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April 2019 Vol. 24 # 06

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ORGANISMS FROM ANOTHER PLANET

QUEEN OF CLEAN’S BIG SPRING CLEAN

POLLUTION: A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS

SUSTAINABLE ECO-DENIM

GANGSTERS OF LONDON AND GIBRALTAR

SWEATY, SWEARY RAGE YOGA


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from the editor

APRIL ISSUE EDITOR’S NOTE

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’ve found it hard to write my editor’s letter this month as I’m full of beans about my upcoming Easter holiday. Are you going anywhere nice? We asked a selection of the local public where they’re spending their Easter break (p. 8).

Rosto, minestra, potaje, panisa… and shepherd’s pie. Richard laments that homecooked lunches have been left behind in the days of yore (p. 27). If you want to bring it back to the present day, flick to our recipe pages to turn your hand at making some of Mama’s samosas - or why not try a ‘Full Gibraltarian’ vegan breakfast for lunch (p. 80)?! Go crazy, it’s 2019. There are new health and exercise fads bursting onto the scene with such voracity that keeping astride of them all feels like a workout in itself. I’ve got a lot of time for this latest one though… Rage Yoga! Getting sweaty and sweary as you find your inner chi is proving to be quite popular. I suppose you could say… it’s all the rage (p. 67). What do you opt for when you’ve hurt yourself? Plasters? A bit of Germolene? How about some fish skin? That’s exactly what Guy Killick did when he was presented with a dog who had a lifethreatening injury. Read about his pioneering surgery, and what happened next (p. 36). When does a general household clean turn into a problem? I’ve been told I can be a little ‘OCD’ with my cleaning, which is something Lynsey ‘Queen of Clean’, a woman hooked on hygiene, knows plenty about. Luckily for us, she’s compiled a handy guide to help keep a happy home (p. 73). And finally, on the cover this month we have the talented AnneMarie Reading; a seasoned dancer who graced the main stage at London’s Excel Centre last month, performing an intense contemporary flamenco piece (Libertad, written by AnneMarie Gomez) alongside Robyn Bugeja, Nicola Dewar, Kayleigh Halmshaw and Angelina Haveland. Bravo, ladies!

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


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EDITOR: Sophie Clifton-Tucker editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com DESIGN: Justin Bautista design@thegibraltarmagazine.com

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REPORTER: Victoria Locke SALES: Advertising Team sales@thegibraltarmagazine.com

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DISTRIBUTION: DHL martin@matrix.gi ACCOUNTS: Paul Cox paul@thegibraltarmagazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Eran and Ayelet Mamo Shay Mark Montegriffo Jorge v.Rein Parlade Elena Scialtiel Benjamin Coombs Christine Guluzian Nyree Robinson Conchita Triay Marlene Hassan Nahon Lewis Stagnetto Marilis Azzopardi Richard Cartwright Peter Schirmer Andrew Licudi Denice Shute Lynsey ‘Queen of Clean’ Julia Coelho Resham Khiani Reg Reynolds Dr Keith Bensusan Christine Gilder

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facebook.com/gibmag/ twitter.com/gibmag instagram.com/thegibraltarmagazine/ The Gibraltar Magazine is published monthly by Rock Publishing Ltd Portland House, Glacis Road, Gibraltar, PO Box 1114 T: (+350) 20077748 E: editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com © 2019 Rock Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written consent of The Gibraltar Magazine. www.TheGibraltarMagazine.com

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Magazine & website archived by the British Library 6

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


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71

content 8 Hello There: How Do You Beat the January Blues? 9

39

What’s on?

(Sapa capuchainnema k c la B y Cheek nigritus) in Ip

10 News 18 Around Town

BUSINESS 17 Politics: Past vs Future

LEISURE

21 Property Investment - Ireland

59 Wine: Avril’s Grapes

24 5th Delegation to Israel

63 Med Steps 5 Challenge

LIFE 27 Cooking the Changes

67 Rage On with Rage Yoga 69 Travel: 5 Onsens of Japan

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30 April Foolery

73 Queen of Clean: Spring Cleaning

32 #BalanceForBetter

76 Fashion: Sustainable Denim

36 Saved by the (Fish) Skin of His Teeth

REGULARS

85

39 A Zookeeper’s Diary 42 Cargo, Convoys & Commanders 46 Pollution: Public Health Crisis 48 Organisms from Another Planet 50 Alameda Biodome Project

SCENE 52 Heart of Glass: Kate Davies

80 Recipes: Vegan Full Gibraltarian & Mama's Samosas 84 Guides and Information 85 #GibsGems 86 Poseidon and Plastic Pollution 90 Schedules 94 Coffee Time

54 Gangsters of London & Gibraltar 56 Gibraltar’s Straight-Talking Podcast

FRONT COVER PHOTOGRAPHER: ELLIOTT C HOWE MODEL: ANNE-MARIE READING

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

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jus


hello there

HOW ARE YOU SPENDING YOUR EASTER BREAK?

David Evans, 51, Managing Director at Masbro Insurance I'm not going anywhere glamorous this Easter. I'll be spending it on the Rock, relaxing with my friends and family... and my dog Rufus!

Rufus, 3 ½, Head of Security My owner is too stingy to take me on holiday, so I’ll be spending it sat on the balcony barking at birds.

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Craig Vincent, 34, Broker at Masbro Insurance

Arianne Garcia, 18, Personal Lines Clients Services Executive at Masbro Insurance

I will be going to Malaga to watch the processions of 'Tronos' for Semana Santa.

With my family and friends, enjoying lots of Easter eggs!

Miriam HassanWeisfogel, 64, Jenel Hoile, 26, Personal Lines Clients Services Executive & Team Leader at Masbro Insurance I will be spending my Easter break this year surrounded by family and friends, and very much enjoying the break from work.

Motor/Travel Claims Administrator at Masbro Insurance Easter for me is Passover and I will be spending it with my family.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019


what’s on

WHAT'S ON? APRIL 2019 SATURDAY 6TH APRIL

MONDAY 15TH APRIL

FROM 23RD - 26TH APRIL

Craft & Collectors Fair

Jimmy Carr Live

The Here and This and Now

 t Andrews Church, Governors S Parade, 10:00am - 2:00pm

 t Michael's Cave, S 8:00pm - 11:55pm

For further information please text 00350 54023166

For more information visit: www.buytickets.gi

FROM 3RD - 5TH APRIL

FROM 15TH - 17TH APRIL

Stylos Dance Studio presents Coco

Theatre Lighting Course

 John Mackintosh Hall, 7:30pm–11:00pm For further information visit www.buytickets.gi

John Mackintosh Hall, 8:00pm - 11:55pm To sign up and further information please email: gibraltar.artdance@ gmail.com or info@culture.gi

THURSDAY 11TH APRIL Flower Arranging Workshop John Mackintosh Hall, 6:30pm For further information please contact The Gibraltar Horticultural Society by email: gibraltarhs@gmail.com

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

THURSDAY 18

TH

APRIL

Cello recital - Steven Isserlis The Convent, 8:00pm

GADA Studio 8:00pm For more information please contact The Trafalgar Theatre Group on: drama@trafalgartheatregroup.org or visit www.buytickets.gi for tickets WEDNESDAY 1ST MAY May Day Celebrations Casemates Square, 10:00am For further information please contact the Events Department, Gibraltar Cultural Services on telephone 20067236 or email: info@culture.gi

For more information please contact The Gibraltar Philharmonic Society on: tgpsociety@gmail.com

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news HE’S DONE IT! You may have been following the incredible journey of Lee ‘Frank’ Spencer (and if you haven’t, why not?! Read more about him by searching our site for the article ‘Mean, Lean, Rowing Marine’), the man who is now officially the record holder for rowing the Atlantic. Yes, you read that right. The entire Atlantic. Solo and unsupported. And with only one leg too! Lee, 49, was given a sendoff from Gibraltar before commencing his journey from Portimao, Portugal on January 7th of this year. He went on to cover approximately 3,800 miles of blood, sweat, and tears across the Atlantic Ocean before arriving in French Guiana in just 60 days – a whole 36 days faster than the previous (able-bodied!) record holder. Lee’s successful Guinness World Record attempt has raised awareness and money for the Royal Marines Charity and the Endeavour Fund, which supports wounded, injured and sick service personnel, and veterans using sport and adventurous challenges as part of their recovery and rehabilitation.

