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February 2019 Vol. 24 # 04

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BREXIT-PROOF YOUR BUSINESS STRIPPING BACK DOWN UNDER

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AROUND THE WORLD IN A CAMPERVAN GIBRALTAR POETS: AN ANTHOLOGY SONNET FOR AN AGED VALENTINE

ON I S I V E L E OF T


C/ Maribel, 8, Sierra Nevada 18196 Granada | +34 958 480 600 | reservas@ellodge.com | ellodge.com


Sonnet for an Aged Valentine Do you recall those days of roses and of wine, When we lithe and young and gay, When life was filled with colour, and all day We'd sing. We’d dance by candlelight, and dine And plight our troth – I yours and you were mine. We lived, and loved, and knew we’d never age We played at life and made the world our stage. And I swore that you’d be my Valentine. I saw you in the square the other day. You’ve put on weight; your breasts, once pert, now droop; Your hair no longer glorious gold, but grey. And – goodness me – you’ve aged. You stoop. Your pearl-white teeth turned dull by nicotine. Alas, you can no longer be my Valentine.

PETER SCHIRMER


from the editor

FEBRUARY ISSUE EDITOR’S NOTE

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alentine’s Day has rolled around faster than you can say overpriced chocolates and feigned affection, so this month, we’re bringing you a special love-themed issue!

One of my favourite articles this month (and I promise I haven’t been threatened with a raised zapatilla to say this) is an interview with one of Gibraltar’s best-loved media personalities, and the longest-running female news reader in the world, my mum. Alice Mascarenhas interviews Susan Clifton-Tucker and recounts the highs, the lows, and the 70s shows with great gusto (p. 31).

THE HEART HAS ITS REASONS, OF WHICH REASON KNOWS NOTHING.

From one radio and television sweetheart to the next, we sit down with Davina Barbara as she slips off her six-inch reporter heels in favour of her recently acquired Cultural Development Officer hat (p. 42). Valentine’s Day now comes attached with Hallmark-scented stigma about consumerism, but what’s the real reason for celebrating this day, and who is this Valentine chap who has us all running around card shops like frenzied ferrets the days leading up to the 14th? Peter gives us a lesson on love as he teaches us the history behind the celebration (p. 40). What if, instead of splashing out on 5* luxury resorts, we stripped back all the bells and whistles and opted for an intimate, low-budget adventure instead? Gianella takes us on a campervanning adventure to Western Australia and encourages us to experience an altogether different sort of couples’ getaway, whether romantic or platonic (p. 69). Also choosing the noble campervan as their moyen de transport are Harald and Snorri: two Norsemen with a penchant for aged motor vehicles and travelling the great outdoors – specifically Norway to Cape Horn. But with unreliable brakes, a faulty exhaust system, and tyres in dire need of a check-up before they even set off, how far have they made it (p. 63)? First it was the ‘V’ word (Veganuary), and now it’s the ‘B’ word that’s hot on everyone’s lips – the dreaded Brexit. As a business owner, the future climate may seem uncertain, but luckily we’re bringing you 10 top tips to help Brexit-proof your business (p. 26). And if you’re finding all this Valentine’s malarkey as sickly-sweet as a mass-produced box of heart-shaped chocolates, you can always run away to Greece and start over, with a little help from our monthly property article (p. 23). Forever yours,

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


Have you thought about a loan with the Gibraltar International Bank? Are you planning a wedding or celebrating an important life time event? Let us help you make your dreams a reality For faster loan approvals please apply via our website www.gibintbank.gi

traditional banking with a modern feel gibintbank

@gibintbank

www.gibintbank.gi | +350 (200) 13900 | Gibraltar International Bank Ltd, PO Box 1375, Ince’s House, 310 Main Street, Gibraltar GX11 1AA Gibraltar International Bank Limited is authorised and regulated by the Gibraltar Financial Services Commission. Company Registration Number 109679


EDITOR: Sophie Clifton-Tucker editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com

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DESIGN: Lina Sproge design@thegibraltarmagazine.com REPORTER: Victoria Locke

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SALES: Advertising Team sales@thegibraltarmagazine.com DISTRIBUTION: DHL martin@matrix.gi ACCOUNTS: Paul Cox paul@thegibraltarmagazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Eran and Ayelet Mamo Shay Jorge v.Rein Parlade Andrew Licudi Gianella Baldachino Julia Coelho Lewis Stagnetto Snorri and Harald Alice Mascarenhas Elena Scialtiel Kerstin Andlaw Resham Khiani Richard Cartwright Peter Schirmer Jeremy Gomez

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Mark Montegriffo facebook.com/gibmag/ twitter.com/gibmag instagram.com/ thegibraltarmagazine/ The Gibraltar Magazine is published monthly by Rock Publishing Ltd Portland House, Glacis Road, Gibraltar, PO Box 1114 T: (+350) 20077748 E: editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com Š 2018 Rock Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written consent of The Gibraltar Magazine. www.TheGibraltarMagazine.com Magazine & website archived by the British Library 6

Tamarin

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content

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3 Sonnet for an Aged Valentine? 8 Hello There: What’s the best romantic movie? 10 What’s on? 13 News 20 Around Town

BUSINESS

LEISURE 63 Around the World in a Camper 69 Stripping Back Down Under

23 Property Investment: Greece

73 Spring Bag Trends

26 Brexit-Proof Your Business

78 Your Chablis or Mine?

28 Helicopter Flights Around the Rock

REGULARS

LIFE

82 Recipes: Take A Pizza My Heart & Two-Ingredient Truffles

31 The Unforgettable Face of Television

85 83 69

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85 Guides and Information

37 Mindful Resolutions

87 #GibsGems

38 Heart Intelligence

88 Olympus: Zealous Zeus’ Manifesto

40 My Valentine 42 Profile: Davina Barbara 44 Back to Our Roots

92 Schedules 96 Coffee Time

47 A Zookeeper’s Diary 50 Monster Mussels

SCENE 53 Love and Decadence 56 Gibraltar Poets: An Anthology 59 Fantasy Novelist: Alison Gardiner

COVER PHOTO MODEL: SUSAN CLIFTON-TUCKER

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

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hello there

WHAT’S THE BEST ROMANTIC MOVIE? Alice Gazzola, 30 Nurse.

Amelia Nunez, 32

Kerry, 1

Course Coordinator at Little English Language School (Gibraltar).

Scavenger of Seeds.

Midnight in Paris, because I love Paris and Belle Epoque too. I like that the main character met a lot of famous novelists and artists such as Ernest Hemingway, Salvador Dali, Picasso and Toulouse-Lautrec.

Rio. It gets me every time…

I love About Time. It’s really sweet, nostalgic, and always makes me cry!

Beata Gaj, 28 Self-employed.

Jessica Skilton, 26 Last Technician at Montanna’s Nails and Beauty.

Mango, 1 Pecker of Noses. The Birdcage… Ooh la la!

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10 Things I Hate About You, because there’s nothing better than a boyfriend who is also your best friend.

I am not a huge fan of romantic movies, but if I had to choose one it would be The Terminal. I am a big fan of movies with Tom Hanks. He is an amazing actor – I’ve really enjoyed every single movie I’ve seen with him in it!


Save a dog's life  and sponsor today JULES                 BAYRON       LOLA                  HARRY

THOR

All these dogs become invisible in a shelter with 500-600 dogs at a time. With sponsors we can move the dogs from the shelter into private kennels where they will get to go for walks and have their chance to be seen. We can take the most vulnerable and weak and build them up to be strong and confident. As a sponsor you will receive regular updates on your s p o n s o r e d d o g t o s e e j u s t h o w m u c h p r o g r e s s t he y a r e making. Any amount helps so please sponsor today. You can arrange your own transfers below. For more info: Please email us to confirm you have donated/become a sponsor so we can add you to the group for updates: info@ainf.gi or send me a message: 54008557 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


what’s on WEDNESDAY 6TH FEBRUARY UNTIL SUNDAY 10TH FEBRUARY

WHAT'S ON? FEBRUARY 2019

Gibraltar Backgammon Open Tournament 2019

MONDAY 18HT FEBRUARY UNTIL TUESDAY 19TH FEBRUARY Gibraltar Museum Guided Tour

The Convent Ballroom, 8:00pm

Gibraltar Museum, 4:30pm

Tickets priced at £20.00 are available from Sacarello’s coffee shop – restaurant in Irish Town and The Silver Shop at 222 Main Street or online at www.buytickets.gi A limited number of tickets at £10.00 are available to senior citizens via the John Mackintosh Hall at 308 Main Street.

Organised by the Gibraltar Museum for young people ages 5-8 with an accompanying adult. Pre-registration on a first-comefirst-served basis.

WEDNESDAY 13TH FEBRUARY

To book your place please contact telephone 200 74289 or email education@gibmuseum.gi indicating the name and age of the child, name of a accompanying adult and contact details.

Pacho Flores - Trumpet & Pepe Gallego - Piano.

TUESDAY 19TH FEBRUARY

J ohn Mackintosh Hall, 9:00am–5:00pm For further information please visit Gib Talks on Facebook or Twitter or alternatively contact the GCS – Events Department on 20067236 or via email: info@culture.gi

Launch Art Treasure Hunt Gibraltar Museum, 4:30pm Organised by the Gibraltar Museum for young people ages

FRIDAY 1ST FEBRUARY

MONDAY 18HT FEBRUARY UNTIL FRIDAY 22ND FEBRUARY

Golden Oldies Charity Dinner Dance in aid of Mental Health Support

Schools, youth groups and individuals invited to participate in a fun and interactive art treasure hunt through the different Art Galleries via Casemates and Irish Town.*

School Open Days

‘Learning to take the Perfect Shot’

BOYDS (Leisure Centre) 8:30pm–0:00pm

City Hall, John Mackintosh Square

The Jewel Box, 148 Main Street

Visits to the Mayor’s Parlour at the City Hall, hosted by Her worship the Mayor Kaiane Aldorino Lopez GMH. Pre-booking required.*

Clubhouse Gibraltar, 24 Wellington Front, 20068423

MONDAY 18HT FEBRUARY

Rock Bastion, 58007873

Jamboree Launch

SATURDAY 2ND FEBRUARY

Activities organised by Gibraltar Cultural Services.

Tickets cost £25 including Dinner and Dance and are available from:-

GibTalks 2019 J ohn Mackintosh Hall, 9:00am–5:00pm For further information please visit Gib Talks on Facebook or Twitter or alternatively contact the GCS – Events Department on 20067236 or via email: info@culture.gi 10

Wellington Front, 4:30pm Workshops organised by the Gibraltar Photographic Society. For further information please email: gibphoto@gibtelecom.net ‘Getting to Know’ Adrian Pisarello, live chat & music session** GEMA, Montagu Bastion, 7:00pm-8:00pm

GEMA Gallery, 6:00pm

Arts & Crafts Workshop with Giorann Henshaw for young people aged 8 to 12 years. (Vault 1) Fashion Workshop for teenagers with Paul Perez. (Vault 2) Drama Workshop for teenagers with Daniel Strain Webber. (Vault 3)*

WEDNESDAY 20TH FEBRUARY UNTIL SATURDAY 23RD FEBRUARY 17th Gibraltar International Dance Festival John Mackintosh Hall Theatre Tickets prices at £5 per session and £15 for the Gala. Tickets on sale as from Friday 8th GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


what’s on February 2019 from www.buytickets.gi. For further information please email mopro@gibntelecom.net WEDNESDAY 20TH FEBRUARY Story Construction Workshop with writers Stephanie and Lee Dignam  John Mackintosh Hall Lecture Room For young people ages 8 to 12 years.** THURSDAY 21ST FEBRUARY Guitar for beginners with musician Justin Phillips Rock on the Rock Club, Town Range, 5:00pm-7:00pm For young people ages 8 to 12 years.** ‘Getting to Know’ Nolan Frendo, live chat & music session** GEMA, Montagu Bastion, 6:00pm-7:00pm MONDAY 25TH FEBRUARY UNTIL FRIDAY 1ST MARCH Gibraltar Festival for Young Musicians FYM John Mackintosh Hall Theatre For musicians ages 4 to 18 years. Tickets priced at £5 per session and £12 for the Gala available at the door. For further information please email info@gampa.gi.

Live drawing session with artist Sebastian Rodriguez GEMA, Montagu Bastion, 6:00pm-8:00pm For young people ages 13 and over. For more information or to book your place please call Face Frames on telephone 200 72629 or email face@gibtelecom.net . TUESDAY 26TH FEBRUARY UNTIL FRIDAY 8TH MARCH Young Art Competition 2019  John Mackintosh Hall, 9:00am-9:30pm For further information please contact GCS Events Department on 20067236 or email: info@culture.gi TUESDAY 26TH FEBRUARY UNTIL SATURDAY 2ND MARCH Kim-Peter Waltzer-Girda Exhibition Fine Arts Gallery, Casemates Square, 10:00am-6:00pm Free entry.

J ohn Mackintosh Hall, Lower Exhibition Room, 6:00pm-7:00pm THURSDAY 28TH FEBRUARY ‘Getting to Know’ Paul Isola live chat & music session* Gustavo Bacarisas Gallery, Casemates, 6:00pm-7:00pm Improvisation & Contact Workshop with Nathan Conroy** Bayside Drama Studio, 6:00pm-7:00pm *For more information please call GCS Cultural Development Unit on telephone 200 79750 or email info@culture.gi **For more information and to book your place call GCS Cultural Development Unit on telephone 200 49161 or email info@culture.gi.

Wellington Front, 4:30pm Workshops organised by the Gibraltar Photographic Society. For further information please email: gibphoto@gibtelecom.net. Percussion workshop with Surianne Dalmedo** Gustavo Bacarisas Gallery, Casemates, 5:00pm-6:00pm

Social media workshop with Surianne Dalmedo

Creative writing Workshops with Jackie Anderson

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Poetry Workshop with Giordano Durante*

‘Learning to take the Perfect Shot’

WEDNESDAY 27TH FEBRUARY

For young people ages 16 years and over.*

GEMA, Montagu Bastion, 6:00pm-7:00pm

TUESDAY 26TH FEBRUARY

MONDAY 25TH FEBRUARY

 John Mackintosh Hall Lecture Room, 5:00pm-6:00pm

‘Getting to Know’ Layla Bugeja live chat & music session**

Gibraltar College of Further Education A session organised at the Gibraltar College for their students. 11


what’s on GIB TALKS SCHEDULE This year’s Gib Talks will see a range of local speakers who will deliver 15-minute talks on a broad spectrum of subjects with the aim of focusing on the anecdotal, the personal, and the light-hearted. The schedule for the event is as follows: 10:00 – 10:10 Julian Felice – Let’s Talk About Stats 10:15 – 10:30 Stanley Flower – A Parent’s Ordeal 10:35 – 10:50 Steven Walker – Addicted to Escaping Reality 10:55 – 11:05 Stuart Byrne – VP – Don’t DYS Einstein 11:10 – 11:25 Pro-Life Movement – Clare Bensadon – One of Us BREAK 11:40 – 11:55 Keith Azopardi QC – Changing Society & The Importance of Positivity 12:00 – 12:10 Noemi Jimenez –VP- When Escaping Doesn’t Set You Free 12:15 – 12:30 Monica Ritchie – The Girl from North London 12:35 – 12:50 The Hon. Dr Joseph Garcia MP – Brexit: In, Out & Shake Our World About LUNCH 14:00 – 14:15 Sonia Golt – Age Is Just a Number 14:20 – 14:35 Nathan Payas - Mindset 14:40 – 14:50 12

Nicole Stein-Jezulin – VP – Montessori: Introducing a Love of Learning 14:55 – 15:10 Pro Choice Movement – Rose Oliva/Charlotte Lowe – Am I Morally Obliged to Bear a Child? BREAK 15:25 – 15:40 Tommy Finlayson - Memories 15:45 – 15:55 Tamsin Suarez – VP – The Strength of an Egg – A Parent’s Fragility and Strength When Faced with a

Cancer Diagnosis 16:00 – 16:15 Stephen Whatley – If I Can Do It, Anyone Can 16:20 – 16:35 Lindsay Weston – My Gibraltar Story Tickets £5 from John Mackintosh Hall or buytickets.gi. Ticket-holders can come and go throughout the day. For more information visit Gib Talks on Facebook/Twitter or contact GCS – Events Department on 20067236 or via info@culture.gi. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


news NO DEAL BREXIT – EUROPEAN HEALTH INSURANCE CARDS In November, the European Union and the United Kingdom concluded the terms of an agreement for the orderly departure of the UK from the European Union. Gibraltar was part of that agreement. In the event of a no deal Brexit our European Health Insurance Cards will cease to be valid throughout the European Union. HM Government of Gibraltar advises all its citizens travelling within EU Member States should take out a travel insurance to cover for any eventuality. If you are taking out travel insurance shortly after we leave the EU,

you should make sure you understand the terms and conditions of your travel insurance policy. Also make sure that the policy is sufficient to cover possible disruption. If you already have travel insurance, your insurer should let you know if there are changes that will affect you after we leave the EU. If you have questions about what your travel insurance policy covers, or whether it covers possible disruption, you may wish to contact your insurer. An emergency in another country can be very expensive. Examples include:

emergency treat҇ment ҇ £20,000: in France with 4-night hospital and repatriation to Gibraltar.

҇҇

£28,000: broken ankle in Cyprus and repatriation to Gibraltar.

҇҇

£10,000: a fall in Spain, resulting in a broken hip, hospital treatment and flights. It is your responsibility to ensure you can cover the costs of medical treatment abroad. The right travel insurance will ensure you can do so.

60 wines by the glass 40 small dishes of Mediterranean cuisine

30 John Mackintosh Square GX11 1AA Gibraltar Tel: 200 70201 info@vinopolisgastrobar.gi www.vinopolisgastrobar.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

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news

FIRST FRIDAY IN FEBRUARY TO RAISE AWARENESS OF THE HEART The Gibraltar Cardiac Association is celebrating ‘Wear Red Day’ on Friday 1st February 2019 to start off the heart month and raise awareness about heart disease and the fact that there are steps we can take to minimise the risk. To coincide with this they have invited Dr Lewis, a cardiac transplant physician from the Royal Papworth Hospital to give a presentation at the University of Gibraltar at 1100 hrs on 50 years of heart transplantations. There will be no entrance charge for this but you are requested to register your attendance with the university beforehand as there is limited seating. The day will end with the association’s first annual dinner at the Hall of Fame restaurant. Tickets for a three course meal are available from committee members or The Gibraltar Crystal Shop.

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MO THE MACAQUE AND HIS JOURNEY THROUGH TIME Quest Gibraltar is a Young Enterprise team hoping to bring patriotism alive in children’s hearts, through their new book Mo the Macaque and his Journey through Time. Quest’s book aims to make Gibraltar’s history easily accessible to children by simplifying its concepts, and synthesising them into Mo’s unique journey. By following a carefully crafted storyline, children will hopefully be able to enjoy learning about Gibraltar’s history, and become more educated on past events that helped to shape Gibraltar into the proud nation it is today. The team explains: “We found there to be an extremely limited number of children’s books based on Gibraltar’s history, and so we

created our book in order to keep our special past going throughout future generations.” The book itself was mainly written by Co-Managing Director, Sophie Macdonald, and was illustrated by Quests operations managers, Emma Ocaña and Julian Gerada. After a lot of research and artwork, they were able to slowly piece together the pages of the book, resulting in the product it is today. Keep an eye on Quests Facebook page for more information on how to purchase a book for yourself: facebook.com/QuestYE18. Quest will be holding a Treasure Hunt in The Alameda Gardens on Saturday 2nd of February, so come along!

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


news LEE SPENCER DEPARTS GIBRALTAR FOR TRANS-ATLANTIC ROW Lee ‘Frank’ Spencer made his departure from Gibraltar last month to begin his solo and unsupported row to South America. Due to weather conditions in the Strait, his point of departure was changed to Portimao. However, in the light of all the support he has received from Gibraltar, he wished to mark his departure from the Rock, rowing away from Marina Bay at midday on the 8th of January. He is aiming to become the world’s first physically disabled people to row the Atlantic, from mainland Europe to mainland America, all 3,800 nautical miles, on his own. He hopes to beat the current able-bodied record of 96 days, 12 hours and 45 minutes, gaining him a new Guinness World Record. He has food for 90 days but aims to complete the row in

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

60 to 70 days. Lee survived 24 years as a Royal Marine and three operational tours of Afghanistan, but lost his right leg when he stopped to help a motorist on the M3 in 2014. He was hit by flying debris and his leg was severed in the impact. His rowing campaign is about showing people you do not have to be defined by disability. He will be keeping wounded servicemen and women in the hearts and minds of the nation whilst also raising money for the Royal Marines Charity and the Endeavour Fund. To donate please visit: uk.virginmoneygiving.com/ LeeJSpencer To read our article on Lee, search ‘Marine Rower’ on thegibraltarmagazine.com.

