all this was a fascinating man. A Cambridge University graduate in history he travelled to Italy in the 60s aged twenty and got this pizza idea to bring back to London. It was a great success. The fact is the chain was only just starting in Spain and had no outlets in Costa del Sol. We met the directors in Madrid and concluded a deal. We became the master franchisees of Costa del Sol with a first restaurant in Malaga. The idea was to open up half a dozen along the coast and then takeover all the rest in Spain which belonged to them. The head company owned some 12 restaurants, making a reasonable profit. In the right hands, things could improve considerably. Plans were worked out. Then,

in 2008, Spain was hit by what some people called a recession. The crisis was so immense that it was more like a depression, and it took its toll on most businesses. The pizza chain included. The company started closing down restaurants. What did we do? Closed it down and took all our equipment and started our own concept in Marbella’s Golden Mile: a French bistro offering casual Mediterranean and French cuisine. We ran it successfully for several years until we moved on to a new project. We did not make much out of it but made a decent profit, and more importantly we kept afloat during the economic crisis, paid school fees for our children, and supported our families. And we ate beautifully - it all came out of the restaurant.

The crisis was so immense that it was more like a depression.

I am trying to give you an example of how a franchise, even if it was a winner as a brand, and reasonably priced and run by extremely capable and professional people,

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start-ups

and secure a contract with the franchisor make sure you know the following points:

1 did not quite work out. Let us go into detail about how it normally works. The first thing is to have a clear mind of the type of franchise you are looking for. We had pizza and Italian casual dining in mind. You may have burgers and fast food in mind. Or ice cream or doughnuts. Do good research 24

is the answer, and pick up what your instinct tells you to do. Talk to other franchisees in the close and not-so-close areas. Don’t be afraid to fire away the most direct questions about the franchisor, his sources of supply etc, which can make the difference between success and failure. Once you decide to go ahead

Initial fee. The big companies may ask outrageous sums of money. From â‚Ź30,000 upwards seem an average figure. A top brand in fast food business could ask a lot more than that. If things go wrong, you will never see this money again. Is this initial fee negotiable? Yes, it most certainly is, particularly if you are not dealing with the largest brands. In our case for example we only paid half the fee.

2

Decoration and works to be carried out. Most of the franchise companies use their own

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


start-ups contractors and suppliers and make very handsome profits out of you. This chapter will run into the thousands however small the franchisor is. The better known the more money they will demand.

3

Food and beverages supply. 98% of the franchisors will supply you their own products. And if we are talking about fast food, we are talking 100% their own supplies - mostly frozen. They make a vast profit out of this. If you are dealing with a casual dining brand there is a certain flexibility with regards to supply. Initially we used to get supplied by a central warehouse in Madrid, but with the recession they went bankrupt and we got our freedom as where to get supplied provided the official recipe book was followed meticulously. In this particular case, the head company made some money via small commissions or rappel yearly fees, but nothing much, and the fact you purchased as a group gave you better prices. From day one we worked very closely with the franchisor, and we built a solid relationship based on mutual trust and honesty, later becoming a great friendship. This is not so usual, and it has lasted until today.

4

Royalty fees. Voilà le bonbon. This is where most make their cut. Regardless of whether you make a profit or a loss the franchisor will get his royalty fees, levied on weekly or monthly sales. We paid 5%. In some cases, it can go as high as 10%. The average is between 4% and 6%. Is this GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

negotiable? Not really. In our case we negotiated an agreement with the president of the franchise company: If our restaurant was not making a profit it would not pay any royalty fees. It was a verbal agreement between the president, their managing director, our lawyer and I. The president left the company to start his own brand. And our restaurant started making a loss. They honoured the agreement. Very unusual in today’s world.

5

Advertising and marketing. Most franchisors will demand a small percentage for marketing and advertising. This could be a few percentage points. Not really negotiable.

6

Follow up and training. This was professionally done in our case. All the staff got trained by top instructors; cooks, helpers and waiters. This was included in the initial fee but not transport or accommodation. This is the norm with most brands.

So, all this said, shall I start a franchise, or go for my own concept? If you are new to the business and have plenty of resources, a quarter of a million upwards and set up without bank finance, and wish to have a top brand in your hands, then go for it. But if on the other hand you are a real entrepreneur, young, with a passion for the food and hospitality business I would most certainly recommend you invest in your own project. Copy a successful idea. Pick up what you think is best and do it yourself. Headhunt a top-class manager and cook. You will need to pay a premium to take them away from their present jobs. That is after all what they do in football and rugby; bring in the best players. It certainly costs, but far less that the initial fee and all the ‘extras’ that come in the package. And if you succeed, you may even start franchising yourself. One can never tell with new start-up businesses. This is the long and the short of it.

7

Advice with locations. They do make sure you are properly placed and that there is enough flow of customers to get the right amount of business. But they get it wrong now and then. The main reason we closed was because the flow of customers was much less than what the shopping centre had guaranteed. Shopping centers make the most money out of you in the form of high rent. Never forget that.

JORGE V.REIN PARLADE MBA Business Consultant +350 54045282 jorgeparlade@aol.com 25


business

an Event by Auxilium Reflecting on the past year and the inaugural Working Minds event in October 2019, I am happy to share with you what Working Minds is all about and the reasons why I founded and created it. BY KERSTIN ANDLAW

T

he intention of the Working Minds event was to raise awareness of the importance of supporting people’s wellbeing at work, to share ideas and possible interventions and to highlight that companies in Gibraltar are already taking action with regards to this. It was a privilege to hear the event panellists, Marcus Killick - CEO of Isolas LLP, Angelique Linares Managing Director of EY, Hannah Pilcher - Director of Operations at the FSC, Saskia Donald - VP HR at Addison Global and Justin Phillips - Partner at Phillips LLP share their experience and insights from their varying backgrounds. Each brought a unique view and contribution to the discussion from board level, start-up, larger and smaller company perspective, highlighting that there is no onesize-fits-all solution, but many 26

There is no onesize-fits-all solution, but many different approaches. different approaches. It was therefore great to see the event being sold out and the interest that was created following on from that. It demonstrates that companies in Gibraltar are keen to address wellbeing at work with a proactive and preventative approach to tackle the effects of our fast-paced, highly pressured professional and personal lives. Working Minds will be contributing regular articles exclusively for The Gibraltar

Magazine about wellbeing at work over the coming year, and you are invited to join the Working Minds LinkedIn group (search Working Minds Gibraltar) which features the full video of the October event, plus interviews with local and international business leaders sharing their ideas and approaches to wellbeing at work, and how they have been implemented, some on a global scale. The idea of the group is to provide resources and inspiration to support companies to create the solutions that work best for their company and their people. I am very encouraged with the responses and support generated by Working Minds in 2019, and more locally the support Working Minds has received by leaders from within Gibraltar. There is much work ahead and a few key points that are worth considering GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


business

for solutions within our circumstances and our environment (we often cannot change our circumstance). Instead we need to create a better experience through a shift in mindset that empowers people to take ownership of their experience. •

We need to stop fixing people or even suggesting that they need fixing or improving and instead support them to discover their own capabilities, resilience, and wellbeing that they already have access to.

We need to stop wasting our time focusing on what we do and adding more to people’s to-do lists and really consider how we do what we do. Adding more and more strategies and tools to our already busy schedules only creates more stress and pressure. Instead, let’s look at how can you go about doing what is required of you in a different mindset, with a

if we are to tackle the crisis that is stress, pressure, anxiety and depression affecting people in Gibraltar and across the globe. •

We need to consider mental health not as a problem that needs fixing, but as an opportunity to grow and evolve. This will also become more important as technology and bio engineering advance and our world continues to change. Resilience and adaptability will become our most important tools. We need to stop looking

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

different approach in order to create a better experience for yourself. In short, what is required is a shift in perspective in how we approach wellbeing, and in some parts of the world this shift has already begun. Gibraltar is small and agile and able to show the world the positive impact the right approach can have on a whole community and the business landscape.

Kerstin Andlaw www.auxiliumctc.com Kerstin Andlaw is an Executive, Performance and Wellbeing Coach, mindfulness facilitator and founder of Auxilium CTC - a Performance and Wellbeing Consultancy and founder of Working Minds.

27


life

DUKE OF EDINBURGH’S GIBRALTAR NEW YEAR

The beginning of a New Year is a time for celebration, and in January of 1884 in Gibraltar the third Duke of Edinburgh did plenty of that. Along with Governor Sir John Miller Adye he attended a string of dances, receptions, dinners and fund raisers over a period of nearly two weeks. BY REG REYNOLDS

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rince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, was the second son and fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. On his own insistence he joined the Royal Navy aged 12 and so had visited Gibraltar many times before his arrival, aged 39, on Christmas Day, 1883. Earlier that month he had been made Commanderin-Chief of the Channel Fleet with his flag in the battleship HMS Minotaur. Because of the Duke’s presence and in order to celebrate the holidays there were more warships than usual in Gibraltar Harbour. Along with Minotaur there were Royal Navy ships Agincourt, Northumberland, Sultan, Achilles, Neptune, Grappler and Forward. The Trenton represented the United States and there were also Donau of Austria, Dagmar from Denmark and Prinz Albert and Stein of Germany. Between Christmas and the new 28

There were more warships than usual in Gibraltar Harbour. year, the Duke reviewed the troops of the Garrison, took a day trip to Tangier and watched a rugby match in which the Army beat the Navy three tries to nil. The highlight of the holidays was a New Year’s Eve ball with 500 guests held at the Convent hosted by Governor and Lady Adye. Captain and Mrs. Fremantle entertained the Duke at a dinner party on New Year’s Day and Sir H. Burford-Hancock did the same the next evening. Unfortunately, with so many sailors in town on leave and drinking to excess, trouble was inevitable. On January 2nd there was a riot, and five Royal Navy Blue Jackets were

arrested for beating a civilian nearly to death. The Times of London reported: “All the public houses have been closed, and it seems likely the Blue Jackets will have anything but a pleasant time. The affair must be put down to the men in the eastern division, as the Plymouth ships don’t commence to give their leave until tomorrow, and there is every probability of it being stopped.” Despite the disruption the Duke continued to be entertained, presumably peaceably. On January 10th he attended the Garrison Dramatic Company’s performance of the comedy Still Waters Run Deep, followed by the farce A Thumping Legacy. On January 11th, he concluded his visit by playing the violin (Gonnad’s Ave Maria) at a concert fund-raiser for the widow and children of a late bandmaster of the 53rd Regiment. Alfred GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


history

With so many sailors in town, trouble was inevitable. Alfred Ernest Albert was born on August 6th, 1844. As mentioned earlier Alfred, at his own behest, joined the Royal Navy aged 12 and after passing examinations was appointed Midshipman at the age of 14. In July 1860, while aboard HMS Euryalus, he paid an official visit to the Cape Colony and is reported to have made a very favourable impression both with the colonials and the native chiefs. In the Queen’s Birthday Honours of May 24th, 1866, Alfred was created the Duke of Edinburgh. His reign might have been a short one had he not survived an assassination attempt at Sydney Australia on March 12th, 1868. The Duke was attending a picnic at the beachfront in the suburb of Clontarf to help raise funds for the Sydney Sailor’s Home. During the festivities he was shot in the back by Irish-Australian Henry James O’Farrell. The bullet struck to the right of Alfred’s spine and luckily did not hit vital organs. Alfred spent the next two weeks in hospital being tended GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

by a team of six nurses. Bystanders restrained O’Farrell, who was deemed to be a paranoid alcoholic who, though not a Fenian himself, had been inflamed by Fenian rhetoric against England and the Royal family. Alfred was sympathetic and argued O’Farrell should be found innocent by reason of insanity. The Australian authorities thought otherwise, and after a speedy trial O’Farrell was found guilty and hanged on April 21st, 1868. Alfred was only the third man to be granted that title of Duke of Edinburgh. The first was Prince Frederick, (1726-1751), son of George II and Queen Caroline, and the second was Prince George (1751-1760), the son of Prince Frederick and Princess Augusta. The fourth and current holder of the title, Prince Phillip, was created the Duke of Edinburgh on the day of his marriage to the Queen (then Princess Elizabeth), on November 20th, 1947. On a visit to Gibraltar in 1954 Phillip, when noticing a group of reporters approaching, famously asked, “Which are the monkeys?”. On January 23rd, 1874, Alfred married the Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia, daughter of Emperor Alexander II and Marie of Hess, at the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg. To commemorate the occasion the English bakery Peak Frean made the Marie Biscuit, similar to a rich tea biscuit and usually vanilla flavoured. It is now a popular treat worldwide. The couple had five children, Alfred, Marie, Melita, Alexandra and

Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh

had studied violin at Holyrood, Edinburgh. There is no review of his performance in Gibraltar but Sir Henry Ponsonby, Queen Victoria’s private secretary, wrote that the Duke, “Fiddled out of tune and noise abominable”. Nonetheless, Alfred loved music and played a prominent role in establishing the Royal College of Music in 1882.

Prince Phillip famously asked, “Which are the monkeys?” Beatrice. In 1893 Alfred inherited the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and surrendered his role as Duke of Edinburgh and his seats in the House of Lords and on the Privy Council. He retained Clarence House as his London Residence. Alfred died of throat cancer on July 30, 1900, aged 56, six months before the death of his mother, Queen Victoria, on June 22nd, 1901. His name lives on in many legacies around the world including the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney Australia, Prince Alfred Pass in the Western Cape, South Africa and, Manta alfredi, aka Prince Alfred’s Manta Ray. 29


THOSE RESOLUTIONS… HERE WE GO AGAIN!

So, what’s it to be? Smoking, jogging, power walks, and losing weight? Or chocolates and swearing to become a no-no? Turns out for many, it’s all a complete joke: two or three weeks – or less – into the ‘effort’ and your New Year’s promise ends up in the bin and forgotten... perhaps next year? BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

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he first thought that comes to mind is, valid as those intentions are and clearly important for you to achieve, they can be pulled off at any other time of the year like the 4th March, 17th July or 1st of November... why wait 'till the 1st of January of any given year to accomplish something that you feel is harmful or objectionable to you? However, some individuals do fulfil what they’ve set out to do... Well done and good for you! But it’s true to say so many other challengers’ plans fall by the wayside. For them I suppose, it was a meagre attempt, ending up as a bit of fun to recount to family and friends. 30

Why wait till the 1st of January? Perhaps the whole endeavour is an act of stoicism on your part, or a simple dare. Alternatively, how about thinking about your promise, pledge, or ‘resolution’ during the run-up to Christmas and choose something that would really make a difference to what could be described as our day-to-day failings in the way we deal with circumstances, having predetermined ideas about others, and all sorts of things.

So how about trying one or more of these: This year I’m going to… be a better listener, accepting the other point of view whether you think it’s right or wrong but giving the other person a chance to explain and really trying hard, if need be, to see where they’re coming from, consequently having a better understanding of their view. This year I’m going to... try hard to have more patience and not ‘lose it’, hold back, and give things a chance. This year I’m going to... be more considerate and take on board other people’s needs: not parking GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


life When helped along by social media it becomes an epidemic. indiscriminately, moving to one side when chatting to others not blocking the way on our busy Main Street and other minor and not-so-minor inconsiderate actions. This year I’m going to... regularly take on a ‘good deed’ which will make me feel good and be of great benefit to, for example, those living alone, affording them a few minutes of your time by knocking on their door chatting for a couple of minutes and offering to run an errand for them, or go and visit someone in

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

hospital who may be from abroad with no family or friends. This year I’m going to... be more willing to push headstrong opinions to one side when it comes to any specific, unpleasant state of affairs within the family or amongst friends and be brave, stand up to the plate and break the impasse for the benefit of all. Get rid of the macho stance of brinkmanship like “I’m not giving in, why don’t they?”. This year I’m going to... try my hardest not to be so selfopinionated about which I know some family members and friends think I am; stop always wanting to be right. This year I’m going to be... more tolerant of people from other nations and not tarnishing those from certain countries with the same brush. Talk to those from

different cultures with a view to equip yourself with a better understanding of what they’re all about. Make up your mind about people on a one-to-one level and forget about what colour they are, religion they practice or part of the world they’re from. And what if this year I’m going to... stop claiming, “Oh, you know what they say about priests, churchgoers, the Yacht Club lot (los del peesh), the wealthy, politicians and the homeless sleeping in the street”. I’m not going think of them as bad people

Assumptions, assumptions, assumptions - don’t entertain them!