GIBRALTAR’S CLIMATE CHANGE CAMPAIGNS There has been a lot of movement in Gibraltar regarding climate change as of late. The Chief Minister was pleased to receive a petition from the Gibraltar School Strike for Climate last month at No 6 Convent Place. The Chief Minister said: ‘I am incredibly proud of both the initiative shown by these students and the exemplary way in which they have conducted themselves throughout the organisation of this protest. It is now up to my Government to consider their reasoned asks in detail. As Gibraltar’s students rightly told us today: there is no Planet B’.

keeps ticking along and hopefully grows,” says John Charles. “We will continue as long as our bones permit. This is basically done out of love for our children. Apathy is unacceptable. Everybody has time for their things, but sadly enough, not for important issues. Our numbers fluctuate, but this is only the beginning. This is only the third time we’ve set up. It’s not a matter of numbers, it’s about getting the message out and making sure it grows. Things take time. Greta was out there campaigning on her own for a while too.” Catch them in town on Fridays from 4-6pm.

Also last month, John Charles ‘JC’ Pons and a small, but growing group of concerned locals set up a stand in town following on from young Greta Thunberg’s environmental activism in Sweden. “It continues, we cannot have just one march and forget it. We are here trying to make sure the thing

A sincere congratulations Lee, from all of us here in Gibraltar. You are an inspiration, and a reminder that the sky is the limit. Further information can be found at www.leespencer. co.uk. For donations please visit uk.virginmoneygiving. com/LeeJSpencer. Follow the conversation via #NotDefinedByDisability.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


news EXTENSION TO THE GIBRALTAR NATURE RESERVE The Government has extended the Gibraltar Nature Reserve by 2.42km2 and so protected a uniquely scenic and little known area of Gibraltar for future generations. The Devil’s Tooth Green Corridor, as the area will be known, gets its name from the shape of the rock formation that dominates the site which is close to North Gorge. It was formerly a footpath linking the area of the Naval Hospital to Camp Bay. The extension also includes important cliff formations in the Camp Bay area, connecting

these to those south of Little Bay, already within the Nature Reserve, and so providing a green corridor extending all the way along Europa Foreshore to Europa Point. The area has important biodiversity and holds a number of plant species rare in Gibraltar, such as the wild caper, found nowhere else on the Rock, and provides nesting sites for Kestrel and Peregrine Falcon. The habitat in the area will be improved to encourage more biodiversity, and it is intended to open parts of it to the public on a restricted basis in due course.

today shows the Government’s commitment to preserving important green areas and to environmental protection. And it goes further. These are areas that are part of our heritage and that were lost to us for years when they were under MOD control. We are giving them back to the community and we will soon be able to enjoy this long forgotten but stunningly beautiful and unique natural area.”

Minister for Environment, Heritage and Climate Change said, “There is much comment in some quarters about concrete jungles and loss of green areas. The step we’ve taken

60 wines by the glass 40 small dishes of Mediterranean cuisine

30 John Mackintosh Square GX11 1AA Gibraltar Tel: 200 70201 info@vinopolisgastrobar.gi www.vinopolisgastrobar.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

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news

GHA STRENGTHENS CHILDREN SERVICES The Gibraltar Health Authority (GHA) has announced the appointment of three new Consultant Paediatricians to further improve the provision of children health services in Gibraltar. Dr Lorena Soler Casale qualified in Argentina and engaged in extensive sub-specialty training in Neonatal & Perinatal Medicine in Canada and Australia. She brings with her a wealth of relevant clinical and managerial experience, having single-handedly set up and led the Neonatal service at the Turks and Caicos Islands prior to joining the Enhanced GHA Paediatric Service. Dr Sarra Ahmed is a consultant specialist in Acute General Paediatrics. She has sub-specialty expertise in the fields of Paediatric Diabetes, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, gained through direct clinical experience in tertiary referral centres in the UK, such as Great Ormond Street Hospital and The Evelina Children’s Hospital.

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Dr Sen has over 28 years of clinical experience from his professional time in India and UK. His sub- specialty interests are Paediatric Respiratory Medicine (including Cystic fibrosis) andPaediatric Allergyand he worked closely with Manchester Children’s Hospital and Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool. He is also an appointed Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health examiner. These new consultant appointments have come at an exciting and transitional period for children health services in Gibraltar, and complement the scheduled inauguration of the Children’s Development and Neuro-disability Service. The service will be based at the Paediatric Community Health Centre (PCHC), where the recently commenced Gibraltar Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services will also eventually be based. All of these developments will form the first chapters of an enhanced GHA Paediatric Service.

PANIC STATION A NEW BAND ON THE ROCK Panic Station is the latest new band to rock the local music scene and the boys are determined to rattle some cages. The creation of three friends, Justin Philips, George Linares and Nick Ellul, Panic Station grew out of a long-time desire to work together on a musical project. “Having played in bands such as Voodoo Monkey, Ellipse, Soul Within and Wasted the overlap between related but varied musical interests really excited us, but we had difficulty finding the right singer. Everything came together when we heard Antho Rocco (former singer of Omnibus) sing. Since that point it has been full steam ahead.” Don’t miss them on the 5th of April at The Ivy in Ocean Village for a great night of music!

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


news THE CARE AGENCY CELEBRATE WORLD SOCIAL WORK DAY The Care Agency celebrated ‘World Social Work Day’ at an event held at the Family & Community Centre, on the 19 March 2019. Ms Natalie Tavares, CEO (Ag) of the Care Agency, said that this marked a very significant day in the year, where Social Workers in Gibraltar and across the world stand together to celebrate, and reflect, on the numerous and important achievements of their profession. Minister for Health, Care and Justice, the Honourable Neil F. Costa MP highlighted that this year’s local celebration was particularly special, as, for the very first time, Gibraltar has seen the introduction of a locally delivered BA Social Work (Hons) degree course, in partnership with Kingston University and the GHA’s School of Health Studies. This course provides persons interested in embarking in a career in Social Work with an invaluable opportunity to obtain their requisite qualification, without the need to travel abroad.

Ms Tavares spoke of the constant progress local Social Services had made from its early beginnings, as a team of unqualified welfare officers and visitors, working within the small Family Care Unit at the former Department of Labour and Social Security, to the current, stand-alone organisation, of professionally regulated and qualified practitioners. She said: “Having had the privilege of working for social services for the last 31 years, I have seen the great progress this organisation has made. In this respect, I must sincerely thank all those practitioners, staff members, administrators, and policy-makers, for their vision, commitment and drive in making this happen. Changes in social policy, practices and legislation have made it a reality and have provided a better future for the children, individuals and families, which Social Services

work with. ” Minister Costa said that World Social Work Day provides an important opportunity to raise awareness and support for the invaluable role that social workers play in the lives of vulnerable families and individuals in our community, adding: “Social work is, without doubt, a vocation. In a tight-knit community such as Gibraltar’s, our Social Workers have to overcome unique challenges, which they would not face within larger communities. Since my appointment as Minister with responsibility for Health, Elderly and Social Care, in 2016, it has been a real pleasure to work with Natalie, and her excellent team of passionate and caring Social Workers - I would like to thank, and express my well wishes to, each and every one of them on this special day.”

The event saw a number of speakers, including Professor Ian Peate, Principal of the School of Health, who spoke about his involvement and support in the implementation of the BA Hons Degree in Social Work, and Ms Natalie Tavares, who addressed the audience expressing her vision for the future of social work on the rock. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

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around town

© Mark Galliano Photography Launch of ‘Music Box’, Gibraltar’s first music channel

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


around town

© Mark Galliano Photography Gibraltar International Dance Festival 2019

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

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business

PAST VS FUTURE Spain’s general election.