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news GIBRALTAR STUDENT NURSES ‘WALK THE BEAT’, RAISES OVER £10,000 Twelve Student nurses from the Gibraltar Health Authority’s School of Health Studies (SHS) recently organised and participated in a 24 hour walk in aid of the Gibraltar Cardiac Association. The students, together with registered participants, took turns to walk around the Victoria Stadium’s track during a 24 hour period. The event took place at the Victoria Stadium between Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th of September 2018. A total of £10,151 was raised from the event, with all the proceeds being donated to the Gibraltar Cardiac Association. The aim of the event was to raise funds and awareness on heart and cardiovascular diseases in Gibraltar. A student nurse, who participated and helped organise the event, commented: “Organising walk the beat has

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been a challenge, but extremely fulfilling. Our aim was to raise awareness and help the Cardiac Association financially, as it is a relatively new charity. The support we received was overwhelming, and we are delighted to have raised £10,151 for such a worthy cause.” Principal Lecturer of the SHS, James Viñales added that: “as part of the BSc (Hons) nursing programme, students are encouraged to engage in extracurricular charity work within Gibraltar. It is a huge achievement to organise such an event and raise the amount of money that they have for such an important and worthy cause. The charitable work and engagement of the Gibraltar public is essential, as, at some point, Gibraltarians will require our health services, and they will

be nursed by the students. I am extremely proud of the student nurses, both past and present, who have engaged in charity work throughout Gibraltar.” Chairperson of the Gibraltar Cardiac Association, Suyenne Catania, stated: “The Gibraltar Cardiac Association is extremely grateful to this group of GHA students who took time out of their studies to organise ‘Walk the beat’ and raise both awareness and money for our charity. It was a most challenging event, which proved to be a success and will now form part of our bi-annual calendar. Being a new charity, we are overwhelmed with the generous amount of money which has been raised thanks to the support of our community and the hard work and dedication of a team of student nurses, whose vocation has gone beyond their call of duty. You are a credit to our health service and the GHA.” The Minister for Health, Care and Justice, the Honourable Neil F. Costa MP, said: “I would like to sincerely thank and congratulate the student nurses for their outstanding efforts in helping raise over £10,000 for the Gibraltar Cardiac Association and helping to raise awareness locally on cardiovascular diseases. Their achievements are especially admirable, given they have organised the event in their spare time, whilst, at the same time, working very hard towards their challenging studies. The dedication and kindness they have demonstrated in planning and taking part in this event signals that the future of nursing in Gibraltar is in excellent hands.”

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


news

GIBRALTAR MENTAL WELFARE SOCIETY FLAG DAY SUCCESS

INCREASED ENERGY EFFICIENCY ACROSS GIBRALTAR The Government and the Gibraltar Electricity Authority are pleased to report on the continuing success of its energy efficiency measures, with reduction of energy consumption in a number of areas.

these too are now LED, there was a 24.7% reduction in electricity consumption for the town area, including the Sun Dial from last year and a 72.39% decrease in consumption on Christmas lighting since 2011.

Due to the ongoing, phased replacement of street lighting with Low Energy Devices (LED lighting), there has been a 20% reduction in street lighting consumption when compared against the year 2012/2013, when the initiative was started by the present Government. This provided a consumption saving of 378 MWh in the last financial year, but more impressively a total consumption saving of 1.37 GWh since 2012/2013.

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change John Cortes commented: “These figures show that Government’s energy efficiency policy is effective. They also show that we can all help in improving efficiency. If we all take these steps in our homes and places of work, collectively we will make a tremendous difference in reducing the use of electricity. Not only is this cheaper for the consumer, it also means that less power is needed, which reduces generation and pollution. I urge everyone who has not already done so to take the step of converting all lighting to LED.”

In spite of an increase in the coverage of parts of Gibraltar with Christmas lighting, because

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

On the 21st December the Gibraltar Mental Welfare Society was able to raise £1,432.60, during its flag day. This was an impressive amount, considering there were only collections at three posts. The Society is very grateful for these funds which will enable it to continue to provide a range of support for service users, both in and out of hospital. This support might take the shape of a fridge or a washing machine for somebody living in the community, on limited benefits, or it might provide emergency counselling sessions for an individual who cannot wait for a pending appointment and who cannot afford such an expense. The GMWS provides gifts at Christmas for all those in residence at OV during this period, and also birthday gifts for some of the long stay patients. It also funds outings for long stay residents in OV. There are many practical ways in which the GMWS spends its funds and it thanks the community for its continued support.

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news

YOUTH SERVICE DRAMATHERAPY WORKSHOPS Last month the Youth Service joined up with the experienced and qualified Dramatherapist, Nyree Robinson, to run a series of age-appropriate workshops. The workshops aimed to educate young people about healthy relationships. Through creativity and dramatherapy games, members explored issues and themes around respect, personal / body boundaries and interpersonal relationships. Over 30 members engaged positively in the workshops and understood the concept of what a healthy relationship is. Healthy relationships are vital to mental and emotional well-being, and it is important that young people are provided with the right educational tools to help them at each state of their development.

NEW ST MARTIN’S SCHOOL PLANS APPROVED The finalised plans for the new St Martin’s School were approved and signed off last month at the Department of Education. The plans, which now include detailed layouts, are for a school that will cater for all the needs of the students, with a range of facilities to include a hydrotherapy pool, large playing area, gym, and extensive therapy areas. The designs have been developed by GCA Architects, with full involvement of the teaching profession. The school will be located at what are currently the playing fields at Westside School. The site investigations are complete and construction is expected to begin within weeks. The signing was carried out after a presentation of the plans to the senior team at the Education Department and St Martin’s. Present at the signing ceremony were the Minister for Education John Cortes, Director of Education Jackie Mason, the Department’s Estates Director Derek Alman, St Martin’s Head Teacher Annabelle Felipes, Senior Education Advisor Keri Scott, and Deputy Head Michael George.

Annabelle Felipes stated: “I am so very grateful for this. It is a dream come true. This gives us a huge opportunity to advance special education and provide the educational facilities that are students and dedicated staff deserve”. Jackie Mason commented: “We move towards the future of inclusive education where every student will be able to develop and progress to achieve their goals with the right support in the education system.” Minister for Education John Cortes added: “This is one of the most exciting steps yet taken as we move Education forward in Gibraltar. St Martin’s is in such dire need of moving to the level that our children deserve. I want to thank the teachers, all the other staff, and most importantly parents and families, for the patience and understanding that they have shown while we have been developing this project, looking at all the options, and listening closely to all. It is now at a stage where we will soon be able to see it growing right before our eyes. I simply can’t wait!”

For more information on Gibraltar Youth Service please contact the Principal Youth Officer, Mark Zammit at mzammit@gibraltar.gov. gi or for youth clubs opening times, visit www.youth.gi.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


news MISS GIBRALTAR 2019 RECRUITING OF CONTESTANTS NOW OPEN Gibraltar Cultural Services on behalf of the Ministry of Culture is inviting young women to sign up to the 2019 Miss Gibraltar pageant. The event will be held on Saturday 1st June 2019 and will be produced by YDS for HM Government of Gibraltar. Contestants must be aged between 17 (as at 1st June 2019) and not more than 26 years old (as at 31st December 2019). The first 10 contestants to sign for the pageant will each receive £500. The winner of the pageant will represent Gibraltar at Miss World later in the year. PRIZES ARE:

Miss Gibraltar

҇҇ £2,000 cash ҇҇ £3,500 clothing allowance ҇҇ Participation at Miss World 2019 1st Princess

҇҇ £1,000 cash ҇҇ £500 clothing allowance 2nd Princess

҇҇ £500 cash ҇҇ £500 clothing allowance The YDS production team are encouraging young women to use this as a platform to express and

challenge themselves and not miss out on a positive and rewarding experience. It will also provide entrants with an opportunity to be involved in a unique production with a great team of experienced and talented professionals from the entertainment & fashion industry. Entry forms are available from the John Mackintosh Hall at 308 Main Street. For further information, contact the Miss Gibraltar Office on 20067236 or e-mail info@culture.gi. Recruitment will commence as from Monday 21st January 2019. Closing date for entries is noon on Friday 22nd February 2019.

HMGOG ACKNOWLEDGES UNITE THE UNION DEMONSTRATION Her Majesty’s Government of Gibraltar acknowledges the demonstration held last month by Unite the Union. The Chief Minister, the Hon Fabian Picardo QCMP said: “I have not come out of No6 to meet those demonstrating at the express request of the leadership of Unite. I acknowledge the message from those demonstrating and I welcome the constructive and positive engagement with the issues represented by the newly appointed National Officer with

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

responsibility for Gibraltar, Stuart Davies, who I have known for some time. I look forward to working with Stuart and the leadership of Unite in Gibraltar in resolving the issues relating to agency workers in the Civil Service, as I have already said we will do. I also look forward to discussing the issues that Stuart has set out in his public statements. As a member of Unite myself for more than 20 years, I support the right to peacefully demonstrate to make a political

point and I will not ignore the views represented by those demonstrating. The Cabinet has already agreed it will only have two agenda items, Brexit and the issue of agency workers, so that we resolve the latter matter as quickly as possible. I also look forward to continuing the other good work I have done with Unite in so many areas since I was elected, not least in respect of the introduction of pensions in the private sector and the recognition of trade unions. There is a lot we have done together and a lot still to do.”

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MICHAEL DANINO AWARDS © MARK GALLIANO PHOTOGRAPHY

around town

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


around town

K9 PASSING OUT PARADE © MARK GALLIANO PHOTOGRAPHY

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


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business

PROPERTY INVESTMENT ABROAD Part III: Greece.

I

n my past two articles we covered France and its magnificent Côte d´Azur as well as enchanting Portugal with its superb and often unpolluted beaches and beautiful cities. We will now venture back to the other side of Europe and consider Greece at the other end of the Mediterranean with its pristine gin-clear waters and its interesting history. Why would anyone consider Greece, if after all we do have very similar weather, and taxes are much higher in that jurisdiction, and we have a flight to catch each time? Let us be realistic here: Greece is a charming country with great practical advantages for someone looking for a place to retire in the sunny side of Europe. Greece is the land of Gods and where real democracy all started, so the world does owe them something. It is also a country of incredible beauty; lush in vegetation in certain areas, dry and arid in othGIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

ers; where beautiful mountains and plains mix rather interestingly, often covered with old pine trees and olive groves. It boasts no less than 2000 islands with whitewashed houses that remind us of places in northern Morocco or Spain. Is Greece a top choice to make a sound property investment? Not an easy question to answer, but it is certainly improving and the market is not as bad as a few years back, offering interesting yields of return as far as rental income from an investment is concerned. Greece is the perfect choice islands in particular - to buy prime property and use it as a holiday destination, and rent out for whatever period we do not make

any use of it. This can be achieved using any OTAs like Airbnb or HomeAway to name a couple. The official average rate of return is about 4% for long-term rentals but I have clients who obtain several times that figure renting to holiday clients who simply prefer less spoilt areas of the islands in the Aegean Sea, with its pristine transparent and warm waters. The Greek transparent blue sea is unmatchable.

It is a charming country with great practical advantages for someone looking to retire.

Back to business, the reality is that Greece has been through an extremely difficult economic period and was badly hit by the recession from 2007 up until recently. In all those years the property market in Greece contracted to a degree of 42%. Not far off Italy and other mediterranean countries which 23


property ASSOS VILLAGE, GREECE, KEFALONIA

MYKONOS-STREETVIEW

non-EU nationals who make a minimum property investment of €250,000. Spain and Portugal offer similar investment incentives with a difference. Spain for instance, requires a minimum investment of €500,000 - double of what Greece is requesting. This plan grants an unconditional full residency permit that lasts 5 years and can be renewed, provided the non-EU investor keeps the property. This measure, along other austerity measures, has helped the housing market to slowly show signs of getting back into black figures; a break much anticipated by this ancient country.

figures, encouraging growth. And what about purchase expenses in Greece? Are they too high perhaps, or quite similar to other mediterranean EU jurisdictions? At the time of publication of this article the total purchase expenses for Greek property is 10% approximately. This includes transfer tax, notary fees 1%, lawyers’ fees 1%, agency fees 2% and registry fees. It is reasonable compared to Spain where expenses can be 15% or more.

The Greek transparent blue sea is unmatchable.

suffered severely from the world economic crisis. The fact is that Greece is now slowly making its way to recovery following several massive cash injections and a bailout from the EU. A true fact is that the Greek economy grew by 1.6% in 2017 and some 2.5% in 2018. Housing prices have either stabilised or are starting to move slightly upwards. It looks as though the worst is probably over, but there is a long way to go still for the market to get to an acceptable level of growth. The Greek government, in order to boost recovery and foreign investment, offers residence to 24

Greece; where beautiful mountains and plains mix rather interestingly, often covered with old pine trees and olive groves.

According to EU official sources, the possible real GDP growth expectation for Greece this year is about 2.5%. We must realise that Greek political stability and its economy starting at a low base will surely improve its

If I rent my property what taxes will I pay on rental income? At present, taxes for non-residents stand at 15% for the first €12,000 and 35% from €12,000 up to €35,000. Not bad; less than in France or Spain. The tax is paid only on income once all the running yearly expenses have been deducted.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


property PAXOS ISLAND NEAR CORFU

ISLAND KOS

And if I sell at a profit what capital gains tax will I pay? At the moment, capital gains tax on net profit stands at 15%. Quite reasonable. And what about company tax? 26% at the time of writing this article. Apart from all these important economic figures what are the main reasons to buy property in Greece? I can think of at least 11 reasons to buy a lovely compact size villa in Greece: 1. Excellent value for money properties. You can easily pick up a gorgeous 3-bedroom 1000m2 plot villa in Crete with a pool and superb sea views for just over €250,000. A 2-bedroom flat with sea views about €95,000. Running costs are as low as €30 monthly. Quite unknown in other jurisdictions.

4. Very safe country with probably amongst the lowest crime rates in the EU. 5. Beautiful safe and clean seas. Over 400 blue flagged beaches in Greece. Perhaps one of the most beautiful seas in the world. 6. Healthy lifestyle and mediterranean food. Greek food is rated one of the healthiest in the world. 7. Very low cost of living. Greece is great value for money in every sense. 8. Good flight services, particularly with Mainland UK. 9. Golden Visa investment opportunity available to non-EU investors.

2. Greek hospitality. It is second to none. Friendly people and a language that has no equivalent of the word foreigner. They use ‘guest’ instead.

10. Restrictions on overdevelopment. Greece is very environmental friendly and protects its villages and buildings as well as restricts any high-rise condo buildings or overdevelopment. Your views will surely stay as they are for years.

3. Climate. 300+ days of sunshine. Balmy winters and pleasant summers.

11. Greek culture. Amongst the oldest and most interesting in the Mediterranean. The land of Gods

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

and the birthplace of democracy. We do owe them something.

JORGE V.REIN PARLADE MBA Business Consultant +350 54045282 jorgeparlade@aol.com

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business

HOW TO BREXIT-PROOF YOUR BUSINESS Top ten tips to help you prepare for the future.

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usinesses in Gibraltar (and in the UK) are still largely in the dark about trading conditions post-Brexit, and at the time of writing this article it is not even known whether we are heading towards a ‘No Deal Brexit’ or a ‘Brexit with a Deal’ or a different scenario altogether… While it is impossible to plan ahead with certainty, anticipating and preparing for this worst-case scenario will allow businesses to identify the strengths and weaknesses of their current business operations and react quickly to emerging scenarios. SO HERE ARE OUR 10 TIPS FOR MAKING YOUR BUSINESS BREXIT-PROOF:

҇҇

Consider hedging: A lot of businesses are already feeling the effects of falls in the value of sterling and this has led to increased costs for many business26

es in Gibraltar who import goods from Eurozone countries and beyond. As Brexit negotiations continue, we could see extreme exchange rate fluctuations, and businesses should consider ways of managing the associated risks. In addition to hedging products which may be viewed as overly complex by some traders, simple solutions such as holding a foreign currency bank account may be an effective strategy for managing exchange rate risk and businesses should discuss options with their bank to ensure one is chosen which best aligns to its overall strategy.

extend beyond March 2019, it is important to ensure that flexibility is built in, where possible. For example, it makes sense to avoid agreeing fixed dates for the delivery of goods post-March 2019, as customs procedures could cause significant delays.

҇҇Reconsider Be certain that grant funding your staff are well- strategies: trained and readily There is still a lot uncertainty able to adapt to the of with regards to the continuachanges.

flexible contracts: ҇For҇ Negotiate organisations looking to enter

into or renew contracts with customers and suppliers based on the continent, which are likely to

tion of EU grant funding. While some EU grants could remain available for one or two years after March 2019, organisations should be looking at alternative funding opportunities that might arise post-Brexit.

҇҇

Employee mobility: While the MoUs signed between Spain and the UK with respect to Gibraltar should ensure the free-movement GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


business of employees across the frontier, for businesses that already have British nationals working in EU-based subsidiaries, it will be necessary to consider whether these people will be required to obtain working visas and residency permits, or even calculate the worst-case scenario of having to repatriate these employees back home.

҇҇ Adjust your supply chain to

that your staff are well-trained and readily able to adapt to the changes. That will mean including a robust financial team that can react to potential turbulence. Having staff that is trained properly in Financial Management and Project Management is a sound method of ensuring flexibility, and if you need further support reach out to external consultants to ensure more resources are available for your business.

It will be necessary to consider obtaining working visas and residency permits, or even having to repatriate these employees back home.

mitigate against rising import costs: Gibraltar businesses who import from the UK goods that are sourced in other EU countries may find that the cost of importing will increase since the UK supplier will be charged VAT from its supplier. All businesses should review their entire supply chain to identify where additional costs might be incurred and to see if this can be restructured. For example, a business that currently imports goods from outside the EU and then sells directly to EU customers from the UK may find it beneficial to have a distribution warehouse in another EU country post-Brexit, so that goods do not incur charges on import into the UK and then again on export out. Companies providing goods and services in other EU countries should take advice on whether they will be required to separately register for VAT in those countries post-Brexit, and if registration is likely to be required, they need to consider the timing of this to ensure registrations are in place in good time.

҇҇ Practice flexibility: Be certain GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

҇҇

Take some inspiration: Have a close look at some examples of similar businesses in countries who don’t rely on the single-market of Europe and see how they operate. Once you’ve had a look at these examples, create business scenarios based on the examples you have found.

҇҇

Consider setting up an EU entity: One way to Brexitproof your business is to open a foreign legal entity in an EU country. If you’re a business owner that only sells to locals, or within the UK, then having an EU legal entity doesn’t make much sense for you. However, if your market is primarily the EU and you rely on EU Regulations (for example Financial Services sector) you may find it beneficial to set up an EU entity to be able to do business in the EU hassle-free.

҇҇

Communicate plans to your staff: Make your staff aware of the consequences for the business and what mitigation actions you are taking. Discuss possible steps that staff should be making

on a personal level such as obtain an international driving licence, renew their passports, register their residency (if they reside in Spain), review medical and travel insurance policies etc.

҇҇

Look beyond the EU and seize all opportunities: Brexit offers potential opportunities for anyone who is able to react fast and adapts positively to the new economy. Be sure you don’t get so focused on protecting the business that you pass up possible opportunities which arise due to Brexit. Take a look at countries outside the EU and take actions to explore the potential there. For example, The Gibraltar-Israel Chamber of Commerce (gibrael. org) will be taking a business delegation to Israel in early March. This is your opportunity to explore both a potential new target market as well as see some of the latest innovations in a variety of sectors. Whatever happens with regard to Brexit, look ahead and not to the past. Success is always around the corner. Don’t talk yourself into a recession, or convince yourself that Brexit is a disaster. See it as an opportunity.

ERAN SHAY, Managing Director & AYELET MAMO SHAY, Business Development Director of Benefit Business Solutions Ltd. (+350) 200 73669 general@benefitgibraltar.com 27


business

HELICOPTER FLIGHTS AROUND THE ROCK

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he Government has recently announced that Norwegian helicopter company, FONNAFLY, will be offering sightseeing flights around the Rock from 1 May 2019. The inclusion of such a service has been a long-term aim of the Government in order to supplement the already extensive offer of tourist excursions available to tourists visiting Gibraltar. FONNAFLY started operations in Norway in 2004 and operate a fleet of 13 helicopters. They currently offer sightseeing flights from 5 locations in Norway, operating over 2,000 of these flights in 2018. The company also offers taxi flights, VIP transfers and underslung load operations in Norway. This announcement is the culmination of many years work by Mr John-Erik Sogn, a Norwegian pilot living in Marbella, who has been in contact with the Gibraltar Government for a number of years. He devised the mitigations required to meet the strict environmental conditions imposed by the Department of the Environment in order to be able to operate in Gibraltar, and has now partnered with FONNAFLY to bring his dream to fruition.

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FONNAFLY will be deploying one EC 130 helicopter - equipped with seven passenger seats and two pilots - to the airport. Each sightseeing flight will take off from the airport and will fly around the Rock in one direction before reversing to repeat the flight in the other direction – this in order to ensure that passengers on both sides of the helicopter get uninterrupted views of the Rock. Each flight will last between 10 and 15 minutes. The package, which is particularly aimed at the cruise ship market, will give passengers the opportunity to take photos of their cruise ship with the Rock in the background. The company also hopes to be able to develop the helicopter services offered to include taxi flights to Malaga Airport and other destinations in the future. Minister Gilbert Licudi, the Minister with Responsibility for Commercial Aviation commented: “I am absolutely delighted to welcome FONNAFLY to Gibraltar and am pleased to be able to announce this exciting addition to the Gibraltar tourist product. As a private pilot who has seen the Rock fromthe air on a number of

occasions, I know that the tours will provide fabulous views for the passengers.” Mr John-Erik Sogn said: “I am glad to see that the years of work I have put into this project are finally going to bear fruit. I am delighted that flights will be starting in May and excited at the potential that basing a helicopter in Gibraltar can bring. Besides the Government, I would also like to thank the Ministry of Defence, in particular the Station Commander, for their help in agreeing to provide hangarage for the helicopter during our initial operations.” Mr Jon Ove Velure, the CEO of FONNAFLY, stated: “FONNAFLY have long been interested in the potential of Gibraltar for sightseeing flights. As a busy cruise ship destination, with an incredible Rock formation dominating the location and views over to Africa, we are convinced the trips we will be offering will be successful. We look to a long and fruitful relationship with Gibraltar and can’t wait to start services in May.” Details of the tour can be found at GibHeli.com or by emailing booking@gibheli.com. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


Susan Clifton-Tucker is, without a shadow of doubt, one of the Rock’s most popular television and radio personalities of the past 50 years. She has graced our screens and airwaves on GBC Television and Radio Gibraltar and in December called it a day, stepping down as one of the newsreaders on GBC’s main news programme - Newswatch. Her friend and colleague, broadcaster and journalist Alice Mascarenhas looks back on her long, varied, and notable broadcasting and journalistic career.


life THE UNFORGETTABLE FACE OF TELEVISION BY ALICE MASCARENHAS

J

ust when you think you know someone, suddenly out of the blue there comes a surprise.