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life

simply because some maybe corrupt, immoral or they far from practice what they preach. Their profession or status doesn’t label them unworthy. This year I’m not going to... think of those with a glum face who perhaps find it difficult to say, “Good morning” and don’t say much as, antipatico. They may have something on their mind or are just shy. You could say they’re not very simpatico, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re antipatico (displeasing). Also, a common one is that you should never judge the book by its cover. I’ve had experiences of that one and realised you could be so wrong. It happens quite often: having preconceived and sometimes very rigid opinions about someone which often turn out to be wrong. 32

This year I’m not going to… use the ‘hate’ word, especially about people, and even when it refers to the less important silly, obvious platitudes: “Oh how I hate queuing”, or “I hate being caught in the rain!”. Let me ask, who enjoys queuing or being caught in a downpour? So, forget the hate word, it’s not very nice, especially when referring to someone. And we come to my favourite which we must all really, really try to eradicate from our minds. This year I’m truly, truly going to stop... making assumptions about people and situations! This one’s rampant and when helped along by social media it becomes an epidemic. So many of us are guilty of this and it’s made worse by the conviction with which some express their misguided views on any particular issue or person. It’s expressed as a given, because they’ve been

told by someone who claims to be a bona fide source, because the person who told him or her knows etc… ‘Lo saben de Buena tinta’, a watertight origin or stool pigeon which later turns out to be a predetermined, misguided, fixed opinion in the storyteller’s mind. And in the end turns out to be erroneous and very wide off the mark, hence this one should be top of the list for those to whom it applies. Assumptions, assumptions, assumptions - don’t entertain them! So, whilst attempting to cut out your smoking habit, trying to lose weight, and cutting down on lovely chocolate consumption, why not try one of the above? Whatever you attempt, may Lady Luck accompany you. I raise my glass of bubbly, commending your efforts! GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


spotlight

F

ounded by Gibraltar’s TV chef Vicky Bishop in 2017, Vicky’s Natural Kitchen is Gibraltar’s and the Costa del Sol’s go to caterer and events co-ordinator. Vicky is passionate about creating food that is vibrant, seasonal, healthy and, of course, delicious. Vicky’s Natural Kitchen has been offering Gibraltarians and tourists alike healthy and delicious food for almost 2 years. However, founder, Vicky, begun her culinary journey 28 years ago with a small company she ran from home, providing

corporate catering for Gibraltar’s growing private banking and law community. Vicky is a qualified Health Supportive and vegan cuisine chef, receiving training at the Natural Gourmet Institute in NY and additionally, under Mark Reinfield. Vicky has worked abroad as a member of the International Festival’s International Chef Exchange, and given cooking demonstrations across the globe.

Her catering business has gone from strength to strength and has seen Vicky cook prestigious dinners for well-respected companies at reputable venues in the area. Today, you might recognise Vicky from popular TV show Rock Chef where she is a judge. Her passion for the food industry is unbeatable and Vicky’s fun loving and warming attitude has been refreshing. With a dining room upstairs, Vicky’s Natural Kitchen is a perfect lunch spot for those looking for a healthy and fresh alternative, catering extensively for vegans, vegetarians and those with food intolerances. Now also available for pre-booked high teas. 2020 is a big focus for Vicky and her team where there will be a huge focus on hosting regular supper clubs, cooking classes and private hire. The space is modern and sits 20 people, offering guests an intimate and unique dining experience. The space at Vicky’s Natural Kitchen is available for private hire for all event types, including Christening, birthday and engagement parties. Catering and events is at the heart of Vicky’s Natural Kitchen, whether it’s a formal special occasion, a relaxed family gathering or corporate Christmas party, Vicky has you covered. Vicky and her dedicated team will offer you an event to remember, impressing you and your guests with her bespoke menus which focus on fresh and seasonal produce. For more information contact admin@vbc.gi or follow Vicky on Instagram: vicky_bishop_catering, Facebook: Vicky's Natural Kitchen, or visit www.vbc.gi.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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life

A ZOOKEEPERS DIARY Our monthly spotlight on the superstars at the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park… and their keepers! This month, the AWCP help us break destructive, old habits to make way for healthier, new ones.

ises

hed torto pur -thig S g n li h tc

Ha

BY JESS LEAPER

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hey say, the busier you are, the quicker time passes, and this year really has flown by at the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park. Although at present there are currently no active breeding programmes at the AWCP, there have been some unexpected arrivals in the past year. Notably this October, when seven tiny ‘replicas’ emerged unexpectedly. These Spur-thighed tortoise hatchlings were found over the space of a few days, wandering around the tortoise enclosure. At just three centimetres in length, they really are fascinating to see. This species is sadly endangered in Morocco due to the illegal pet trade and various other 34

environmental pressures, so these additions to the population, although unexpected, are most welcome. Some of the animals have been at the park since its very beginning. The Long-tailed macaques have been at the AWCP since 1994 when they were found by Gibraltar Customs on a ship from Indonesia. These macaques were most likely bound for European animal testing laboratories. A lucky escape from a life of misery, the three macaques are thought to be over 26 years old. Sadly, in June 2019, La Chica, one of the eldest passed away, from age-related issues. A sad loss for the AWCP. The loss of an animal is always a hard time for staff and volunteers at the park, many of

whom have worked with them for many years. The two other macaques, rescued by Gibraltar Customs, El Macho and La Vieja, are still going strong, despite being a similar ripe old age. Other than maintaining the animal inhabitants and grounds, 2019 was all about fundraising and community campaigns for the AWCP. One of the most exciting developments of the year was the launch of the Habits for Habitats campaign at the Gibraltar Gardens and AWCP Open Day in November. Many of the species of animals at the AWCP are affected by habitat loss in their wild habitats and are subsequently endangered or threatened with extinction. Much of this habitat loss is directly related to things GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


life La Chica the Long-tailed macaque

around Gibraltar that are having a positive impact on our local habits and habitats. Making positive changes to our individual habits is an ideal way to start 2020 and to take positive action! Here are 12 habits to break and make in 2019:

1

Old Habit: Eating meat every day of the week. New Habit: Cut down on meat consumption, at least one day a week. Take part in ‘Meatless Monday’. The AWCP-run ‘Conscious Eating’ campaign has worked on improving access to meat-free options in Gibraltar’s restaurants and supermarkets. Other local entities such as ‘Vegan Gibraltar’ have also pushed for a change. This year the Conscious Eating team also introduced Gibraltar’s first Beyond Meat burgers and sausages at the Calentita Festival, since then they have appeared in local restaurants and supermarkets. The meat industry contributes to habitat loss the world over, particularly in the Amazon rainforest. Also, it is one of the highest contributors to greenhouse gasses and subsequently climate change. Switching to plant-based is the easier (and cheapest) way to make a positive impact.

we do in our everyday lives, from plastics in ocean habitats and waterways, to rainforests cleared for soy production to feed cattle in Europe an USA, to greenhouse gasses and the impacts of Climate Change. Many of our everyday habits are inadvertently helping to destroy habitats for species all GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

over the world. Habits for Habitats highlights these impacts and encourages people to take small steps to replace old habits with new habits that make a positive change to habitats (and species) all over the world. There are already many actions and campaigns already taking place

2

Old Habit: Sending birthday or Christmas cards. New Habit: Plant a tree. Or get JustOneTree to do it for you! This fantastic initiative is working in areas around the world to restore forests and habitats. In February, the AWCP and the Botanic


life SWISH at the AWCP with TNP

Gardens will be helping local schools to get involved with a ‘Green Uniform’ day on February 14th. A £1 donation will plant a tree for each pupil that takes part. Ecosia search engine is also a great way to help re-forest the world. For every search you make on Ecosia, a tree is planted.

3

Old Habit: Buying plastic water bottles. New Habit: Carry your reusable and refill around town. Thanks to The Nautilus Project and their tireless campaigning in Gibraltar for ocean habitats there is far more awareness in Gibraltar. There are also many more refill sites are available throughout Gibraltar. The AWCP has a filtered water fountain too, and reusable bottles on sale rather than plastic bottled water. Say no to plastic where every you can, from straws to packaging, we just don’t need it. Reuse plastic bags wherever possible and take your own bags shopping with you.

4

Old Habit: Buying clothes and fast fashion. New Habit: Spend a little more money on good quality, sustainable clothing. Quality items tend to last longer too. Complement quality items with secondhand or thrift store clothing. You can also host a SWISH for your friends at your home to swap clothing. This year the AWCP hosted a sustainable fashion show at Dusk nightclub, with The Youth Group presenting their secondhand clothing outfits from Clubhouse. During the 36

festive season, The Nautilus Project and Habits for Habits hosted a SWISH to encourage people to swap party outfits rather than buying new.

5

Old Habit: Buy supermarket fruits and veg. New Habit: Grow your own veg. The Botanic Gardens Gardening Club have introduced the world

of hydroponics to Gibraltar. With these amazingly compact systems, you can grow your own herbs and leafy veg in your home or classroom without the need for soil. New schools in Gibraltar have also taken this ‘Grow your Own’ initiative on board and most schools now have an area where pupils can take part and also taste the fruits of their labour. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


6

Old Habit: Throw food waste.

of SE Asia and parts of Africa, destroying many hectares of pristine rainforest every year. It is found in many food products. Looking for Sustainable Palm oil labels on products is the best way to help. Palm oil grown in sustainable areas is far more sustainable than many other oils and is actually quite healthy too. Many of the parrot species you can see at the AWCP feed on palm oil fruits in the wild.

New Habit: Reduce your food waste and compost the rest. Composting is an area that needs development in Gibraltar but can easily be implemented at home. Home wormeries have come a long way over the years, available to buy online, these discreet and clean boxes fit neatly into the smallest kitchen and help dispose of your food waste. The AWCP has plans to purchase a closed unit composter to help dispose of vegetable waste and plant matter produced at the Wildlife Park. Any compost produced can then be reused in the flower beds and animal enclosures.

9

Old Habit: Polluting waterways with microfibres. New Habit: Go cool with your washing machine settings and buy environmentally friendly natural fabrics. Plastic microfibres are released when washing clothes, these micro plastics get into the food chain and can be devastating to marine life. At cooler settings the fibres hold their integrity better.

7

Old Habit: Drive to work. New Habit: Gibraltar is small, and we have an excellent ‘free for residents’ bus service. Sustainable Gibraltar have also introduced ‘Traffic Free Tuesdays’, encouraging people to leave the car at home and walk, cycle or bus to work or school. The new residential parking zones also encourage people to leave their car at home, rather than drive to work. Better for the environment, and you’ll be healthier for it!

8

10

Old Habit: Buying processed food and not checking labels. New Habit: Cook from scratch more often and check labels. Processed food is usually heavily packaged and it also often harbours ingredients that are damaging to the environment. Palm oil is a huge factor to consider as it is responsible for large-scale deforestation in most GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

11

Old Habit: Using chemicals to clean our homes. New Habit: Chemicals washed down sinks and toilets end up in our oceans and waterways, destroying habitats. There are many excellent, natural alternative cleaning products. You can also make your own from a variety of traditional ingredients: lemon, baking soda, and borax are nonpolluting and give the same result as many shop-bought chemical cleaning products.

life

New Habit: Buy an experience or support a conservation project instead of pointless gifts. The AWCP has a variety of Animals Adoption Gift packs and Experiences. These immersive and educational experiences also help to support the animals at the park, as well as the valuable conservation projects and initiatives the park supports around the world.

12

Old Habit: Voting for tax cuts and self-serving initiatives. New Habit: Vote for politicians that support Green initiatives and want to tackle Climate Change and environmental issues. Gibraltar has its very own Department for the Environment and Climate Change and is working hard to meet environmental targets for the future. It is important that Governments take environmental issues seriously, now, before it’s too late. The most effective change occurs when changes take place both from a Government level and individual level. Better habits mean a better future for all the species on the planet.

If you would like to find out more about Habits for Habitats campaign or the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park and its work, visit www.awcp.gi.

Old Habit: Buying presents and gifts. 37


life

‘NEW YEAR, NEW ME’

How to actualise change… today, not tomorrow! BY JEREMY GOMEZ

‘N

ew Year, New Me’ has been a recurring slogan for each new year for this last decade, but it is a strange sentiment that we feel that the opening of a new year will allow us some new freedom or power to change ourselves. Why are we waiting for the new year and why not any time in March or October? Is it that we feel that there’s a certain magic about the day? I think this arbitrary designation of a special day for monumental change could be described as Cinderella syndrome; a great change to ourselves and our circumstances once the clock strikes twelve. For the sake of honesty, I must admit that I’m a sucker for the Cinderella magic of December the 31st, but for all the magic in the world, I don’t think it’s really working. In recent years there has a been a large amount of content in books, academic journals and other media noting the importance of habits; smaller, regular actions that contribute to a large change. This has been shown 38

to actualise a real and more enduring change than our fairy godmother or her more modern counterpart, sheer force of will. They suggest a toolkit of ideas with a touch of neuroscience, a dash of behavioural economics, and a heap of ancient philosophy. The rules for these tools are that they must be achievable,

they must be actionable in the here and now, and they must be clear and measurable. With the toolkit and these rules, it is likelier that through the smaller steps of regular habits, we can reach more of our goals. Let us begin by taking a look inside the toolkit and it’s a toolkit because you might find that some of these work for GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


life Mindset is essential, you cannot change if you are unwilling.

you and others might not. The first set of tools are those of mindset; it might seem obvious that mindset is essential, you cannot change if you are unwilling or if you believe change is impossible but it is more than that: sometimes even our positive thinking set us up for failure and frustration. So begin with this: what is within your control and what is not within your control? The rationale behind this is that sometimes our goals might require a lot of practice or might solely down to us. In terms of our habits, it can be prudent to measure what we can input rather than the desired output. For instance, it a possible but difficult goal in 2020 to run a marathon, it can be an arduous slog until you reach that goal. By measuring the input as goals, such as aiming to run for a specific time per week you can make that slog mentally lighter. Likewise, an output goal of saving a specific amount, doesn’t take into account what might happen over the year but setting a goal to spend less or ensure a certain percentage to put away per month is within the realm of your control. Another tool of mindset is about GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

who you consider yourself to be. Habits expert, James Clear has written that in order to ensure the persistence of a habit it needs to be a part of your identity and in enacting that habit, it is like casting a vote for that identity. As an example, you might want to begin reading more but find that many times during the week you just don’t have time to read.

For all the magic in the world, I don’t think it’s really working. Clear would say that a small vote of reading a paragraph or page before bed regularly is more important that reading a great tome one Saturday. Our second set of tools is how we plan our time. The scheduling and setting a time for a habit can be powerful as it allows an assurance of time to carry out the habit and a buffer against distraction or disruption. Timing is also useful for applying deadlines,

if you must have goals in terms of output. Plotting your time to breakdown a goal into smaller incremental habits takes off the cognitive strain that might push you to resist reaching that goal, such as writing an article might be daunting but writing a 100 words a day can make the task seem menial. Incremental steps over a long period of time can lead to success on grand goals. The final set of tools in today’s toolkit is using your environment. Wanting to get into a habit of running is a good goal but the application of it can be tricky. Our brains have evolved to follow the path of least resistance and if can treat simple things like finding our kit, getting dressed, finding your headphones as exhausting hurdles. But in using our environment to our advantage; preparing things beforehand and making it visible or with an alarm can prime us to carrying out the desired habit. The reverse is true too; if you don’t want to snack on cookies, don’t leave them on the countertop, make them harder to reach. These are only a few sets of tools that we can use and apply in 2020, they may not be the most glamorous of tools but they can serve and help us just as much as any fairy godmother. Bippity boppity boo. 39


life

HEARTS OF GIBRALTAR Talking to Sangeeta Khiani.

BY ROMINA MAYANI NANKANI, CYE-CYL

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offee in hand and notepad at the ready, I met with Sangeeta Khiani to talk about her fascinating journey; one that I knew about, but hearing it as I did, was something else. The first thing she says is, “You know what? It’s International Day for People with Disabilities and here we are chatting! You can’t imagine how blessed I feel”. Sangeeta is an above congenital person from birth, meaning she was born with her right forearm missing. Did she let this stop her? Let me tell you: no, she did not. “I can’t stress enough how my family, since day one, did everything in their power to ensure I didn’t feel different from others. All the measures put into place, facing obstacles and the positivity to embrace who I was, never ceased up to this day. Being Indian, a disabled person and a woman, was a complicated concoction of ingredients, in those days. With the aid medical team in London, I was fitted with prosthesis at age two, and began learning how best to lead a normal life. There on I had two options to choose from:

1. I could sit in a corner and let 40

life go by, or;

Painting by Sangeeta

2. Take the harder road, challenge myself and go against the odds.”

So, Option 2 it was! Her teachers throughout her schooling years worked effortlessly to ensure inclusivity in P.E., Home Economics and other physical activities. She received endless support from friends too. A few years ago however, Sangeeta was diagnosed with acute tendonitis on her left arm due to overuse, causing severe back and neck pain and restricting her movement. “This was the first time I hit a low period in my life. The flexible mobility and independence I had worked so hard for, was being revoked. Who would be able to understand how I felt? Everything around me became a struggle simply because my mind was thinking ‘defeated’. My dear friend Bhavna Nagrani had an idea and directed me to Kyrone Watson.” Kyrone is a personal trainer. He studied and researched Sangeeta’s case and was willing to take on the challenge to train her and build muscle strength. “Kyrone

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MY

changed my life! The doctors in London saw my progress and fitted me with a training prosthesis. The first time I trained with it, I was overwhelmed. THIS is how able-bodied people do it! What a feeling! I have continued training and working on my thought process to be able to continue living an optimal life. I could say so much more but we’d take up the entire magazine. “Let me add this for those reading: Believe in yourself; don’t let anyone prevent your growth just because they think you are different - and actually, no one can.” Sangeeta encourages. Sangeeta is currently a businesswoman. She cooks, swims and is an extremely talented artist. Her artwork is beyond breath-taking and I can say, it’s a true reflection of her perseverant and ‘go-getter’ nature. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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literature

LITTLE SANTAS FOR SENIORS

The Beavers, Cubs and Scouts embrace what Christmas is truly about, as they carry out their annual gift-giving and sing-songs to the elderly. BY KRISTEL COOMBES Santa's little helpers: The Beaver Scouts and Cub Scouts.