BY MARK MONTEGRIFFO

O

n April 28th, the people of Spain and all her regions will head to the polls for the third time in just over three years. Corruption killed the PP last year, but the right has found new success through the momentum of Ciudadanos and, as evident in the recent Andalucia election, the far-right Vox party. Meanwhile, the rise of Unidos Podemos appears to have turned into a decline, with PSOE counting on a relatively stable 8 months under Prime Minister Sanchez. Catalonia and the political prisoner fiasco looms large, as does the xenophobia brought to the table by the growing popularity of Vox. But the country, like is mostly the case with others, has not truly recovered from the financial crash, the ‘deshaucios’ and the unemployment crisis. Couple that with the exacerbated

regional divides, and it’s fair to say that Spain has been in a political crisis at least as far back as 2015. Corruption scandals and the ongoing economic crisis from the decade prior plagued the nation’s politics, leading to a hung parliament. Weeks and months passed and the two major parties were unable to negotiate to form a coalition. The result was another election in 2016, which put the PP and Prime Minister Rajoy’s tenure on life support. Twenty months later, Rajoy’s house of cards fell as he became the first Prime Minister to succumb to a no-confidence vote since Spain’s transition to democracy.

Corruption killed the PP last year, but the right has found new success

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

Leading a minority government is the worst scenario for most politicians. In Spain especially so, with the regional interests as well as the diverse strata of parties and their

interests pulling the parliament in every direction. In this situation, one can’t really hope for much better than stasis - the best case scenario is damage limitation until the next election. But this is where Sanchez benefits from his flexibility. Not expressly ideological, Sanchez is in some ways the very cause of the crisis that Spain and many nations are facing. A fundamental reason why populist parties have found popularity to the left like Podemos, and indeed to the right like Vox, are because they provided answers. ‘Moderate’ or ‘centrist’ characters with a liberal or indifferent social posturing but with a commitment to the interests of capitalism are the ones that have alienated and pushed people away to polar extremes. They are not the prime causes of crisis, but crisis has made them impotent. Whether it’s the immigrants or capitalism, whether they’re correct or 17


politics

the best case scenario is damage limitation until the next election.

abhorrent, answers are provided and narratives are told. In this case, Sanchez appears to be an exception. It is hard to paint him with the reckless idealist brush if you’re his opponent. It is also hard to convey him as weak on Catalonia and regional conflicts, but he outperformed expectations in that regard. His patience and pragmatism has allowed him to be a chameleon. In a time where political survival is the priority, Sanchez has played a blinder. He’s had to keep all sides happy enough, across the spectrum of interests. Even when it comes to Gibraltar, he is capable of grandstanding on the reclamations or incursions. Brexit also has meant that Sanchez has the opportunity to show his detractors that he won’t be an embarrassment to Spain, which they surely would have attempted if he had shown more weakness or sympathy on Gibraltar. If he wins a workable majority in April, he’ll be better placed to strive for his vision for Spain as opposed to the balancing act he’s had to master so far. 18

Sanchez won’t be so vulnerable to the PP and Casado as the two party domination used to make obvious. Instead, Ciudadanos will likely be the main competitor. Both parties have opted to communicate a basically pro-EU platform, but Ciudadanos have targeted national pride more than PSOE, particularly with their success in Catalonia as the biggest anti-secession party. The liberal credentials of Ciudadanos has justifiably come under question since their agreement to cooperate with the PP and Vox in Andalucia. It is plausible then, to argue that Ciudadanos are sliding back into effectively what the PP was under Rajoy, instead of a dead centre liberal party. With the tripartite force on the right, PSOE would need to rely on Unidos Podemos to the left of them, even if PSOE get the biggest share of the vote.

or alliances. For Sanchez, the goal is to alienate as few potential partners as possible. Over the past eight months, he seems to have done that. In the position he was in after the removal of Rajoy, it was always a test of strategy in terms of waiting for the perfect time to call an election and form a stable government. Stability is perhaps the absolute best one can hope for with Spanish politics existing as it has the past decade. His threat to the right and far-right could be useful foil, as they can be charged as increasing instability and PP and Ciudadanos facilitating that with a smaller party of extremists in Vox. But extremism thrives on instability. The story of America, Hungary, and Brexit too, has not been replicated in Spain.

In a time where political survival is the priority, Sanchez has played a blinder.

Like in Andalucia recently, half the battle in Spanish politics is ‘pactos’,

This April, however, will be the greatest chance yet for the international nationalist wave to reach the Iberian Peninsula. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


property

PROPERTY INVESTMENT ABROAD Part V: The Republic of Ireland.

I

n my past articles we covered some interesting jurisdictions in the Mediterranean including The Côte d´Azur in France, The Algarve and Lisbon in Portugal, Greece and its islands, and Malta. Now we are heading North of Europe to the Republic of Ireland, a jurisdiction that suffered severely from the global recession of 2008, which affected the entire world economy. Up to 2007 Ireland had a booming economy before the recession hit most of Europe. It was badly hit to the extent that the EU had to come to its rescue, injecting enough funds to keep its economy and banking system alive. But the Republic of Ireland was not alone in this rescue program of the EU´s badly hit jurisdictions. Similar economic measures and bailout programs had to be made in Portugal, Greece and unofficially GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

in Spain and Italy. It is interesting to know that Ireland has not only completely recovered from its Economic crisis, but it is well back on track, to the extent of having a healthy rate of economic growth at present as well as being one of the safest and most profitable property rental markets in Europe, followed well behind by Portugal and Spain, that do also offer good rental yields but lower than that of Eire. Greece and Italy on the other hand have still got a good way to achieve full economic recovery although they are working on it at present.

a chance to the Emerald Island, as Ireland is known, to gain full economic recovery and to pay back all its debt to its EU creditors and to show very healthy rates of growth in its economy at present. This happened because of a variety of reasons but let us go into detail first on what has been described as 'Leprechaun Economics'.

The EU had to come to its rescue, injecting enough funds to keep its economy alive.

In 2010 nobody gave much of

In 2008 the property market bubble in Ireland burst, leading to a severe crash. In addition to this and to make matters more complicated in Ireland, the US subprime mortgage added to the problem, making the situation in the housing market extremely difficult to control. House prices 21


property

in Ireland had fallen about 53% between 2008 and 2013. This led to negative numbers of growth and in 2010 Ireland had the Euro Zone highest deficit probably over 31% of GDP. In that very year, The EU together with the International Monetary Fund IMF organised a €67 billion bailout loan. In exchange, Ireland agreed to a strong austerity program. This together with substantial foreign investment from the US and the UK (Ireland´s largest trading partners) plus strong lending measures by the Irish banking system started a gradual and miraculous recovery.

refinance or give out new loans. This included not giving over 80% of finance of the property value to first time buyers when prior to the recession 100% had been fairly common practice. In addition, investors loans to buy to let would not exceed 60 to 70% of the value. The fact of having a fairly strong demand and a certain shortage of supply - a little like the Gibraltar market - plus very low interest rates never exceeding 2 or 3% per year added to speed up recovery. The fact is that by 2011 the Irish budget deficit was 12.5% and just 8% in 2012 slightly less than the figure agreed with its creditors. 2013 saw a further reduction to 5.7% of its GDP. At the end of that year Ireland was finally able to exit the Eurozone bailout program. From then up until today the Irish Economy has

The housing market in Ireland is expected to rise 8% this 2019, 7% in 2020 and 6% in 2021.

This did not happen overnight. It was a slow recovery and the banks had to take exceptional measures when it came to

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gone from strength to strength. Money talks, and in 2016 the budget deficit had shrunk to 2% and in 2017 to just 0.2%. In 2018 the deficit was down to 0.1%. At this point in time, way into 2019, the European Commission expects the Republic of Ireland to register a surplus in the next two years. Ireland has now got a stable economy with good rates of economic growth. The property market is certainly back on track. And how long for? According to the rating agency Standard & Poor’s, the housing market in Ireland is expected to rise 8% this 2019, 7% in 2020 and 6% in 2021.

҇҇

The agency fees are paid by the seller as in Gibraltar. Surely Dublin is where most investors concentrate their purchases. A 1-bedroom apartment in Dublin 1 costing about €200,000 will produce rentals of €1400 per month,

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


property

yielding a gross minimum 9%, amongst the highest in any safe European jurisdiction. The percentage gets smaller if the property is larger as in most markets. So, the answer is to buy several units which splits up the risk and yield a higher percentage figure.

҇҇

And what about purchase costs? Quite fair is the answer. Stamp duty is 1% on properties not exceeding €1,000,000. Properties exceeding this cost will be charged 2% of the excess figure. Agency fees are 1% to 3% and are always included in the purchase price. Conveyancing fees are charged by lawyers or business consultants at 1% up to 1.5%. Registration fees cost 0.25% to 0.75%.

by the tenant, and you may file for a return on all your running expenses like community charges, rates, repair bills and advertising expenses.