“You learnt to fly?” I question, almost open mouthed. “I can’t imagine you doing that!” “Whilst in Guernsey I took some flying lessons. I produced and presented a ‘how-to’ programme for CTV (Channel Television). It was so much fun,” Susan smiles cheekily. Now, there’s something I was

not expecting. But Susan CliftonTucker is a no-nonsense lady. What you see is what you get. Honest, to the point, and quite simply fun to be with.

I have known Susan for most of my life and we share a lot in common, for like me she too grew up in the familiar surroundings of the old GBC television studios at Wellington Front. Her father Ray Clifton was an engineer, and my father Manolo Mascarenhas was a journalist and broadcaster in those early pioneering days.

Susan CliftonTucker is a nononsense lady. Honest, to the point, and quite simply fun to be with.

Her final Newswatch was just in December, but her news reading duties on GBC first began in 1985. Can you believe that on and off she has been on our screens for 47 years?

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life SUSAN PRESENTING FOR CHANNEL TELEVISION.

SINGING DUO 'SUE AND PHYLLIS'.

Who would have imagined all those years ago, when as children we met in the corridors at Wellington Front, that we too would become a part of its history? Susan Clifton was 16, I was 11, and as she taught me my first chords on my guitar, who could have imagined we would find ourselves here today, both having chosen a career path as broadcasters and journalists? It was the very early 70s, and one could say GBC Television was still in its infancy. 32

When Susan joined GBC in 1972 it proved the right move for her for a variety of reasons. She was used to the lights, the microphones, the cameras and the stage. At the age of 12 she had already formed a singing duo with her school friend Phyllis Miles ‘Sue and Phyllis’ in which they both played guitar.

out of it. There was a phone on a side table. In front was a small TV monitor, two projectors, projector room, engineering workshop and equipment further along, the continuity room and Master Control.”

But she recognises she also had a great affinity for the place. It was her father who at the time mentioned there was a vacancy for a continuity announcer on television, and she knew this was what she wanted. So, at 16, whilst still a pupil at the Green Convent in the Commercial Section (where No.6 is today), she joined the GBC family.

“There was no training really, but I do remember Christine Dobinson (then Anthony) sitting in on my first announcement. I was given the running sheet which showed what was on television that night and I ringed round all the times I saw ‘anno’ and ‘commercials’ which I had to then read live over a slide of the product when it appeared on screen.”

Training then was limited, she recalls.

“You sat down, set yourself up, looked at the camera and you got on with it.”

The shifts were long from 7pm to midnight and as continuity announcer you waited for the moments in between programmes and the scheduling to do your work. “We sat on an ex-army, old and grey sofa, with stuffing coming

It was, she says, very different to today.

“There were no commercials as we see them today. You really had to do it all.” The continuity announcer also read the news headlines and the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life weather. Every Saturday they also had to read out the football results.

TAKING FLYING LESSONS FOR CHANNEL TELEVISION.

“I remember we had to switch all the lights on in the studio and set the camera up. In fact, you sat down, set yourself up, looked at the camera and you got on with it. It was black and white and we had big bulb televisions – and tiny black and white film on reel to reel which were weaved into the projectors. “If a piece of dust or hair found its way onto the film on the projector you had to remove it... with some saliva, which did not always work... and then you would see it on the screen. We would laugh so much.”

In 1974 she was runner up to Miss Gibraltar. That same year she also won Miss Tourism.

Those days were so happy, she adds. “GBC was like one big family. Personally for me it was also the start of a long and happy career. Everything was live and you made mistakes on air because you were learning on the job. But it was a different era. “I remember reading the headlines one day when I heard this noise which turned out to be the roller blind which had moved up to reveal “The Sunday Message” background. I could see the monitor from the corner of my eye but you just carried on. We had a mice infestation too, and you would often have to lift your feet up as you made your announcements. But it was normal, and they are all happy memories.” GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

“More than anything I remember the laughter,” she smiles, lost in the memories. “No one really taught you what to do when you presented the Maggi or Knorr Swiss draws or Miss or Mars. You just got on with it. I just remember it being joyful, and when you were asked to work extra hours you did without question.” By 1973 having completed her O Levels she knew she had found her dream job and decided to take a full-time role at Radio Gibraltar, also based at Wellington Front. She worked a daily shift with presenters Maribel Cumming and Ken Anthony and head of radio at the time Gerry Martinez. The Baron presented the afternoon show.

Radio then opened at 7.55am and the announcer on the Breakfast Show had to switch on the transmitters in the rooms separating studios A and B. They were on their own until everyone walked into work at 10am.

AS A CONTESTANT ON MISS GIBRALTAR, 1974.

In those days the ‘strip shows’ which now last a few hours did not exist, and the announcers (today presenters) would present all programmes – Woman’s Hour, The Top 20, Children of all Ages and all the specialist programmes. On television too, the list of programmes she presented is long: Miss or Mars, Rendezvous and 17. A short break would see her back in the late 70s early 80s. Do you remember Screen Time and Snippets? Then with the opening of the frontier also came new opportunities. 33


life

Midweek with Susan was to prove very popular – a live programme broadcast from the studios at South Barracks. Here she mixed with celebrities who visited and lived on the Costa del Sol and somehow convinced them to join her on her weekly show – Kevin Keegan, Deborah Kerr, Max Bygraves, Tommy Steel, Lionel Blair and the unforgettable Bruce Forsyth. Another programme Profile would take us into the homes of celebrities on the Costa. Her news reading days began in 1985. She formed part of the newsroom team for a number of years. With Strait Vision much later she would present Medical Matters and her own One to One interviews with local personalities.

Twice a week she would fly between islands to Jersey and it was then she took up flying. As correspondent for Sark one of her first assignments was to cover the opening of Chief Pleas (Sark’s Parliament). “I recall feeling nervous. I turned up in my sharp suit, smart hat and heels only to find that the islanders were dressed down wearing bobble hats and wellies!” She admits these were interesting times, experiencing a very different set-up to what she had been used to on GBC. One of the highlights was covering the visit of Prince Charles on the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of the islands, during which she managed to record a short piece with him island hopping from Guernsey to Sark.

“On a personal level, the fact that we were just like one big family made it very special.”

Then in the early 90s she would leave Gibraltar to work for CTV – Channel Television in Guernsey – where she worked as a reporter and news anchor. 34

Back at GBC she was one of the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life ALICE MASCARENHAS ON THE FAR LEFT WITH SUSAN BESIDE HER, AND SUSAN'S RADIO PRESENTER SISTER, CHRISTINE, ON THE FAR RIGHT.

original producers and presenters of the television programme Viewpoint. In New York she would cover UN sessions and the Pique/Straw meeting at Carlton Gardens in London. “I doorstepped Jack Straw, the then Foreign Secretary, and refused to move, and he agreed to a full interview,” she says. The fact is that her broadcasting accomplishments are long, as are her list of programmes – both long and varied. Over the years this presented her with the opportunity of presenting song festivals, charity shows and Miss Gibraltar pageants. In 1974 she was runner up to Miss Gibraltar. That same year she also won Miss Tourism. Her broadcasting life can be described as one big roller-coaster GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

ride where she rightly found her place in the heart of this community, which has formed the subject of so many of her news and feature stories. She has filled our television screens. She has entertained and informed us, and she will be missed. But as she turns to writing and completing her bucket list I am certain there is always something else around the corner. As our chat reaches its final stages she admits that television will always come before radio (for me it’s the other way around) and yet, like me, she admits that if she had to choose between Wellington Front and South Barrack, her first place of work would always win. “We were embryonic then; we were starting out and a lot of things were new and innovative, and on a personal level, the fact

that we were just like one big family made it very special.” So if she were to do it all again would she choose the same path? No time for reflection or pauses here as she emphasises: “I would do it all again in a heartbeat!” 35


life

MINDFUL RESOLUTIONS How to achieve your New Year’s resolution.

BY KERSTIN ANDLAW

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4% of New Year’s resolutions fail before the end of February. It is not so much a lack of willingness, or ability to achieve them, but more of a misunderstanding in how to create lasting change.

Resolutions are firm decisions to do, or not do, something.

Most New Year’s resolutions are set for a specific result or goal, such as learning a new language, getting fit, eating healthy, or losing weight.

The importance is on actionable small steps that can be done no matter what.

Goals are not actions, they are an end result and therefore are very difficult to achieve unless made into actionable steps.

The importance is on actionable small steps that can be done no matter what.

Therein lies the problem, as we don’t consider our intentions or resolutions. Intentions are the reasons why we want to achieve a certain outcome. For example: wanting to feel well or be less out of breath could be the intention for wanting to get fit. Being able to communicate with people in another country would be the intention for learning a new language. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

For example, if you want to learn a new language, you might commit to 10 minutes of practice and learning every day. You could set a timer or use an app and make yourself accountable by telling your friends about what you are doing so that they can support you.

25 press-ups a day. Make it small, sustainable, and above all, doable no matter what. So the take-away is, set your: to do/be able to ҇do҇ Goal: I want . Why do I want to do ҇this/ ҇ Intention: What is the purpose of doing this?

҇҇

Resolution: Take action; commit to small consistent actions and do them no matter what. Be aware that you will face resistance along the path, and remember that your mind is really good at making up stories that play into creating comfort and not doing what you have committed to doing.

Be aware that you will face resistance along the path.

If you want to get fitter, perhaps you could commit to going to the gym 3 times a week, or to doing

Your thoughts are the only thing you are up against, and they are not something you need to listen to. 37


life

HEART INTELLIGENCE Resham teaches us how to develop our heart intelligence. But what exactly is it?

BY RESHAM KHIANI

T

he heart has naturally always been popularly associated romance, passion, and of course heartache. Whether you are discussing literature, singing, and writing love lyrics, or reading up on your favourite romance novel, hearts always draw attention from everybody, especially now as it is the month of St Valentine. Everywhere you look and listen, people from all religions and cultures speak about the heart as if it were the true centre of wisdom. And I’m certain at some point you have heard: ‘follow your heart’, ‘connect to your heart’ or ‘speak from the heart’. At the Institute of HeartMath (IHM), scientists have found that

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the heart is capable of giving us messages and helping us far more than anyone ever suspected. ‘Heart intelligence’ can have a measurable impact on decision-making, health, productivity at work, children’s learning ability, bonding with your family, and the overall quality of our lives. Studies in the field of neurocardiology are beginning to explain the intimate connection between the heart and the brain and the critical role the organ plays to our sense of self, emotions and intuition. It sends us emotional and intuitive signals to help govern

our lives instead of just simply pumping blood, which directs and aligns many systems in the body so that they can function in harmony with one another. The heart is an information processing centre that can learn, remember, and act independently of the cranial brain, and actually connect and send signals to key brain areas such as the amygdala, thalamus, and hypothalamus, which regulate our perceptions and emotions. And although it is in constant communication with the brain, we now know that the heart makes many of its own decisions – meaning

The heart is not weak or overly sentimental: it is intelligent and powerful.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life the heart is not weak or overly sentimental: it is intelligent and powerful. However, the second ‘brain’ in our chest is not a new concept; Greek philosopher Aristotle already knew. He theorised that the heart’s location allowed it to communicate with, and control other organs and, therefore, was most suited to being the seat of the soul. Surprisingly, after thousands of years, Aristotle may not have been completely wrong in his belief that the heart is an organ of intelligence as many of his peers, such as Plato, argued against Aristotle´s beliefs and dismissed them. While it most certainly is true that the brain is the major relay centre for cognitive function, it seems that the heart is not just a muscle pump, as many believe it to be. Students of the philosopher believed and taught cardiocentric model, which stated the heart was the true centre of human intelligence and not the brain. Dr. Andrew Armour, a Canadian neurocardiologist, discovered some fascinating facts about the heart’s nervous system. For example, while the heart can be influenced by messages sent from the brain, it doesn’t necessarily obey it all the time. Furthermore, the heart’s ‘mini-brain’ can send its own signals to the brain and exercise its influence on it. To give one illustration: oxytocin, which is typically referred to as the “love hormone”, has been shown to be released not only from the brain, but also from the heart. Oxytocin is not only important for love and bonding, especially for pregnant and lactating mothers, but it also has roles in social behaviour, wound healing, learning, memory, and empathy. In short, it’s one hormone that affects a very wide GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

variety of important functions.

ciation, and love instead.

What science is doing is validating what our spiritual traditions have been telling us for thousands of years: that the heart stands at the centre of an intelligence system that gives us access to the soul’s wisdom. Thanks to this new evidence, we are now rethinking our entire attitude toward ‘following our hearts’. When the concept of Heart Intelligence is fully embodied and integrated, it gives you the ability to be present in the now, connected and heart-directed in every area of your life so that you can experience greater levels of performance, creativity and intuition.

Improve your mental focus and clarity regardless of what is happening around you.

Only the size of a fist, the heart has been central to human existence and a powerful symbol. The Egyptians were cardiocentrists who treated the heart with great honour during their embalming rituals because they believed it was the seat of intelligence, emotion and sensation. Other ancient cultures such as the Mesopotamians believed the primary organ ruled over decision making, emotions, and morality.

҇҇ ҇҇

Build an inner reserve of energy that helps you to thrive in these complex and chaotic times. your heart’s intelli҇gence ҇ Activate to bring your work and life into greater alignment with your deeper life purpose.

҇҇

Create more authentic, intimate and harmonious relationships.

҇҇

Achieve your goals more quickly and easily. The rhythmic beating pattern of the heart changes according to the emotions we experience. Negative emotions like fear, envy and anger create an incoherent and disordered pattern in the heart’s vibrational rhythm. On the other side, positive emotions like love, gratitude, appreciation, happiness create a coherent rhythm. When you access your heart’s intelligence and wisdom, you can feel even more confident in trusting your intuition. If you feel something is wrong or you get a bad feeling about someone around you it is your heart’s intution trying to protect you and warn you of the potential threats and dangers surrounding you. Trust the feelings and experiences you have inside your heart centre, and allow yourself to fully feel and connect with whatever it is that arises within it.

What science is doing is validating what our spiritual traditions have been telling us for thousands of years.

By activating your heart's intelligence, you will gain the skills and tools to:

҇҇

Prevent emotional upsets and increase positive feelings so that you can make empowering and life-affirming choices for yourself.

҇҇

Loosen the hold of stress, worry, and anxiety by actively choosing joy, compassion, appre-

39


life

MY VALENTINE Cards that come with love and XXXs.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

M

ore than half a century has passed since I last received a Valentine's Day card, and more than six decades since any left me to guess the sender’s identity... Until the puppet-masters of commerce took over the saint’s feast day, anonymity was at the core of February 14th for many in a celebration whose roots can be traced to fertility rites in pre-Christian Rome. The Victorian romantics welcomed the saint’s day, giving it a florid and floral embellishment as passionate as any poet’s love verse, though seldom including the hearts so ubiquitous in modern cards. But since then - as with the commercialisation of the two great Christian religious 40

festivals, Christmas and Easter Valentine’s Day has burgeoned into a business cash-cow, and last year generated an estimated £1.6 billion in retail sales of cards, gifts and flowers in Britain. Across the pond, in New York alone that figure was almost doubled – generating a record-breaking advertising bonanza as well.

the General Roman Calendar, hagiography marked February 14th as the saint’s day of two Valentines martyred in Rome – Valentine of Terni, clubbed to death in AD 197, and Valentine of Rome who was executed 299 years later.

The skins of sacrificed goats were used to whip women to encourage fertility. Far from romantic in anyone’s book.

Yet so little is known about the saint who came to symbolise romantic and courtly love and yearning, that even his identity is uncertain; and, until 1969 when the Catholic Church removed his name from

According to some sources, Terni’s Valentine was martyred for witchcraft after curing a group of Roman virgins of blindness; others argue that he did not cure them, but instead found husbands for them – though neither explain why so charitable an act should merit so

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life bleak and unromantic an end. Several academics argue that a little-known Pope, Gelasius I, established February 14th as Valentine’s Day – successfully Christianising the pagan feast of Lupercalia, celebrated in ancient Rome as a fertility festival during which the skins of sacrificed goats were used to whip women to encourage fertility. Far from romantic in anyone’s book. And a slew of hagiographers and historians prefer the Valentine who on February 14th, AD496 was buried in a cemetery near the Milvio bridge in north Rome. Their highly improbable, but widely accepted, version is that this Valentine fell in love with his gaoler’s daughter, and on the eve of his execution sent her a note declaring his love for her and signed it ‘from your Valentine’ – the first Valentine’s greeting. None of which explains the emergence in 15th century France of Valentine as a major symbol of Medieval courtly love, whose saint’s day was celebrated with singing, dancing and lavish banquets. Or why among Britain’s Georgian aristocracy, Valentine should re-emerge as a symbol of romantic love. The manuscript section of the British Library lays claim to the earliest written Valentine verse – in a letter to his wife from the Duke of Orleans, sent while a prisoner in the Tower of London after the 1415 battle of Agincourt, and which reads: ‘Je suis desja d’amour tanné, ma tres doulce Valentinée’ (or, roughly: ‘I am already sick of love, my very gentle Valentine’). The Library also claims the oldest surviving Valentine’s letter in English. Sent GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

in 1477 by a Margery Brews to her fiancé John Paston, she describes him as her ‘right well-beloved Valentine’. Inevitably, Shakespeare got in on the act and in Hamlet gives Ophelia a reference to Valentine’s Day: “To-morrow is Saint Valentine’s day, All in the morning betime, And I a maid at your window, To be your Valentine.” (Hamlet, Act. 4 Sc. 5.)

ed cards was given a further fillip when in 1840 the cheap Uniform Penny Post was introduced. Barry suggests that by the late 1840s the amount of cards being circulated doubled, and re-doubled over the next two decades. As part of its ‘Collections Online’ project, the Museum of London is currently digitalising its collection of more than 1,800 Victorian Valentines cards – believed to be the largest in the world and most of which were made and sold in London from 1840-1880 by a London printer, Jonathan King, who also collected cards privately.

On the eve of his execution he sent her a note signed ‘from your Valentine’ – the first Valentine’s greeting.

The first of the ‘roses are red, violets are blue...’ touches appear in a collection of nursery rhymes printed in 1784, according to cultural historian Anna Maria Barry who has studied the Valentine card extensively, uncovering a mass of material including the fact that the first true Valentine’s cards were sent in the 18th century. ‘Initially these were handmade efforts’, she writes. ‘Lovers would decorate paper with romantic symbols including flowers and love knots, often including puzzles and lines of poetry. Those who were less inspired could buy volumes that offered guidance on selecting the appropriate words and images to woo their lover. These cards were then slipped secretly under a door, or tied to a door-knocker.   The first printed commercial Valentine cards appeared in Georgian Britain but it was the Victorians who adopted them with gusto – and by the mid1820s an estimated 200,000 cards were posted in London alone. The popularity of the print-

‘Most of the cards subject matters illustrate the blossoming commercial symbolism of love,’ says a Museum press release, adding that King’s collection shows the range and development of the Valentine cards and its symbols. The earlier cards ‘build on inherited Valentine association with birds and gloves, and later feature the Victorian figure of cupid’, providing an intriguing record of how symbols are adopted and adapted, how they flourish or whither. King’s private collection also includes spiteful cards, featuring cruel rhymes and caricatures, and which mock the recipient. ‘These,’ says the Museum solemnly, ‘would probably not have been treasured by their addressees.’ I shall put my mind to some this year and – for the first time in more than half a century – will post some. 41


life

DIVERSION? DAVINA!

New Cultural Development Officer role for former Radio and TV sweetheart, Davina Barbara.

BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

H

er deep warm voice had become a familiar sound at breakfast, lunch and dinnertime in our homes, when we switched on the radio or the telly for news, so you might have noticed Davina Barbara missing from our screens, busy waving her mic at her interviewees or reviewing the latest pièce de théâtre.

After an almost eighteen-yearlong career as broadcast journalist at GBC, Davina has been appointed Cultural Development Officer, a new role created by Gibraltar Cultural Services (culture.gi) to boost the already varied offer on the plate. A cultural programme of courses, exchanges, residencies, amongst other platforms, for youngsters, the general public and tourists alike. 42

“This is the opportunity for me to focus solely on culture, which is my main area of expertise by university training and experience,” History of Art graduate Davina says, “and for me to grow professionally.”

“I love being kept on my toes and I relish the challenge, so I am always on the ball, even evenings and weekends. When my son was just eight-months old, I returned to work to present the Breakfast Show; those were early starts, but late finishes were also common in the Newsroom. I am now used to flexible hours, and wouldn’t do it otherwise. Culture doesn’t stop, and nor can I."

“I love being kept on my toes and I relish the challenge … culture doesn’t stop, and nor can I."

The pace has surely changed since her days at GBC, where everything happens ‘here and now’, and reporters run the fast lane, and plans are made just to constantly update them. While Davina’s new role is still busy and buzzing, yes, there is more room for planning, and looking ahead to the middle-distance future is actually a big chunk of her job.

When she took up her post last November she was thrown in at the deep end with her press supervision of the Literary Festival, when the head press GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life officer Stuart Green was suddenly summoned to travel to London with the Chief Minister for Brexit talks and couldn’t be in attendance. “Social media presence is paramount nowadays, and I and the team are kept busy posting photos and comments or tweeting about the day before and the one ahead.” Barely a trimester in the job, and nipping in and out the Drama Festival, the Youth Arts Jamboree and Worlds Book Day, the new Culture Development Officer is applying the finishing touches and working to develop initiatives to spring and summer projects. First of all, the Arts Jamboree for young people is returning with new hands-on opportunities and a chance to learn from success stories, meet local artists, and be exposed to their artwork; later the Island Games Arts Residency will paint the John Mackintosh Hall red and all colours of the rainbow hosting figurative and performing artists from the countries participating in the Games. This isn’t a new project, and in fact Gibraltar has participated in previous editions, but of course it is the first time it happens here, and local artists will have the opportunity to work together and exchange ideas with islander artists worldwide. This will be complemented by a retrospective on Gibraltar’s participation in past Island Games, set up in cooperation with the Gibraltar Chronicle.