“Look carefully because what you’ll see is not what you just saw.” (Da Vinci)

I

sat in the far corner of the room, nestled between two ageing women, their hands folded as they listened and the children commenced their Christmas carolling. For a moment, the hospital ward was transformed. The daunting sadness disappeared, replaced by memory and identity. I observed the faces of the audience, in the knowledge that some were condemned to remain there and others were unable to read or interpret the lines of their lives any longer. They all smiled understandably. It was the music that moved them with its overwhelming power. In the fashion of a temporary Santa, the children began to distribute the gifts across the ward. Naturally, my thoughts turned to how little we actually knew about the personalities around us, however, I came 42

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


A little Christmas cheer helps the patients forget their illnesses. that, “Being away from friends and family in a hospital setting during the festive season can be extremely unsettling for most, and a little Christmas cheer helps the patients forget their illnesses and treatments, if only for a short while.”

to learn that the choice of gift was not significant. The gift was important because it provided these children with an opportunity to say “I understand you.” Thus, love was the gift that survived in undiminished vigour as all else faded away. The Beaver and Cubs Scouts truly embraced the healing presence GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

of their Christmas carols during their recent gift giving ceremony at St. Bernard’s hospital. We have all known insupportable loneliness at one moment or another in time, and the elderly are especially vulnerable to social isolation during the festive season. As a result, this may have a serious effect on their health. One of the Scout leaders stated

The treasures of daily enchantments are controlled by time, and those of us unwilling to show compassion or honesty walk like blind men into the future. Those who have walked before us have given so much and made possible the life we all enjoy today. I encourage readers to become advocates for better care in our community, after all, “It is not how much you do, but how much love you put into the doing” that truly matters. 43


scene

PROPER

ENGLISH

Fowler (who’s he?) must spin in his grave... BY PETER SCHIRMER

B

raggadocio. A resonant word with a hint of history and romance... and new to me when I came across it in a slim 40-page paper-back with a canary-yellow cover bearing the title THE TIMES STYLE BOOK in the first week of May 1961 – a few days after joining the City staff of The Times. It contained a list of frequently misspelt words; ‘The Thunderer’s’ own choices where there were variants; and, to my initiate’s delight, one of its own quirks – connection spelt ‘connexion’. A considerable part of the booklet was devoted to defining the size of headlines – mainly for the benefit of linotype operators and type-setters in an era when the only type used in the paper was Times New Roman. These were indicated by alphabetical lettering. Thus (as I recall) ‘A’ indicated 36-point capitals across three columns, and its lower-case version the same type size but in lower case; ‘B’ similarly for 26-point capitals across two columns – the style used for the bulk of news reports 44

– and so on, down the alphabet. Then still a broadsheet – and, of course, with no online version – The Times was the last of the dailies to carry ‘smalls’ adverts on its front page.

by the noble 500 was missed by the newspaper’s sub-editor, and infuriated the paper’s towering and influential editor John Delane... hence the word’s stylebook appearance.

Fascinated by its resonance and the fact that the newspaper had chosen so obscure a word as ‘braggadocio’ to rule on its spelling, I probed – found its origins in Braggadocchio, the name of a braggart in Spenser's The Faerie Queene, and, more significantly, that it had been a

Newspaper editors and columnists have their own stylistic foibles, and Delane was a stickler for spelling. The editor of my first newspaper disliked ‘despite’ and insisted staff, instead, used the phrase ‘in spite of’ – and woe betide any sub-editor who let ‘despite’ slip into print. Alas, in spite of his grammatical injunctions, in the more than six decades since then, I frequently use the single word. His deputy, a stickler for punctuation whom (it was said) slept with a copy of Fowler under his pillow, introduced me to the ‘Oxford comma’ – a literary conceit which I still follow.

Never use ‘And’ or ‘But’ to begin a sentence. But I do. favourite word of William Howard Russell, widely regarded as the world’s first war correspondent, who covered the Crimean War and was first to report the ‘Charge of the Light Brigade. His incorrect spelling of the ‘bragadacio’ of that charge into the Valley of Death

[Like myself, he would have mourned the fact that, early in December, the Apostrophe Protection Society came to a full stop – closed down, according to its founder 98-year-old exjournalist John Richards, by the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


style guide

‘ignorance and laziness present in modern times’. Richards started the society in 2001 after complaining (in a letter to The Times) of seeing the ‘same mistakes over and over again’, and within a month received more than 500 letters of support worldwide. The Society listed the three simple rules for correct use of the punctuation mark*.] First published in 1926, and commonly known as ‘Fowler’, after its author Henry Watson Fowler (a schoolmaster, lexicographer and grammartarian) A Dictionary of Modern English Usage was, for decades, both a vital writer’s tool and the bug-bear of English classrooms. In it, Fowler offers comprehensive and practical advice on grammar, syntax, style, and choice of words. He also clarifies questions of usage such as the split infinitive, and – in later editions –the intricacies of political correctness. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

Sadly, although an updated edition was published twenty years ago, Fowler is largely neglected today. A local English teacher admitted that she had never heard of the lexicographer, let alone used his ‘Dictionary’ as a teaching tool. And I am as guilty as anyone in failing to follow his rules... he must spin in his grave every time I open my laptop. There! I’ve just broken one rule – beginning a sentence with a conjunction. Never use ‘And’ or ‘But’ to begin a sentence, Fowler would have told me. But I do. So how horrified he must be by some of the writings of many Gibraltarians whose casual, and improper, use of capital letters, other than to start a sentence or to denote proper noun, must have the great man spinning even more frequently than I do. Years ago, I lost my school-days copy of Fowler and have never replaced it. And my little Times

Style Book was lent to someone... and never returned. After bemoaning its loss to Marcus Killick a few months ago, he recently presented me with a new edition of The Times Style Guide ... A Guide to English Usage. A 284-page paperback that effectively could replace Fowler. But nowhere in it do the words ‘Braggadocio’ or ‘connexion’ appear. Small wonder then that Delane’s ‘The Thunderer’ no longer thunders. *Apostrophes are used to denote a missing letter or letters, as in ‘can’t do that’; to denote possession, for example ‘the magazine’s cover’; and are NEVER ever used to denote plurals! Common examples of such abuse: ‘road closed to lorrie’s’, ‘egg’s for sale’. 45


PERSPEX PERSPECTIVE

InterARTctive: Stephanie Yeo wants you to bring her sculpture to life. BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

A

ny work of art, pretty much like theatre, would have no reason to be (and perhaps it wouldn’t even exist) if it wasn’t for its audience, and the emotional connection it stirs within them. Relational aesthetics is the current of contemporary fine art that researches this relationship with the production of sculptures or installations aimed to involve the onlooker in its creation, evolution, completion and sometimes destruction, often making the human component the very focus of the artwork. Local artist Stephanie Yeo graduated from the University of Wolverhampton with a Bachelor of Arts with Honours First Class in Fine Arts and was also awarded The Wolverhampton Art Gallery Prize: “Every year, a Degree Show is held at the university where final year students present their end projects in an exhibition. Some art officials are invited to the show to speak to artists and judge the work; I was fortunate enough to win the top prize with my work Perception,” Stephanie says. “I decided to bring it over to Gibraltar, as I was given the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

People don’t just witness art, but they actually become part of it. opportunity to display it in a joint exhibition at GEMA gallery. It is now on permanent display at the University of Gibraltar.” At the moment, the sculpture, with its components huddled together, is located in a bright hall, where its colours dazzle in the glow filtering down the skylight, but the original concept dictated a darkened venue in which the geometric solids were scattered around to allow for comfortable paths for the audience to walk amongst and around them at leisure, torches in hand, in order to cast shadows on the surrounding walls and on the floor. These ever-moving shadows thus become the centrepiece of the ever-changing artwork, mixing the solid opacity cast by your body, or highlighted parts of it, with the

tricks of coloured light shining through the transparent panels. Each member of the audience can interact with the installation, aesthetically pleasing on its own right, but static at the beginning, and the visitor can condition its impact on how art is truly experienced by the individual. For Stephanie, it is paramount that people don’t just witness art, but they actually become part of it: “You project the shadow, you produce the shadow, and you can control the shadow through the angle and intensity of your torch beam,” she says. “You are actually encouraged to touch my artwork, to see how the light plays its panels’ colours on your skin, for example.” There are artists out there who make the audience build their own sculptures by providing basic shapes in an exhibition room, and inviting its visitors to arrange or pile them in congenial designs, so that with a limited number of basic shapes, the individual imagination can string together a collective exhibition, when every permutation is documented. 47


art

"I want my art to challenge the idea that only the artist can make art." Stephanie still needs to elaborate further on this particular aspect, since her pieces are so sizeable and weighty that it isn’t advisable for the audience to lift them, but she is working on her own idea of ‘painting with light’; a form of evanescent portraiture, each existing for only as long as the torch beam is held steadily, and each a single tableau in a gallery. An experiment of this idea was seen in the piece exhibited at the 46th Gibraltar International Art Competition. Titled Perception II, it consists of a thick frame where several layers of clear acetate sheets are mounted in parallel sequence, each featuring the outline of parts of a woman’s face 48

in different colours. If you look straight at it, you’ll see the parts come together and her portrait take shape at a slant, eyes, mouth, nose and cheekbones highlighted in bright colours. This is just the prologue of the story though: a sign invites the audience to pick up the torch provided and shine its light through the composition towards the blank screen placed behind it, in order to project the portrait, magnified and manipulated on the wall, and enjoy the change in expression afforded by movement and intensity of light.

Stephanie picked fine arts for her university career because she wanted to become a painter at first, but she was offered a selection of cutting-edge modules in sculpture and photography, so she shifted her interest towards the current research into breaking all barriers between art and audience: “I want to blur the lines, and put focus on involving people in my art. I want my art to be a platform for social interactions, to challenge the idea that only the artist can make art but instead, be a facilitator for the audience to create art their own.” GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


art and she’d rather go for the steel feel, which adds a touch of contemporary cool. “I would love to hold an exhibition to show my journey from painting to interactive sculpture, featuring the various stages gone into the final realisation. I usually start with sketches, because I have plenty of ideas, but not all of them are suitable to be moulded into reality, whether because they wouldn’t stand the test of time or wouldn’t be freestanding.” Once she is satisfied with the feasibility of a project: “I craft paper models, a bit like origami, to see how the different panels and corners would click together and how it would look in real 3D, which cannot be fully appreciated in the blueprint. Eventually, I cut into the Perspex and assemble the parts.” Stephanie’s art is costly and time-consuming, that’s why her production isn’t too extensive at the moment, besides the fact that it needs room for accommodation: “I usually work on my dad’s balcony, but ideally I’d need a proper covered studio, with no constraints of space and time.” She works with steel rods and Perspex, a technique she has perfected through trial and error: “Steel rods were readily available to me whilst at university, but one needed some sort of expert supervision when welding it at the school. Once soldered them into the geometric shape, I was faced with the challenge of cutting and attaching Perspex panels to them. I tried piercing them and tying them together with string, but this was too visually distracting, especially in the projected shadows, so I eventually settled for epoxy resin GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

"I would love to hold an exhibition." glue and black duct tape to cover any spaces between the Perspex sheets and steel rods. Perspex wasn’t my first choice either, because it can be pricy, I started my experimentation with coloured cellophane. This however, is too flimsy and it sags, cracks, caves easily, so it made my sculpture impractical to transport. Any sort of touch would cause it to break, so this hindered my idea to involve the audience.” She also worked with wood, an example of this was seen in last year’s Young Art Competition, where she won first prize for her piece Modern Identity, but the overall effect is quite different,

Before going all the way with Perspex, Stephanie worked with light-filter sheets, generally used in theatres to add mood lighting: she cut rhombuses and other basic geometrical shapes out of different coloured sheets and mounted them into chandelier-like structures that can be hanged or dangled from the ceiling fan or lamp: the artwork is the set of coloured designs projected on the wall, and can be enjoyed like a kaleidoscope, with the added bonus of opaque shadows thrown in the equation when someone walks in the room: here, art can become cross-disciplinary, should someone stage a Chinese shadow-theatre style drama with the room hosting Stephanie’s installations. Visit Stephanie’s Instagram @ stephanie_yeo_art to keep updated on her artistic progress. 49


N. A. LANGDON An exhibition of architectural drawings. BY JEREMY GOMEZ

They portray detail and precision in art and design. N. A. Langdon’s works can be found all over Gibraltar, but drawings of his most iconic works are the focus of the exhibition; the redevelopment of Assembly Rooms to become the Queen’s Cinema and the Queen’s hotel. The launch of the exhibitions comes sixty-three years after the inauguration of the Queen’s Cinema and the evening of the launch was a warm gathering to 50

N. A. Langdon (1913-1977)

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f culture were the soul of a city, it would be conceivable to think that the landscape and architecture would be the face of that city that gives expression to the soul. On the 2nd of December an exhibition was launched in Sacarello’s Cafe that displayed the works of a man that gave Gibraltar one of its expressions: Nathaniel Arthur Langdon.

celebrate the life and work of an individual that modern Gibraltar is indebted to. The exhibit was organised by his family and in particular his son and daughter, John and Michele. His nephew opened the evening with an insight into the life of the man and the art that he mastered, explaining that architecture is a privileged profession in that it requires the utilisation of all the technical aspects of building. N.A. Langdon was originally trained as an engineer but brought to the structure, the artistic and social considerations that make architecture an art. The striking thing about every technical drawing, painted rendition of the completed buildings, and even of the caricatures that Langdon painted of himself and others, is that they portray the detail and precision in art and design that comes from a life in pursuit of excellence. The exhibition, which ended in December, saw works displayed in the tea rooms of Sacarello’s coffee shop on the ground floor. Visitors of the exhibit were treated to the history of Gibraltar’s most iconic

buildings that hosted generations of moviegoers and other events until its closure in 2014. With the recent demolishing of the cinema, the exhibit brings back to life a part of our recent history we should endeavour to hold on to, and gives praise to the life of a man that cultivated an idea, an art, and a gift that he brought into reality. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


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BOOKISH... Join us for our monthly book club. BY JOEL FRANCIS

H

appy New Year! It’s January, and you know what that means, there’s a whole bunch of “new year, new me” going around. Most of the time, these resolutions don’t last because the goal doesn’t seem tangible enough. This year why not set yourself the goal of finishing just 3 books? Aim to read just a paragraph a day, or read for 15 minutes a day, and I promise you’ll get through those books in no time. To get you started, here are 3 books that are fantastic and super easy to get through... I would know, I’ve read them!

THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER Stephen Chbosky

Genre: Contemporary Young Adult Fiction What’s in the pages? Charlie is a “wallflower.” Join him as he navigates his journey through adolescence. He encounters love, loss, glorious triumph, devastating defeat and The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He is caught between trying to enjoy his life and wanting to run away from it simultaneously. It’s the quintessential coming-of-age story. Why should you read it? Word’s cannot explain just how unique this book is. By presenting Charlie’s story in an epistolary style (through letters), Chbosky manages to pull you right into the world of Perks of Being a Wallflower. This is a beautiful example of a coming-of-age story done the right way. Chbosky captures all the highs and lows of being an adolescent in a genuinely relatable way. It’s full of the types of life lessons you wish you’d had in your teens, but are still poignant no matter what stage of life you are at. It’s a modern classic in every sense, and even better, it’s unputdownable!