҇҇

In case of selling my property investments what are my tax liabilities? At the time of publication of this article the figure charged to nonresidents as far as capital gains tax is concerned amounts to 33%. Similar to other EU jurisdictions like Portugal or France. Higher than Spain and much higher than in Gibraltar where capital gains tax does not exist.

And what about income tax on rental income?

Corporate tax is 12.5% for trading companies and 25% for non-trading companies. If you have a family fund the former applies provided you have it well structured.

About 20%, which is withheld

All these advantages, great air

҇҇

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

communications between Malaga and Dublin or Belfast (about 5 to 7 flights daily with costs of less than €100 return if booked in advance), plus the language factor and a very simple bureaucracy makes Ireland an extremely attractive jurisdiction to invest in the international property market.

JORGE V.REIN PARLADE MBA Business Consultant +350 54045282 jorgeparlade@aol.com

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buisiness

GIBRALTAR DELEGATION TO ISRAEL Eran and Ayelet reveal all as they return from the 5th delegation to Israel.

T

heodor Herzl, the visionary of the State of Israel and the founder of the Zionist movement, once said “If you will it, it is no dream; and if you don’t, a dream it is and a dream it will stay”. Indeed, during our 5th business delegation from Gibraltar to Israel as part of the Gibrael Chamber, we have witnessed first-hand, how dreams are turning into reality. Visual sensors for flying cars, machines that produce water from air, $1 million fighter pilot smart helmets, nano-technology for enrichment of gold jewellery… these are just a few of the latest

mind-blowing innovations that the delegates were exposed to as part of their visit to Israel. As part of this four-day trademission, the delegation travelled to 4 cities (Tel Aviv, Haifa, KfarSaba and Jerusalem), visited 3 technology accelerators, met with countless entrepreneurs and attended 2 large conferences. Commenting on her experience, Josiane Richardson of Richardsons Chartered Surveyors said: “Without a doubt, the passion, energy and dedication the Israelis deploy towards their start up nation will mean they will be

“If you will it, it is no dream; and if you don’t, a dream it is and a dream it will stay.”

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leading the global technological revolution mankind needs to sustain our planet. Gibrael have access to a high-level network of people in Israel and Ayelet and Eran Shay have a unique and generous attitude in the way they introduce the delegation to their network. The manner in which the chamber conducts these eyeopening experiences is extremely professional. I am sure this trip will create lifelong bonds for me”. At Takwin Labs in Haifa, a technology accelerator dedicated to Arab entrepreneurs and sponsored by two of Israel’s largest Venture Capital firms, delegates were told about the peaceful coexistence between people of different faiths and cultures in the city of Haifa GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


buisiness and how a different approach is sometimes required in order to encourage innovation within ethnic minorities in Israel. Talking to analysts from Israel’s StartUp Nation Central Organisation, the delegation learnt about the secrets to how Israel has become a hi-tech powerhouse and the importance of Government support in stimulating investments in this sector. Indeed, the Israeli Government has various programs in which it matches dollar to dollar investments made by the private sector. The role of the compulsory army service for 18- to 21-year-olds was also highlighted as one of the biggest human resource enhancement platforms through which young people develop into leaders and train to solve problems in innovative ways. Solomon Cohen of Cohen & Massias Jewellers & Watchmakers-commented: “What tiny Israel, with a population of just 8 million, has achieved in 70 years, in every field of human endeavour, no other country has achieved and all this despite being surrounded by enemies and being thrown into 7 wars. Gibraltar will use smart Israeli technology to improve the everyday lives of every human being on our planet”.

blockchain industry, with Gibraltar featuring prominently amongst the jurisdictions mentioned. In Jerusalem the delegation attended the OurCrowd Global Investors Summit, which saw over 10,000 investors and entrepreneurs from 183 countries attending. At this huge conference, delegates had the opportunity to listen to world renown personalities such as top video blogger Nas Yassin, Noble Prize winner Daniel Kahneman, TechCrunch News Editor Frederic Lardinois and many more. According to Nadine Collado of the University of Gibraltar: “Being part of this week’s Gibrael Delegation has been a very positive experience for the University of Gibraltar. With a particular emphasis on meeting senior representatives of Hitech start-ups as well as a variety of top-level institutions and meeting executive members of universities we are now looking at establishing collaborations with relevant parties.

“Gibraltar will use smart Israeli technology to improve the everyday lives of every human being on our planet.”

An important aspect of the delegation was to network with many interesting and diverse professionals from a wide variety of sectors. Participating at the Tel Aviv Fintech Week Conference, delegates have met many fintech entrepreneurs and heard about some of the latest trends in the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

the OurCrowd Conference. “We work hard, we play hard!” says Eran Shay, President of Gibrael Chamber. No doubt the delegation will be coming back with much inspiration and significant business opportunities, and as explained by Gibrael Chamber’s Chairwoman, Ayelet Mamo Shay: “Besides the Israeli market, the delegation also opens the door to many delegates to do business between themselves here in Gibraltar. We become a family!” Commenting on his experience, Mark Recagno from the Gibraltar International Bank said: “It was a pleasure to be part of the delegation. I loved the experience, but more importantly I take with me a friendship amongst people which I have thoroughly enjoyed the company of.” Gibrael Chamber is already working on planning the next delegations to Israel for later this year. For further details contact us on info@gibrael.org.

This is in particular in the area of blockchain tech, software development, cyber security, executive programmes amongst others.” Besides the professional side of the visit, the delegation enjoyed some of the famous sites of the Old City of Jerusalem, the spectacular views from the top of Mount Carmel in Haifa, sampled Tel Aviv’s night life, as well as tasted some of Israel signature dishes and danced the night away at the after-party of

ERAN SHAY, Managing Director & AYELET MAMO SHAY, Business Development Director of Benefit Business Solutions Ltd. (+350) 200 73669 general@benefitgibraltar.com

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


(OR COOKING) THE CHANGES

life

RINGING

The Dockyard hooter blows. It’s exactly 12 noon, which means it’s lunchtime; a cheese and ham role, a piece of fruit or a Kit Kat, and a mug of hot tea or soft drink would suffice to see you through your working day till you get home for your main meal. Not so! It’s on your metaphorical bike to make a quick exit!

BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

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hat was the routine for most workers on the Rock a few decades ago, whether white, blue or no-collar workers. Going home for lunch was the norm for shop assistants also, during the days when shops closed from one to three pm. Yes, it was lunchtime for all so we nipped home for a proper cooked lunch. Then there was also teatime when you got home after work – if you finished at five. You’d be called for supper at nine thirty or 10. Oh, and at the start of the day you would partake of a bowl of cornflakes or a bread role accompanied by a mug of lovely fresh, ground coffee brewed in the cafetera before you left for work!

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At lunchtime, I would rush off with another Dockyard worker friend – Spanish workers would stay put arriving in the morning with ‘El Costo’ (lunch pack) in their little bags: ‘proper’ meals which would be re-heated on the workshop cookers. We’d get home in twenty minutes, have lunch in another twenty minutes and get back to work on time – well past the North Gate into the Dockyard – to clock in, just before the dreaded hooter took off again at 1pm. At home, the food waiting on the table would consist of homemade soup, followed

by a stew, shepherd’s pie, rosto, minestra, potaje, fish, pasta or some other local dish, and a piece of fruit. There could also be panisa, a type of calentita of a much heavier consistency – all homemade and laboured. Soon after getting back home, teatime arrived at five or five thirty. That meant a sandwich and sometimes a cake from the cake man who called at your door with his glass topped baskets enticing you to drool over the contents within, containing japonesas, milhojas, bread puddings and other goodies: perfect

Smokey Joe on Lynch’s Lane and hotel restaurants you couldn’t really afford to eat out.