Arts Residency are non-competitive, so participants can cooperate and learn from each other. The Arts Jamboree is promoting inclusion and opportunities, in view of transmitting and acquiring skills that will indeed be useful and perhaps used in future competitions. All arts will hopefully be involved, with the opening of GEMA vaults for workshops, and a treasure hunt expected to take children and parents from gallery to gallery in search of hidden masterpieces, among many other events.

“I drove the van back to Broadcasting House in my six-inch heels to deliver the goods on time for the news bulletin.”

Both the Arts Jamboree and the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

“We are also promoting the Art Galleries tour with tourists – after all, we’ve six original Christian Hook’s paintings here, and he is an international artist nowadays. The tour will include a walk through Casemates, Irish Town and the City Hall Gallery, getting youngsters active in this way too." Davina and her team won’t organise every single cultural event in Gibraltar, but they will facilitate them, liaising with private entities and cultural or charity associations and providing access to the calendar of events to make sure various events don’t clash. One of their future planned projects is an Arts Awards Scheme, akin to the one already running in the UK, and structured like the Duke of Edinburgh Awards but focusing exclusively on arts: research, performance and essays about, or inspired by, local artists, are encouraged, in the view of scouting, nurturing, and training future arts leaders. Furthermore,

cultural awards to recognise talent and success are also on the agenda, complementary to the Sports and Heritage awards, but specific to the arts. From her lengthy and varied career at GBC, Davina treasures too many memories to mention, and the ‘friendships for life’ she forged, because the workplace wasn’t ‘just a job, but an extended family’; surely she had her highlights, from compèring Summer Nights karaoke with James Neish to her adventurous scoop on Peter Hain’s interview, when she was barely one year in the job: “I managed to get my two-minutes-worth of airtime with him, questioning him about what I believed Gibraltar wanted to ask him, and drove the van back to Broadcasting House in my six-inch heels to deliver the goods on time for the news bulletin.” We wish you the best of luck in your new role, Davina! 43


life

BACK TO OUR ROOTS

I’ve always said that every individual, or youngster especially, should leave the Rock for a period of time in order to ‘broaden their horizons’ and assimilate the fact that there is a bigger picture beyond our borders. Many, if not most, however, will return to their birth place... A place called home.

BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

I

left in the early 60s at a time when many emigrated to the UK and other countries. Hundreds, if not thousands, left the neighbouring town of La Linea round about then, and also when General Franco ordered the frontier closed. Thousands of Spanish workers were left jobless, especially as work was hard to come by in the Campo area. As far as Gibraltar’s concerned though, I would say there is no match for leaving your home town for a few years when you’re young to get a taste of what life’s all about away from mummy, when stinky socks aren’t going to wash themselves and a plate of sausage, egg and chips is not going to appear on the table if you don’t get up on a cold, wintery morning and look for a job. It’s a challenge... and quite an experience. 44

You can imagine the scene: you’re in unfamiliar surroundings where you don’t know a soul, so having to cope in a different culture and meeting new people is a must. If you’re shy you have to snap out of it and work on your confidence - or lack of it! It should all add up to make you a better informed, clued-up and therefore a more ‘worldly’ person. The fact so many Gibraltarian youngsters leave the Rock to go to university these days is a major plus in developing you into a much more mature, professional and self-assured individual.

who have completed their studies, returned to the Rock, and maybe gone off again to put into practice what they’ve learned, and those that are left in search of a new and, hopefully, better life? At what stage do they start thinking of coming back to their homeland - or do they? Are there many that perhaps don’t entertain the idea at all? I would really like to know what percentage of citizens from any given country return home to their place of birth. A number of them are inevitably struck by one of Cupid’s little arrows and fall head over heels in love with a native of the country they’re domiciled in

There is no match for leaving your home town for a few years when you’re young to get a taste of what life’s all about.

So then what happens to those

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life

A number of them are struck by one of Cupid’s arrows and fall head over heels in love.

at the time, then go on to produce offspring, and before you know it, they too have children. Years pass and you stay put, because your new family has taken root there and it’s pretty much impossible to wrench yourself away from kids and grandchildren to come back home. Others simply make a better life for themselves in their adopted country of choice, whether financially or otherwise, and maybe only return for a holiday or short visit, or perhaps never go back at all. The fact is that for most, to my mind, ‘there’s no place like home’, wherever that is. Many of those who left La Linea in the 60s are a case in point. Many have come back to join their extended family and friends to enjoy what’s become known as – per that well known maxim – ‘a better quality of life’. I often wonder how many of those ex-pats living on the Costa del Sol and other sun-drenched paradises follow the same pattern of returning home, or are the tables turned? Do they stay in their chosen paradise because it doesn’t make sense to return to the place they escaped from - the cold, the rain and the gloomy days and dreary nights? Your income and/or pension might

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

go much further in the country you now call home, so you stay put! Many of these retirees do not return, and seem quite determined to live their remaining twilight years in the sun with their new found friends. But closer to home in Gibraltar, you invariably hear of someone you haven’t seen for many years and who in fact left when they were quite young and have now returned to the Rock. After many years in the UK or in some other place they appear on Main Street and you say to yourself, “that’s a face I know”. In some cases, the returnees are of a more mature age and simply want to come back home for what’s left their time on terra firma. It has to be said too however, that you sometimes hear of the odd individual who has returned to the Rock and left again at some stage because they’ve realised it’s not really for them anymore; they’ve outlived the local way of life. It’s a question of, ‘that was then and this is now’ and what was once home is not now their cup of tea. They would suggest they’ve moved on from

that ‘village mentality’ they were once part of, and that’s even taking into consideration all the pluses: your kids can roam free safely, you don’t have to commute to and from work, family is close enough to babysit for you or simply because of the price of booze and cigarettes or the love of living by the sea! Yes, it really is a case of horses for courses, but it’s interesting to see how for so many after a period of time, home has that special pull or mmagnet that makes you want to return to it. So could it be a New Year’s resolution to stick to for some, making plans for a new dawning at some juncture during 2019? For those who return, the bottom line must be that a yearning to come home is an innate desire to return from whence you came, coupled with a sense of nostalgia and desire to seek out what you perceive will hopefully be a better life for the rest of your days. You’ve exhausted your ideas and cravings to live out fantasies of some sort, perhaps even achieved your professional goals, and now it’s time to go home, because home is where the heart is. And for a great majority, the heart is back home.

In some cases, the returnees simply want to come back home for what’s left their time on terra firma.

45


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life

A ZOOKEEPERS DIARY Our monthly spotlight on the superstars at the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park… and their keepers!

S

pring is in the air at the zoo in Gibraltar. It’s a time for thinking about who and what we love. For two years now, the AWCP, in conjunction with Gibraltar Botanic Gardens and other Gibraltarbased entities, has supported the Climate Coalition’s #ShowTheLove Campaign. “This campaign is great for getting people to think about the world we live in and to appreciate what we have,” says Jessica, the Park Manager. “The aim is to get people of all ages to recognise the link between Climate Change and how it will affect the things we love and hopefully take action and make a change for the better.” This Year, Prior Park will be in the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

n Campaig e v o L e h T 8 Show

201 Botanic Gardens creating seed bombs with Christine Gilder, as part of the Gardening Club. These seed bombs will be implemented in disused areas and create a haven for wildlife, which will also tie in nicely with the UK Zoo Association's annual ‘Grab That Gap’ campaign. “Last year we had schools and the Gardening Club creating green hearts with messages of love for the environment on Valentine’s Day. This year we hope to share the love even more with these seed bombs that can be planted

anywhere to create wild spaces for life to thrive”. Despite being one of the smallest British zoos, the Alameda Wildlife Park in Gibraltar likes to think big. For the past twelve years, the Park Manager, Jessica Leaper, has been determined to see this little zoo thrive. One of the goals of the first strategic plan was to create a park for Gibraltar to be proud of. “I saw the potential, as many others had, to turn this little oasis into something very special.” After a

Despite being one of the smallest British zoos, the Alameda Wildlife Park likes to think big.

47


life association conferences in the UK, to marketing, education, accounts, events, graphics, fundraising, coordination of projects, and the list goes on. Jessica says, "There really is no regularity to my work, it’s something I love about the role”. As the team expands with evermore experienced and talented staff, the burden is gradually lifting and making way for more exciting projects for the future.

ed malong-tailper ', o h c a lma Lea ' and 'M La Vieja ques in love. © A ca

‘Djump’ the Com

mon

© Gary RonaldsoMarmoset n

lot of hard work, blood, sweat and tears, this equally small team seems to be getting somewhere. “As an attraction we are currently #1 of 57 things to do in Gibraltar on TripAdvisor. This is an amazing achievement for such a small zoo in a country where tourism is so high. Each year we are seeing an increase in visitors and feedback shows that our visitors are really enjoying our park.” Even though the zoo is small, there is still a lot going on behind the scenes, and the manager is often in the thick of it. From attending zoo 48

CONSERVATION TheAWCP is now becoming more involved in conservation projects internationally. This month, Jessica will be travelling to Brazil, joining zoo experts from Jersey Zoo and Apenhaul for a workshop held by the Mountain Marmoset Conservation Project (MMPC), the focus being two species of tiny primates being rapidly driven to extinction by habitat loss and the wider impacts of the illegal pet trade. During this trip, Jessica will be joining researchers from the UK and Brazil to carry out surveys and collect data to determine species populations in the areas. “It’s a fantastic opportunity for me to get back to where I started all those years ago, primate research and fieldwork, but it’s also an excellent opportunity for the park to partake in some really valuable conservation. We hope to continue to support this project in the future.” The project also aims to set up captive breeding programs for these marmosets in Brazil, to ensure their future survival. There is potential for the AWCP to send more staff over in the coming years

to help out further with research, building, and professional training. LOVE IN THE ZOO The park's marmosets, Djump and Rommie, are becoming ambassadors for the MMPC, as they were both rescued from the illegal pet trade. It is marmosets like this in Brazil that are causing a problem for local wildlife. When they are released into the wild from the pet trade, they drive out the other species, or hybridise with them. Rommie and Djump arrived separately to the AWCP but have lived together ever since. “We’d like to say it’s a love story but to be honest, Rommie is definitely the boss! But I’m sure they wouldn’t be without each other”. There are similar ‘love stories’ throughout the Wildlife Park, animals thrown together by circumstance and misfortune, who now live happy lives together. “Our oldest love story is that of La Vieja and El Macho, two long-tailed macaques rescued by Gibraltar Customs in 1994,” Jessica explains. “They were wild-caught and destined for laboratories, they are lucky to be here instead. They are now grandparents as well! We have separated the group to give this old couple some peace and to reduce aggression. Older individuals are often rejected in primate groups, so we protect them from this”.

“Our oldest love story is that of La Vieja and El Macho, two longtailed macaques rescued by Gibraltar Customs in 1994.”

Valentine’s Day also marks the birthdays of one of the AWCP’s sets of twin Cotton-top tamarins, Frank and Florence. These two were born in 2010 as part of an international breeding

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


life programme. They are now awaiting their own love interests in the near future. NEW PROJECTS This month, staff are busy preparing the park for new developments. Over the past few years the park has been redesigned and redeveloped. Being only a one-acre site, there is not much room for expansion. “We have a few larger plans for the future, such as a Local Biodiversity Area, but for now we have an ingenious and simple way to expand the park for the animals. We can’t expand outwards, so we are going to go up,” explains Jessica. Over the next few months the AWCP will be installing a network of tunnels and platforms for our primate species. Starting with the smallest and lightest, the Cottontop tamarins will be the first to finally experience treetop living. “I started to plan out the routes for the tunnels and realised it was a bit like the London Underground, so it became the Alameda Overground. We have been fundraising over the Christmas period and have managed to secure generous donations from local companies”. Notably, locally based gaming company, GVC, have opted to sponsor a whole line, station and platform for the tamarins. This will be named the ‘GVC’ line and will form part of Tamarin Bypass, which leads to Tamarin Terminal.

nels are complete, visitors will be able to watch the monkeys and lemurs running along above their heads. This system also allows for flexibility of enclosures and also stimulation for the animals at the Wildlife Park. As far as daily routine for the manager, there is none. Jessica explains: “Unless I am called in to help in the park I try to make headway with work in the office. At 9am I will first check the parks emails. I then catch up with Steve Perry, our Senior keeper, and the rest of the staff, to discuss any developments or plans for the day. From there I could be doing anything from attending meetings, vet visits, more office work, or helping out in the park. It’s certainly never dull!”

“I started to plan out the routes for the tunnels and realised it was a bit like the London Underground, so it became the Alameda Overground.”

Projects like this are fun and capture the imagination of the visitors to the wildlife park. Once the tunGIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Jessica’s only gripe about her work is that there are not more hours in the day, as there are always a multitude of often very diverse tasks to get through. “It is a case of multitasking throughout most of the day. I still get to work with the animals, mostly on weekends or when we are shortstaffed. I really enjoy that aspect, working to a schedule again; this is usually when I get my best ideas. During feeding and cleaning animals or hosing paths, that’s when the real inspiration happens!” With a small but mighty team of four keepers alongside her, the sky really is the limit for this humble little park.

‘La Vieja ’ the Lon g-tailed caque © MaAlm a Leaper

Tamarin

If you want to #ShowTheLove this February, why not visit the Wildlife Park and pick up a seed bomb or two, or just have a wander round and enjoy some time with the animals? The AWCP is open every day from 10am-4:45pm (last entrance 4.30pm). If you are a local company and would like to sponsor a tunnel, please get in touch at info@awcp.gi or visit: www.awcp.gi.

49


environment

MONSTER MUSSELS: PINNA NOBILIS

This month, we’re learning about the noble pen shell, ‘Pinna nobilis’ - a large species of mediterranean clam.

BY LEWIS STAGNETTO, THE NAUTILUS PROJECT

M

ost people will think of a small black shell and tasty orange flesh when confronted with the word ‘mussel’. Commonly consumed throughout the Mediterranean, these molluscs have irregularly shaped shells and can measure up to 12cm long. The mussel you are thinking of is the common mussel Mytilus edulis. Now imagine a mussel reaching 120cm in length, and you might consider that the fleshy orange morsel inside is large enough to feed a family! The stuff of fantasy surely? Actually no, and indeed found on a coast near you; enter the fan mussels. The first thing to mention about these gargantuan molluscs is that they are very strictly protected by Annex IV of the EEC Habitats directive and all forms of capture or harvesting are prohibited by law. This is exceptionally important

50

to respect as they are incredibly sensitive to pollution and are listed as endangered within the Mediterranean. Typically found in soft sediments and in seagrass meadows up to a depth of 60 metres, fan mussels are solitary, which is atypical compared to the common variety which form beds. They do share the mussel beard known as the Byssus filament, but use it to attach themselves to hard surface within the sediments. The filaments are made of keratin like our fingernails and are found beneath the substrate boundary towards the anterior of the mussel and in total about one third of the shell is buried. Historically, these fibres were

used in weaving cloth such as sea silk which can then be used to create all sorts of clothing. The Romans valued sea silk so much that only the wealthiest individuals could afford it. This anchor is very important in keeping the animal upright and in an ideal feeding position. Interestingly, the seagrass is also very important for them as seagrass blades help to slow down the flow of water and protect the mussels from being pushed over. The combination of the mussel and the seagrasses forms the foundation of a diverse and healthy ecosystem where shrimps and many small crustaceans hide away. These crustaceans then form an important

And you might consider that the fleshy orange morsel inside is large enough to feed a family!

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


environment food source for many species of fish along the coastline. Pinna nobilis is also affected by a number of threats which contribute to its poor abundance. Mass mortality events were experienced across the Western Mediterranean in early autumn 2016. No one was able to determine exactly why they were dying until various researchers stumbled upon haplosporidia - a eukaryotic parasitic animal which most closely resembles terrestrial fungus in its lifestyle - in the digestive system of the mussel. The rate of spread of the parasite was so fast that it killed whole populations of mussels over hundreds of kilometres of coastline and consequently pushed it into the critically endangered zone.

the coast of Italy and tragically 32 people lost their lives. A lesser-known fact is that the location where Concordia partially sank was also the site of an established Pinna nobilis population and the ships presence on the sea bed threatened to destroy them all. As part of a monumental effort to rescue the surviving mussels, scientific divers carefully removed them manually and relocated them to a suitable location. Fortunately, the survival rates were pretty good and hence the damage was limited to some degree.

The spread of the parasite was so fast that it pushed it into the critically endangered zone.

The destruction of seagrass meadows through pollution and commercial fishing have also had a significant impact on standing stocks. Net dragging is highly destructive of the benthic habitats as it decimates everything in its path. Sessile Pinna nobilis is often a victim in these kinds of activities. Typically, the fishermen are back before the sea bed has had a chance to recover and this keeps it in a degraded state, permanently. It is not just commercial fishermen either as free divers have targeted them for the easy pickings since Egyptian times. Fishing activities of all kinds affect them negatively. Although infrequent, shipping disasters also take their toll. In January 2012, the cruise ship Costa Concordia ran aground off GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

As ever, climate change is a serious threat to these organisms. Studies have shown that as water temperature rises, the juvenile survival rate decreases, which could dramatically affect larval dispersal rates and population growth. Increased oceanic acidification due to increased carbon dioxide levels are also expected to increase stress pressures on standing stocks. Ecologically they are very important as proficient filter feeders. Filter feeding is an essential natural component for the removal of detritus which is in suspension throughout the water column. These mussels retain the detritus within their digestive system which helps clean up the water. Typically, the higher the biomass of filter feeders the lower the turbidity; this is particularly good for divers. Not just that, but the loss of such a monster mussel would be a big blow to conservational efforts in the region. Gibraltar’s coastline has already

PHYLUM: Mollusca

CLASS: Bivalvia

HABITAT: Soft sediments around coastal shelf

DIET: Filter feeder

INTERESTING FACT: Pinna nobilis hosts symbiotic shrimp which live inside its shell.

lost its seagrass beds and looking to the future we must carefully ponder the fate of the monster mussel. With an appropriate monitoring programme and careful coastline management we can build a sanctuary for them on our coastline for generations to come. 51


£39

.00

GIBRALTAR

per person

Valentine’s Dinner THURSDAY - 14TH FEBRUARY, 2019 Amuse-Bouche Serrano Ham Churros with Aioli

Starter King Prawns & Mango Salad Pomegranate Chia Dressing (V) Asparagus & Wild Nettle Soup scented with Tarragon

Main Pan Seared Prime Fillet of Beef with Gremolata Butter & Silver Skin Onions Grilled Salmon with Samphire & Chive crushed Potato & Lime Sabayon (V) Potato & Spring Onion Galette with Caramelised Root Vegetables, Puy Lentil Broth (All served with Seasonal Vegetables and Potatoes)

Dessert Butternut Milk & Passion Fruit Panna Cotta Marbled Chocolate Tuile Vanilla & Salted Caramel Crème Brûlée

Coffee/Tea Selection of Handmade Chocolates Music by Nigel Palmer

Contact: +350 200 73000 / events@rockhotel.gi to reserve your table The Rock Hotel, 3 Europa Road, Gibraltar. Visit us online at: rockhotelgibraltar.com


scene LOVE AND DECADENCE

“You know, it’s quite a job starting to love somebody. You have to have energy, generosity, blindness. There is even a moment, in the very beginning, when you have to jump across a precipice: if you think about it you don’t do it.” – Jean-Paul Sartre in Nausea (1938)

BY MARK MONTEGRIFFO

T

o manipulate a phrase from another consequential thinker: philosophers have hitherto interpreted love; it is up to the songwriters to communicate it. There is obviously much more involved than energy, generosity, and blindness. It is a human instinct, whether love is selfish or selfless. It is a subject that a songwriter can rarely resist.

Love is a noun. Love is a verb. It is devotion and detachment. It fills your soul as easy as it tears it apart. It is absurd, yet there is nothing more natural. Love is a contradiction. It is security and uncertainty. It GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

is the worst and the best of human experience. The highest highs and the lowest lows; being in love is being truly alive, for better or worse. No emotion elevates the mind and heart as much as love, or lets it reach the depths of what it is to be. One loves because one exists in the world.

positive and negative. But dualities are simple. Love, being fundamental to life, is complex. This is why it is intense. This is why poets, artists, and novelists write endlessly on the subject, from the most intricate pieces of creation to the more benign. If it were simple, there would be no need for the constant revisiting of this common sentiment. Indeed, the complexity can lead to shame in society; something

Philosophers have hitherto interpreted love; it is up to the songwriters to communicate it.