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FAHRENHEIT 451 Ray Bradbury

Genre: ‘Classic’ Science Fiction What’s in the pages? In a world where houses are fireproof, firemen have a new job: to destroy the most illegal commodities, the printed book. Guy Montag is one of those firemen, he never questions his career or his existence. He leads a bland life with an unfulfilled marriage to Mildred. When he meets a young girl named Clarisse, who introduces him to a past where people didn’t live in fear and a present where books can be used as weapons of free thought, his life changes. When Mildred attempts suicide and Clarisse disappears, Montag begins to questions everything he has ever known, leading him down a dangerous path. Why should you read it? The irony of a book about censorship being banned. Fahrenheit is an essential part of Sci-Fi and Literacy canon. Bradbury manages to convey the personal growth of Montag from blissfully ignorant to a painfully aware person in a seductively beautiful piece of prose. In my opinion, this book gets increasingly relevant as time goes on. While people often cite Orwell’s 1984 as a reflection of modern society (most of the time without actually having read it), I would argue that Fahrenheit 451 is the real reflection. This is essential reading for everyone at least once in their lives; I guarantee you will fall in love with at least one part of this book!

JUST KIDS Patti Smith

Genre: Autobiography What’s in the pages? An immersive story of youth, friendship, love and hardship set against the mythical backdrop of the 1960s and its most famous landmarks - The Chelsea Hotel, Max’s Kansas City and Warhol’s Factory. This is a story of two kids who promised to care for each other and ended up changing the world. Introducing Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe.

Why should you read it? Preface: You don’t have to like Patti Smith to read this book - but you should read it anyway. I was reluctant to pick up this novel for that reason, but I am so glad I did! It is one of the richest autobiographies I have ever read, Smith’s use of language is second to none, beautiful, heartfelt and undeniably charming. Furthermore, the backdrop of the 60s has never felt more poignant to a story as it does in this one. I would recommend this book to anyone and would go so far as to call it a classic of the modern age. For more book recommendations follow Joel’s Instagram @neurodiversebookworm.

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scene

A Florentine Sonnet BY PETER SCHIRMER

Battered by a tsunami of tourists rolling past as I stood between the Duomo and the Baptistry, I felt the urge to write a sonnet in doggerel - which came together as I ran the gauntlet of Indians and Bangladeshis who seem to run the long rows of tourist stalls outside the market proper. I jotted it down on the back of a downloaded train ticket... and here it is:

Ghosts of the Medicis stalk the lanes, alleys and palaces that once were theirs now veiled by visitors, whose gawps and stares (directed by their tourist-programmed brains) pay little notice to the stench of drains; for God has left - if He was ever there and there's no longer incense on the air. The stink persists here, even when it rains. And yet there's charm. too in the cobbled streets, a medieval magic blankets all, drowning the tourist clamour which competes with importuning vendors at each stall‌ In spite of this, I think I understand why some still view Firenzi as sublimely grand.

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5 home décor trends to embrace in 2020.

leisure

A NEW DECADE OF DESIGN BY KRISTEL COOMBES

“W

hat the New Year brings to you will depend a great deal on what you bring to the New Year.” While our personal lives may need a bit of refreshing, our homes deserve the same kind of attention too. Lucky for you, I’ve tackled the New Year shift in the hope of easing your design transitions at home. This year’s interior design trends focus on wellbeing, comfort and sustainability. Let’s take a look at the colours and trends we will be lusting over in 2020. Here’s the story so far…

#1 ECLECTIC GLAM This trend introduces a fusion of 30s sophistication and 70s luxury interiors. A classic and subtle scheme is achieved using curved pieces and fluid shapes. Rich tones of royal blue or ruby can be mixed with warmer tones of ochre rose or bronze for a glam finish. Implement metallic accents into the space, such as burnished coppers, golds and bronzes to achieve a retro twist. Do not be GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

afraid to layer on the bling as metallics are trending this year! When it comes to furnishings, velvet is reigning strong over the next few seasons. Deco meets mid century in this trend with plenty of piping, tassels and fringing across furnishings and home accessories. If your living and dining spaces are open plan, go for a plush statement sofa to anchor your design, add some dining chairs in a contrasting tone and weave the space together with accents of gold and brass furniture, lighting and cushions. With this trend, playfulness is the perfect final touch!

"What the New Year brings to you will depend a great deal on what you bring to the New Year." you. Japandi features clean lines, neutral tones, a love of natural textures and a deep respect for craftsmanship. For those of you with hectic modern lifestyles,

#2 JAPANDI Japandi is a very obvious fusion of the Japanese style and Scandinavian style. Aspects of ‘Hygge’ (the Nordic term for the homely feeling of cosiness) and Japanese ‘Wabi Sabi’ (finding beauty in imperfection) harmonise to create a stress-free environment. If you love a fresh design infused with simplicity and functionality, this trend is for 57


this trend will help you create an environment in which you can truly unwind.

#3 HONEST INTERIORS This look is stripped back, creating a space to relax and regenerate. The colour palate emphasis on natural pigments remains at the root of this trend, for instance oatmeal, washed teals, or mossy greens. Get ready to trade bold and bright colours and embrace soft and neutral ones. This trend features raw materials and unrefined finishes, such as terracotta, rattan, hemp, cane, and straw. Implementing comforting cushions, throws, knits and faux fur will instantly transform your spaces. For the bedroom décor, think quilted throws and bedspreads, washed linens, thick woolen blankets and decorative fringing, tassels and trims. This approach will see you through the winter and still feel light enough to see your home fashionably dressed when ready for spring. 58

#4 ABSTRACT PATTERNS Inspired by abstract expressionist artwork, this trend is all about expressing personality in our homes. Bold geometrics and abstract patterns evoke emotion and lend a playful approach to styling and décor in these spaces.

‘Hygge’ (the Nordic term for the homely feeling of cosiness).

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leisure Celebrating the imperfect fluidity of hand drawn forms, colour comes to the forefront with this trend. For an instant update try burnished red with navy in any room to make a statement. This look is best represented in the use of abstract cushions, rugs, wallpaper designs and duvet covers.

#5 A NATURAL EDGE

natural feel.

This trend is all about expressing personality in our homes. Whether you go big with a potted tree or adorn your shelves with adorable succulents, having living, breathing plants in your home will instantly give your space a more

It’s time to usher in a new decade of design! There is no escaping trends, whether you live by them or feel completely unaffected by them, everything designed for our homes is influenced by a wider trend. Still, one must remember that nothing is passé if you really love it. In other words, the root of all design should always be happiness.

When bringing the outside in, we want to create a space that mimics the beauty, shapes and colours of nature in a way that fits your environment and your lifestyle. If you want to design a warm space, then think of autumnal hues and rich wood tones. If you want a bright and airy space to inspire movement, green colours and fresh plants is the way to go. After all, the easiest way to bring the outside in is by decorating with plants. One thing we’re seeing a lot of this year are terrariums which require less maintenance than larger plants.

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CONFESSIONS OF A BEAUTY ADDICT The 'Clean Beauty' movement. BY ALEX ORFILA

P

erhaps one of the most positive trends of our times is that all things natural and healthy are in. By now we are all familiar with the concept of clean eating; a diet with a focus on eating foods in their most natural state and avoiding processed foods altogether. Clean Beauty is a somewhat lesser-known movement and one which is much harder to define. Some describe it by using words such as ‘organic’ or ‘natural’ implying that these products will only contain ingredients which are sourced from nature. Others will use words such as ‘non-toxic’, ‘hypoallergenic’ or ‘non-chemical’. However, some skincare experts believe the term non-chemical is misleading, given that all ingredients whether GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

natural or not are, in fact, chemical. There are two schools of thoughts on the Clean Beauty movement. Some believe that this is just another beauty fad which will whittle away like so many others before it, whilst others have built an entire brand around this very concept. Drunk Elephant is a clean beauty brand which has quite literally taken the beauty world by storm with its founder Tiffany Masterson going from stay at home mum to beauty industry mogul. Earlier this year it was reported by Forbes that there are plans for the brand to be acquired by Japanese powerhouse Shiseido for a cool $845 Million, which would make it the fastest-growing skincare brand in history. Their philosophy is to create skincare

Others have built an entire brand around this very concept. which is free from what they have dubbed the ‘suspicious six’ ingredients which are commonly used in cosmetic products. These being essential oils, alcohols, silicones, chemical sunscreens, fragrances, dyes and SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate - the ingredient which is used to create foaminess in shampoos and cleaning products). They claim that these ‘suspicious six’ tend to be the culprits linked to most skincare concerns. Silicone, however, is an ingredient which has particularly divided 61


beauty the beauty community. It is often described as suffocating and pore-clogging, but silicones have actually been scientifically classed as comedogenic, which means that its molecules are too large to be absorbed by the skin and it instead acts as a barrier. It is very common in products, mainly because of its silky texture and smooth finish, thus making it particularly effective in primers and makeup. Many top skincare brands such as The Ordinary use silicones in their moisturisers because it improves the application of products containing active ingredients such as Vitamin C which can often have a gritty consistency. It may sound like an icky artificial ingredient but if you start to inspect the ingredients list on some of your favourite beauty products it won’t be long until you come across it. Paraben is another word which has acquired notoriety in recent years. We seem to prefer paraben-free and sulfate-free shampoos. It’s something I instinctively look out for now when undertaking any haircare purchase. A product may promise, shiny, hydrated, voluminous hair, but despite these tempting promises I still find myself asking: BELOW: DRUNK ELEPHANT’S THE LITTLES £71.

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Is it paraben free though? But how many of us have actually taken the time to research what that means? I must confess I only did so when I began writing this article. Let’s just say I’m glad I’ve chosen to avoid this ingredient which is claimed to disrupt hormone functions. It can apparently mimic the activity of oestrogen and is linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. In reality most of us usually don’t have the time to dissect the very long ingredients list on the boxes of products we purchase, which - let’s face it - often read like a periodic table of elements and can seem quite daunting to the untrained eye. Fret not, there’s a variety of apps to assist us in checking the chemical content of a product - enter Think Dirty. Scan a bar code on any product and the app will review this against their ‘Dirty Meter’; a rating system with a numbering scale ranging from Dirty to Clean. Products with a red 8-10 rating are classified as containing ingredients with potential negative health implications, those with an amber 4-7 rating contain moderately negative ingredients and anything in the green 0-3 zone are considered to be clean, i.e. not containing any ingredients which have a documented

It is linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. negative impact on health. Unfortunately, not even these apps can be one hundred percent accurate because further regulation in the beauty industry is still needed. In the US it is surprisingly not a requirement to publically disclose what ingredients attribute to a products scent, and the word ‘fragrance’ alone can be used on the product’s ingredients list. The moral of the story is that just because something is perfectly packaged, looks pretty and has a gorgeous scent it does not necessarily mean that is passes the smell test, so to speak. It seems that the argument for and against Clean Beauty will continue to rage on, but for now it is a movement which is here to stay. After all, it is not unlike all the other lifestyle choices which are synonymous with this decade which focuses on health, self-care, and sustainability. If Clean Beauty is something which you would like to explore as part of a new year, new you voyage of discovery then take the plunge. Research products before you buy, try out minis to test if certain products work for you before you commit to purchasing full sized items, or perhaps check out these clean beauty brands which are currently making waves in the industry:

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


beauty FOR A FULL SKINCARE REGIME: DRUNK ELEPHANT

sustainability, organic ingredients and reasonable prices at its core it’s no surprise that this brand has been established for almost a century!

A heavyweight, not only in the clean beauty world but in the cosmetics industry as a whole. Meet the brand which has revolutionised skincare. Is the hype justified or is it all a lot of hot air? Their starter pack of minis will reveal all.

FOR A MASK: FARMACY This brand pride themselves in being farmer cultivated and scientist activated. Their ingredients are sourced from nature and science makes the magic happen! The company also only partners with organic farms which have implemented sustainable methods. All of their products are free from parabens, mineral oils and synthetic fragrances, so it’s no surprise their masks have acquired cult status in the clean beauty world.

FOR SKINCARE ON A BUDGET: WELEDA This brand was founded in 1921 and was therefore way ahead in the clean beauty game. It is still thought of as one of the leaders in this space with its focus on gentle formulas which are free from synthetic preservatives, fragrances and mineral oils. With

BELOW: FARMACY HONEY POTION 50G £36 ABOVE: WELEDA IRIS HYDRATING NIGHT CREAM 30ML £17.95

ABOVE: WELEDA SKIN FOOD 75ML £12.95

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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beauty are formulated with botanicals and they believe that when it comes to makeup you shouldn’t have to compromise on colour, safety or performance. It sounds like Kosas was formulated in makeup heaven and I must admit my online shopping basket is constantly brimming with their products.

ABOVE: COOLA CLASSIC FACE SPORT SPF 50 WHITE TEA £30

MAKE UP: KOSAS Founded by LA artist Sheena Yaitanes, Kosas prides itself in being a modern, non-toxic, clean beauty brand. Their products ABOVE: COOLA MAKEUP SETTING SPRAY SPF 30 £30

FOR SUNSCREEN: COOLA Clinically tested organic sunscreens which will protect you from more than just harmful UV rays. Coola is formulated with plant based ingredients and their aim is to optimise protection whilst also deeply nourishing skin. They even have a makeup setting spray which promises to keep you protected and smudge free.

LEFT: KOSAS COLOUR + LIGHT CREAM £32 ABOVE: KOSAS WEIGHTLESS LIPSTICK IN ROYAL £26


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travel

FLYING THE FLAG FOR GIBRALTAR

One of our readers regales us with her interesting experience up in the skies… BY CLAIRE SPENCER

B

A have been flying from London to the Rock for many years; indeed they were the first to do so, originally as a subsidiary carrier, GB Airways, until BA finally took over a few years ago. My first flight to Gibraltar in 1996 with them is etched indelibly on my mind, as the landing proved to be both lively and exciting as we landed safely in the teeth of a blustery Levanter. On this flight I distinctly remember sitting next to a guy who I swear was John Altman aka ‘Nasty’ Nick Cotton of EastEnders fame; this wasn’t beyond the realms of possibility either, as apparently some of the cast of that popular TV soap were regular visitors to The Rock. And so, on a beautiful December afternoon I found myself back yet again for the umpteenth time waiting on the terrace at Gibraltar International Airport in brilliant sunshine for the BA flight to arrive to take me back to the UK. The plane duly arrived ahead of time, cruising in from the bay, with its wings looking like friendly arms outstretched in welcome to an old friend, the Castle and Keys waving back in the Levanter breeze from The Moorish Castle, and The Rock looking on as ever in silent witness. 66

However, despite this early arrival, I knew that due to the French air traffic controllers strike that we would be late departing. So, it came as no surprise that once we were all comfortably seated in our luxurious leather seats, that the captain’s polished tones announced from the flight deck that we had a one and a half hours wait until we had a clear slot for the flight back.

An unprecedented move to take the sting out of the situation we were in. My heart and those of my fellow travellers sank on hearing this rather unwelcome news, but our spirits were soon raised when the captain went on to say that we were free to wander around the plane and come up and visit the cockpit if we so wished. This was an unprecedented kind move by BA to take the sting out of the situation we were in. Rather than sit and wait for takeoff, I took him up on his kind offer

and, somewhat cautiously, as if I couldn’t quite believe what I’d heard, approached the cockpit. A friendly chief purser encouraged me to enter, whereupon I found myself in the welcoming company of Captain Karl Stringer and First Officer Jon Fernandez surrounded by the mesmerising myriad dials and controls of the flight deck. Someone else, who had taken up the offer of the visit, was taking advantage of the chance of a photo opportunity to sit in the pilot’s seat whilst I was chatting to the captain. As well as delving into various subjects including the deeper mysteries of multi-layered flight paths and the billion pounds insurance value of the aircraft, Captain Karl answered a common question that many people ask: “Why do we have to board the plane if we are delayed, instead of waiting in the terminal?” The logical reason he gave was, that if a slot became free, we had to be ready to depart. In fact, this happened on this occasion, as we took off about twenty minutes or so earlier than the original delayed departure time. First Officer Jon Fernandez was equally friendly, kindly posing for photographs and patiently answering my many questions. Jon told me that he did his pilot GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


travel training in nearby Jerez, and treated flying into Gibraltar very much a routine procedure, a fact which would be very reassuring to people who worry about flying. It would appear that BA is a good airline to work for, as the cabin crew have notched up many years’ service between them; one stewardess I spoke with had been with them for 28 years, so was possibly on that first flight I made back in 1996, whilst the friendly purser alluded to earlier had been with them for just 23 years. The time soon flew by, and all too soon, the captain was telling us all to return to our seats ready for take-off. As the plane taxied down the runway as if on a proud lap of honour by the floodlit Britannia Stadium, the lights of Ocean Village winked at me as I said my silent farewells to this very special place.