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to accompany your tea and sandwich. And then, much later on in the evening, ham ‘n’ egg and chips or similar for supper. That was a lot of cooking and preparation for our hardworking mums who, in those days, were housebound for much of the time, only venturing to town mainly to shop around for food and not much else. I often wonder how much of that still goes on today. For a start, young families are in a different mindset today, mum and dad work and there’s a mortgage to pay. Children these days are involved in more extra-curricular activities than was the case in the past when we played out in the street more. There’s so much going on to choose from today and many of the kids need to be driven to those activities and later picked up and so on and so forth and in some cases two, 28

three and even four times a week! Life these days runs at a much faster pace than in the past and so eating trends change. Also, we’re much more affluent today and restaurants are in their dozens on the Rock and even in their hundreds across the border. In the 50s and 60s I don’t recall there being any eateries on the Rock apart from Smokey Joe on Lynch’s Lane and hotel restaurants - you couldn’t really afford to eat out. Takeaway outlets abound now and at any lunchtime many have queues spilling out onto the street. Friday and weekend evenings are invariably curry, fish ‘n’ chips or pizza nights. These days for most households, I think it true to say cooking twice a day

is a thing of the past and so we’ve been ‘cooking the changes’. Weekdays many of us tend to have a snack of some sort at lunchtime and that proper meal comes in the evening. For some the reverse may be the case. From what I learn, some traditional practices of more food on the table prevail, but that would mainly apply to the more senior members of our community. It won’t have gone unnoticed how our community is growing and becoming much more cosmopolitan. Our neighbours in the hinterland, I’m told however, still have more than the one main meal a day which would include a breakfast also. Hindus

It all goes out the window, especially at sea on the very popular cruises

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life eat a-plenty, cooking lots of vegan and vegetable dishes eating two full meals daily, but again the younger element I’m told, will snack at lunchtime. Eastern European guest workers on the Rock tell me most are of the one-propermain meal-aday-kind and the Jewish community continue to cook every evening and lunches are varied but many of them also don’t follow the strict, family members sitting all together at meal times as in the past.

may indulge in during the day. Having said that, it all goes out the window when we go on holiday, especially at sea on the very popular cruises we all go on which for some individuals have easily run into two or more every year. On those, not so infrequent occasions, we gorge on the abundance of food on offer: full breakfasts accompanied by fresh fruit and juices, big lunches, tea and cakes in the afternoon later culminating in a full meal for dinner... not forgetting the bottle (or two) of wine. Overeating is an understatement when on a cruise, which includes a midnight chocolate feast... Gluttonous is not the word! But that’s OK, especially so because you haven’t had to lift a finger!

There’s no question of mum or dad doing all that ‘days-of-old’ cooking.

Modern day practices (or antics) dictate we should eat more healthily: more salads, nourishing snack bars and juices are to be consumed to substitute the bacon, sausage, egg – or all three – baguettes or sandwiches some

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Back home however, you’re back to the often-arduous routine of modern day living, working and looking after home and family. A reminder those mortgages need to be serviced so there’s no question of mum or dad staying at home to get stuck in doing all that ‘daysof-old’ cooking. There are some households though, that keep up the trend of yesteryear meal times but I assume not that many and one aspect of mealtime that’s kept by some is having the whole family – or as many members as possible – to get around the table to dine together at least once a week. Others are really into cooking which is also a popular, modern day activity but for many more, times have moved on and other necessary commitments are calling which are much higher on the agenda, which means it’s a cheese and ham sandwich, a healthy juice and a delicious banana for lunch... or a Kit Kat!

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APRIL FOOLERY ...and how a ravenous spaghetti weevil destroyed the Swiss pasta harvest. BY PETER SCIRMER

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n a small island in the heart of Botswana’s Okavango Delta, a 50ft relative of the sausage tree towers above waters where hippopotami snort and yawn. Dangling from its branches, thin unripened seed-pods 15 to 20 cm long look remarkably like strips of pasta. So, perhaps there is such a thing as the legendary ‘spaghetti tree’ which first sparked a wider British interest in Italian dishes more than six decades ago. The Okavango’s ‘pasta tree’ is real - a rare sub-species of Kigelia africana (the Sausage tree whose pods resemble plump pork bangers). The ‘spaghetti tree’ was a product of Richard Dimbleby’s vivid imagination. Dimbleby, father of today’s broadcastings brothers, was the BBC’s first war correspondent, and later, as its leading TV news commentator, was the first host of the longrunning current affairs programme Panorama. His news report on the ‘Swiss

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spaghetti harvest’ aired on the programme on April 1, 1957, is still regarded by many as the greatest ‘April Fool’ spoof among the millions spun by children and fun-loving adults since the adoption of the Gregorian calendar during the 16th Century – where muddled dates produced the first ‘April Fools’, according to some academics.

the same; and that the ‘ravenous spaghetti weevil which had wreaked havoc with harvests in the past had been conquered’. The scam would have fallen very flat today, but 60 years ago there were only a handful of Italian restaurants in all of the UK; foreign travel and the discovery of new dishes that accompanied it were still very much the province of the well-todo; and if the average Briton encountered spaghetti, it was in a Heinz tin and splurged in a sickly tomato sauce. When the programme was aired more than 250 viewers jammed the BBC switchboard - most asking serious questions: where could they go to watch the harvesting? Were spaghetti plants available in the UK? How long did it take for plants to produce spaghetti?

I prefer the calendar connection in which the New Year was celebrated on April 1.

With a suitably faked film – complete with buxom peasants in dirndl skirts, and with strings of spaghetti drooping from a tree’s branches – as his backdrop, the broadcaster told his millionsstrong audience the early Spring Europe was experiencing had also hastened the spaghetti harvest. And he went on to outline the story of the pasta’s cultivation; how it had taken years of dedicated experiments to ensure that spaghetti’s lengths were all

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


Though the theory relating it to the change from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar is widely accepted, the origins of Aprilfoolery are obscured by a string of other theories. These range from a commemoration of ‘the fruitless mission of the rook - the European crow - who was sent out in search of land from Noah’s flood-encircled ark’ (according to The Country Diary of Garden Lore) to a link with the Romans’ end-of-winter celebration, Hilaria, to the end of the Celtic new year festival or to the Vernal Equinox.

has developed its own lore and superstitions – one of these the belief that it expires at noon and any pranks attempted after that time will call bad luck down onto the head brings misfortune to prankster. Similarly, anyone who shows irritation or annoyance in response to an April Fool prank attracts bad luck to themselves.

media-linked. In recent years the Chronicle has carried several clever twists. And, long ages past, I penned a piece for the City pages of The Times setting out details of the new hunting season for haggis, linking it to the £500,000 a year export of the rare tail feathers which were much sought after by Parisian couturiers and milliners.

‘Not all superstitions about the day are negative, though,’ says one source. ‘Young men fooled by a pretty girl are said to be fated to end up married to her, or at least enjoy a healthy friendship with her’.

It drew only one response – from the Commercial attaché at the French Embassy who, in all seriousness, pointed out to the City Editor’s secretary that there was no truth in the report. Perhaps he had not come across the term ‘poisson d’avril’ - an ‘April fish’; a young fish which is easily caught. But then, like the French peasants of the 16th century who coined their version of ‘April Fool’, French diplomats are not noted for a sense of humour...

From such humble beginnings it spread into Britain and across the Englishspeaking world.

Both the Encyclopedia of Religion and the Encyclopedia Britannica relate it to the timing the arrival of spring, when nature ‘fools’ us with fickle weather... though clearly the phrase ‘global warming’ would not have been coined. I prefer the calendar connection in which, because the Julian year began on March 25 which fell in Holy Week, the New Year was celebrated on April 1. When the Gregorian calendar switched the year’s start to January 1, a common trick was to persuade one’s neighbour – or any other sucker, for that matter – that the year still began on April 1 and those believing it were dubbed ‘April Fools’.

Though its greatest delights are still those of children, particularly when teachers are the victims, many of the better hoaxes – as with the spaghetti harvest – are

*The original Panorama programme can be found on You Tube – enter ‘Swiss Spaghetti Harvest’.

It was particularly popular among French peasantry – who had very little fun otherwise, and were not noted for a subtle sense of humour – and from such humble beginnings it spread into Britain and across the English-speaking world. Whatever its origins, April-foolery GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

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# BALANCE FORBETTER

Following on from a successful and highly-informative evening in aid of International Women’s Day hosted at the Together Gibraltar headquarters, 3 of the panellists recount their main points for our readers.

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• 1 in 6 women experience sexual violence as opposed to 1 in 10 men according to stats in the USA and UK. • 93% of service users that used rape crisis UK were female in 2017.

We recite the mantra that Gibraltar is a safe place where these hideous crimes do not occur, but they do.