Like the world, love at once seems a duality. It is the black and white of right and wrong, good and bad,

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music

which Bob Dylan acknowledges in ‘Simple Twist of Fate’: People tell me it’s a sin/To know and feel too much within/I still believe she was my twin/ But I lost the ring/She was born in the spring/But I was born too late/ Blame it on a simple twist of fate. It is the shades of grey in love that give it an infinitely fascinating creative purview. Every love is different, yet there is a little bit of anyone who has loved in every expression of love. Leonard Cohen is the master of the grey areas of love. There is, of course, ‘Hallelujah’, but listen to the end of ‘Chelsea Hotel #2’ – I don’t mean to suggest/ That I loved you the best/I can’t keep track of each fallen robin/I remember you well/In the Chelsea Hotel/That’s all, I don’t even think/ Of you that often. Then there’s 'Suzanne', which gives a provoking take on the romantic versus the platonic nature of love: And you want to travel with her/And you want to travel blind/And you know that she will trust you/For you’ve touched her perfect body with your mind. Song-writing is not something that is easily judged objectively, if that is really possible at all. Yet there is

something in the grey areas of life and of love that make it worth the candle, and that make the words speak to you authentically, acknowledging the lack of black and white certainty.

in reference to, some of his songs about love:

The late singer and poet from Montreal influenced a current singer and poet from Gibraltar, living in London. Gabriel Moreno is working on a new album after his Farewell Belief record. But it is the preceding album, Love and Decadence, which hits home those grey areas throughout like a hammer to the heart. Before spending time in America, I saw Gabriel play in a bar in Farringdon Road. I hadn’t seen him perform in London until then. Being a new father, he is going through a different love in bringing up his child, with all the challenges and fears it brings. I was thinking about that night I stopped over to watch him sing. I was in London briefly, on my way to America for a few months. I remembered listening to his songs and how I thought in some ways he spoke to my love experience.

It’s been on my mind/What came of the Russian girl you hoped to find?/I thought I saw her last night/In Apollo’s arms

Love and submission – are the two options very different after all?

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Returning from America, I wrote him this poem in the style of, and

Gabriel Brown/Your Hispanic hat that is shielding your crown/Can you lend it to me?/I need your powers of prose

His lute kissed the ground/It was just as poetic as Rimbaud and Pound/ Don’t surrender your voice/Your Espinel guitar Like Joselin/I sincerely hope that you conquer your dreams/But do share your boots/And working class pride Gabriel Brown/It’s the end of December and I’m back in the town/ This old fortress rock/Couldn’t keep you at bay Unlike PM May/I hope you’re never in a place you ought not to stay/Just keep moving on/You’ll get there in time Joking aside/Your essay on Angelo watered my eyes/I hope you are well/ Have a happy new year Love and Decadence begins with ‘No One Can Reach Us Here’, and again it is the verse before the final choGIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


music rus that packs that emotional gutpunch which speaks for itself: And now we’ve reached the threshold/ Of love or mere submission/I wanted to adore you/Without losing touch/ Only your hands could/Make me real. Love and submission – are the two options very different after all? There’s submission on track one, but we’re swiftly taken to delusion with ‘Beautiful Lies’: I am drowning my eyes/In your beautiful lies. Delusion and manipulation are not surprising aspects of love, although they are sobering. We are humans with egos, insecurities, and, again, complexities. In this track, the voice is willingly surrendering under the spell of manipulation and delusion, because the lies are too beautiful to resist, despite the cost.

You said we were meant to be stars/ But whose war are we fighting?/Are we fighting back? But the next track is more accepting. ‘We Are What We Are’ is a conversation to a lover about being a singer of love songs, in his words, singing for someone to love. It sounds a bit like meta-commentary: Metric rhymes and vaccines/Well I still have your eyelids/I even pawned my language/To stay inside the Sanskrit of love.

Every love is different, yet there is a little bit of anyone who has loved in every expression of love.

Look to my eyes/They’re like animals in hiding/They are lonesome and wild/Like the feelings that I’m fighting. ‘Love or Fire’, track three, builds on the imperfection of love. It is insecure and often carnal or instinctive, not always relaxed and rational. It is very human in its sensitivity but very animalistic in its drive for desire. Imperfection is reiterated a couple of verses later when we move from the insecurity of the eyes to the desolate cavern of the mind: Look to my mind/It is darker than a forest/And in theoretical terms/You are the lantern/And the solace. ‘Love or Fire’ is the story of risk, trusting something or someone that could blow everything up in your face, or provide a lasting flame. ‘Losing Game’ sharply questions love, almost to the degree of apathy: You said it’s a trial from the start/ GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

It is ‘Saturday Night’ for track number six and the focus is on London nightlife, drowning sorrows in alcohol, and ‘melting the clocks for you’. It is disillusioned and disheartened; a cry to get out of the inauthenticity and superficiality of the dating scene. From here onto the next track, we get a taste of the existential and religious, where the love of God feels unrequited: Oh Lord what have you done/You turned a thought into a man/And all the fun we could have had/Turned into scorn and into mud.

hope you can see me/Here in your blood/Bodies are fragile like China/ But bonds are like castles/Reigning our minds. The tail-end of the album begins with ‘The Waiting Song’. There is a realisation that now that there are no answers in the grey areas of love, no matter how long you wait: I was waiting for the dancers/ To release the waltz of answers/I was waiting for the wonder/In the inner life of numbers/I was waiting for a ride/Into your mind. But in ‘Piensa En Mi’, there’s an offer despite the uncertainty: Si tienes ganas de llorar/ Piensa en mi (If you have the urge to cry/Think of me). We come full-circle with the final track, ‘Mother of Song’, as there is certainty of the uncertainty: I used to be blind but I am l blind no more/My eyes were like marble-made stones/If you flee from your mind/We can hide from the light. The journey of love is now complete; through passion and doubt, reflection and acceptance. We read our own stories into song. Communication is only so good in so far as it is received, but that’s all that matters. It is not the accuracy to the song-writer’s image that counts. It is not some sort of quest for objective meaning. Love grows in us, from those awkward teenage dates to your first love, from the heartbreaks to the soulmates. Writing about love truly does not just embrace the extreme black and whites, but rather the innumerable shades of grey that occupy the experience of human existence.

Writing about love truly does not just embrace the extreme black and whites, but rather the innumerable shades of grey that occupy the experience of human existence.

‘Fuentes’ brings us back to a similar theme of commentary as in ‘We Are What We Are’: I was wise to write what I knew dear/ Sometimes lines make it all clear/ There were times I was one with your dreams. Sometimes lines make it all clear. But sometimes they don’t; they reflect the lack of clarity, like in ‘Dance in the Night for Us’: Father, I am counting my marbles/I

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poetry

GIBRALTAR POETS: AN ANTHOLOGY ‘The Anthology of Contemporary Gibraltar Poets’, to be published in May 2019, aims to bring together the best work written by poets with a significant degree of affinity to Gibraltar.

BY JEREMY GOMEZ

W

ords are everything when being with your beloved; the choice of words, the rhythm and timing, the syntax, the subtle but meaningful pauses in the conversation… Words can raise the hairs on the back of your neck, or draw tears from your eyes. When we are considering love, we must be considerate of the words we use, and sometimes the right words are hard to find. The poets of millennia past have always known the struggle in finding adequate words for love, to the point that the much admired poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, advised an aspiring poet to avoid writing romantic poetry altogether until later in his career. However, if there were a medium to capture the meaning and experience of love, it would be poetry. This year, a group of local individuals are hoping to find the poets of

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Gibraltar, whether experienced and published or an aspiring poet beginning to develop their craft. The Independent Writers and Artists Project are aiming to include the best of their findings in an anthology of Gibraltarian poetry. One of those individuals and one of the judges for the anthology, Giordano Durante, met with The Gibraltar Magazine to tell us about the anthology.

boost civil society and Gibraltarian writing, because one of the things that was missing was that there was no single volume that brings together current Gibraltarian poetry. There isn’t a single volume that brings together short stories or essays either, but the medium he was drawn to was poetry. Obviously, there is poetry that is being published (mainly self-published) locally, such as in the Chronicle, or circulated around friends, but it isn’t brought together in a single volume of quality contributions. The reason Felix contacted us is because three of us are involved with poetry: Trino Cruz, who is a published poet; Jackie Anderson, the current judge of the annual poetry competition hosted by the

Words can raise the hairs on the back of your neck, or draw tears from your eyes.

WHERE DID THE IDEA FOR THIS ANTHOLOGY ORIGINATE FROM AND WHAT GAVE RISE TO THE IDEA? The idea came from Felix Alvarez, who contacted us and said that he wanted to do something to

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


poetry JUDGING PANEL - LEFT TO RIGHT - TRINO CRUZ, BECKY GABAY, GIORDANO DURANTE, JACKIE ANDERSON

Ministry of Culture who writes her own poetry; Becky Gabay, a PhD researcher at the University of Gibraltar who is writing a thesis on Gibraltarian literature, and myself. WHEN DID IT ALL BEGIN AND WHEN IS THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS? We started talking in October and, by November we finalised some of the rules and how we were going to go about it. We opened up for entries at the beginning of December, when we made our first public announcements, and we’ve been receiving the entries since then. The closing date is 9th of February and we’re hoping to publish in May. Once the closing date passes, we’ll go through the stage of making our final decisions, and then the editing and putting together of the anthology will happen, before printing locally.

It was just strange... I felt certain memories, certain experiences, certain sights, I thought could be put into poetry.

AS A PUBLISHED POET YOURSELF, HOW DID YOU BEGIN? There was nothing, there was nothing particular that happened or that I consciously tried to do. It was just strange...I felt certain memories, certain experiences, certain sights, and simple things; simple things like things I saw on my way to work or taking my daughter to nursery, there would be something about the quality of the light or an evocative smell that came along and I thought these could be put into poetry. I don’t GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

play an instrument, I don’t dance, I don’t paint, so my only form of expression is through words. I tried to look back at certain encounters that I’ve had in my past, certain significant moments, significant things that I’ve experienced and thought: how could I turn this into to a poem? How can I transform it into something that brings it alive again now? A poem is like an old photograph; it captures a world that’s lost, or a moment that is no longer there. You try and filter out the things that aren’t important and keep the essence of what’s significant.

not a traditional love poem in the sense that, perhaps, you wouldn’t write it in a Valentine’s day card. It is this poem by Andrew Marvell, a metaphysical poet of the 17th century. His poem is called: ‘To His Coy Mistress'.

A poem is like an old photograph; it captures a world that’s lost, or a moment that is no longer there.

FINALLY, AS VALENTINE’S IS FAST APPROACHING, DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVOURITE LOVE POEMS? I knew you were going to ask this, so I thought about it! One of my favourite love poems is

The deadline for submissions is fast approaching and, like Marvell, you might feel “Time’s winged chariot hurrying near”, so in hope of having your poetry in this upcoming anthology, submit your poems to connectedgib@yahoo.com by the 9th of February. 57


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literature

ALISON GARDINER: FANTASY NOVELIST Dr Fantasy’s trip to Eridor island: Alison Gardiner shares writing tips and spreads the magic.

BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

A

t her creative writing workshop held in Gibraltar as part of the Gibunco Literary Festival 2018, tweens’ adventure novelist and Dorset GP Creative Writing Competition 2017 winner Alison Gardiner spellbound children and adults alike, having them penning an elevator pitch and opening to their new novel in the mere space of one hour – and judging from the participants who dared to sample out loud, it was productive brainstorming! Alison’s recipe for best-selling plots is simple, whether in fantasy or any other genre: after fashioning out the protagonists’ characterisation and back-story, set them in their historical and GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

geographical background, whether real or make-believe, give them a goal to achieve or a mission to complete and riddle their path with obstacles to overcome and lifelines to grab.

the middle of drama instead, and drip-feed the back-story in later. Prune out extra words: flabby prose is a turn-off. Anything that is an unusual take on an old theme has the potential for hooking new readers. Write what you are passionate about, not what seems to be popular or might be the next big thing.”

“Write what you are passionate about, not what seems to be popular."

So, here go the ingredients to make readers want for more after the first chapter (in fact, the literary submissions internet program Alison is a regular host to, Litopia, is geared to judge a book not by its cover but by its 700-word incipit): “Avoid giving too much information at the beginning, explaining how they got to the present situation. Start right in

And whatever you do, never open with descriptions of the weather! Alison favours the fantasy genre because “I can make absolute59


literature adds that from the reader’s point of view, fantasy stretches their imagination too, and takes them to astonishing, magical worlds unbound by physics, convention or the mundane.

ly anything happen or create what I choose: flying crocodiles, thinking mountains, ancient magical puzzles, lions that turn to stone at will… anything that my brain can conceive.” She

Furthermore, she believes that fantasy genuinely helps children to have a window to the world of reality: “They can see that basic moral values hold true including loyalty, friendship, commitment, love, truth and so on. The cloak of fantasy makes these more accessible as concepts, more achievable and in many ways more desirable. In many fantasy stories, including my own, it’s often reliance on these core values that will get a character through at the end, even more than the fantastical tools they’re given like spells, time travel, and ability to contact spiritual world. Children can learn that tackling problems can be hard work and uncomfortable, but that persistence, thinking things through, knowledge and teamwork will often give the desired result.”

Alison’s plots and the geography of the fantasy island of Eridor are influenced by her childhood in Jamaica, which explains her love for water and tropical settings. “A trip to Australia, which included going to a rainforest and contact with snakes, also had its bearing. There are flashes back my childhood - for example at one point in a chase the hero, Alex, is on a tree looking down at a mud filled lake. In Jamaica there was a tree-filled paddock and we used to climb one each to pretend we were in ships with the sea below.”

“Flying crocodiles, thinking mountains, lions that turn to stone at will… anything that my brain can conceive.”

If this allows for broader freedom of creation than other genres, the writer still has to abide the set of his or her own rules, whether on the limits of anyone’s magical powers, characters’ abilities, and layout of the territory they move in: “Consistency is paramount. It’s unsettling and unsatisfactory for the reader to have any problem solved by suddenly pulling out of a hat something disconnected to previous events, or finding that certain rules apply at one point but not at others, unless hints 60

about these eventual outcomes were subtly planted in the previous chapters but went unnoticed until hindsight highlights them.”

Many of her characters were inspired by Alison’s four children and family friends: “Generally I take parts of people’s character and meld them together with somebody else’s characteristics to make a new composite personality. I think it’s important not to try and recreate a real life person, as you can get quite restricted about what that person believes, or how they might react. Borrowing a range of characteristics, mannerisms, thought patterns can be fun and very fertile ground for creating someone new and believable.” In fact she borrowed quite a lot from her own real world to build up her fantasy escape, by fashioning the heroes of The Serpent and Eridor, returning in Alchemy (Wishing Shelf Book Awards Red Ribbon Award winner and highly GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


literature recommended by them) after the children on her school run: “My son Alex became the main hero Alex Weston, with his inseparable pet hamster Skoodle, a non-magical teenager who walks his own path but is fiercely loyal to his friends; my daughter Natasha evolved in Ikara the clever, supercilious snake, her friends Katie in Keeko the ebullient monkey, fierce in fight, and Claudia became Clawds the cat.

Kaleidoscope of Time, in which readers might meet his love interest.

“I chose a teenage hero because he had to be old enough to be reasonably likely to undertake such a journey, but equally I didn’t want an adult hero, out of touch with my readership because young people generally enjoy a hero a little bit older than themselves, and my books target the 9 to 12-year-old market.

She writes ‘on her feet’ by dictating her first draft to voice-recognition software or recorder so she can transcribe and polish it later: “Thus I can tell the story straight through without getting slowed down by thinking too hard about punctuation, adverbs, word repetitions or spelling errors. It means that editing the first to the second draft tends to be quite intense. But dictating gives me the freedom to think, talk and keep going, which is glorious.”

“The idea of animal companions for Alex arose when I realised I didn’t want him to encounter humans while adrift on a jungle island. My animals don’t have the stereotypical features of fables, because I created the character first, and later squeezed it in the animal body, whose salient features I kept, such as agility for the monkey, and rope-like muscles for the snake, for instance; just check out the unpleasant armadillo in Alchemy who is my most unconventional, being intelligent but uncooperative, irritating and vindictive.” Alex, a mortal boy in a magic world, where he can fight evil only thanks to his qualities of “loyalty, quick wits and sheer cussedness”, is expected to be starring in a pentalogy, and he is half way there with the forthcoming publication of his third adventure The Goblin’s Curse, due for summer, followed by The GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

On a busy schedule as motherof-four GP and medical appraiser in Dorset, Jersey and indeed Gibraltar, Alison undertakes school visits to give talks to years 5-8, and she also is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators and the Society of Authors.

At the beginning of a book she needs two to three hours of quiet time for ‘blue-sky thinking’ to work out where she’s going with the story, but later her editing is done in bits and scraps of time like ‘late at night, on a train, first thing in the morning, Sunday after lunch’. Her family is supportive, reading her completed works and chipping in suggestions, so they all feel part of what she does: “I don’t like being interrupted if I’m building a story; while I’m editing it’s less disruptive. Cup of tea, cat, quiet house, pen. Perfect.” Alison Gardiner’s novels are available from Waterstones, WHSmith, Amazon, Barnes and Noble or the publisher, Matador. Signed copies can be ordered on her website AlisonGardinerAuthor.com.

ELEVATOR PITCHES: The Serpent of Eridor: Escaping an assassin, fourteen-year-old Alex Weston casts himself adrift in a typhoon. Landing on the tropical island of Eridor with his hamster Skoodle, he enters an enchanted world. Alex possesses no magic; armed with bravery, loyalty, sheer cussedness and wit he fights evil wizards and goblins to save his life and those of his friends. But does a few ounces of added rodent make him the strongest fighting unit on Eridor? Alchemy: An armadillo alchemist’s puzzle; Eridor nearing destruction; a close friend turned traitor; the anger of a powerful wizard. With no spells, no weapons, Alex must somehow save his dying friends in the few minutes remaining before he himself is murdered. The Goblins Curse: Alex seeks vital globules of reverse time, yet every action in trying to break in to a wizard’s secret store is thwarted as he is dragged to the bottom of a lake, blocked by a monster guard-porcupine and an evil multi-headed snake. He must burgle a goblin’s funeral, save a friend’s family from annihilation and prove his loyalty to the limit. Meanwhile, the goblin leader, Rectoria, has been cursed to lose what she loves most; but things are not as they seem.

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leisure

AROUND THE WORLD… IN A CAMPERVAN Snorri & Harald: The travelling tale of two Norsemen, one campervan, and a bucketload of determination.

BY SNORRI SIGURBJØRNSSON & HARALD BREVIK

I

t was night. The moon was shining bright, with a few stars dotted here and there. The palm trees were bathing in the moonlight. Waves from the Mediterranean gently hitting the Catalonian beach of Coma-Ruga. In a small parking lot, five meters from the soft sand, wedged between two empty resort buildings, stood a 1986 Fiat Ducato campervan. This is where we, the Nordic voyagers, the Icelandic Snorri Sigurbjørnsson (28) and the Norwegian Harald Brevik

(32), had decided to spend this particular December night. Having left our home city of Fredrikstad, Norway on the last day of November, the main aim was to reach the warmer climate of the Mediterranean so we could prepare for the voyage in a more comfortable temperature than the freezing

and icy winters of the North. As the waves softly hit the shore, there was a sense of tranquility as we both drifted away into deep slumber.

Suddenly, the whole car shook accompanied with a loud banging noise. Quiet. Then again.

Suddenly, the whole car shook accompanied with a loud banging noise. Quiet. Then again. It was followed by a violent grabbing of the door handle.

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travel Someone was trying to get in. At such moments, one must properly interpret the situation. Some will also take stock of how they ended up in such a predicament to begin with. THE BEGINNING One hot Norwegian summer’s day, travelling popped up, yet again, as the conversation topic du jour. Only this time, with a twist. “Let’s travel to India,” Snorri said. “Sure,” replied Harald.

Our trusted Rocinante, or mode of transportation if one isn’t too acquainted with Cervantes, would be the aforementioned 1986 Fiat Ducato. A car in such a state we could only help but wonder if it ever had its heyday. We concluded it must’ve been when it was plastic, aluminum and steel, way before being assembled into its current shape. Food and drink is also a necessity. As is petrol, for such a machine. It would require a sizeable budget. Driving all the way from Norway through India and onwards to Cape Horn. “This is where the locals come in,” we agreed. “We will offer our stubborn selves, limited abilities but eagerness in learning to aid those who need help with whatever they might need help with, whatever fruit they want us to harvest, whatever house that needs paint, whatever wine in need of a proper tasting in exchange for some food, drink and perhaps even some money for petrol.”

Travelling popped up as the conversation topic du jour. Only this time, with a twist.

“But let’s travel in a campervan.” Snorri exalted with a grin.

“Why stop there? Why not go to the end of the world? Or as close as possible. Cape Horn!” said Harald, grinning even more. “Then let’s get going!” was the last thing said before we started perusing every classified section and every relatable website for a proper campervan. “Traveling the Earth is done by everyone. Mostly by plane. We will travel ON Earth. Literally. Discover what divides us and also what unites us as humans of different cultures and traditions. How do people live in places we consider unlivable?” questioned Snorri. “How do people live in cities and areas often visited by hordes on a daily basis? What is their day-to-day like? And how are humans in meeting with strangers? Are they helpful?” Harald kept piling on questions 64

that would frame our quixotic expedition.

charge. The list of items to fix was long. Brakes. Handbrake. Exhaust system. Tires. A mechanic even offered to build a new exhaust system, free of charge. As we were driving to the mechanic, we approached Europe’s favorite road design tool: the roundabout. This was a roundabout in a busy intersection on the main artery in Fredrikstad. During rush hour. We yield for a car in the roundabout, then, as we enter, a loud whining noise is heard, black smoke is coming up from the hood and the car doesn’t move an inch. So there we are, in the middle of a roundabout. Cars everywhere. In rush hour. With a car that doesn’t move. Honking as cars pass by. Smiles and thumbs up. Shouts of “You didn’t get farther than this?”, from a man recognizing us from the newspaper. It was a blast. The clutch had snapped. And was useless. This was added to the list of things to get done. A tow truck finally towed the car to the mechanic, and as they started working on it, the mechanics and us would-be voyagers soon discovered it was much like peeling an onion: for every layer peeled there was another layer of things to fix. The list of things to fix grew.

Into the freezing cold river it was. A quick scrub and the two travellers were ready.

With the premise now solidified, we set our wheels in motion from Fredrikstad and headed south.