It certainly added a bit of class When we reached the bay end of the runway, the aircraft seemingly pirouetted to face East ready for take-off; then the engines roared back at the crouching lion of the Western Med as we accelerated past the waiting traffic which turned into a blur as we leapt up into the clear evening sky. Normal service was resumed: the cabin crew went about their duties, but not before we were all treated to a very entertaining safety procedures video with an all-star cast including Michael Caine and an absolutely fabulous GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

Joanna Lumley amongst others. It certainly added a bit of class to what is usually a well-rehearsed choreography courtesy of the trolley dollies on other airlines. Before long, after a reasonably smooth flight, we were beginning our descent into a rather blustery Heathrow, just about an hour behind schedule. Those on board who were concerned about their onward connections were reassured when the friendly purser informed them that they would be met by a team of the airline’s representatives who would book them onto alternative

flights and sort any overnight accommodation on arrival. As I made my way off the plane, to be wished goodbye from the smartly turned out crew, I reflected on the experiences of the day on a flight made so much more memorable by one of the world’s leading airlines, and was actually grateful that the flight had been delayed, otherwise all the exciting events of the day would never have happened. Claire has donated her fee for this article to Street Safe, a charity for the homelss. 67


Roman Forun (Il Foro Romano)


travel

AN ITALIAN ITINERARY

Working your way around Rome and Florence, one gelato at a time.

BY CHRIS HEDLEY

A

lot of the travel articles I write are about places I’ve visited as part of a huge trip, with time to spare to visit everything on the list. They are written impersonally, with a matter of fact ‘must-see’ itinerary and some historical references thrown in for some context. In a slight departure from the usual style, I’m going to write a first-hand account of what we actually do on holiday - in this instance, ten days in Italy with the editor of this magazine (who also happens to be my fiancée.) Normal procedure before booking a holiday is to have a brief discussion about where to go, and why my opinion is the only one that matters. In this instance, the trip was part of a birthday present for Sophie, so I couldn’t completely disregard her preferences. A long awaited and much voiced desire to visit Italy was on the cards, and although the voice had painted pictures of coastline in the summertime, we get precious few holidays in this life, and I just can’t bring myself to spend money to go sit on a beach, living where we do. Fortunately, the voice had also mentioned pizza, pasta, gelatos, and Italian

culture. Besides, our free time for a trip such as this fell in the winter, so beaches were no good to us. I had booked the first three nights in Rome, which became four nights after Vueling decided to change our flight dates no less than three times. A nice little place called the Pope’s Attic on Airbnb, with views of St. Peter's Basilica from the terrace; illuminating the rooftops at nights, and accompanying morning coffee with pleasant chimes of the bells of the Vatican. As it happens, we had both been to Rome before as children (strangely, in the same year! Perhaps a mini version of us exists in each other’s holiday snaps…), but memories can be an elusive notion, so we thought it best to revisit some of the classic landmarks. The first morning we made a beeline for the Colosseum, walked around it marvelling at how big it was, then went inside with a few hundred other tourists to have a closer inspection of the old bits of stone. After looking at some of the artefacts recovered from the area, and watching a short video clip about the battle formations adopted by boats of that era (for

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

some reason), we pushed on past the plethora of men selling selfie sticks (although Sophie was doing less pushing and more haggling) and made it the few hundred yards to The Roman Forum. The Roman Forum (or Il Foro Romano) is teeming with history. The ancient government buildings, temples, and what was once apparently a little brothel all squeezed into one market space has left an impressive smattering of chariot-marked cobbled streets, lined with residual columns in every direction. The final stop of the day was to follow the other hundred thousand tourists to the Trevi Fountain, which, impressive as it is, hosts a number of equally impressive gelaterias in the surrounding area, each with their own take on how to serve cannoli. Sweet, creamy ricotta deep-fried pastries were consumed and stomachs ached. Before you head for these tasty morsels, chuck a coin over your shoulder into the fountain – the saying goes that if you toss a coin into the Trevi Fountain, you'll return to The Eternal City (Rome). Toss two coins and you'll return and 69


The Vatican

Trevi Fountain

fall in love. Three coins will get you a return, love, and marriage. Sophie was less than impressed when I threw in two, but I assured her I was simply doubling up on our luck. Luck or no luck, your coins are all going towards a worthy cause; €1.5 million is collected from the beautiful Baroque fountain each year, with the money given to the charity Caritas, supporting the poor and homeless. The next day we planned to visit the Vatican, which from our apartment was about a two70

minute saunter. As we were setting off, I remembered someone I had met in Madrid, who happened to live in Rome, who also happened to be a priest. I managed to rope him into showing us around the Basilica (which is free to enter), but he told us to visit the museums on our own, as tickets were seventeen euros each, and he had been many times before. Just outside the city walls, we were fortunate enough to run into a man with insider knowledge. “You’re not going to queue for tickets, are you? That’ll take at least two hours! Trust me.” He said. “I can get you on a tour for sixty

What kind of fool wants to queue for two hours? euros, and you’ll be permitted to jump the queue, which, if haven’t already mentioned, is extremely long.” I turned to Sophie and voiced what would be on any reasonable person’s mind at this point. “I trust this man with all my heart. What kind of fool wants to queue for two hours in the cold?” “Possibly more.” He chimed in. “Possibly more!” I continued, “And GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


travel

Safe in the knowledge I’d made an excellent point, I reached for my wallet. At this point, for reasons unbeknownst to me, Sophie rolled her eyes and suggested we walk around the corner, ‘just in case’ this kind-hearted Samaritan was mistaken about the queue. By the time we had rounded the corner the crowds must have dissipated in some one-in-a-million event, because we walked straight into the museum, with no queue in sight. Inside we assumed the standard museum procedure. Staying in the first room for half an hour looking at old pottery and musing over the historical significance of each item, gradually speeding up with each passing exhibition, before breaking into a light jog towards the exit sign. It seemed the other tourists had adopted a similar strategy for this museum, which culminated in the pièce de

résistance at the end - The Sistine Chapel. We hung around here looking at the walls and the ceiling for a bit, abiding entirely by the rules of no photography, without any surreptitious attempts to point a phone at the ceiling whatsoever. No sir. Not us. We then met my Portuguese friend for a tour of St. Peter’s Basilica. It should be noted at this stage that his English isn’t very good, and our Portuguese is nonexistent. We settled on Spanish (although his Spanish is mixed with Italian and Portuguese, which made things interesting). He took us round the statues and mosaics

explaining the historical context and religious significance of each piece with impressive detail, after which he asked us if we had any questions. I don’t think “Where can we get a pizza?” was what he had in mind, but we went to a restaurant nevertheless, then called it a day.

The Creation of Adam by Michelangelo. Photo taken from the Internet. Definitely not by Sophie or Chris.

this kind man is offering us the opportunity to avoid all that and show us around the artefacts, giving us details about them so we don’t strain our eyes reading all those plaques. Furthermore, it’s only an additional forty-three euros each!’

Our final day in Rome was spent walking the streets, popping in and out of shops selling cannoli and trying to visit tourist attractions that didn’t cost much. Having walked up and down the Spanish Steps, we rejoiced in the fact that this particular landmark was free, and reasoned that we deserved a cup of tea by way of celebration. Luck was on our side once more, as there was a quaint little tea house at the bottom of the steps named Babington’s Tea Room. The interior surpassed any stereotype for quintessential

Canoli

We of course ordered immediately with a smile to mask our embarrassment. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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travel

Babington’s Tea Room

Ponte Vecchio, Florence

English high tea and the walls were adorned with literary heroes from the past who had frequented the place. Once sat down and comfortable, we were hit with the news that a cup of tea would be fourteen euros each, which we of course ordered immediately with a smile to mask our embarrassment, as is the British way. The main take away from Rome 72

was the impressive amalgamation of old and new. One moment you could be walking down a street lined with glass-front shops selling high end brands, and the next when nipping down a side street for a coffee you find yourself on a cobbled lane with two-thousand-year-old structures. More time could have been spent walking these streets, but we had a train to catch – on to Florence we went. Florence is a whirlwind city of picturesque streets upon streets. A five-minute walk outside of the centre, and the shops transform, each exhibiting a specialist nature, where the goods inside are only suitable for the one person in the

world who was looking for that particular item. Shops dedicated to antique chairs, or clocks, or specific fabrics. None of which were useful to us, but had us peering in the windows regardless An eighteen-euro ticket gains entry to a variety of sights around the quite frankly stunning Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, including the Cathedral, Crypt, Baptistery, Bell Tower, Opera del Duomo and an aerial view from the top of the Duomo, after climbing four or five hundred steps. Finally, periodic visits to the Med Steps over the last few months had paid off! Once again, there are a number of museums to visit here, and of course we couldn’t leave without seeing Michelangelo’s David GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


Sophie and the Leaning Tower of Pisa

Michelangelo's David

travel

Gelato for breakfast

(although after our fifth museum and tenth pizza, we did consider it) but simply walking the streets was one of the main attractions for us. Stopping on the famous medieval stone arch bridge, Ponte Vecchio, admiring the view of the river and the hills beyond, was as aesthetic as any of the works of Renaissance art in the Uffizi Gallery.

The Pitti Palace (Palazzo Pitti) next door is worth a visit though, if you like that sort of thing, which after binge watching 3 seasons of The Crown, Sophie most definitely did.

both agreed Pisa is best visited as a day-trip from Florence.

On our final day, on another walk (the purpose of these walks had quickly morphed from leisure to necessity due to the volume of gelatos being consumed), we decided to visit the Boboli Gardens. Ten euros in the summer, six in the winter. Having paid and after walking for at least ninety seconds, Sophie proclaimed that “The Alameda Gardens are better, and they’re free.” So we left.

The final two days of our trip were spent in Pisa, more for a change of scenery that anything else. Apart from taking silly photos at the tower [not fit for publication in this esteemed magazine], most of the trip here consisted of me complaining that the it wasn’t as nice as Rome or Florence, and Sophie countering that it was a nice change from the hordes of tourist-filled streets. However, we

Italy is a country with one of the richest histories in the world, landmark art, and ancient ruins, and one that has made a powerful and lasting mark on the Western world (and its cuisine). It’s amazing how much time slips you by wandering the cobbled streets, eating ice cream, and drinking coffee. By the end of our trip, it wasn’t just our suitcases that had gained a few extra kilograms.

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food and wine

MICHELANGELO AND A GLASS OF CHIANTI Michelangelo and Walter’s tips for a long and healthy life. BY ANDREW LICUDI DIPSWET According to the BBC online life calculator, I’ll probably live until I am 83. If I was a woman, 85. If I had been born in Burundi, I’d already be dead as I would be in Afghanistan, Burma, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. If I had been born in Haiti I’d have been dead for decades. Living in anywhere in Spain is preferable to Helsinki though not quite as good as Geneva or Okinawa. With these thoughts on longevity I make my way along the narrow, cobbled streets towards my friend’s apartment. Its eight in the evening and already dark. Here, streets empty quickly in winter and only now and then do I pass a fellow pedestrian, hands in pockets, hunched against the bitter cold, much like me. Walking along my eyes are drawn to the 74

large astragal windows, brightly lit, curtains yet to be drawn, the furniture and paintings within telling passers-by this is a well-to-do area. In one of the windows a handsome, white parrot in an expensive-looking cage is clearly visible. Behind it, on a crimson-papered wall, a large impressionist painting hangs majestically. Swirls of green, blue, and red surrounded by a large and elaborate gilded frame somehow accentuates the poor beasts’ captivity and disconsolate look on its face. Soon I arrive at my friend’s house. I ring the buzzer. His lives on the second floor. As I go up I can’t help reflecting on the simplicity of the stairs with its bare stone steps, thin wooden bannisters supported by spindly metal rods and uneven walls - features of Georgian architecture which gave

On the walls, grinning menacingly, a collection of native Polynesian masks. no importance to communal areas but went overboard, once inside, with excessively large rooms, high ceilings, elaborate cornices, huge marble fireplaces and massive windows inevitably overlooking a city garden. When I arrive at the landing, slightly breathless, the door is already open. The warmth of the apartment and home cooking soon envelopes me in a comforting embrace. Organised chaos reigns supreme. In the hallway wooden and GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


food and wine unmatched sofas and chairs clearly chosen for comfort alone. On the walls, grinning menacingly, a collection of native Polynesian masks easily neutralised by a gentle piano sonata radiating from an old-fashioned record player. Sitting in a large, winged armchair with a glass of red wine in one hand and a magazine on the other is Walter, the man I have come to meet. Walter has just celebrated his one hundredth birthday. Walter is my friend Jonathan’s uncle.

Mostly in moderation, and rarely without food, unless it was Champagne.

cardboard boxes of wine are stacked against the wall. As I take my coat off I just have enough time to surreptitiously glance at some the boxes. Batailley, Jadot, Pierre Yves and Meursault some of the names my brain quickly deciphers. A door, left ajar just in front of me, reveals more wine in shelves and on a small table I can see red wine has already been decanted. The kitchen is GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

also visible from the hallway, incongruously modern with a grey stone island where a pot gently simmers and various cheeses, still wrapped in cheesemonger’s wax paper, neatly wait in a nearby worktop.

I can’t recall when I first met Jonathan. It must be twenty or more years ago. What I do know is wine would have been the reason we met. Perhaps at a wine merchants tasting or a mutual friend’s wine dinner. Since then we have shared many bottles. It was at my flat over a bottle of Burgundy that the subject of wine and longevity came up. Jonathan told me his father, who was teetotal, had died in his sixties yet his uncle Walter, a committed vinophile would soon be celebrating his one hundredth birthday. I asked Jonathan if there was any obvious reason for the disparity in their longevity? Was it genetic perhaps? Diet? Exercise?

Entering the sitting room magazines and newspapers lie in piles and the immense room is populated by a variety of

Jonathan laughed, “Let’s hope its wine! He is coming for dinner next week. Come and talk to him yourself. I am sure he would 75


be delighted to answer your questions”. Walter had no trouble getting from the sofa to meet my extended hand. It was difficult to believe this man had been born just after the first world war. I would have placed him in his mid-seventies. Soon I had a glass of wine in my hand. After some chitchat Walter asked me what I thought of the wine. I got the impression he was testing me, though he was kind enough to tell me it was an old Rioja, saving me the embarrassment of placing the wine in the wrong country - or worse still, the wrong continent. Whatever I answered must have satisfied Walter and soon I felt I had known this man for a long time. Walter had been born in a well-to-do family. He had been privately educated and his early life had been fairly predictable and mostly uneventful. He had studied classics at Cambridge and was a keen photographer. During the war, he had joined the RAF as a reconnaissance photographer. Walter survived though, smiling, he admitted that in spite of countless sorties into enemy territory, he never lost his fear of flying. After he was demobbed, Walter went to work for an insurance company; a tedious and boring job, according to Walter. In the fifties, after being left a generous inheritance, Walter went to live in Florence where he spent his days with his camera and extending his knowledge on Italian history and art. He was helped by a brilliant but impoverished professor who was delighted to 76

spend time with Walter and earn a little foreign currency. It was in Florence that Walter first became interested in wine and since then Walter had always drunk wine with his meals, though mostly in moderation, and rarely without food, unless it was Champagne.

Carnei di Poveri, Leek and Fennel Soup Serves two Ingredients •

1 can of chickpeas (or dried chickpeas, soaked overnight and cooked if you have the time)

1/2 litre of vegetable stock

Olive oil

2 shallots, finely diced

2 leeks, sliced

1 fennel bulb, sliced

Salt and pepper

Method 1.

Sweat the vegetables in olive oil.

2.

Season with salt and pepper.

3.

Combine chickpeas and stock with the cooked vegetables.

4.

Simmer until chickpeas are very tender.

5.

Set a quarter of the vegetables aside and blitz the rest in a blender.

6.

Add the remaining chick peas and vegetables and serve with additional olive oil.

When I asked him how he was managing to staying so young and fit he said he really didn’t know, though in Italy the professor had in introduced him to a dish which the professor claimed Michelangelo had eaten every day giving him extraordinary strength and vitality and allowing Michelangelo to reach almost ninety years of age in an era when medicine was poorly understood. According to the professor wine also featured highly in the artist’s diet. The dish was Carne dei Poveri, or pauper’s meat, better known as chickpeas. Being such a simple dish to make Walter, like Michelangelo, has eaten this most days always accompanied by crusty bread and a good red wine. Walter wrote the recipe for me: Italy was still suffering from the ravages of the war when Walter arrived in Florence. Meat was hard to come by and Walter developed a love of vegetables which he maintains to this day, only occasionally eating red meat. Though he did say that he loved wellmade sausages now and then. As far as exercise, Walter has walked everywhere, though he never participated in any sport other than golf. His knees, he told me, were still in perfect working order. He drinks tea and coffee though he doesn’t like water unless he is thirsty, preferring weak tea or water mixed with wine. Walter said he loves fruit and the odd bit of cake and chocolate. He had been happily married and has always considered himself lucky, never worrying too much about anything. Walter’s favourite wines are Chianti and Champagne.


Show Us Your Mag!