• 100% of the people that have contacted ‘No means No’ locally are female. • Most perpetrators are male. NYREE ROBINSON, Expert on Non-Verbal Autism and Chairperson of the No Means No Group

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WHAT IS THE LOCAL SCENE? The scene has been one of silence, fear and victim blaming. We recite the mantra that

Gibraltar is a safe place where these hideous crimes do not occur, but they do.

Since we launched ‘No means No’ in September 2017, mainly women have approached us with their stories. Stories from former beauty pageant winners being groped by powerful men at public events. Stories from women who have left work because they are sexually harassed by well-to-do men in our community, which they feel they cannot challenge. Stories of women being attacked whilst purposefully drugged or encouraged to drink by perpetrators are commonplace. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


life Young teenage women are expressing hopelessness in how sexual violence is perceived locally. They express no faith in the system from reporting the crime to the RGP right through to delivery in court. We need to address this issue of impotence in our young women. Only a third of reported cases in Gibraltar lead to prosecution, and how many of those lead to a conviction we do not know. The recent cases reported by the media leaves a lot to be desired. HOW CAN WE IMPROVE? • The judiciary system; laws need reviewing, sentencing needs to be more severe in cases of guilt, we have had very lenient sentencing. Does the jury work? Are people intimidated by who is who is our society and possible repercussions? Why are we not looking at countries like Scotland that have better laws and procedures?

in places like UK and USA. We must question as a society these flippant comments founded on nothing but ill-informed rhetoric. • We all have our part to play and our grain of sand to contribute, be it from challenging a myth, locker room talk and reporting to the authorities when you witness something wrong. We are recruiting volunteers for a number of roles - please email us at endsexualviolencegib@hotmail. com or find us on Facebook page No means No if you would like to join us. #TheBalanceIsWayOff!

• Support for victims introducing ISVA (Independent sexual violence advisors) which can double up with a domestic abuse support role. Someone impartial that can help steer victims. • Educate the community with awareness campaigns in schools, youth clubs, awareness days and with a multi- agency approach so women feel safe in our community, heard and able to report and get justice. • We need to protect women, we must stop the slut shaming! We need to get rid of the myth that ‘a lot of women make false allegations of rape’ or that ‘women have sex then regret it and cry rape’ this is not true, in fact only 3-8 % make false rape allegations GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

CONCHITA TRIAY, Retired Educator, Head of 6th Form at Westside for 12 Years, and Head of The Mental Welfare Society There has never been a time when the word misogyny has been so often used. Misogyny, we are told, is the reason why men sexually harass women, rape them, kill them; why women in most of the

world's countries are still little more than chattel, to be bought and sold and exploited in a myriad of ways. It is the reason why today there are only six countries in the world - out of 195 - which give women and men equal work rights. In less extreme cases, it explains why men ridicule them and speak to and of them in a patronising way. Whenever I think of the definition of the word - a person who dislikes, despises or is strongly prejudiced against women, or even one who hates women - I ask myself where this can come from. Why do so many men, all born of women, despise women so much? What is it that makes a boy grow up to be a misogynist? Because ultimately, this is where it starts -infancy - and this is where we have to put in the work so that it doesn't keep on happening. What messages is a boy getting that makes him think that girls are inferior to him? That they're silly? That they’re stupid? That they can be told what to do, and can be forced to do what they don’t want to do, if necessary by using physical force? In the same way, we have to ask ourselves, what messages are we giving to girls that make them feel inferior, that they're not quite as good as the boys, that they can be pushed about by boys, literally and metaphorically? How do we differ in our upbringing of boys and girls? Do parents, often mothers themselves, have different expectations of their children, as regards housework chores, for example? Do they drum into boys the same messages that are often drummed into girls, that they always have to be clean and pretty, and nicely dressed, and sit in a way which 33


life mental load’. In Gibraltar, perhaps I used to be of the opinion that is acceptable, but that it’s ok for to achieve real equality one had boys to be rough, to be assertive, because we are a Latin-rooted, to ignore the issue of gender. to try to get what they want? Mediterranean society, women Because if we are all How much do we are overwhelmingly the primary condition children What is it that truly searching for caregivers, be it with their kids or equality, then gender not by what we say their own parents. We manage a makes a boy shouldn’t define us to them but by the million things at once. It’s known grow up to be or divide us. But that roles they see their as ‘the mental load’. It means own parents carry that whether we work or stay at a misogynist? was until I became a Member of Parliament. out? home, our women are the ones Becoming a Member who, in the main, are managing of Parliament was my fast track We need to change the way the chores, the tasks, and the course to the feminist cause. we shape our children to fit household related challenges It was there that I learnt the stereotypical roles, which are in their heads; and even if their importance of flying the flag for often restrictive to both sexes. partners are pitching in, it is added female representation We must break the patterns largely down to the woman to in Parliament and for equality which have historically always delegate, and to be ultimately legislation. With only two been there. A crucial step we responsible for what needs to be women out of 17 Members of need to take in this direction is to done. It is this ‘mental load’ which Parliament, I realised how vital it implement parental leave so both causes the drain on the woman is for our democratic hub to be parents - where they are available and puts her off the idea of extra gender balanced. Women have - can take equal responsibility responsibilities or the prospect of different perspectives to men in bringing up children and have a career in public service which is and considering that we are the equal roles in the social space. taxing per se. 50%, we have to Only then will we take the strive for ways Out of 191 necessary leap forward which will Historically and structures really put women and men on an nations, we are to facilitate and speaking, I was equal playing field in all spheres. currently ranking looking around for encourage more women to get at 154 on the list. Gibraltar’s women involved in the in history, and I democratic process so that we was astounded that I couldn’t can call it truly representative of really find many who had been its people. immortalised. Think about all the housing estates, or roads, or According to a study by the Interplaques around Gibraltar. Where Parliamentary Union, out of 191 are our women? A few names nations, we are currently ranking here and there, but generally? at 154 on the list, with countries Barely. How can we expect to like Qatar, Congo, Iran and Nigeria inspire our women of the future fairing worse than us in their when our women of the past are female to male parliamentary barely there? ratios. For a country that boasts such a high GDP, sits on mainland Europe and enjoys sophisticated industries to fuel its economy, something doesn’t add up locally.

MARLENE HASSAN NAHON, Politician and First Female Party Leader with Representation in Parliament

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Why is it that women are not equal brokers in the workspace and in public life? As well as the lack of equality legislation, women still have the lion’s share of ‘the

Only through implementing legislation, educating, and celebrating our women can we really make a difference. Without equality frameworks which are friendly for working dads and mums, we will not have the basis with which to change attitudes and outdated positions. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


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SAVED BY THE (FISH) SKIN OF HIS TEETH

You may recognise the name Guy Killick, not only because he is a Gibraltarian citizen, but because he recently appeared on Channel 5’s A Yorkshire Vet, performing a very interesting, intricate, world-first surgery‌

BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER Hi Guy! Firstly, a big congrats on your pioneering surgery. Could you tell us a little more about it? Well, in simple terms, Gigha (a dog) got a small cut in her elbow while out on a walk. Unfortunately, this then got infected with a nasty bacteria which was resistant to antibiotics. As such, she lost quite a lot of skin and tissue to the infection. It really shows how nasty and even life-threatening small cuts can be when antibiotics don't work. To fight the infection, we had to cut away the diseased skin to have any chance of fighting it. At the time she was very close to developing septicemia, going into shock and dying. At one point even it looked like she may even 36

lose her leg. Fortunately, this wasn't the case, but we were left with quite a large hole that we had to repair. Unfortunately, because of its size and other factors, traditional skin grafts weren't suitable, so we had to look at alternatives. Tilapia fish grafts have previously been used in humans and wildlife to treat severe burns, wounds that by their very nature were large in size and very deep, so began the discussion on whether the same technique could be used in a very different type of wound. And after a lot of late night and

early morning phone calls with the University of California, together we came up with a new technique. The curious thing about tilapia is that as well as being naturally antiseptic, they also provide a pain-relieving effect and donate collagen to the skin that is being healed, allowing it to heal quicker. Since the grafts hadn't been used in dogs before, and for this type of wound a few alterations had to be made from the burn method. We all waited with baited breath to see if it would work. Thankfully it did, and Gigha is now completely back to normal.