Not quite so immediately. For the car was a wreck. In dire need of a proper up-check. The check-up was done, free of

In the midst of all this, the word of our predicament had spread, and many local businesses and GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


travel

people stepped up to aid us on our quest. Every item and most of the work that was needed for the car was supplied free of charge. Some sponsors simply bought advertisement on the car. Money that went to pay for the pharmacy-sized load of vaccines that had to be taken. Even a solar panel system was donated to the voyage. Things were looking up. The car was named Murphy No.1. After Murphy’s Law, “what can go wrong, will go wrong”, and Number 1, because it is the first car and it’s the first of what is not unlikely to be a few more Murphys, should it break down. Finally, we departed the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Norwegian stronghold of Fredrikstad, with teary-eyed, flag-waving mothers looking on. Now we had a plan… of sorts. Initially, the route went through Finland and the Baltics before heading to Southern Europe but the fast-approaching winter put a stop to those plans. We decided to spend the winter close to the Mediterranean, to properly thaw and prepare for the eastwards voyage across Asia and onwards through the Americas to Cape Horn. There are still some running expenses, such as cell phone (mobile data), new travel insurances, visas, petrol, etc. So we can’t just go for the umbrella-drinks, we

have to generate some income. Additionally, we are looking to explore the area, learn common trades, immerse ourselves in local culture, make videos and content on our websites. Much like we did when we were invited to visit the Belgian brewery Moortgat’s Duvel-factory in Breendonk outside of Antwerp in Belgium. THE POST-BEGINNING PREVOYAGE VOYAGE We ferried from Oslo to the German town of Kiel. Along the way we tried to stop at different points of interest, all while bearing in mind that a milder climate would make living in Murphy somewhat more comfortable. 65


travel SNORRI SIGURBJØRNSSON

equipped, let’s just leave it at that. We contacted the Crowne Plaza Hotel, and they enthusiastically invited us to use their spa facility. (They even rung us up as we were leaving the city; it turned out that the reception staff that day had forgotten to give us a present from the hotel - two bags of Belgian liquid delicacies and some delicious Belgian cookies.)

HARALD BREVIK

Every night we looked for different suitable spots to park. Sometimes it’s a restaurant parking lot, sometimes it’s outside a school. In Antwerp, we were in need of a good shower. It had been a few days since the last one. And Murphy is not very well66

This turned out to be only the beginning of our encounter with Belgian specialties. The rest of the day was spent at the Duvel brewery. We were invited with open arms, given a tour, and several samples. And gift baskets too. Murphy was strategically parked a few blocks from the brewery, in the small village of Breendonk. As we walked down the street that night, we stumbled upon a pub. There we met a gathering of

SNORRI SIGURBJØRNSSON

locals. They shared their stories, taught us how to play the game of bumper pool and whipped up some homemade frites, or Belgian (French) fries. This Belgian hospitality would soon be encountered again, in the small village of Achouffe, population 37. We stopped in this tiny village, close to the Luxembourgian border, on the advice of the generous people at Duvel, the owner of the award-winning brewery there - Brasserie d’Achouffe. We arrived late in the evening; the town was more or less deserted, except for two brewers working the night shift. We parked on a lot next to the river, a bad stone’s throw from the brewery shop and restaurant. The next morning, we woke up to a thunderous noise outside. “NORWEGIAN! NORWEGIAN! Any Norwegians here? Time GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


travel to get up!” That shouting voice belonged to Chris Bauweraerts, the founder of the Achouffe brewery. He was there to show us around. We saw the facilities, the bottling plant, and of course tasted our way through the entire selection. Chris invited us to lunch at the only open restaurant. There we were joined by Eric Pigneret, a burgundy winemaker. We were offered to visit his vineyard; a visit we might have to do on our way back up from the Mediterranean before heading eastwards. Next to us two couples were seated. They knew Chris, and so we were also introduced. That lunch turned out to be a long one. We joined them for a few glasses of even more Achouffe, and as evening approached it was shortly time for dinner. They invited us to join them at their rented cottage for a traditional Belgian style meal. That was simply an offer we couldn’t and wouldn’t refuse. But first, we needed to freshen up. Into the freezing cold river it was. A quick scrub and the two travellers were ready for an evening of Belgian hospitality and a visit to the frites shop. It was a fantastic night! … Then it was that terrible night. Stranded in an unfamiliar location, with only a few centimeters of a badly upkept plastic-aluminum hybrid separating us from whatever was going on outside. Another jolt shook the car. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Then quiet. Quiet. Minutes passed. Still quiet. The police were called, and it turned out someone had broken the back window, trying to get into the car. We know that this won’t be the last time of episodes such as this. Fortunately, wherever we go we meet mostly generous, helpful and kind people that guide us on our journey. Like the painter Benjamin Carbonne in Montpellier, with whom we shared coffee and a long conversation of everything from art to happiness to life. Or the French truck driver going back to his truck and writing down directions for us. Or the Fredrikstad native, now working in Luxembourg City, who recognized Murphy and stopped by for a chat and some advice.

These are the moments we are after. All of them. The good, the bad, and yes, the ugly. We want to experience and share our experiences with others. We have a long journey ahead, and we will spend the time here in the Gibraltar area planning, hopefully finding some income, some sponsors, and also learning. For however long and hard the road may be, we will reach Cape Horn. When we have nothing else, we have determination, our feet and the ability to put a smile on our faces. Much like the two of us in Murphy, on this planet, we’re all in it together. Snorri and Harald can be followed on their website www.snorriogharald.com.

E facebook.com/SnorriHarald Q SnorriogHarald P & 0SnorriHarald 67


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travel

STRIPPING BACK DOWN UNDER

Valentine’s Day is a prime example of a day dedicated to celebrating romance and showing appreciation for our loved ones by showering them with gifts. Many take this opportunity to escape on a romantic getaway, usually taking the form of an all-inclusive hotel with pool and spa. However, imagine trading such luxury and comfort for a rough, low-budget trip. Such an idea may seem preposterous and completely unfitting for such an occasion… or perhaps, it is exactly the kind of trip you should be choosing.

BY GIANELLA BALDACHINO

T

he idea of a couples retreat typically implies time to relax, be spoilt, and spend time with your partner. Businesses will take advantage of such an opportunity by offering hotel deals and discounts to entice many to buy as a gift for their significant other. Admittedly, there is a great attraction towards this illusion of being able to fully unwind in a 5* hotel, but the likelihood is you will be in a building surrounded by many other people. If an overly crowded environment does not appeal to you, your option for more priGIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

vacy is going to cost significantly more. In reality, your romantic getaway for two may be shared amongst a sea of fellow couples who had the same initial idea as you once did. We are sold the idea and made to believe that this is the kind of scenery to provide a blissful way to enjoy a romantic retreat. However, the charm behind its appeal is solely

based upon a materialistic, commercialised façade. I won’t deny it would be enjoyable, and if it appeals to you it will certainly be worth your money. However, alternative and less popular options, and therefore cheaper ones, can also provide an idyllic getaway.

Alternative and less popular options, and therefore cheaper ones, can also provide an idyllic getaway.

We live in a commercialised world, not always appreciating 69


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ourselves, and therefore with one another. My experience comes from travelling the West Coast of Australia with a friend. Although this was not on a romantic level, the lessons learned and better understanding for another person is easily relatable to any couple seeking an escape for some quality time together. Going back to basics could allow you to bond on a far deeper level than on a highcost retreat.

Going back to basics could allow you to bond on a far deeper level than on a highcost retreat.

what our planet truly has to offer us. Instead, we surround ourselves with excessive amounts of unnecessary possessions and products we feel we cannot live without, which often affects how we treat one another. There seems to be a certain expectation for how we are to prove our devotion to another person: by spending money on them with expensive gifts. I have learned that connecting back to a natural setting can help us to connect better with 70

Opting for a getaway that involves nothing more than you, your partner, a fully equipped car, camping gear and a road trip itinerary may not have the same blissful appeal as a hotel, but is one that will leave you feeling refreshed. Choosing to ‘freedom camp’ (camping in nature without external facilities) can often be far more valuable than choosing caravan parks, as you will get to experience nature in its wildest form. Unlike a hotel where every-

thing is provided, you have to be fully self-contained, carrying all your belongings, food and water wherever you drive to and decide to camp for the night. Camp must be set up every night and packed away every morning, and the sleeping arrangement will consist of a thin mattress in your tent. There are no chefs to serve wonderful meals at any given request; instead you will have to cook for each other outside on a portable stove. This may sound like hard work rather than a holiday, so why choose it? Ultimately, it will enrich you both on a greater level as all the materialistic distractions have been eliminated. The beauty of camping may not be for everyone, but it is certainly an experience I encourage you to try. The main reason for choosing a minimalistic, camping road trip will be the personal growth you both gain. Stripping your environment back to a natural format and travelling via a remote route will automatically force you to work as a unified team, where you must ensure appropriate planning and carry sufficient quantities of supplies. Spending 24/7 with anyone is enough to put any relaGIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


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tionship to the test. This teaches us so much about each other’s quirks as you begin to develop a true appreciation for who they are as a person. However, being in the presence of each other’s company for such long periods of time will undoubtedly bring arguments and irritations, but despite some unpleasant moments, you realise you would not have undertaken this trip with anyone else. Despite its roughness, the experience can still be one that is romantic. For example, as light pollution is non-existent, the stars light up the entire night sky; a scene that would never be visible within a city. There is something extremely peaceful about watching the stars illuminate and shoot across the sky.

tourists, these isolated beaches meant we only had to share with the local wildlife! The stunning gorges of Karijini National Park rewarded us with breathtaking views and vibrant colours. Snorkelling the Ningaloo Reef was extraordinary as we came so close to marine life by simply swimming a few metres out to sea; and all this could be experienced for free. If you have some extra money, spend it on a oncein-a-lifetime experience. Booking a snorkelling tour with Ningaloo Reef Dive & Snorkel® in Coral Bay or Ningaloo Whaleshark Swim® in Exmouth was a highlight. These eco-friendly tours ensure high animal welfare, with as little interference as possible, and allow you to swim alongside manta rays, whale sharks, humpback whales, turtles, sharks and other marine life. It is an unforgettable

There are no chefs; instead you will have to cook for each other outside on a portable stove.

Romantic experiences can be achieved on a low budget. Travelling down the West Coast of Australia we saw white sand beaches with the clearest turquoise waters. As opposed to the popular spots which are sold to GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

experience that justifies its cost, as opposed to spending money on an easily forgotten bed in an expensive hotel. A romantic getaway doesn’t necessarily mean spending a chunk. Spending less on materialistic items and being exposed to nature essentially makes us richer in each other’s company. A natural setting brings us back to our rawest forms, providing the opportunity to connect on a much deeper level - and what could be more romantic than that?

Stripping your environment back will automatically force you to work as a unified team.

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SPRING BAG TRENDS

Spring is soon approaching at long last, and although we may still have to wait a couple more months before we can start sporting the styles that the impending new season has to offer us, there’s one item that we can begin incorporating into our wardrobes with immediate effect: handbags.

BY JULIA COELHO

B

ags are ideal for impatient types, as they can be purchased all year round without too much consideration as to the season or occasion. Stocking up on a couple of new handbags is the perfect way to kick off a new-season refresh, and you’ll be pleased to know that the top 2019 trends have already hit the shelves. As a dedicated high-street shopper myself, I find that my

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

most-frequented shops never ever fall short in the bag department. Firm favourites such as Topshop, Mango and Zara continuously lead the way with timeless, clean designs in gorgeous tones that are mostly free of any branding or unrealistic prints, accentuated with lovely eye-catching details. Although often not the cheapest of my purchases. it must be said, many high-street shops

offer high-quality and versatile pieces that look a great deal more luxurious than their price tags may reveal. This season’s styles feel somewhat retro, with plenty of 90s throwback structured silhouettes, faux croc, and tortoiseshell tones dominating most bag collections. With all that in mind, check out seven of the key bag trends you can expect to see on the shelves this year: 73


fashion LEATHER CROSSBODY BAG WITH CHAIN DETAIL ZARA, £89.99

DEMI CROC SHOULDER BAG TOPSHOP, £25.00

FAUX CROC PRINT Are we sick of animal print by print yet? Either way, you’ll be pleased or dismayed to know that it’s not going anywhere just yet. Trends can often feel like flash moments that barge into our lives at full steam ahead, and fizzle out just as rapidly. But every once in a while, a trend with real staying power comes along, and proves its longevity season after season. This year, we’re taking things up a notch with faux crocodile print styles, which tend to look luxurious and expensive, and have the ability to make any outfit look more elegant and put together.

I’ve been loving equestrian styles in general over the past month; fitted checked blazers paired with polo necks and boots, complete with my faux leather saddle bag. This classic shape consists of a rounded bottom with a top flap, usually worn as a shoulder or cross-body bag. Essentially, it’s the ideal everyday bag; minimal and stylish, and perfectly appropriate for work and postwork drinks, often adorned with eye-catching hardware to further elevate its level of chic. 74

CROC-EFFECT TOTE BAG MANGO, £35.99

SADDLE BAGS

This year, we’re taking things up a notch with faux crocodile print styles

ACCESSORIZE – TESSA GREY LOCK CROSS BODY SADDLE BAG ASOS, £27.00

RIVER ISLAND – GRAB HANDLE BAG WITH SNAKE POUCH IN CLEAR ASOS, £30.00

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


fashion

METAL CHAIN MESH CROSSBODY BAG ZARA, £69.99

PLASTIC FRAME BAG WITH CONTRAST REMOVABLE INNER POUCH ASOS, £32.00

MESH/CHAIN & TRANSPARENT

You don’t have to break the bank dipping into fun novelty trends that you’re unlikely to return to next year.

One of the key advantages about high-street price points is that you don’t have to break the bank dipping into fun novelty trends that you’re unlikely to return to next year. Mesh and chain styles have definitely caught my eye this year for their unique and fun look, as well as their ability to jazz up any look with ease.

PIECES BUCKET BAG ZARA, £29.99

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Transparent styles burst onto the scene a few seasons back, and while they’re completely impractical and counterintuitive due to obvious reasons, this season they’re back, this time with a nifty design update for those of you who aren’t too open to the idea of exposing your everyday possessions. 75


fashion

ESSENTIEL ANTWERP FAUX FUR PANEL SHOULDER BAG ASOS, £125.00

METHACRYLATE BAG MANGO, £89.99

TINT TORTOISESHELLS CLIP FRAME BAG TOPSHOP, £25.00

TORTOISESHELL Once a popular 90s style, tortoiseshell bags have been thrown back into the mix this year, and I think they’ll be an aesthetic many of us will get on board with. They were peppered all over the runway last season, and as expected, many high-street shops have already tried to capitalise on the hype. The trend has since exploded in different directions, and the likes of Topshop and Zara have some gorgeous styles on offer. They’re perfectly adaptable, and look great with just about any outfit, not to mention the possibility of coordinating with a pair of tortoiseshell sunnies. 76

Once a popular 90s style, tortoiseshell bags have been thrown back into the mix this year. TEDDY FAUX FUR BUCKET BAG TOPSHOP, £25.00

SOFT BACKPACK ZARA, £19.99

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


fashion OLA ROUND STRAW BAG MISSY EMPIRE, £33.00

BRIGHT FAUX FUR If, like me, you had already long embraced the furry bag trend, then you’ll be pleased to hear that they’re still going to be bang on trend throughout 2019. The high-street is offering a huge selection of fun colours and styles to play with, all of which are sure to inject some life and oomph into your wardrobe. ASOS DESIGN – BAMBOO SQUARE BOXY CLUTCH BAG ASOS, £35.00

MI-PAC – NYLON FOLD TOP BACKPACK IN ROSE PINK ASOS, £29.99

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

The backpack trend has emerged in full force over the past few seasons, and while we’ve been seeing a steady influx of more expensive brands such as Fjallraven and Herschel Supply Co, there are a huge number of equally practical yet stylish options available on the high-street for even more affordable prices. JANNA ROUND STRAW BAG MISSY EMPIRE, £32.00

There’s been a renewed interest in bags made from natural textures like bamboo and straw.

BACKPACKS

NATURAL TEXTURES Initially kicking off last summer, with the hugely popular woven basket bags we saw on practically every other arm, once again there’s been a renewed interest in bags made from natural textures like bamboo and straw. Perfectly beachy and appropriate especially in our part of the world, these styles are the perfect accessory to a simplistic outfit. I’m definitely planning on getting my hands on a couple of these this spring! 77


wine

YOUR CHABLIS OR MINE?

Looking for Love: Fish seeks white wine with character for serious pairing.

BY ANDREW LICUDI DipWSET

R

omans also celebrated St Valentine’s. Then, Rome was awash with temples, gods, goddesses, magicians, soothsayers and fortune tellers - perhaps incomprehensible to our modern sensibilities, but essential to Roman citizens as they tried to make sense of the universe. Festivals abounded including the pagan fertility ritual of Lupercalia, eventually sanitised to fit in with Christian values and today known as 'St Valentine’s Day'. The original festival involved sacrifices at the temples, after which drunken, semi-naked youths 78

ran a predetermined route. Young, married women were encouraged to expose themselves and were playfully flogged in front of their husbands by the youths using strips of goat hides. Grave inscriptions indicate that fertility, inexorably linked with happiness, was a huge issue in the mind of ordinary Romans, and this ritual was considered highly beneficial. Flowers, cards and pink champagne were still a long way off. We may no longer obsess about fertility, but it seems that happiness, that other Roman preoccupa-

tion, is now considered important enough that the United Nations compile annual league tables of happiness around the world. According to the UN, Norway is the happiest place on earth whilst poor, war-torn Burundi is the unhappiest. Shamefully, Gibraltar is not mentioned so you will need to decide how happy we are yourself. If it helps, the United Kingdom comes in at 19th place immediately after the US, both being considerably happier than Spain which comes in 36th place - two places below Saudi Arabia. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


wine Seemingly, from UN reports, people’s perception of their politicians significantly affects how happy they feel, so whether this year’s league table will suffer some re-arrangement after last year’s Brexit squabbles, Trump sagas, or the miscalculated demise of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi remains to be seen. If it does, Spain, Catalonia permitting of course, could very well inch up the league tables as the US, the UK, and Saudi Arabia lose ground. As a final observation I can’t help feeling that that both Gibraltar and Spain would be considerably happier if neither had ever heard of the other. I love Norway, which now celebrates St. Valentine’s in pretty much the same way as we do: with cards, flowers and chocolates. We keep going back there as we like their stunning country, the people, and breakfast, which always includes an array of pickled herring in all sorts of marinades from mustard and dill to cream and chives. Lunch is identical to breakfast with the addition of soup which must contribute to the general happiness of Norwegians who don’t have to worry what to serve for lunch. I have always been fascinated with why they should be happier than anyone else, particularly since they don’t look happier than anyone else. Norwegians, proud they are self-sufficient in clean energy with their extensive renewable sources, have recently taken to buying super-expensive electric Teslas with great gusto. Teslas are everywhere, undoubtedly boosting their

felicity, aware their driving does not contribute to the world’s rising temperatures. However, the more thoughtful amongst them may well reflect that their wealth, and hence their ability to make £100k+ Teslas run-of-the-mill, comes from selling their vast deposits of oil and gas for others to burn, arguably making Norway a significant enabler of global warming - and that should make anybody miserable.

You could pair it with Champagne, which will do admirably. Alternatively, try a good Chablis.

Norway’s other less awkward export is smoked salmon. Once the preserve of the rich, it is now (like Teslas in Bergen) affordable and seen everywhere. Considered an aphrodisiac due to its mood-enhancing serotonin levels, it's probably something to be considered by all those lovers in February who don’t have immediate access to half-naked youths wielding strips of goat hide.

...something to be considered by lovers who don’t have immediate access to half-naked youths wielding strips of goat hide.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

was associated in the minds of many consumers with non-descript, basic white wines is now a protected name. Wine labelled as Chablis can now only be made from 100% Chardonnay. It can only be made in Burgundy and then only in the northernmost part of the region, unsurprisingly, known as Chablis. Its bone-dry, never sweet and never sparkling with a lovely streak of acidity. It is of course always white.

Smoked salmon is one of those rare foods which actively improves those fine, austere, dry white wines. Perhaps it’s the fattiness in the salmon merging beautifully with the wine’s acidity, or simply the wine and saltiness of the fish marrying seamlessly - much like olives and fino sherry. If you decide to go with smoked salmon and boost your amorous endeavours, you could pair it with Champagne, which will do admirably. Alternatively, try a good Chablis. Chablis, a name which in the past

“The wand chooses the wizard, Mr Potter,” according to JK Rowling. She could equally have said “The climate chooses the wine” and she would have been right – a fact that thousands of wine makers around the globe ignore trying to make Chablis-like copies, inevitably turning out poor examples of Chablis’ uniquely dry, age-worthy, flinty wines. Climate is why Cava will never challenge Champagne, whilst the South of England might. It’s why there are few note-worthy white wines in Spain or why so many Australian and Californian wines are doomed never to achieve that magical, understated pure elegance which vines, struggling in the frost-prone vineyards of Chablis, seem to possess in abundance. Of course, climate both giveth and taketh and spring frosts regularly wreak havoc with the harvest in Chablis. Growers, when frosts threaten, light hundreds paraffin heaters known as smudge pots confusing many a traveller as they drive by on dark nights. The war with the weather never stops in Chablis. The French would vehemently argue that it’s not just about climate 79


wine CHABLIS, FRANCE

which they, so adeptly, describe “gout de pierre à fusil” (gun- flint). Chablis, to me, smells of those shiny limestone pebbles found on Eastern Beach after they have been warmed by the sun. Perhaps they also taste like it.

but about soil as well. Chablis has two types of soil: Kimmeridgean, composed of fossilised oyster shells and producing the wines with greatest finesse, and Portlandian, considered inferior and responsible for the cheaper wines known as Petit Chablis. The Chablisienne have no doubt the oyster shells are responsible for the flintiness in their wines 80

Like the rest of Burgundy, Chablis’ vineyards are classified into several categories. At the top of the trees are seven vineyards the Grand Cru Vineyards, next come a multitude of Premier Cru vineyards and after that wine which is simply sold as ‘Chablis’ with no designation – able to be made anywhere in the Chablis region. At the very bottom is Petit Chablis.