Baby Ella, 5 months old

LITTLE READERS COMPETITION Want to enter our next competition? Snap a picture of your little one holding a copy of Gib Mag and send it in to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com, and you’ll be in the running to win a week’s worth of meals at Supernatural! (Competition ends 20 th March. Winner announced in our April issue.)

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fashion

WARDROBE STAPLES FOR THE NEW YEAR

"Sustainability" is a keyword on our minds this new year, particularly when it comes to shopping the high street. With many of us keen to make that necessary shift towards an elevated environmental awareness, it’s now a crucial time to really consider the roles we all play in fast-fashion and its disastrous environmental effects. BY JULIA COELHO

W

ith the vast quantities of clothes that are churned out and so readily available for the taking these days, not to mention the meteoric rise of social media, it can be easy to put our blinkers on and become a part of the problem. But irresponsible and mindless consumption is slowly becoming a thing of the past, and this year, we’re keeping our eyes peeled for items that will transcend seasons and occasion. You may even find that many firm stylish staples are already residing in your wardrobe, collecting dust and ready for a revamp. On a strictly practical level, a consumer’s main concern is utility, and so our primary goal should always be to find high-quality pieces that are easy to style and put together. I know I’ve definitely made the mistake of only buying 78

one-off disposable fashion pieces that don’t go with anything in my wardrobe many times before. But a wardrobe built on a carefully curated selection of items makes day-to-day dressing infinitely easier and makes a great deal of financial sense too! Many of our highstreet favourites, particularly the likes of Mango and Zara, as well as a recent favourite of mine, & Other Stories, continue to ace it in the wardrobe-staples department, offering well-made structured pieces that will stand the test of time no matter which trends come and go.

ABOVE: TIE WAIST TRENCH COAT IN BEIGE - PIMKIE - £33.99

TRENCH COATS A trench coat is one of those truly timeless pieces that will never fail you, and if you invest in a GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


fashion STRAIGHT LEG JEANS Most of us will remember the ultra-low-rise jeans that were all the rage back in the 90s. They definitely had their moment to shine, but as style evolves and we become more mature along with it, they seemingly become a less practical option. These days, there’s nothing quite like a pair of perfectly cut straight-leg jeans to flatter your figure and nail pretty much any look. BELOW: SAND RAW HEM STRAIGHT JEANS - TOPSHOP - £40.00

LEFT: CHECK TRENCH TOPSHOP - £85.00 TOP:MID BLUE EDITOR JEANS - TOPSHOP - £49.00

Irresponsible consumption is a thing of the past. good one, there’s no doubt that you'll be using it for years to come. Trenches look just as gorgeous layered over dresses or skirts as they do with a pair of fitted trousers and trainers; it’s really no wonder that they’ve secured a firm spot amongst our staples. Best of all, there are various iterations up for grabs should the classic Burberry-esque styles not be for you. If you want to go for something a little different, why not opt for an 80’s inspired vinyl finish for an extra hint of glam? GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

BELOW: FLAT HIKER BOOTS IN BLACK NEW LOOK - £29.99

ANKLE BOOTS There are so many different boots on the market at the moment, from thigh-highs, to western and sock styles, but there’s no doubt that a good old pair of ankle boots will quickly become one of the most beloved things in your wardrobe, regardless of their height. A personal favourite of mine, Dr Martens are tried-andtrue staples that have recently made a bit of a resurgence, proving the consumer’s natural shift towards long-wearing brands that are also making moves to become more ethical and environmentally-friendly. 79


fashion BUTTON-UP BLOUSES You really can't get much more classic than a button-up blouse, and in my opinion, it’s one of the most underrated pieces in anyone’s fashion armoury. Be it for the office, a family lunch, or just for a casual weekend look with some trainers and a pair of jeans, a structured blouse is one of those pieces that will make you look put together with no real effort. I'm an avid collector of RIGHT: STRETCH HIGH HEEL ANKLE BOOTS - ZARA - £49.99 BOTTOM LEFT: 100% SILK BLOUSE MANGO - £69.99 BOTTOM RIGHT: NECK RIBBON SATIN BLOUSE - MANGO - £29.99

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fashion checked shirts, but this year I’ve decided to take it up a notch and hunt for silky blouses and neutral shirts that will go with pretty much everything even when I feel like I’m in a total style rut. Think of those inevitable jeans-and-a-nicetop occasions, sorted.

KNIT JUMPERS A knit jumper is hands down, my favourite ever thing to wear, not only for comfort reasons but also for ease of styling and sheer versatility. In recent years, I've noticed that high-street brands are making a real effort to up their game when it comes to quality and expensive-looking knitwear. Marks and Spencer reigns supreme when it comes to premium high-street knits at a decent price point. I personally tend to opt for classic silhouettes and nude colours, as I find they’re easy to throw on and style with so many different aesthetics. This winter, I'll be living in my turtleneck jumper in all shades of beige.

most occasions. Slip-ons are also a great idea; comfortable enough to walk in, but infinitely sleeker than the ‘ugly’ dad-style lace-up trainers that took the fashion world by storm last year. Getting dressed during winter might seem tricky when you compare it to the simplicity that is so inherent during the warmer seasons. Sure, warmth is a priority, but with a solid

collection of staple pieces, it’s never been easier to look awesome and feel cosy. ABOVE: CUBA WHITE LACE UP TRAINERS - TOPSHOP - £29.00 BOTTOM RIGHT: TURTLE NECK OVERSIZE SWEATER - MANGO - £35.99 BOTTOM LEFT: OAT KNITTED WAFFLE JUMPER - TOPSHOP - £35.00

TRAINERS Last but by no means least,

Dr Martens are tried-andtrue staples. no wardrobe is complete without a crisp classic pair of white trainers thrown into the mix. It’s a style that is both unassuming yet effortlessly cool, and can be worn by people of all ages, and for GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

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BERRY BRILLIANCE

Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/thegibraltarvegan

It’s January and a great number of us might have overindulged last month and accordingly made pledges to get our diets and health back on track this month. My Berry Brilliance juice aims to help nourish the body with lovely vitamins and minerals and give the boost your system needs. INGREDIENTS

Tip, add one teaspoon of agave if you are searching for a sweeter hit.

150g raspberries

100g blueberries

500ml sugar free cranberry juice

METHOD

1tbsp chia seeds

1tbsp hemp seeds

1. Place all the ingredients in a blender and blend

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2. Pour into a glass and drink

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


ROSCO DE ANIS (ANISE CAKE)

Recipe by MamaLotties.com

Anise can be strong so go easy on the syrup otherwise it won’t just be ‘don’t drink and drive’ but ‘don’t eat and drive’. INGREDIENTS Cake •

255 g Sugar

255 g Butter

255 g Self raising flour

6 Eggs

Syrup

METHOD 1. Beat the egg yolks together with the sugar, leaving the egg whites seperately to one side. Once the eggs and sugar are creamed together, mix in the flour. Make sure not to over mix, but just enough to blend the contents together.

350 ML Water

250 g Sugar

250 ML Anise liquor (Anis seco, dry anis)

2. Leave to one side and beat the egg white until you have a peaked merringue. Now fold this into your batter, until all the egg white and batter is blended together.

Cinnamon

3. Place your batter in a lined bunt

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

tin and bake at 180°C for 40 to 45 minutes. 4. Once golden and fluffy and you see that you can pierce your cake and have a clean blade, leave to one side to cool and prepare your syrup. 5. Heat the water and sugar in a pan until everything is dissolved and reduces, then add your anise. 6. When cool, flip your cake over and pour half the syrup over the bottom of the cake, allow to soak for a few minutes, then flip and repeat over the top. Finish off with a sprinkle of cinnamon. 83


restaurants, bars & pubs THE LOUNGE

SOLO BAR & GRILL

ALL’S WELL

Stylish Lounge Gastro Bar on Queensway Quay Marina serving best quality food prepared by passionate, qualified chefs. Popular quiz on Sundays from 7pm and a relaxed friendly atmosphere. A separate Lounge Bar Area serving a wide range of hot drinks, wines, beers, spirits and cocktails at reasonable prices, with large TV’s for sports and events coverage.

Solo Bar and Grill is a stylish and modern eatery — perfect for business functions or lunches — and part of the popular Cafe Solo stable. Serving everything from Goats’ Cheese Salad, Mediterranean Pâté and Cajun Langoustines to Beer Battered John Dory, or Harissa Chicken, and Chargrilled Sirloin Steak. This is a delightful venue in Europort with a cosy mezzanine level and terrace seating. Well worth a visit, or two! Available for private functions and corporate events — call 200 62828 to book your function or event.

In the fashionable Casemates square stands Gibraltar’s last historical themed pub, named for the 18th-century practice of locking gates to the city at night when the guard called ‘All’s Well’. Their food menu caters to all cravings; whether it’s fish and chips, a homemade pie, or maybe even a delicious sharing platter, they have it all. All’s Well have an amazing range of bottled beers as well as being the only pub in Gibraltar to offer craft beer on tap. Happy hour is daily from 7-9pm. Large terrace. Karaoke Mondays & Wednesdays until late.

Open: 10am-late Mon - Sun Be sure to arrive early to ensure a seat! The Lounge, 17 Ragged Staff Wharf, Queensway Quay Marina Tel: 200 61118 info@thelounge.gi

Open: 12-8pm. Solo Bar & Grill, Eurotowers Tel: 200 62828

All’s Well, Casemates Square. Tel: 200 72987

NUNOS ITALIAN Nunos Italian Restaurant, overlooking the Mediterranean, is popular with hotel guests, tourists and local residents. This 2 rosette rated, AA restaurant is renowned for its eclectic interior, intimate atmosphere and fine cuisine. Savour a wide selection of freshly prepared Italian delicacies, including bread, pasta, meat and fish, followed by delicious desserts. In the summer months, the hotel offers alfresco dining for private parties in the Garden Grill. Sitting nestled in the colonial garden you can enjoy a mouth-watering menu of charcoal-grilled meats and freshly prepared salads in candlelit surroundings. Open: Mon-Sun 1-3pm lunch, 7–11pm dinner Nunos Italian Restaurant and Terrace Caleta Hotel, Catalan Bay Tel: 200 76501

Email: reservations@caletahotel.gi

CAFÉ SOLO Modern Italian eatery set in lively Casemates square. Everything from chicory and crispy pancetta salad with walnuts, pears and blue cheese dressing, or king prawn, mozzarella and mango salad to pastas (eg: linguine with serrano ham, king prawns and rocket; smoked salmon and crayfish ravioli with saffron and spinach cream) to salads (eg: Vesuvio spicy beef, cherry tomatoes, roasted peppers and red onions; and Romana chorizo, black pudding, egg and pancetta) and pizzas (eg: Quatto Stagioni topped with mozzarella, ham, chicken, pepperoni and mushroom) and specialities such as salmon fishcakes, beef medallions and duck. Daily specials on blackboard. No smoking. Café Solo Grand Casemates Square. Tel: 200 44449

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information EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY: ALL EMERGENCIES................................. 112 FIRE...............................................................190 AMBULANCE.............................................190 POLICE.................................................................199

Business Information Financial Serv. Commission Tel: 200 40283/4 Chamber of Commerce Tel: 200 78376 Federation Small Business Tel: 200 47722 Company Registry.Tel: 200 78193 Useful Numbers Airport (general info.) . Tel: 200 12345 Hospital, St Bernards. . Tel: 200 79700 Weather information. . Tel: 5-3416 Frontier Queue Update Tel: 200 42777 Gibraltar Museum Tel: 200 74289 18/20 Bomb House Lane 10am-6pm (Sat 10am-2pm). Admission: Adults £2/Children under 12 - £1. Exhibitions also at Casemates gallery.

Police 200 72500

Gibraltar Services Police Emergency Nos: (5) 5026 / (5) 3598

Gibraltar Garrison Library Tel: 200 77418 2 Library Ramp Mon-Fri: 9am-5pm. Free Library tour offered every Friday at 11am. chris.tavares@gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi

Gibraltar Public Holidays 2019

Registry Office Tel: 200 72289 It’s possible to get married within 48 hours. A fact taken advantage of by stars such as Sean Connery & John Lennon.

Good Friday

Rock Tours by Taxi Tel: 200 70052 As well as offering normal fares, taxis provide Rock Tours taking in the Upper Rock, Europa Point etc.

Spring Bank Holiday

Monday 27th May

Queen’s Birthday

Monday 17th June

John Mackintosh Hall Tel: 200 75669 Includes cafeteria, theatre, exhibition rooms and library. 308 Main Street 9.30am - 11pm Mon-Fri.

Late Summer Bank Holiday

Monday 26th Aug

Gibraltar National Day Tuesday 10th Sept

New Year’s Day Commonwealth Day Easter Monday

Monday 1st Jan Monday 11th Mar Friday 19th Apr Monday 22nd Apr

Workers Memorial Day Monday 29th Apr May Day

Christmas Day Boxing Day

Wednesday 1st May

Wednesday 25th Dec Thursday 26th Dec

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD Gibraltar adhdgibraltar@gmail.com facebook.com/ADHDGibraltar/ Alcoholics Anonymous meet 7pm Tues & Thurs at Nazareth House Tel: 200 73774. A Step Forward support for single, separated, divorced/widowed people, meet 8pm Mon at St Andrew’s Church. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group those who are pregnant, breastfeeding or have breastfed to get together for coffee / support. Partners and older children welcome. Meets 1st Wed / month at Chilton Court Community Hall at 1.30pm. Enquiries and support 54014517. Childline Gibraltar confidential phone line for children in need. Freephone 8008 - 7 days a week 5pm - 9pm Citizens’ Advice Bureau Open Mon-Thur 9:30am-4:00pm, Fri 9:30am- 3:30pm. Tel: 200 40006 Email: info@cab.gi or visit at 10 Governor’s Lane. Free & confidential, impartial & independent advice and info. COPE Support group for people with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia or Rheumatoid Arthritis. Meetings at Catholic Community Centre Book

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

Shop at 7.30pm first Thur of each month. Tel: 200 51469 Email: copeadsupport@hotmail.com Dignity At Work Now Confidential support and advice for those who are being bullied at work. Tel: 57799000. Families Anonymous Support group for relatives and friends concerned about the use of drugs or related behavioural problems. Meet weekly on Thurs at 9pm at Family and Community Centre, Mid Harbours Estate, Bishop Caruana Road. 54007676 or 54014484. Gamblers Anonymous Telephone: 54001520 Gibraltar Cardiac Rehabilitation and Support Group meets on the first Tues of every month at 8.30pm at John Mac Hall, except for Jul & Aug. Gibraltar Dyslexia Support Group 72 Prince Edwards Rd Tel: 200 78509 Mobile: 54007924 website: dyslexia.gi Gibraltar Hearing Issues & Tinnitus Association Voicemail: (+350) 200 66755, Text Message (SMS): (+350) 54066055, Correspondence Charity P.O. Box 90220, Gibraltar. Email: info@ ghita.gi, Facebook: Gibraltar Hearing Issues & Tinnitus Association (GHITA & BSL Club), Our support group meets the first Monday of every month at Suite 3, Kings Bastion Leisure Centre as from 5pm.

Gibraltar Marriage Care Free relationship counselling, including pre-marriage education (under auspices of Catholic Church, but open to all). Tel: 200 71717. Gibraltar Society for the Visually Impaired Tel: 200 50111 (24hr answering service). Hope miscarriage support Tel: 200 41817. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support: Meets every Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous Tel: 200 70720 Parental Support Group helping parents and grandparents with restrictive access to their children and grandchildren. Tel: 200 46536, 200 76618, or 54019602. Psychological Support Group, PO Box 161, Nazareth House. Meet Tuesdays at 7pm, Fridays 8pm. Tel: Yolanda 54015553 With Dignity Gibraltar support for separated, divorced/widowed or single people. Meet Weds 9pm, Catholic Community Centre, Line Wall Rd. Outings/activities. Women in Need Voluntary organisation for all victims of domestic violence. Refuge available. Tel: 200 42581 (24 hrs).

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The Gibraltar Magazine is published and produced by Rock Publishing Ltd, Gibraltar. Tel: (+350) 200 77748

NON-URGENT CALLS: Ambulance Station 200 75728


I’M A GOD, GET ME OUT OF HERE!

Zeus discovers he’s a ‘super celebrity’, but says ‘No thanks’ to a menu of bugs and beetles. BY PETER SCHIRMER

W

hat defines a ‘celebrity’ and who or what decides whether such a description is merited? This latest topic at the Olympian breakfast table had found the celestial family as sharply divided as usual, though - unusually - this divide was age-oriented, rather than along lines of gender, with the Father of the Gods stubbornly traditional whilst the younger of his offspring cast a wider definitive net. Laid down more than two years ago, soon after the family had immigrated from Greece to the Rock, Hera’s sole domestic rule, that her brood should sit down together for at least on meal each day, had remained firmly in place. So, as Zeus tucked into toast slathered with a mix of Gentleman’s Relish and Roses lime 86

marmalade; Dionysus sipped his first bloody Mary of the day; and the other gods and goddesses squabbled over whose turn it was to have the last helping of Coco Pops, the Olympian family regularly discussed a range of subjects… often focusing on the latest foibles of the local mortals.