Tilapia fish grafts have been used in humans and wildlife to treat severe burns.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


Have you always wanted to be a veterinary surgeon? How did you first get into it? Well actually I originally wanted to become a human surgeon. I always had an interest in biology and science; honestly, I always found medical programs on TV fascinating. Even at an early age I would read magazines and news articles on the latest in medicine. It was only after I came to Skeldale Veterinary Centre and worked alongside Peter Wright (The Yorkshire Vet) while I was doing my A-levels that I switched over (Peter still proudly tells the story on how he converted me - I've known Peter since I was around 7 years old and he has been my mentor for many years). I found the greater variety of cases and problems in veterinary surgery invigorating and even to this day I don't get bored

that I’ve come across yet! However, most days I begin the morning in our wards, checking our patents and planning the surgical procedures of the day. These are usually completed by the afternoon where it usually becomes a free for all. I may get asked for a second opinion on a case from my colleagues. We have emergencies coming in and out on a fairly regular basis which also keeps me on my toes. I also see surgical cases for pre- and post-op checks in the afternoon.

We all waited with baited breath to see if it would work.

Talk us through a typical day in the life of Dr Killick. Well there is no ‘typical day’

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

What particular event stands out for you the most in the span of your career to date (this operation aside)? Having to treat an animal that had been hit by a car in the middle of a motorway. The animal was too unstable to move and I had to have a police escort to get me through the traffic. Having not only the police and fire service but also all the people caught in the traffic watch me work was quite a

daunting experience What’s your favourite part about what you do? As cheesy as it sounds: making animals better. there is no better feeling that seeing an animal that came in near death’s door walk back out fit and well What advice would you offer someone hoping to follow the same career path as you? Apart from working hard at school, work experience. As wide a variety as possible with as many different types of animals. That's how universities tell the difference between people who want to become a vet just because they like animals, and those who are passionate about the field. Getting into uni is very competitive and its very important to stand out. It also gives you a wide knowledge base to work from right through your career. It’s amazing how little things you learn that seem so inconsequential become really important even years down the line.

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A ZOOKEEPERS DIARY Our monthly spotlight on the superstars at the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park‌ and their keepers!

jus in (Sapa h c u p a c Black ) in Ipanema Cheekynig ritus

BY JESS LEAPER

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ne of the aims of the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park (AWCP) has been to support conservation efforts, both locally and farther afield. Until recently, due to the parks small size and equally small staff base, the AWCP has mostly raised awareness and funds for conservation projects relevant to the species at the zoo. For example, the Barbary Macaque Awareness & Conservation in Morocco, Proyecto TitĂ­ for Cotton-top tamarins in Columbia and also through the park-led Conscious Eating Campaign, the AWCP has raised funds for the World Land Trust, working to preserve habitats across the world. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

Many of the animals at the park have a story to tell; they were either confiscated from illegal trafficking or kept as unwanted or abused exotic pets. Common marmosets, Ronnie and Djump are two such examples. They came to the AWCP from Stichting AAP, a sanctuary in the Netherlands after they were confiscated in France where they were kept illegally as pets. They met here in Gibraltar, at the Wildlife Park and now have an important story to tell about their species and homeland. Common marmosets were originally found in the northeastern coast of Brazil and are quite a robust and successful primate. Sadly, due to the prolific

illegal pet trade, many pet marmosets have been released into other areas. As the name suggests, they are a rather tough marmoset and have been highly successful in cities and forest fragments around Minas Gerais. Sadly, this has been detrimental to more sensitive local species of marmosets, namely the Buffy tufted-ear and Buffy headed marmosets, (Callithrix aurita and Callithrix flaviceps). Ronnie and Djump have since become ambassadors for the Mountain Marmoset Conservation Project (MMCP) in Brazil, helping to raise awareness of the plight of these two endangered primates. Park Manager Jessica Leaper was lucky 39


life encourage forest ‘corridors’ to link up fragments and release previously isolated groups of marmosets.

enough to spend three weeks in Brazil this February with the MMCP. Jessica accompanied MMCP Facilitator Sally Fransen and local students to carry out surveys of these marmosets in fragments of forest in areas of Minas Gerais. They also assisted project founder, Dr. Rodrigo Salles de Carvalho, on the conversion of the breeding and recovery centre in Vicosa, in preparation for the MMCP Workshop held at Viçosa University during the trip. This workshop was run by Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, also assisted by Apenhaul Zoo experts. This project in Brazil also ties in with the park-led Conscious Eating Gibraltar campaign run by the zoo since 2016, which aims to raise awareness of the impact of industrial meat and dairy farming on habitats, especially rainforest destruction. Sadly, in the area of Minas Gerais, the destruction is all too visible and can be, along with urbanisation, largely blamed for the fragmentation of the habitats of many of the primate species in this area. One of the aims of the MMCP, will also be to 40

The aim of the MMCP’s advocates, including the AWCP, is to help facilitate the conservation project in Brazil, providing expert advice and assistance at the early stages of its formation. The workshops provided by Durrell aim to build knowledge and skills in-country to facilitate the success of conservation projects around the world, using the One-Plan approach. The fourth workshop in Brazil was focused on the MMCP in Viçosa, providing in-depth information on captive breeding to aid the successful conservation of these two endangered marmoset species. The aim of the research field trip was to locate groups of Buffy headed marmosets in forest fragments in an area surrounding a town called Ipanema, north of Viçosa. Sally Fransen, Jess Leaper, the AWCP park manager, also a trained primatologist and vet student/researcher from Vicosa University, Larissa Vaccarini Avila set out on a three-day expedition.

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After an early breakfast, the team is ready to start field work. In an average daily temperature of

33°C, an early start is essential to escape the worst of the heat. There is also a tendency for torrential rain mid to late afternoon which makes sightings of marmosets all but impossible. After locating the fragment to be investigated, the team jumps in the car and heads out. Driving in Brazil is an experience in itself; there is a propensity towards fast driving, so the ‘powers that be’ came up with an interesting solution to the problem: sleeping policemen strategically placed but virtually impossible to see. It became essential to have one person driving and another on ‘bump look-out’ but still we were regularly foiled and feared our hire car may lose its undercarriage at any moment! A safe arrival at the fragment and Larissa begins a series of ‘playbacks’; prior recordings of other marmoset groups. This fools the shy but territorial marmosets into thinking another group is encroaching on their land. More often than not, just one, dominant and often angry little marmoset will appear, alarm calling and responding to the playback calls. More often than not, nothing is heard or seen. As the day progresses, we fear we will not find any marmosets at all. Sadly, much of the population of Buffy-headed marmosets in this area has been decimated by outbreaks of 12 11 1 Yellow Fever 10 2 in 2018. 9 3

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The searing and sweaty heat

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life of the midday sun is beginning to grate on the researchers. The 400m slow drive in airconditioned car is the only respite before exiting and holding the playback speaker as high as possible, directed at the trees in the hope of some sight or sound. At 12.40pm on the second day of field work there was finally a reply, it was distant at first and deep in the dense foliage on the edge of a relatively busy stretch of road beside the river in the reserve. The calls continued for around an hour but sadly we were unable to gain visual on any of the group.

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An important part of the research experience and where Larissa really came into her own, was contact with the local population. Larissa would enter into conversation with any locals we saw, even in the supermarket. These encounters were often fruitful and became crucial to our fieldwork. Through a conversation in a local supermarket, we came into contact with Antonio Bragança, an employee of the local Environmental Department and previous ranger with extensive experience and knowledge of local primates and biodiversity. It was with him we were able to have our first sightings.