Blanchot, Valmur, Grenouilles and Les Clos. At their best they share the complexity of the rest of Burgundy if not their opulence. However, they possess a unique minerality which sets them apart - often at half the price. The most revered producer in Chablis is probably Domaine Raveneau whose prices unfortunately are very high. Other Grand Cru producer’s wines are more accessible and comparable to the price of a good Champagne.

Chablis smells of those shiny limestone pebbles found on Eastern Beach after they have been warmed by the sun.

The Grand Cru vineyards are Bougros, Les Preuses, Vaudésir,

The Premier Crus do provide good value for money with name like L’Homme Mort, Vaillons and Mont-de-Milieu. Here good wines can be had for less than £20 with many available locally. Happy St Valentine’s.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


+ 350 20 067469 | info@ifai.gi | w w w.ifai.gi


recipes Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/thegibraltarvegan

TAKE A PIZZA MY HEART

Valentine’s Day: a day of cards, poems, romance, busy florists and chocolatiers, flustered men and women in potentially-uncomfortable-but-drop-dead-gorgeous lingerie… and pizza.

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recipes As the preparation of the pizza base takes around 2.5 hours, if you are stuck for time you can buy a pizza base and cut it into the shape of a heart.

floured so that it doesn’t stick to the counter. Once you have the base at the desired depth cut in into the shape of a heart. Pop your base into the freezer first to let it harden a little if you are finding cutting the shape difficult.

PIZZA BASE INGREDIENTS 250g strong white flour 130ml water

8. Repeat step 8 for the other half of the dough.

1.5g rapid rise yeast

PIZZA TOPPINGS

½ tsp salt

INGREDIENTS

(This makes two medium-sized pizzas.)

12 tbsp passata

METHOD

1 handful fresh basil

1. Preheat the oven to 200°C.

½ red onion

INGREDIENTS

2tbsp pine nuts

255g dark chocolate (70% or higher)

2. Place the flour, yeast and salt into a bowl and mix well. 3. Make a hole in the flour and gently add the water, using your fingers work the mixture until it is all blended. 4. Place the dough on a wellfloured countertop or table and knead for 10-15 mins. (Perhaps YouTube how to do this if you are unsure.)

2 sundried tomatoes

2 cubes defrosted frozen spinach ½ yellow pepper diced 8 cup mushrooms

Deliciously decadent, suprisingly simple.

7 tbsp coconut milk (well-shaken) ½ tsp vanilla extract

1tbsp vegan parmesan cheese (recipe on my Instagram page)

¼ cup unsweetened cocoa or cacao powder OR finely chopped hazelnuts

METHOD

METHOD

1.

Finely chop chocolate and place in a bowl.

Place the passata, sundried tomatoes and fresh basil in the blender and blend.

5. Grease inside a bowl and place the dough in it. Cover with cling film and leave it to prove (rise) for 1.5 hours.

2. Scoop the now blended tomato sauce onto the pizza and spread evenly.

6. Take it out of the bowl, knead it again and let it prove for a further 30 mins.

3. Place all the other ingredients on top and sprinkle some vegan parmesan cheese.

7. Divide the dough into two. Flour your countertop and start to roll out the dough until it is nice and thin. Keep it well-

4. Transfer your pizza onto a pizza cooking tray (or pizza stone) and cook for 10-12 minutes. (Keep an eye on it!)

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

TWOINGREDIENT TRUFFLES

Heat coconut milk and add to chocolate. Cover bowl for 5 mins. Uncover and gently mix. Add vanilla, stir. Chill in fridge for minimum 3 hours. Scoop out, and then roll into balls using hands. Roll in cocoa/cacao powder/ hazelnuts to finish. © MINIMALISTBAKER.COM

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restaurants, bars & pubs THE LOUNGE

SOLO BAR & GRILL

ALL’S WELL

Stylish Lounge Gastro Bar on Queensway Quay Marina serving best quality food prepared by passionate, qualified chefs. Popular quiz on Sundays from 7pm and a relaxed friendly atmosphere. A separate Lounge Bar Area serving a wide range of hot drinks, wines, beers, spirits and cocktails at reasonable prices, with large TV’s for sports and events coverage.

Solo Bar and Grill is a stylish and modern eatery — perfect for business functions or lunches — and part of the popular Cafe Solo stable. Serving everything from Goats’ Cheese Salad, Mediterranean Pâté and Cajun Langoustines to Beer Battered John Dory, or Harissa Chicken, and Chargrilled Sirloin Steak. This is a delightful venue in Europort with a cosy mezzanine level and terrace seating. Well worth a visit, or two! Available for private functions and corporate events — call 200 62828 to book your function or event.

In the fashionable Casemates square stands Gibraltar’s last historical themed pub, named for the 18th-century practice of locking gates to the city at night when the guard called ‘All’s Well’. Their food menu caters to all cravings; whether it’s fish and chips, a homemade pie, or maybe even a delicious sharing platter, they have it all. All’s Well have an amazing range of bottled beers as well as being the only pub in Gibraltar to offer craft beer on tap. Happy hour is daily from 7-9pm. Large terrace. Karaoke Mondays & Wednesdays until late.

Open: 10am-late Mon - Sun Be sure to arrive early to ensure a seat! The Lounge, 17 Ragged Staff Wharf, Queensway Quay Marina Tel: 200 61118 info@thelounge.gi

Open: 12-8pm. Solo Bar & Grill, Eurotowers Tel: 200 62828

All’s Well, Casemates Square. Tel: 200 72987

CASA PEPE

NUNOS ITALIAN

CAFÉ SOLO

A delightful terrace, bar, restaurant on the prestigious Queensway Quay Marina. Wonderful location for business meetings, weddings, anniversaries and other special occasions. Specialising in fresh fish caught locally with daily specials including seabass, dorada, sole, and bream, plus a very comprehensive a la carte menu. Also available are tapas and raciones (double size tapas) to share (or not!) prior to a main course. Mixed paellas also available, as well as fish cooked in rock salt, whole suckling pig and baby lamb to order.

Nunos Italian Restaurant, overlooking the Mediterranean, is popular with hotel guests, tourists and local residents. This 2 rosette rated, AA restaurant is renowned for its eclectic interior, intimate atmosphere and fine cuisine. Savour a wide selection of freshly prepared Italian delicacies, including bread, pasta, meat and fish, followed by delicious desserts. In the summer months, the hotel offers alfresco dining for private parties in the Garden Grill. Sitting nestled in the colonial garden you can enjoy a mouth-watering menu of charcoal-grilled meats and freshly prepared salads in candlelit surroundings.

Modern Italian eatery set in lively Casemates square. Everything from chicory and crispy pancetta salad with walnuts, pears and blue cheese dressing, or king prawn, mozzarella and mango salad to pastas (eg: linguine with serrano ham, king prawns and rocket; smoked salmon and crayfish ravioli with saffron and spinach cream) to salads (eg: Vesuvio spicy beef, cherry tomatoes, roasted peppers and red onions; and Romana chorizo, black pudding, egg and pancetta) and pizzas (eg: Quatto Stagioni topped with mozzarella, ham, chicken, pepperoni and mushroom) and specialities such as salmon fishcakes, beef medallions and duck. Daily specials on blackboard. No smoking.

Open: Tues-Sat lunch & evening, Sunday lunch only, closed Mondays. Casa Pepe, 18 Queensway Quay Marina, Tel/Fax: 200 46967 casa.pepe.gib@gmail.com. www.casapepegib.com

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Open: Mon-Sun 1-3pm lunch, 7–11pm dinner Nunos Italian Restaurant and Terrace Caleta Hotel, Catalan Bay Tel: 200 76501

Email: reservations@caletahotel.gi

Café Solo Grand Casemates Square. Tel: 200 44449

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information EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY: ALL EMERGENCIES................................. 112 FIRE...............................................................190 AMBULANCE.............................................190 POLICE.................................................................199

Business Information Financial Serv. Commission Tel: 200 40283/4 Chamber of Commerce Tel: 200 78376 Federation Small Business Tel: 200 47722 Company Registry.Tel: 200 78193 Useful Numbers Airport (general info.) . Tel: 200 12345 Hospital, St Bernards. . Tel: 200 79700 Weather information. . Tel: 5-3416 Frontier Queue Update Tel: 200 42777 Gibraltar Museum Tel: 200 74289 18/20 Bomb House Lane 10am-6pm (Sat 10am-2pm). Admission: Adults £2/Children under 12 - £1. Exhibitions also at Casemates gallery.

Police 200 72500

Gibraltar Services Police Emergency Nos: (5) 5026 / (5) 3598

Gibraltar Garrison Library Tel: 200 77418 2 Library Ramp Mon-Fri: 9am-5pm. Free Library tour offered every Friday at 11am. chris.tavares@gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi

Gibraltar Public Holidays 2018

Registry Office Tel: 200 72289 It’s possible to get married within 48 hours. A fact taken advantage of by stars such as Sean Connery & John Lennon.

Good Friday

Friday 30 th Mar

Easter Monday

Monday 2nd Apr

New Year’s Day Commonwealth Day

Monday 1st Jan Monday 12th Mar

Workers Memorial Day Monday 30th Apr May Day

Tuesday 1st May

Rock Tours by Taxi Tel: 200 70052 As well as offering normal fares, taxis provide Rock Tours taking in the Upper Rock, Europa Point etc.

Spring Bank Holiday

Monday 28 th May

Queen’s Birthday

Monday 11th June

John Mackintosh Hall Tel: 200 75669 Includes cafeteria, theatre, exhibition rooms and library. 308 Main Street 9.30am - 11pm Mon-Fri.

Late Summer Bank Holiday

Monday 27th Aug

Gibraltar National Day Monday 10 th Sept Christmas Day Boxing Day

Tuesday 25th Dec Wednesday 26 th Dec

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD Gibraltar adhdgibraltar@gmail.com facebook.com/ADHDGibraltar/ Alcoholics Anonymous meet 7pm Tues & Thurs at Nazareth House Tel: 200 73774.

COPE Support group for people with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia or Rheumatoid Arthritis. Meetings at Catholic Community Centre Book Shop at 7.30pm first Thur of each month. Tel: 200 51469 Email: copeadsupport@hotmail.com

A Step Forward support for single, separated, divorced/widowed people, meet 8pm Mon at St Andrew’s Church.

Dignity At Work Now Confidential support and advice for those who are being bullied at work. Tel: 57799000.

Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group those who are pregnant, breastfeeding or have breastfed to get together for coffee / support. Partners and older children welcome. Meets 1st Wed / month at Chilton Court Community Hall at 1.30pm. Enquiries and support 54014517.

Families Anonymous Support group for relatives and friends concerned about the use of drugs or related behavioural problems. Meet weekly on Thurs at 9pm at Gladys Perez Centre, 304A Main Street, Tel: 54007676 or 54014484.

Childline Gibraltar confidential phone line for children in need. Freephone 8008 - 7 days a week 5pm - 9pm Citizens’ Advice Bureau Open Mon-Thur 9:30am-4:00pm, Fri 9:30am- 3:30pm. Tel: 200 40006 Email: info@cab.gi or visit at 10 Governor’s Lane. Free & confidential, impartial & independent advice and info.

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Gibraltar Cardiac Rehabilitation and Support Group meets on the first Tues of every month at 8.30pm at John Mac Hall, except for Jul & Aug. Gibraltar Dyslexia Support Group 72 Prince Edwards Rd Tel: 200 78509 Mobile: 54007924 website: www.gdsg.co.uk Gibraltar Marriage Care Free relationship counselling, including pre-marriage education (under auspices of Catholic Church, but open to all). Tel: 200 71717.

Gibraltar Society for the Visually Impaired Tel: 200 50111 (24hr answering service). Hope miscarriage support Tel: 200 41817. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support: Meets every Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous Tel: 200 70720 Parental Support Group helping parents and grandparents with restrictive access to their children and grandchildren. Tel: 200 46536, 200 76618, or 54019602. Psychological Support Group, PO Box 161, Nazareth House. Meet Tuesdays at 7pm, Fridays 8pm. Tel: Yolanda 54015553 With Dignity Gibraltar support for separated, divorced/widowed or single people. Meet Weds 9pm, Catholic Community Centre, Line Wall Rd. Outings/activities. Women in Need Voluntary organisation for all victims of domestic violence. Refuge available. Tel: 200 42581 (24 hrs).

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

The Gibraltar Magazine is published and produced by Rock Publishing Ltd, Gibraltar. Tel: (+350) 200 77748

NON-URGENT CALLS: Ambulance Station 200 75728


BY DANIEL GHIO

TAKEN A GREAT PHOTO OF GIB AND THINK EVERYONE SHOULD SEE IT? Email your high resolution photo to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com and you might see it published here!


ZEALOUS ZEUS’ MANIFESTO Valentine’s day cards will go... if the Codswallop Coalition sweeps Zeus to power at No 6.

BY PETER SCHIRMER ‘

W

hatcha doin’, Pops?’ Hermes, on four days of extra leave from the Post Office in compensation for having worked on the morning of Boxing Day, had joined the Father of the Gods on the spacious penthouse patio overlooking Marina Bay. He had planned to spend the morning catching some sun at Catalan Bay – empty of beachgoers at this time of the year - but had been defeated by the heavy February clouds with their hint of drizzle to come. Zeus removed the cheap biro from the corner of his mouth where, while he pondered what next to write, it had drooped like a Western gunslinger’s cheap cheroot, and gestured with it at the pad of lined foolscap on the glass-topped coffee table at the side of his lounger. ‘I’m making a list of all the things I’m going to include in my manifesto,’ he said in the serious voice of

88

more than usual gravitas, which in millennia gone by had announced the most powerful Olympian decisions. Hermes raised a quizzical eyebrow: ‘Manifesto?’ ‘Yes. There’s a general election due this year, and I expect No 6 to dissolve Parliament towards the end of autumn. So, I need to start preparing my campaign,’ said Zeus firmly, jabbing the chewed ballpoint against the glass to emphasise each word. ‘Hebe is going off to the Department of Culture tomorrow to reserve the Mackintosh Hall and Ince’s Theatre for every Thursday night in October and November. Dionysus has put me up for membership of the Calpe Club, and Poseidon is wangling me into the Fishing Association. That’ll take the wind out of Picardo’s and Azopardi’s sails.’ ‘Aren’t you being a little precious?’ Hera put down her knitting and

poked her head through the open sliding doors. ‘No 6 has become a bit like this Brexit flummery in Britain and Brussels – totally unpredictable. One thing one minute, something else the next. You might find that the present incumbent postpones an election – just like May kept putting off her ‘meaningful vote’. ‘All the more reason for me to take a stand, impose a firm line, guide the Rock’s financial and gaming sectors into the new uncharted seas of this ephemeral state which they call “Cyber-land” or something’, Zeus rose to his feet and gestured with his right hand outstretched as he had seen Socrates do in moments of high oratory. ‘After all, if you look seriously at all the uncertainties of Cyberspace and crypto-currencies it’s very much like our old world in the early days of Olympus. And we’re certainly the only occupants of the planet who have experienced, and come through, such a muddled GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


satire melange of codswallop.’ ‘Yes. Codswallop.’ He repeated the word which he had discovered while thumbing through the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations as he searched for stirring phrases to include in his manifesto. He like the word, and would work it into his slogan... perhaps even name his party for it. “The Codswallop Coalition” sounded good.

see where it’s got them – super-power status.’ Triumphantly. ‘And in Gibraltar’s financial services sector some of the top players and top tax-payers are foreigners – Germans, Swiss, Frenchmen, even Scandinavians – who pay high rates of personal tax. I estimate there are about a thousand, and should they refuse to pay tax, or threaten to leave unless they enfranchised, the Government will have to give in. It can afford to lose neither their tax revenue, nor their skills. I shall muster them to act. And I’m confident they can become my power base...’

‘No 6 has become a bit like this Brexit flummery in Britain and Brussels – totally unpredictable.’

‘But you won’t be able to stand for Parliament, let alone be elected.’ Artemis had joined her mother in the doorway. ‘You’re not on the voters’ roll... and, as you’re a foreigner, they won’t allow you to vote. You have to be Gibraltarian or English.’ ‘I’ve thought of that,’ he grunted smugly as only an ancient Olympian can grunt. He turned over one of the foolscap pages and held it up for his wife and daughter to see. Scrawled in large capital letters the words “PAUL REVERE”. ‘Ha! I’ve thought of that,’ said Zeus smugly The pair in the doorway peered closely at the letters, exchanged blank looks, and waited for Zeus to explain... if explanation there was. ‘American Revolution?’ the father of the Gods prodded. And when neither showed any sign of understanding, continued; ‘No taxation without representation – that’s a slogan that summarised a primary grievance of the American colonists in the Thirteen Colonies, which was one of the major causes of the American Revolution. And GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

Hermes lost interest in the newborn politico’s address to his two improbable constituents. He scanned the proposed list of manifesto undertakings. There were scrawled words which made little sense – either singly or read in conjunction with each other.

smoking at all – whether in or out of uniforms? Either way it’s unhealthy,’ the ever-wise Hera suggested. Zeus ignored her. ‘And I will put an end to the crass commercialisation of cards – get well, cards, birthday cards, Christmas cards, Valentine’s cards... they’re just unnecessary money-grubbing gimmicks.’ ‘Did I hear someone say “Valentine”? Aphrodite called from the kitchen where she had been drying her newest nail varnish over the electric toaster. ‘Pops is going to ban all sorts of fancy cards when he ousts Picardo in the election, and takes control at No 6,’ Artemis called. ‘Oust Picardo. He mustn’t do that,’ Aphrodite protested. ‘Fabian’s a dish... lose a bit of that middle-age spread and I could really fancy him.’

Valentine’s cards... they’re just unnecessary money-grubbing gimmicks.

“Cigarettes”...“uniform” … “cards” … “girls”. ‘What do these mean?’ Holding out the page, he interrupted Zeus’ flow. ‘Among the first thing I intend to do is to stop girls – and boys – smoking in the streets while wearing their school uniforms. It gives education a bad name.’ ‘Would it be better to stop them

‘You fancy anything in trousers,’ hissed Artemis - and the Olympian household headed back into the everyday. ‘Though, tell you what, let’s both send him a Valentine’s card... I doubt there’s ever many of those in the No 6 mailbox.’ ‘I‘m not surprised they clubbed him to death. Look at all the bother he has stirred. ‘It’s a nice, polite way of courtship,’ ventured Hera, waspish for once as she recalled her husband’s many infidelities and the disguises he used at times to achieve the current object of his lust. 89


Would you like to meet other people with a Hearing Loss? If you are deaf or hard of hearing, have Tinnitus or Meniere’s, life can be challenging and you may feel isolated.

The Hearing Loss Support Group includes people like you, who share information and friendly advice over coffee. Join us for a chat on the last Monday of every month from 5pm at the Atlantic Suites Coffee Shop.

NEXT MEETING: We are user led and support people who are deaf or hard of hearing, have Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) or Meniere’s (vertigo and a sudden drop in hearing).