Hera had neither forgotten, nor forgiven. In the days between Christmas and January 1st, talk had turned to New Year’s resolutions and the search for a commitment that would be easy to make and easy to keep, while creating minimum discomfort for the family. Zeus

had been at his curmudgeonly best, and there was unanimous support for this proposal that the gods no longer would move out of the way of pedestrians so engrossed in their mobile phones or iPads that they were not aware of anyone in their path. The decision had been taken six days ago, but steadily drumming rains that had begun on January 2nd had kept the Olympians indoors, so that it had not yet been put to practice. Poseidon - who had been out and about and ‘didn’t mind a bit of wet’ reported that the rains, flooding the ill-serviced drains in Glacis Road and turning Casemates into a shallow pool of moving water, had kept the bulk of Gibraltar indoors. There had been no-one to confront, dig elbows into. The gods, similarly deprived, had GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


satire turned to the mindless panacea of television in an attempt to find amusement. Their own past lives on Olympus and in the multi-tribal climates of the eastern Mediterranean had contained more excitement and drama than anything found in TV soaps. Between them, the all-knowing Hera and ever-wise Athena could answer every quiz question - almost before the host had voiced it - and, though she had abandoned the hunt to pursue feminist gender issues, only Artemis showed any interest in the multiplicity of wild-life and nature documentaries. Remote on Olympus and with a steadily-dwindling congregation of worshippers, after the death of Archimedes Zeus had paid little attention to any developments in the scientific world. He had been mortified when, attracted by the title ‘Supernatural Wonders’, he had learned from some mortal named Brian Cox – a laid-back, somewhat scruffy physicist who didn’t look at all like professors were supposed to – that a large planet discovered four centuries previously by the Italian Galileo Galilei had been named Jupiter, after his junior Roman cousin. Even more irksome was that the huge planet’s four moons were named after a quartet of Zeus’ own past amours - Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. References to Inachus’ daughter Io, who had been his favourite, were particularly hurtful, for – although he had transformed her from a young woman to a heifer – Hera had swiftly uncovered this particularly infidelity… and had neither forgotten, nor forgiven. Indeed, after the previous year’s ill-fated visit to the Jupiters in Rome, where she had discovered GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

the popular dish Escalopine de Veau on a restaurant menu, the dish appeared regularly at dinners in the gods’ penthouse apartment, as Escalopine Io.

How can insects have any rights… and who are these celebrities?’ As the rains continued it was Aphrodite, mindlessly flipping from channel to channel on the 60-inch TV screen, who discovered ‘I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here!’ – a suitably inane programme to wipe the weather from their minds. ‘They take a plane-load of celebrities into the Australian bush where they face various tasks and ordeals in a knock-out competition,’ she explained to Zeus. ‘Things like putting their heads into glass jars full of spiders or other wriggly things. Or making them chew live worms and insects.’ ‘But why would anyone want to do that?’ her father wondered. ‘They don’t want to eat them – that’s the whole point. They do it for the money.’ ‘The programme has dropped anything to do with live creatures,’ Hermes intervened. ‘They say that it’s a violation of their animal rights.’ ‘Ah! more of that political correctness stuff,’ huffed Zeus. ‘Anyway, how can insects have

any rights… and who are these celebrities?’ [Which had started the discussion that for the past week had table-hopped from breakfast to breakfast after the family discovered that none of them recognised the names of any of the ‘celebrities’.] Her iPad ever ready, Athene had Googled ‘Celebrity – definition’, and read out the result of her search: ‘A celebrity is someone who is famous, especially in areas of entertainment such as films, music, writing, or sport. ... If a person or thing achieves celebrity, they become famous…’ ‘But we haven’t heard or read of any of these people camped out in the Australian bush,’ said Hebe. ‘I think there have been a few politicians who lost their parliamentary seats and have been on the programme.’ ‘Well, they’ll have had plenty experience of nasties. Look at what happened in the British elections last month,’ ever sensible Hera pointed out. ‘An American artist called Warhol claimed that “everyone has 15 seconds of fame” – does that make every mortal a celebrity?’ added Apollo. ‘If fame is the criterion, I must be a super-celebrity.’ Zeus pushed out of his chair and posed with a thrust out arm gripping a clutch of thunderbolts. ‘Ive been famous since the beginning of Time…’ ‘On that basis – we are all celebrities, but I don’t think I want to go to the Australian jungles – let alone being got out,’ said Aphrodite and pecked at a spoonful of Coco Pops. 87


clubs & activities Arts & Crafts Cross Stitch Club: John Mackintosh Hall, 1st Floor, Mon 6-8pm, fee £1. Gibraltar Arts & Crafts Association: Children: Mon&Fri 12.30-2pm, Mon-Fri 3.45-5.15pm Adults: Wed 5.45-7.15, Sat 10.30 to 12.30, Tel: 20073865 email: gibartsandcrafts@hotmail.com Knit and Natter Group: Tues 11am-3pm, Thurs 5.30-7.30pm, at Arts & Crafts Shop, Casemates balcony. Free to join and refreshments provided. Tel: 20073865. The Arts Centre: Prince Edward’s Road, Art classes for children and adults. For more info call Tel: 200 79788. The Fine Arts Association Gallery: At Casemates. Open 10am-2pm, 3-6pm Mon-Fri, Sat 11am-1pm. The Arts Society Gibraltar: Monthly illustrated talks open to the public. Registration from 6:30pm every 3rd Wednesday of the month. Guest fee £12. We meet at The Garrison Library. Contact gibraltar@theartssociety.org or Claus Olesen on 54036666. Website with all informaiton is gibraltar.theartssociety.org Board Games Calpe Chess Club & Junior Club: meets in Studio 1, John Mackintosh Hall Thursday, Juniors: 5p.m. - 7 p.m. / Tuesday & Thursday 7p.m. - 10:30 The Gibraltar Scrabble Club: Meets on Tuesdays at 3pm. Tel: Vin 20073660 or Roy 20075995. All welcome. The Subbuteo Club: Meets in Charles Hunt Room, John Mackintosh Hall. Dance Adult Dance Classes: Wed evenings at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre from 7-8.30pm. Contact Dilip on 200 78714. Art in Movement Centre: Hip-hop/Break Dance, Contemporary Dance, Pilates, Capoeira, Acrobatics, Street Kids & Tods, Modern Dance. Performance and Film opportunities. Judo & Jujitsu Classes: Tue/ Thur with Sensei Conroy. All ages. Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. www. artinmovement.net FB: Art In Movement A.I.M, tel 54025041 or 54007457 Ballet, Modern Theatre, Contemporary & Hip-hop: weekly at Danza Academy. Training from 3 years to Adult Advanced. 68/2 Prince Edward’s Rd Tel: 54027111. Bellydance Classes, all levels, Tue 8-9pm at the Ocean Village Gym (non–members welcome). Contact 54005593. DSA Old & Modern Sequence Dancing: Sessions at Central Hall Fri 8.30pm, beginners 8pm. Tel: 200 78901 or tony@ gibraltar.gi Everybody welcome. Modern & Latin American Sequence Dancing: Mon at Catholic Community Centre 8pm. Tel. Andrew 200 78901. Modern, Contemporary, Lyrical, Flexibility, Hip Hop & Dance Theatre: Classes weekly at Urban Dance Studio, 2 Jumpers Bastion. Tel: Yalta 54012212 or Jolene 54015125. Rockkickers Linedance Club: Governor’s Meadow 1st School. www.rockkickers.com Salsa Gibraltar Salsa: Tues at Laguna Social Club, Laguna Estate. Beginners 7-8.30pm. Intermediates 8.30-10pm. Tel: Mike 54472000 or info@salsagibraltar.com Zumba Classes at Urban Dance: Jumpers Bastion, with certified instructor Tyron Walker. Tel: 20063959 or 54012212 or Twitter: @UrbanDanceGib History & Heritage The Gibraltar Heritage Trust: Main Guard, 13 John Mackintosh Sq. Tel: 200 42844. The Gibraltar Classic Vehicle Association: Dedicated to the preservation of Rock’s transport/motoring heritage. Assists members in restoration / maintenance of classic vehicles. New members welcome. Tel: 200 44643. Garrison Library Tours: at 11am on Fri, duration 1h 50mins. Tel: 20077418. History Alive: Historical re-enactment parade. Main Street up to Casemates Square every Sat at 12 noon. Music Gibraltar National Choir and Gibraltar Junior National Choir: Rehearses at the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Tel: 54831000. The Calpe Band: Mon & Wed. For musicians of brass/woodwind instruments of all standards/ages/abilities 7-9pm. Tel: 54017070 or thecalpeband@gmail.com

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Jazz Nights: Thurs at 9pm at O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel. Tel: 200 70500. Outdoor Activities The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award Gibraltar: Exciting self-development programme for young people worldwide equipping them with life skills to make a difference to themselves, their communities and the world. Contact: Award House, North Mole Road, PO Box: 1260. mjpizza@ gibtelecom.net, www.thedukes.gi. Social Clubs The Rotary Club of Gibraltar meets the Rock Hotel, 7pm Tuesday evenings. Guests welcome. For contact or info www.rotaryclubgibraltar.com Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes: (Gibraltar Province) meets RAOB Club, 72/9 Prince Edward’s Road - Provincial Grand Lodge, Thu/month, 7.30pm. William Tilley 2371, Thurs 8.30pm. Buena Vista 9975, monthly, Social Lodge. www.akearn1.wix. com/raob-gibraltar, william.tilley.lodge@ hotmail.co.uk, Clive, tel: 58008074 Special Interest Clubs & Societies Creative Writers Group: meets up on Tuesday mornings at 10.30 in O’Reilley’s Irish Bar and it is free to attend. Tel: Carla 54006696. Gibraltar Book Club: For info Tel: Parissa 54022808. Gibraltar Horticultural Society: meets 1st Thurs of month 6pm, J.M. Hall. Spring Flower Show, slide shows, flower arrangement demos, outings to garden centres, annual Alameda Gardens tour. All welcome. Gibraltar Philosophical Society: devoted to intellectually stimulating debate. Frequent lectures and seminars on a range of topics. Tel: 54008426 or Facebook: facebook.com/gibphilosophy Gibraltar Photographic Society: Meets on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. Wellington Front. Induction courses, talks, discussions, competitions etc. For details contact the secretary on, leslinares@gibtelecom.net Harley Davidson Owners’ Club: www.hdcgib.com Lions Club of Gibraltar: Meets 2nd and 4th Wed of the month at 50 Line Wall Road. www.lionsclubofgibraltar.com St John’s Ambulance: Adult Volunteers Training Sessions from 8-10pm on Tues. Tel: 200 77390 or training@stjohn.gi The Royal British Legion: For info or membership contact the Branch Secretary 20074604 or write to PO Box 332. UN Association of Gibraltar: PO Box 599, 22a Main Street. Tel: 200 52108. Sports Supporters Clubs Tottenham Hotspur Supporters Club: Meets at Star Bar, Parliament Lane, when Spurs games are televised - call prior to matches to check game is televised. Great food for a lunch if KO is early or an early supper if the game is later. Gibraltar Arsenal Supporters Club: Meets match days upstairs at Time Out Café, Eurotowers. Gooners of all ages welcome. For info/news visit www.GibGooners.com Tel: 54010681 (Bill) or 54164000 (John). Gibraltar Hammers: Meets on match days at the Victoria Stadium Bar, Bayside Road. All league games are shown live. All West Ham supporters and their families are welcome. For details visit www.gibraltarhammers.com or gibraltarhammers@hotmail.com Leeds United Gibraltar Supporters Club. Meet at The Trafalgar Sports Bar 1 Rosia Road when live matches are on. All Leeds United supporters and their families are welcome. Join Leeds United Gibraltar Supporters club at: facebook.com/luscgib Sports & Fitness Artistic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Artistic Gymnastics Association. Tel: Angela 200 70611 or Sally 200 74661. Athletics: Gibraltar Amateur Athletics Association holds competitions through year for juniors, adults and veterans. Two main clubs (Calpeans 200 71807, Lourdians 200 75180) training sessions at Victoria Stadium. Badminton: Recreational badminton weekdays at Victoria Stadium (Tel: 200 78409 for allocations). Gibraltar Badminton Association (affiliated to BWF& BE) junior club/tournaments, senior leagues/ recreational. www.badmintongibraltar.com

Ballet Barre Fitness: Adults on Wed 10am & Fri 6pm at The Arts Centre. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Basketball: Gibraltar Amateur Basketball Association (affiliated FIBA) leagues/ training for minis, passarelle, cadets, seniors and adults at a variety of levels. Tel: John 200 77253, Randy 200 40727. Boxing: Gibraltar Amateur Boxing Association (member IABA) gym on Rosia Rd. Over 13s welcome. Tuition with ex-pro boxer Ernest Victory. Tel: 56382000 or 20042788. Cheerleading: Gibraltar Cheerleading Association, girls and boys of all ages. Cheerleading and street cheer/hip-hop at Victoria Stadium. Recreational / competitive levels. Tel: 58008338. Canoeing: Gibraltar Canoeing Association. Tel: Nigel 200 52917 or Arturo 54025033. Cricket: Gibraltar Cricket, National Governing Body & Associate Member of ICC. Governs International & Domestic Men’s, Women’s, Boys’ & Girls’ cricket- league & cup competitions and in-school coaching. www.gibraltarcricket.com, info@gibcricket. com, Twitter: @Gibraltar_Crick Cycling: Gibraltar Cycling Association various cycling tours. Darts: Gibraltar Darts Association (full member of WDF & affiliate of BDO). We cater for men, ladies & youth who take part in leagues, competitions and a youth academy for the correct development of the sport. Tel: Darren 54027171 Secretary, Alex 54021672 Youth Rep, Justin 54022622 President. Email: info@ gibraltardarts.com Football: Gibraltar Football Association leagues/competitions for all ages OctoberMay. Futsal in summer, Victoria Stadium. Tel: 20042941 www.gibraltarfa.com Gaelic Football Club (Irish sport): Males any age welcome. Get fit, play sport, meet new friends, travel around Spain/Europe and play an exciting and competitive sport. Training every Wed on the MOD pitch on Devil’s Tower Road at 7pm. Andalucia League with Seville and Marbella to play matches home and away monthly. Visit www.gibraltargaels. com or secretary.gibraltar.europe@gaa.ie Hockey: Gibraltar Hockey Association (members FIH & EHF) high standard competitions/training for adults/juniors. Tel: Eric 200 74156 or Peter 200 72730 for info. Iaido: teaches the Japanese sword (Katana), classes every week. www.iaidogibraltar.com Ice Skating: Gibraltar Rock Stars Figure Skating Club lessons every Tuesday evening & Saturday morning, all levels including adults. Contact grsfsc@gmail.com or 58700000 Iwa Dojo, Kendo & Jujitsu: Classes every week, for kids/adults. Tel: 54529000 www. iwadojo.com or dbocarisa@iwadojo.com Judo and Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Budokai Judo Association UKMAF recognised instructors for all ages and levels at Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. Tel: Charlie 20043319. Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Ju-jitsu Academy training and grading for juniors/seniors held during the evening at 4 North Jumpers Bastion. Tel: 54011007. Karate-do Shotokai: Gibraltar Karate-do Shotokai Association - Karate training for junior & seniors at Clubhouse, Shotokai karate centre, 41H Town Range. Monday: 9:30 p.m. & Wednesday 9:45 p.m. Karate: Shotokan karate midday Mon beginners, other students 8.30pm. Thurs 8.30pm. In town at temporary dojo or privately by arrangement. Contact Frankie 54038127 or info@fhmedia.co.uk. Motorboat Racing: Gibraltar Motorboat Racing Association Tel: Wayne 200 75211. Muay Thai and Muay Boran Club: Tues & Thur at Boyd’s Kings Bastion Leisure Centre at 6:30pm, Tel: John – 54024707 FB: Gibraltar Muay Thai Netball: Gibraltar Netball Association (affiliated FENA & IFNA) competitions through year, senior/junior leagues. Tel: 20041874. Petanque: Gibraltar Petanque Association. New members welcome. Tel: 54002652. Pilates: Intermediate Pilates: Tues & Fri 9.30am, beginners Pilates: Fri 10.50am at the Shotokai Centre, 41H Town Range. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Gibraltar Pool Association: (Member of the

EBA) home and away league played on Thurs throughout the season, various tournaments played on a yearly basis both nationally and internationally, Tel: 56925000 gibpool@ gibtelecom.net, www.gib8ball.com Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Rhythmic Gymnastics Association runs sessions from 4 years of age, weekday evenings. Tel: 56000772 or Sally 200 74661. Rugby: Gibraltar Rugby caters for all ages from 4 years old to veterans (over 35’s). It organises competitions and sessions for Juniors; 4 x Senior Clubs; Veterans team; Touch Rugby and a Referees Society. Email admin@gibraltarrfu. com or visit www.gibraltarrfu.com Sailing: Gibraltar Yachting Association junior/ senior competitive programme (April - Oct) Tel: Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club at 200 78897. Shooting: Gibraltar Shooting Federation. Rifle, Europa Point Range (Stephanie 54020760); Clay pigeon, East Side (Harry 200 74354); Pistol, near Royal Naval Hospital (Louis 54095000). Snooker: Members of European Billiards & Snooker Association - facilities at Jumpers Bastion with 3 tables. Professional coaching for juniors/seniors. Organised leagues/ tournaments and participation in international competitions. Tel: 56262000 / 54000068, or info@gibraltarsnooker.com Squash: Gibraltar Squash Association, Squash Centre, South Pavilion Road (members WSF & ESF). Adult and junior tournaments and coaching. Tel: 200 44922. Sub-Aqua: Gibraltar Sub-Aqua Association taster dives for over 14s, tuition from local clubs. Voluntary sports clubs: Noah’s Dive Club and 888s Dive Club. Tel: 54991000. Commercial sports diving schools available. Time - Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.. Telephone, Jenssen Ellul - 54027122 Swimming: Gibraltar Amateur Swimming Association (member FINA & LEN) opens its pool for leisure swimming. Junior lessons, squad for committed swimmers, water polo. Pool open Mon&Thurs: 7-10am, 12.30-4pm. Tue, Wed, Fri: 7-10am, 12:30-5pm. Sat: 3-5pm. Sun: closed. Mon to Fri from 5-6pm groups training. 6-7.30 squad training. Mon, Wed, Fri 7.30-8.30 swimming joggers, Tues & Thurs 7:30-8:30 junior Water polo. Mon, Tues & Thurs 8:30-10pm Adult water polo. Tel: 200 72869. Table Tennis: Gibraltar Table Tennis Association training and playing sessions, Victoria Stadium, Tues 6-10pm and Thurs 8-11pm with coaching and league competition. Tel: 56070000 or 20060720. Taekwondo: Gibraltar Taekwondo Association classes/gradings Tel: Mari 20044142 or www. gibraltartaekwondo.org Tai Chi: Tai Chi for children and adults. MonThur 6.30-8pm at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre and Sat 9am-1pm at the Yoga Centre, 33 Town Range. Tel: Dilip 200 78714. Tennis and Paddle Tennis: Sandpits Club. Junior and adult training available. info : www. sandpits.club. Tel (Louis) 20077035 Ten-Pin Bowling: At King’s Bowl in the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre every day. Gibraltar Ten Pin Bowling (members FIQ & WTBA) leagues, training for juniors and squad. Tel: 200 52442. Triathlon: Hercules Triathlon Club organises swimming, running and cycling training sessions and competes regularly in Andalucia and Internationally. Contact chris.walker@york. gi or Facebook “Hercules Triathlon Club” Volleyball: Gibraltar Volleyball Association training, indoor leagues, beach volleyball competition, 3 v 3 competition, juniors and seniors. Tel: 54001973 or 54885000. Yoga: Integral Yoga Centre runs a full programme of classes from Mon-Fri at 33 Town Range. Tel: 200 41389. All welcome. Theatrical Groups Gibraltar Amateur Drama Association: Meet at Ince’s Hall Theatre Complex, 310 Main Street. Tel: 20042237. Trafalgar Theatre Group: Meets 2nd Wed of month, Garrison Library 8pm. All welcome.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


Š EDGAR A. TRIAY

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information

CRUISE SCHEDULE JANUARY 2020 ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY

Fri 03 Jan 20, 12:00

AMERA

18:00 -

-

Tue 07 Jan 20, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

Mon 20 Jan 20, 09:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

Tue 28 Jan 20, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

31 Dec '19 - 06 Jan '20

DUTY PHARMACY OPENING HOURS

07 Jan ‘20 – 13 Jan ‘20

Monday to Friday (7pm to 9pm) Weekends & public holidays (11am to 1pm & 6pm to 8pm)

14 Jan ‘20 –20 Jan ‘20

For updates, check facebook.com/PharmaGuide

21 Jan ‘20 – 27 Jan ‘20

-

Valmar Pharmacy Europort 1.0.08 Eurotwers  200 63868

Waterport Pharmacy

Unit 14 Crown Daisy House   200 68323

Calpe Pharmacy ICC

Unit g9, ICC  200 77977

Wesley Pharmacy

299b Main Street  200 67567

CHESS PUZZLE ANSWER: 1Bg5 +

90

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE JANUARY 2020 DAY

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZ8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZ8902

11:30

Gatwick

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

15:55

EZY2246

16:30

Luton

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

19:20

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

19:20

EZY6300

20:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

Britsh Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

16:55

EZY1964

17:35

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

10:55

BA491

11:30

Heathrow

EZ6299

easyJet

Bristol

16:30

EZ6300

17:15

Bristol

EZ1963

easyJet

Manchester

19:55

EZ1964

20:35

Tangier

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:15

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:30

BA2663

21:40

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

10:55

EZY2246

11:30

Luton

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:50

EZY8902

12:25

Gatwick

BA492

British Aiways

Heathrow

14:25

BA493

15:15

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:20

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:50

EZY6300

11:25

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:10

EAZY8902

11:45

Gatwick

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

11:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

14:25

BA493

15:15

Heathrow

BA490

British Aiways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

19:25

AT991

20:05

Tangier

This schedule is correct at time of print. For up to date details and changes visit www.gibraltarairport.gi GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

91


R U N W A Y

Victoria Stadium

3

4

REFERENDUM HOUSE ←→ SOUTH BARRACKS

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019

Market Place loop (Eastbound)

http://www.gibraltarbuscompany.gi

Routes operated by

BOTH WORLDS ←→ ROSIA

Rosia loop (Northbound)

MARKET PLACE ←→ EUROPA POINT

3

Midtown loop (Southbound) Midtown loop (Northbound)

Ocean Village

Glacis Kiosk

WILLIS’s ROAD

MOUNT ALVERNIA ←→ ORANGE BASTION

AIRPORT/FRONTIER ←→ TRAFALGAR

EUROTOWERS ←→ ROSIA

http://citibus.gi

H

Bishop Canilla House

PLACES OF INTEREST

Coach Park

Cable Car

Airport

Lighthouse

Cathedral

Museum

BI

Taxis

Seaport

Castle

Beach

Stadium

Trafalgar Cemetery

QUEENSWAY

King’s Wharf

Queensway Quay

Referendum Gates

MAIN STREET

Commonwealth Park

Mid-Harbour Estate

Europort Building 8

A AN RU CA D OP A SH RO

Edinburgh House

58

10

PRINCE EDWARDS ROAD

Eliott’s Way

48 BOTH WORLDS

ROSIA ROAD

Alameda Governor’s House Meadow House Victoria House

H KS RO AD

BA RR AC

Mount Pleasant

3

New Harbours

Cumberland Jumpers Road Building

South Gates

New Mole House

Garrison Gym

© VK (2018)

ce ur So

Gibraltar Bus Network

rg p.o ma et tre ns pe O :

Rosia Plaza

North Gorge

Eliott’s Battery

March 2019 version : correct at time of going to print

Map of Gibraltar

University of Gibraltar

EUROPA POINT

2

Schematic Diagram of Bus Network (not to scale)

Buena Vista

Mosque

BUS NETWORK

GIBRALTAR

9 ROSIA ROSIA 4

Brympton

EUROPA ROAD

SOUTH BARRACKS

SOUTH PAVILION ROAD

St. Joseph’s School

MOUNT ALVERNIA

Schomberg

SO UT

Shorthorn Farm

7

R e s e r v e

Rock Old Hotel Casino

RED SANDS ROAD

Lower Flat Bastion Rd Wilson’s Gardiner’s Ramp Road

Morello’s Ramp

TRAFALGAR Convent Place

Blackstrap Cove

N a t u r e

FLAT BASTION ROAD

Sacred Heart Church

Flat Bastion Rd

R o c k

Caleta Hotel

RECLAMATION Cathedral ROAD Square

King’s Bastion

Arengo’s Palace

PORT St. Bernard’s EURO Hospital GASA Swimming Pool

ROAD

Varyl Begg Estate

MONTAGU GARDENS

9

British War Memorial

LINE WALL ROAD

BOTH WORLDS ←→ RECLAMATION ROAD

Artillery Arms

WILLIS’s ROAD

MAIN STREET MAIN STREET

Moorish Castle Estate

AIRPORT/FRONTIER ←→ RECLAMATION ROAD

Albert Risso House

Sir William Jackson Grove

Waterport Road

QUEENSWAY

Orange Bastion

Fishmarket Steps

1

William’s Way

U p p e r

SIR HERBERT MILES ROAD

1 2 MARKET PLACE

CASEMATES

Routes operated by

10

9

8

7

5

Notre Dame School

Faulknor House

Constitution House

REFERENDUM HOUSE

WINSTON CHURCHILL AVENUE

Park & Ride

MARKET PLACE ←→ WILLIS’S ROAD

R U N W A Y

2

1

BUS ROUTES

5 10

AIRPORT/ FRONTIER

DEVIL’S TOWER RO AD

St. Theresa’s Church

GLACIS ROAD

Eastern Beach

CORRAL ROAD

WATERPORT ROAD

C A R C A B L E

Catalan Bay

N

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coffee time CROSSWORD 1

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10 2 12

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DOWN

1. A German tennis champion (6)

1. Wenceslas was Duke (then posthumously King) of here (7)

4. Recurring theme in a piece of music (5) 7. Old German coin from which the word dollar is derived (6)

8

7

ACROSS

15 6

18

18

7 17

19

8. Old tax levied at the city gates on goods brought in (6) 9. Arabic title (4) 10. Israeli city where Joseph’s workshop is said to have been (8) 12. Ledger (7,4)

20

22

22

23

21

17. Not on the regular skiing runs (3-5) 19. Elephant’s external tooth (4) 20. Play title - The (?) Cometh (6)

2. Relating to heat (7) 3. Wrong (9) 4. A fine coffee (5) 5. Missile usually launched via a submarine (7) 6. Shock; someone looking dishevelled (6) 11. Player of an instrument such as Anton Garas in The Third Man (9) 13. Alkaloid found in coffee etc (7) 14. Ingredient of porridge (7) 15. Osculation (7) 16. Sport; alternative name for St Stephen’s Day (6) 18. Tetchy (5)

21. Portugal, Spain etc (6) 22. Phantom who grants wishes (5) 23. German prison camp (6)

& YOU COULD WIN

SUDOKU

lunch for two at

2

Either SNAP and SEND your completed crossword to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com or RETURN TO THE CLIPPER by 20 th January. 1

2

C O V

O S 9

M E E

11

15

December Answers.

V E

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D C

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14

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S N

S 10

A 8

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H

L

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A M L

H

R

P

C

E

E

N

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C O

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S

E

E

P R

C

E

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N O M E P

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18

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R U D O L E

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23

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12

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S W O M E S

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

3

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Joseph Olivera

7

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3 5

6 9

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P

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THE WINNER IS:

E

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5 93


CHESS COLUMN BY

GRANDMASTER RAY KEENE OBE Highlight of the Year This month we see the absolute highlight of The Gibraltar chess year , The annual Gibraltar Masters at the Caleta Hotel, organised by Brian Callaghan OBE and Grandmaster Stuart Conquest. A key feature of the Gibraltar Masters is the encouragement given to women players , so this month the game is a win kindly contributed by one of the leading lights of the female chess sorority, Grandmaster Dina Belenkaya.


coffee time D Belenkaya-Z Abdumalik Budva 2019 Playng against World’s strongest Junior is a great challenge, which I was very excited about. While preparing for the game, I noticed that the opponent was particularly strong in very sharp and dynamic positions. So my opening choice was rather calm 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 d6 5 f3 0-0 6 Nge2 c5 7 Be3 Nbd7 8 Qd2 a6 9 0-0-0 Far more cautious would be 9 d5 and 9 Rd1. The bold text move encourages Tal to do what he did best: sacrifice! 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.Bxc6 dxc6 5.d3 Bg7 6.Be3 black should continue with NF6-Nd7-e5, or e5-Ne7. other options are possible as well 6... Qa5 7.Qd2 h5?! weakening black's king side 8.f4 Nf6 9.Nf3 c4 black is trying somehow to create dynamic counterplay 10.e5! 10.dxc4?! winning a pawn was not possible due to 10...Be6 11.b3? (11.0–0–0 Bxc4=) 11... Rd8–+; 10...Ng4 11.d4 b5 12.Ne4 the main advantage for white is that both black bishops are extremely passive.

13...Bf5 14.Nc5!! A typical positional pawn sacrifice! 14...Bxc2 15.h3 Nh6

W________W árDWDkDW4] à0WDW0pgW] ßWDpDWDph] ÞDpHW)WDp] ÝWDp)W)WD] ÜDWDWDNDP] ÛP)bGWDPD] Ú$WDWIWDR] WÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈW 16.b3!! cxb3 17.axb3 0–0 18.Kf2 a6 19.Ra2 Bf5 20.Rha1 Bc8 21.Ba5 Nf5 trying to come alive again 22.g3 Re8 23.Rd2 f6 24.Re1 Rf8 25.e6 As we shall see the e6– pawn will be most useful for the endgame 25...Nd6 26.g4 Bh6 27.Kg3 Nb7 28.Nxb7 Bxb7 29.Rc1 Rac8 30.Rc5 Kh7 31.Re2 Rg8 32.Ne1 Bg7 33.Rd2 Rh8 34.Ng2 Bh6 35.Rd1 Rhg8 36.Ne3 Ba8 37.Nc2 Bb7 38.Nb4 Bg7 39.Kf3 Rh8 40.Kg3 Rhg8 41.Kf2 Rgf8 42.Ke3 Rh8 43.gxh5 Kg8 44.Rg1 Rxh5 45.Rxh5 gxh5 46.Nd3 c5 the only option ! giving back the pawn and trying to revive the pieces

12...Qxd2+

47.Nxc5 Bd5 48.f5 Kh7 49.Kd3 Bh6 50.Bb4 Re8 51.Kc3 Rc8 52.Kd3 Re8 53.Nd7 Bg7

13.Bxd2 and now the black knight will be imprisoned on h6.

54.Ra1 Bxb3 55.Rxa6 Kg8 56.Rb6 Bc4+ 57.Ke4 Bf1 58.d5 Bg2+

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020

59.Kd4 Bxh3 60.Bxe7!! part of the plan! e6 was indeed a useful pawn! 60...Bxf5 61.Bxf6 h4 62.Bxg7 Kxg7 63.Ke5 h3 64.Nf6 h2 65.Nxe8+ Kg6 66.e7+ Kg5 67.Nf6 h1Q 68.e8Q winning thanks to a study-like idea! 68...Qh2+ 69.Kd4 Qd2+ If 69...Qf2+ 70.Qe3+!! 70.Kc5 Qc3+ 71.Kd6 Qxf6+ 72.Kc7 Qc3+ 73.Kb8 Qc5 74.Qd8+ Kg4 75.d6 Qe5 76.Qc7 Qe8+ 77.Ka7 Qe5 78.Qe7 Qa1+ 79.Kb7 Qh1+ 80.Kc7 Qa8 81.Qe2+ Kh4 82.Qf2+ Kg4 83.Qd4+ Kh3 84.d7 Qa7+ 85.Kd8 Qa5 86.Ke7 Qe1+ 87.Kf8 Black resigns

PUZZLE Paraminzina-Docx, Gibraltar 2018 How did White win immediately?

W________W áWDWDW4WD] àDbDWiW0W] ßp1WDWDW0] ÞDWDQ0pDP] ÝWDBDWDnD] ÜDW)WDWDW] ÛP)WGKgPD] ÚDWDRDWDR] WÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈW

Answer on page 90

95


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THINK YOU CAN FIND THEM ALL? Can you find all the words in the wordsearch below? Find them and circle them using a pen or pencil. © Nourish Interactive

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020


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Profile for Rock Publishing Ltd

The Gibraltar Magazine January 2020  

Feliz ano nuevo, dear readers. We made it! I was recently whisked away to Italy for my 30th birthday surprise (this is the bit where you gas...

The Gibraltar Magazine January 2020  

Feliz ano nuevo, dear readers. We made it! I was recently whisked away to Italy for my 30th birthday surprise (this is the bit where you gas...