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clubs & activities Arts & Crafts Cross Stitch Club: John Mackintosh Hall, 1st Floor, Mon 6-8pm, fee £1. Gibraltar Arts & Crafts Association: Children: Mon&Fri 12.30-2pm, Mon-Fri 3.45-5.15pm Adults: Wed 5.45-7.15, Sat 10.30 to 12.30, Tel: 20073865 email: gibartsandcrafts@hotmail.com Knit and Natter Group: Tues 11am-3pm, Thurs 5.30-7.30pm, at Arts & Crafts Shop, Casemates balcony. Free to join and refreshments provided. Tel: 20073865. The Arts Centre: Prince Edward’s Road, Art classes for children and adults. For more info call Tel: 200 79788. The Fine Arts Association Gallery: At Casemates. Open 10am-2pm, 3-6pm Mon-Fri, Sat 11am-1pm. The Gibraltar Decorative and Fine Arts Society: Affiliated to UK NADFAS meets third Wed of the month at 6.30pm at Eliott Hotel - lecturers & experts from the UK talk on Art etc. Contact: Chairman Claus Olesen 200 02024 claus.olesen@sghambros.com. Membership Ian Le Breton 200 76173 ilebreton@SovereignGroup.com Board Games Calpe Chess Club & Junior Club: meets in Studio 1, John Mackintosh Hall Thursday, Juniors: 5p.m. - 7 p.m. / Tuesday & Thursday 7p.m. - 10:30 The Gibraltar Scrabble Club: Meets on Tuesdays at 3pm. Tel: Vin 20073660 or Roy 20075995. All welcome. The Subbuteo Club: Meets in Charles Hunt Room, John Mackintosh Hall. Dance Adult Dance Classes: Wed evenings at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre from 7-8.30pm. Contact Dilip on 200 78714. Art in Movement Centre: Hip-hop/Break Dance, Contemporary Dance, Pilates, Capoeira, Acrobatics, Street Kids & Tods, Modern Dance. Performance and Film opportunities. Judo & Jujitsu Classes: Tue/ Thur with Sensei Conroy. All ages. Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. www. artinmovement.net FB: Art In Movement A.I.M, tel 54025041 or 54007457 Ballet, Modern Theatre, Contemporary & Hip-hop: weekly at Danza Academy. Training from 3 years to Adult Advanced. 68/2 Prince Edward’s Rd Tel: 54027111. Bellydance Classes, all levels, Tue 8-9pm at the Ocean Village Gym (non–members welcome). Contact 54005593. DSA Old & Modern Sequence Dancing: Sessions at Central Hall Fri 8.30pm, beginners 8pm. Tel: 200 78901 or tony@ gibraltar.gi Everybody welcome. Modern & Latin American Sequence Dancing: Mon at Catholic Community Centre 8pm. Tel. Andrew 200 78901. Modern, Contemporary, Lyrical, Flexibility, Hip Hop & Dance Theatre: Classes weekly at Urban Dance Studio, 2 Jumpers Bastion. Tel: Yalta 54012212 or Jolene 54015125. Rockkickers Linedance Club: Governor’s Meadow 1st School. www.rockkickers.com Salsa Gibraltar Salsa: Tues at Laguna Social Club, Laguna Estate. Beginners 7-8.30pm. Intermediates 8.30-10pm. Tel: Mike 54472000 or info@salsagibraltar.com Zumba Classes at Urban Dance: Jumpers Bastion, with certified instructor Tyron Walker. Tel: 20063959 or 54012212 or Twitter: @UrbanDanceGib History & Heritage The Gibraltar Heritage Trust: Main Guard, 13 John Mackintosh Sq. Tel: 200 42844. The Gibraltar Classic Vehicle Association: Dedicated to the preservation of Rock’s transport/motoring heritage. Assists members in restoration / maintenance of classic vehicles. New members welcome. Tel: 200 44643. Garrison Library Tours: at 11am on Fri, duration 1h 50mins. Tel: 20077418. History Alive: Historical re-enactment parade. Main Street up to Casemates Square every Sat at 12 noon. Music Gibraltar National Choir and Gibraltar Junior National Choir: Rehearses at the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Tel: 54831000. The Calpe Band: Mon & Wed. For musicians of brass/woodwind instruments of all standards/ages/abilities 7-9pm. Tel:

54017070 or thecalpeband@gmail.com Jazz Nights: Thurs at 9pm at O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel. Tel: 200 70500. Outdoor Activities The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award Gibraltar: Exciting self-development programme for young people worldwide equipping them with life skills to make a difference to themselves, their communities and the world. Contact: Award House, North Mole Road, PO Box: 1260. mjpizza@ gibtelecom.net, www.thedukes.gi. Social Clubs The Rotary Club of Gibraltar meets the Rock Hotel, 7pm Tuesday evenings. Guests welcome. For contact or info www.rotaryclubgibraltar.com Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes: (Gibraltar Province) meets RAOB Club, 72/9 Prince Edward’s Road - Provincial Grand Lodge, Thu/month, 7.30pm. William Tilley 2371, Thurs 8.30pm. Buena Vista 9975, monthly, Social Lodge. www.akearn1.wix. com/raob-gibraltar, william.tilley.lodge@ hotmail.co.uk, Clive, tel: 58008074 Special Interest Clubs & Societies Creative Writers Group: meets up on Tuesday mornings at 10.30 in O’Reilley’s Irish Bar and it is free to attend. Tel: Carla 54006696. Gibraltar Book Club: For info Tel: Parissa 54022808. Gibraltar Horticultural Society: meets 1st Thurs of month 6pm, J.M. Hall. Spring Flower Show, slide shows, flower arrangement demos, outings to garden centres, annual Alameda Gardens tour. All welcome. Gibraltar Philosophical Society: devoted to intellectually stimulating debate. Frequent lectures and seminars on a range of topics. Tel: 54008426 or Facebook: facebook.com/gibphilosophy Gibraltar Photographic Society: Meets on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. Wellington Front. Induction courses, talks, discussions, competitions etc. For details contact the secretary on, leslinares@gibtelecom.net Harley Davidson Owners’ Club: www.hdcgib.com Lions Club of Gibraltar: Meets 2nd and 4th Wed of the month at 50 Line Wall Road. www.lionsclubofgibraltar.com St John’s Ambulance: Adult Volunteers Training Sessions from 8-10pm on Tues. Tel: 200 77390 or training@stjohn.gi The Royal British Legion: For info or membership contact the Branch Secretary 20074604 or write to PO Box 332. UN Association of Gibraltar: PO Box 599, 22a Main Street. Tel: 200 52108. Sports Supporters Clubs Tottenham Hotspur Supporters Club: Meets at Star Bar, Parliament Lane, when Spurs games are televised - call prior to matches to check game is televised. Great food for a lunch if KO is early or an early supper if the game is later. Gibraltar Arsenal Supporters Club: Meets match days upstairs at Time Out Café, Eurotowers. Gooners of all ages welcome. For info/news visit www.GibGooners.com Tel: 54010681 (Bill) or 54164000 (John). Gibraltar Hammers: Meets on match days at the Victoria Stadium Bar, Bayside Road. All league games are shown live. All West Ham supporters and their families are welcome. For details visit www.gibraltarhammers.com or gibraltarhammers@hotmail.com Sports & Fitness Artistic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Artistic Gymnastics Association. Tel: Angela 200 70611 or Sally 200 74661. Athletics: Gibraltar Amateur Athletics Association holds competitions through year for juniors, adults and veterans. Two main clubs (Calpeans 200 71807, Lourdians 200 75180) training sessions at Victoria Stadium. Badminton: Recreational badminton weekdays at Victoria Stadium (Tel: 200 78409 for allocations). Gibraltar Badminton Association (affiliated to BWF& BE) junior club/tournaments, senior leagues/ recreational. www.badmintongibraltar.com Ballet Barre Fitness: Adults on Wed 10am & Fri 6pm at The Arts Centre. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Basketball: Gibraltar Amateur Basketball Association (affiliated FIBA) leagues/ training

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

for minis, passarelle, cadets, seniors and adults at a variety of levels. Tel: John 200 77253, Randy 200 40727. Boxing: Gibraltar Amateur Boxing Association (member IABA) gym on Rosia Rd. Over 13s welcome. Tuition with ex-pro boxer Ernest Victory. Tel: 56382000 or 20042788. Cheerleading: Gibraltar Cheerleading Association, girls and boys of all ages. Cheerleading and street cheer/hip-hop at Victoria Stadium. Recreational / competitive levels. Tel: 58008338. Canoeing: Gibraltar Canoeing Association. Tel: Nigel 200 52917 or Arturo 54025033. Cricket: Gibraltar Cricket, National Governing Body & Associate Member of ICC. Governs International & Domestic Men’s, Women’s, Boys’ & Girls’ cricket- league & cup competitions and in-school coaching. www.gibraltarcricket.com, info@gibcricket. com, Twitter: @Gibraltar_Crick Cycling: Gibraltar Cycling Association various cycling tours. Darts: Gibraltar Darts Association (full member of WDF & affiliate of BDO). We cater for men, ladies & youth who take part in leagues, competitions and a youth academy for the correct development of the sport. Tel: Darren 54027171 Secretary, Alex 54021672 Youth Rep, Justin 54022622 President. Email: info@ gibraltardarts.com Football: Gibraltar Football Association leagues/competitions for all ages OctoberMay. Futsal in summer, Victoria Stadium. Tel: 20042941 www.gibraltarfa.com Gaelic Football Club (Irish sport): Males any age welcome. Get fit, play sport, meet new friends, travel around Spain/Europe and play an exciting and competitive sport. Training every Wed on the MOD pitch on Devil’s Tower Road at 7pm. Andalucia League with Seville and Marbella to play matches home and away monthly. Visit www.gibraltargaels. com or secretary.gibraltar.europe@gaa.ie Hockey: Gibraltar Hockey Association (members FIH & EHF) high standard competitions/training for adults/juniors. Tel: Eric 200 74156 or Peter 200 72730 for info. Iaido: teaches the Japanese sword (Katana), classes every week. www.iaidogibraltar.com Ice Skating: Gibraltar Rock Stars Figure Skating Club lessons every Tuesday evening & Saturday morning, all levels including adults. Contact grsfsc@gmail.com or 58700000 Iwa Dojo, Kendo & Jujitsu: Classes every week, for kids/adults. Tel: 54529000 www. iwadojo.com or dbocarisa@iwadojo.com Judo and Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Budokai Judo Association UKMAF recognised instructors for all ages and levels at Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. Tel: Charlie 20043319. Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Ju-jitsu Academy training and grading for juniors/seniors held during the evening at 4 North Jumpers Bastion. Tel: 54011007. Karate-do Shotokai: Gibraltar Karate-do Shotokai Association - Karate training for junior & seniors at Clubhouse, Shotokai karate centre, 41H Town Range. Monday: 9:30 p.m. & Wednesday 9:45 p.m. Karate: Shotokan karate midday Mon beginners, other students 8.30pm. Thurs 8.30pm. In town at temporary dojo or privately by arrangement. Contact Frankie 54038127 or info@fhmedia.co.uk. Motorboat Racing: Gibraltar Motorboat Racing Association Tel: Wayne 200 75211. Muay Thai and Muay Boran Club: Tues & Thur at Boyd’s Kings Bastion Leisure Centre at 6:30pm, Tel: John – 54024707 FB: Gibraltar Muay Thai Netball: Gibraltar Netball Association (affiliated FENA & IFNA) competitions through year, senior/junior leagues. Tel: 20041874. Petanque: Gibraltar Petanque Association. New members welcome. Tel: 54002652. Pilates: Intermediate Pilates: Tues & Fri 9.30am, beginners Pilates: Fri 10.50am at the Shotokai Centre, 41H Town Range. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Gibraltar Pool Association: (Member of the EBA) home and away league played on Thurs throughout the season, various tournaments played on a yearly basis both nationally and internationally, Tel: 56925000 gibpool@ gibtelecom.net, www.gib8ball.com

Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Rhythmic Gymnastics Association runs sessions from 4 years of age, weekday evenings. Tel: 56000772 or Sally 200 74661. Rugby: Gibraltar Rugby caters for all ages from 4 years old to veterans (over 35’s). It organises competitions and sessions for Juniors; 4 x Senior Clubs; Veterans team; Touch Rugby and a Referees Society. Email admin@gibraltarrfu. com or visit www.gibraltarrfu.com Sailing: Gibraltar Yachting Association junior/ senior competitive programme (April - Oct) Tel: Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club at 200 78897. Shooting: Gibraltar Shooting Federation. Rifle, Europa Point Range (Stephanie 54020760); Clay pigeon, East Side (Harry 200 74354); Pistol, near Royal Naval Hospital (Louis 54095000). Snooker: Members of European Billiards & Snooker Association - facilities at Jumpers Bastion with 3 tables. Professional coaching for juniors/seniors. Organised leagues/ tournaments and participation in international competitions. Tel: 56262000 / 54000068, or info@gibraltarsnooker.com Squash: Gibraltar Squash Association, Squash Centre, South Pavilion Road (members WSF & ESF). Adult and junior tournaments and coaching. Tel: 200 44922. Sub-Aqua: Gibraltar Sub-Aqua Association taster dives for over 14s, tuition from local clubs. Voluntary sports clubs: Noah’s Dive Club and 888s Dive Club. Tel: 54991000. Commercial sports diving schools available. Time - Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.. Telephone, Jenssen Ellul - 54027122 Swimming: Gibraltar Amateur Swimming Association (member FINA & LEN) opens its pool for leisure swimming. Junior lessons, squad for committed swimmers, water polo. Pool open Mon&Thurs: 7-10am, 12.30-4pm. Tue, Wed, Fri: 7-10am, 12:30-5pm. Sat: 3-5pm. Sun: closed. Mon to Fri from 5-6pm groups training. 6-7.30 squad training. Mon, Wed, Fri 7.30-8.30 swimming joggers, Tues & Thurs 7:30-8:30 junior Water polo. Mon, Tues & Thurs 8:30-10pm Adult water polo. Tel: 200 72869. Table Tennis: Gibraltar Table Tennis Association training and playing sessions, Victoria Stadium, Tues 6-10pm and Thurs 8-11pm with coaching and league competition. Tel: 56070000 or 20060720. Taekwondo: Gibraltar Taekwondo Association classes/gradings Tel: Mari 20044142 or www. gibraltartaekwondo.org Tai Chi: Tai Chi for children and adults. MonThur 6.30-8pm at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre and Sat 9am-1pm at the Yoga Centre, 33 Town Range. Tel: Dilip 200 78714. Tennis: Gibraltar Tennis Association, Sandpits Tennis Club. Junior development programme. Courses for adults, leagues and competitions. Tel: Louis 200 77035. Ten-Pin Bowling: At King’s Bowl in the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre every day. Gibraltar Ten Pin Bowling (members FIQ & WTBA) leagues, training for juniors and squad. Tel: 200 52442. Triathlon: Hercules Triathlon Club organises swimming, running and cycling training sessions and competes regularly in Andalucia and Internationally. Contact chris.walker@york. gi or Facebook “Hercules Triathlon Club” Volleyball: Gibraltar Volleyball Association training, indoor leagues, beach volleyball competition, 3 v 3 competition, juniors and seniors. Tel: 54001973 or 54885000. Yoga: Integral Yoga Centre runs a full programme of classes from Mon-Fri at 33 Town Range. Tel: 200 41389. All welcome. Theatrical Groups Gibraltar Amateur Drama Association: Meet at Ince’s Hall Theatre Complex, 310 Main Street. Tel: 20042237. Trafalgar Theatre Group: Meets 2nd Wed of month, Garrison Library 8pm. All welcome.

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information

CRUISE SCHEDULE 2019 ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY

Fri 08/02, 07:30

CORINTHIAN

17:30 American

Travel Dynamics International

Fri 08/02, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 2

18:00 -

-

Thu 21/02, 07:30

CORINTHIAN

18:00 American

Travel Dynamics International

114

Sun 24/02, 08:00

BLACK WATCH

13:00 British

Fred Olsen

798

Sat 02/03, 07:30

CORINTHIAN

17:30 American

Travel Dynamics International

114

Fri 08/03, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 2

18:00 -

-

Fri 15/03, 07:30

CORINTHIAN

18:00 American

Travel Dynamics International

114

Fri 16/03, 07:30

CLIO

18:00 American

Grand Circle Cruise Line

89

Thu 21/03, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 2

18:00

-

Sun 24/03, 07:30

CORINTHIAN

17:30 American

Travel Dynamics International

114

Mon 25/03, 07:30

CLIO

17:30 American

Grand Circle Cruise Line

89

Thu 28/03, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF HERZ

18:00 -

-

-

29 Jan ‘19 – 04 Feb ‘19

05 Feb ‘19 – 11 Feb ‘19

DUTY PHARMACY OPENING HOURS

12 Feb ‘19 – 18 Feb ‘19

Monday to Friday (7pm to 9pm) Weekends & public holidays (11am to 1pm & 6pm to 8pm)

19 Feb ‘19 – 25 Feb ‘19

For updates, check facebook.com/PharmaGuide

26 Jan ‘19 – 04 Mar ‘19

114 -

-

-

-

Morrison’s Pharmacy

Morrison’s Store Westside Road  200 75765

Bell Pharmacy

27 Bell Lane  200 77289

Valmar Pharmacy Europort 1.0.08 Eurotowers  200 63868

Trafalgar Pharmacy West One Unit G1, Eurotowers  200 44406

Waterport Pharmacy

Unit 14, Crown Daisy House  200 68323

CHESS PUZZLE ANSWER: with 1...f3 Black destroys White’s king side.

92

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


information

DAY

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

12:20

BA493

13:10

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

12:20

BA493

13:05

Heathrow

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

15.55

EZY2246

16.30

Luton

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

19:30

EZY6300

20:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902**

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

12:20

BA493

13:10

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

16:55

EZY1964

17:35

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

12:00

AT991

12:50

Tangier

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

12:20

BA493

13:10

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

19:30

EZY6300

20:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:35

Heathrow

EZY6299*

easyJet

Bristol

19:30

EZY6300*

20:00

Bristol

EZY8901**

easyJet

Gatwick

11:55

EZY8902**

12:25

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

14:25

BA493

15:15

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:55

EZY6300

11:25

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:15

EZY8902

11:45

Gatwick

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

11:30

EZY1964

12:00

Manchester

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

14:25

BA493

15:15

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

18:55

AT991

19:45

Tangier

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

* Operates rom 8th February ** Operates rom 9th February

FLIGHT SCHEDULE FEBRUARY 2019

93


finance

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For further information please contact: DHL Gibraltar Unit 36 Harbours Deck, New Harbours, Gibraltar Tel: 200 72210 Email: GIBSN@dhl.com GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE • JUNE 2014

31


Tel: 200 43134 Fax: 200 50648 Convent Gardens, Convent Garden Ramp

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coffee time CROSSWORD 1

2

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5

6

7

8 9 10 11

12 13

15

14

16

17 18

19

20

21 22 23 24

Either SNAP and SEND your completed crossword to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com or RETURN TO THE CLIPPER by 20th February

& YOU COULD WIN

ACROSS

DOWN

1) Roman satirist (7) 8) Collection of foreign articles (7) 9) Wyoming City; James Stewart film “The Man from _________“ (7) 10) Pejorative term for a Native American (7) 11) Guide e.g. a car; a young ox (5) 13) Historical Gallic language (3,6) 15) Open space in a railway station, airport etc. (9) 18) French composer of the Bolero (5) 21) Someone born in Riga for example (7) 22) A bone; support for a rider’s foot (7) 23) Alligator pear (7) 24) A planet’s red man? (7)

1) & 2) French science fiction writer (5,5)

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Last month’s crossword winner: J A N U A R Y A

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7) Initiate; sea going boat (6) 12) Mexican snack (4) 14) Encryption (4) 15) Basement room to keep wine in? (6) 16) Country (6) 17) Price for a hostage (6) 19) Italian composer (5) 20) Flower (5)

9

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3 8

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George Montero

4

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E A R T H M

1

T E

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6) Bird of the finch family (6)

2

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N E W Y E A R G

B

P A Y M A S T E R

S U N T R A P I

A

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5) Rough haired dog (6,7)

1

5 8

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4) Made lascivious eyes at (6)

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lunch for two at

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3) Relating to the study of numbers (13)

8 7 2

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019


CHESS COLUMN BY GRANDMASTER RAY KEENE OBE Both of the players in the London world championship held in November last year are well known to the Gibraltar Chess fraternity. The first twelve games of classical chess from the London world championship between Magnus Carlsen of Norway , and his American challenger, Fabiano Caruana, ended in a record breaking twelve draws. When the time came for the rapid-play tie break games, Caruana was crushed three times in succession, thus guaranteeing Magnus €550,000 in prize money and at least a further two years’ tenure of the title. A most welcome guest at the London match was Stephen Whatley, now liaison officer with Fide for the Gibraltar Chess Association. Caruana-Carlsen; World Chess Championship Rapidplay Play-off (Game 2) London 2018; Sicilian Defence

measures to counteract White’s threatened Be2 which will immediately attack his h-pawn. 18 Be2 Bg4 19 Rc1 Bxe2 20 Qxe2 Qf5

coming ... Ne5 will be murderous.

21 c5 A brave decision from Caruana. 21 Nb5 and 21 0-0 are simpler choices. 21 ... 0-0 21 ... dxc5 is met by 22 Bxc5 Bxc5 23 Qb5+ with good play. 22 c6 The point of White’s offensive, but the disadvantage is that his development has been retarded and his king is not yet secure. 22 ... bxc6 23 dxc6 Rfc8 24 Qc4 Bd8 25 Nd5 e4

26 ... Bxc7 27 Nxc7 Ne5 28 Nd5 Desperation, but 28 Qd5 is refuted by the quiet 28 ... Rab8. Despite White’s extra material, he is defenceless against the numerous threats. 28 ... Kh7 White resigns Black negates the fork on e7 and White’s position falls apart.

PUZZLE Black to play. This is a variation from CaruanaCarlsen, World Championship (game 10), London 2018. Black is a rook down. What is the best way to continue the attack?

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 e5 Carlsen chooses the Sveshnikov Variation of the Sicilian Defence. 6 Ndb5 d6 7 Nd5 Nxd5 8 exd5 Ne7 9 c4 Ng6 10 Qa4 Bd7 11 Qb4 Qb8 11 ... Bf5 was Carlsen’s choice in game 12 of the main match played at classical time limits. 12 h4 h5 13 Be3 a6 14 Nc3 a5 15 Qb3 a4 16 Qd1 Be7 17 g3 Qc8 Black must take defensive GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2019

26 c7 A blunder but the position is already good for Black, as the

Answer on page 92

97


Valentines Quiz ADAPTED FROM THE INDEPENDENT ONLINE.

1. What arouses men more than any other scent in the world (according to the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago)? A. Lavender B. Lilies C. Woodsmoke D. Beer

   

2. Which of the following is not considered an aphrodisiac? A. Asparagus B. Honey C. Cheese Curds D. Truffles

4. Who first wrote the famous lines “Roses are red, violets are blue”?    

A. William Shakespeare B. Edmund Spenser C. T. S. Eliot D. Nicki Minaj

 A . Heart-shaped hole punch  B . Heart-shaped cucumber  C . Heart-shaped Le Creuset dish  D . Heart-shaped loo paper 6. Which Fawlty Towers character was John Cleese romantically involved with off-screen?    

A . Sybil Fawlty B . Dragonfly C . Manuel D . Polly

7. Which Friends character was first to get married in real life?    

1. A

2. C

3. D

4. B

5. D

6. D

7. C

   

A. Nick Cave B. Michael Hutchence C. David Hasselhoff D. Kermit the Frog

5. Which of these is not a novelty Valentine’s gift (yet!)?

A . Joey B . Monica C . Phoebe D . Rachel

ANSWERS

   

3. The classic ‘Especially for You’ sung by Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan was also recorded by Kylie with which other male sex symbol?


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wn, o d t a “You s up, f l e s r u and set yo a r e m he ca t t a it.” h looked t i w t on o g u yo

Profile for Rock Publishing Ltd

The Gibraltar Magazine February 2019  

Valentine’s Day has rolled around faster than you can say overpriced chocolates and feigned affection, so this month, we’re bringing you a s...

The Gibraltar Magazine February 2019  

Valentine’s Day has rolled around faster than you can say overpriced chocolates and feigned affection, so this month, we’re bringing you a s...