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Antonio’s work involves training local farmers in agricultural techniques, but invariably their GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

conversations drift towards his first passion - primates. We went with Antonio to a fragment within the land of one of his clients. After just three playbacks we were rewarded with a shrill reply from the treetops, followed by a glorious hour of visual and aural display from a family group of six or more marmosets. It is still unclear what species this group belong to, it is thought they might be a rare hybrid between C. flaviceps and C. aurita. A later genetic investigation is being planned. Still, very important data for the project. Sometimes local knowledge can be less than helpful but also fruitful in unexpected ways. For an hour or so we were passed from pillar to post by local informants cheerfully professing to know of the marmosets’ whereabouts. After four attempts we finally found the ‘feeding tree’ where local residents would feed these elusive ‘marmosets’ After just one playback we heard some unfamiliar crashing overhead, not the usual entrance for a delicate and tiny primate. It slowly dawned on us that perhaps the locals were not as clued up as we had hoped. A family group of gregarious Black capuchin monkeys appeared and were markedly frustrated to find we had no food offerings. A rummage through the car provided the bounty they were looking for, a small bunch of bananas, promptly snatched and taken up into the trees. An experience well worth having but lesson learned, local knowledge should be taken with a pinch of salt! To most laymen, a monkey is

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a monkey. These fieldwork experiences were later presented by Larissa and Jessica at the Workshop in Viçosa where the important ‘human element’ in conservation research was emphasised to the delegates. Jessica will now work with the students remotely, to help researchers to collect not only primate behavioural data but also ethnographic data. Incorporating local knowledge and the inclusion of local populations and their needs, is imperative for the success of any conservation project where humans and nonhuman primates share the land. Alongside the fieldwork, help was also needed mobilise the volunteer students at Viçosa University to begin renovating the Breeding centre facilities. Harking back to early days at the AWCP when labour was short, it was very much a case of everybody getting stuck in. After purchasing some paint with the project founder Rodrigo, the students, Sally and Jess set about clearing and painting the kitchen and veterinary area, which will soon serve the Breeding Centre. Partaking in in-situ conservation to help species relevant to the AWCP has been a long-term goal of the park and is a huge step forwards for a zoo of its size. The AWCP is now an official Advocate of the MMCP and will continue to work with this project, not just to raise awareness but also to provide assistance and professional advice and assistance both remotely and in-situ. To find out more about the AWCP’s conservation working the MMCP, visit www.awcp.gi/conservation. 41


history

CARGO, CONVOYS, AND COMMANDERS

Another summer season is upon Gibraltar, with tourists and locals alike keen to enjoy the sunny offerings of Gibraltar’s Mediterranean seaside location. Yet, whilst gazing out over the dazzling Med this summer, spare a thought for an altogether different type of scene which the turquoise waters bore witness to nearly 100 years ago…

BY DR BENJAMIN COOMBS AND DR CHRISTINE GULUZIAN

D

uring World War I, when the Allied forces were entrenched in an epically dangerous game of cat-and-mouse with torpedobearing Axis submarines burrowed down in the Mediterranean waters off of Gibraltar, a U.S. Naval Commander, Vice Admiral Albert P. Niblack, was stationed in Gibraltar with his service personnel. Together with the British command, a great Allied operation took place which Niblack would later retrace on paper in a collection of memoirs, Putting Cargoes Through: The U.S. Navy at Gibraltar During the First World War 1917-1919, only recently collected in a book by former U.S. Navy officer, Professor John B. Hattendorf, and published by the Gibraltar’s Calpe Press. What this previously unseen collection of written notes by Niblack points out is the

42

undisputable strategic importance of Gibraltar’s location, which Gibraltar’s history has attested to time and time again, with its link to the Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connections beyond via the Suez Canal. The harsh reality during WWI was that a new type of enemy tactic was being utilised off Gibraltar’s shores unrestricted submarine warfare – intent on constantly prowling and sinking merchant ships transporting goods and troops to and from the Mediterranean in support of the Allied cause. Thus, a great gathering of international naval boats eventually made their way to Gibraltar to protect these crucial merchant ships. Naval ships, and even private yachts fitted out

for military action, crossed the Atlantic to reach Gibraltar from shores as far away as Brazil and California. Italian and French naval forces assisted the military effort as well. However, only the US and British commands were based in Gibraltar itself. Thus, the Commander of the US Naval forces, Niblack, had a first-hand account of Gibraltar during this hugely important time in her history.

Gibraltar became the principal convoy port of the world, with about one quarter of all the Allied tonnage touching there

When Niblack first arrived to Gibraltar, the severity of the situation was obvious: the entire area of the Mediterranean was designated a submarine “danger zone”, with frequent attacks taking place on every second or third convoy of merchant ships. Relatively few

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history administrative headquarters, along with barracks, carpenter shops, store rooms, sick quarters, and repair and fuelling facilities on the waterfront of the dockyard, all “with characteristic American hustle”. This hurried style was quite new and different to the “old world” atmosphere of the Rock. The American forces also brought with them their national sports, which proved popular in Gibraltar:

troop ships were operating in the Mediterranean and cargo traffic was particularly heavy, thus turning the Mediterranean into a “peculiar happy huntingground” of enemy submarines. Also, the narrowness of the Mediterranean meant that a navy-escorted convoy system was less effective here than it was in the Atlantic. Therefore, merchant ships carrying precious cargo for the Allied war effort were left relatively unprotected. Circumstances were dire and, through simple arithmetic, Niblack worked out that “the sinkings of merchant ships by enemy submarines would eventually defeat the Allies”. Gibraltar is perfectly placed at the mouth of the Mediterranean to act as guardian over the sea traffic that traverses into and out of the region. Its strategic placement has been used by navies as a stopping-off point for connections worldwide. This significance was put into practice during World GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

War I when, as noted by Niblack, most of the supply to Allied forces in the Middle East, North Africa and southern Europe passed through the Straits of Gibraltar. To overcome this danger, a great amount of offensive work was necessary around the Straits to deal with the submarine threat. So much so that “Gibraltar became the principal convoy port of the world, with about one quarter of all the Allied tonnage touching there to be formed up into convoys in every direction”. Considering the urgency of the situation, the United States quickly mustered its naval forces to Gibraltar and swiftly set up its base of operations. Remarkably, the Venetia journeyed from San Francisco via the Panama Canal and New York whilst escorting six submarine chasers across the Atlantic and reported ready for escort duty within twenty-four hours of arrival into Gibraltar. Similarly, onshore, Niblack wasted no time in setting up his

“Every ship in our forces entered a baseball team in a series of league games, and gave our friends an opportunity to see our great national pastime ... Basketball and soccer teams were also organized in a series of league games. Foreign officers and men witnessed all of the games in considerable numbers. An effort was made to include the foreign enlisted man in all privileges possible.” Despite the readiness of the U.S. Navy, the lack of a Supreme Allied Naval Commander to oversee Allied operations in the region presented a challenge. Instead, in order to coordinate no less than five navies operating in the Mediterranean, regular meetings of allied officers were set up to determine how to target enemy submarines and protect trade routes. As a result, a multinational convoy system was set up to escort cargo ships and thwart submarine attacks. Niblack issued an order from the start to set out the common goal: “We are here to put all possible pressure on the common enemy, to co-operate fully and freely, and to do not only more than our share, but more than anyone has any right to expect of us”. After the war, Niblack noted that “the system 43


history assisted in the escort of 5,120 ships in the Mediterranean alone. For his service during the war, Niblack earned the Distinguished Service Medal for “exceptionally meritorious service in a duty of great responsibility as Commander of the U.S. Naval Base at Gibraltar, and of the U.S. Naval Forces in the Western Mediterranean”. Hattendorf cites that the Secretary of the Navy recognised that Gibraltar was “‘the gateway through which passed one-fourth of all shipping of the Allies’ and Niblack, with his ‘fine judgement and ability’ was a ‘tower of strength in that region.’”

worked harmoniously, silently and without recriminations”. In fact, Niblack was proud of the cooperative spirit generated from the multinational forces working together in Gibraltar, which helped set a precedent for harmonious relations between the allies after World War I. He would later in 1918 confide to William Sims, President of the U.S. Naval War College, that he was very happy to participate in a multinational command arrangement: “Nothing … could have exceeded the friendly spirit of co-operation and helpfulness of the British naval and military authorities, and all our relations with the allied forces were free from friction or ‘holding back’ from cordial cooperation.”

Following the end of the war, Gibraltar remained an important port of call for the Allied nations. Overall, Niblack highlights that the British merchant service lost 3,147 merchant ships, 7,819,240 gross tons of shipping with the loss of 14,000 men killed. The US Navy operating from Gibraltar 44

So this summer in Gibraltar, whilst taking in the pleasures of the Med, perhaps consider for a moment all of the epic stories which the Mediterranean holds and has to tell. For, as Niblack noted, the story of how allies came together in Gibraltar to turn the tide of the Mediterranean from a “danger zone” into an arena for allied cooperation is a story “well worth telling.” Photo by Benjamin Coombs Wreath-laying ceremony at the American War Memorial, Gibraltar. 11 November 2018.

Fig. 1

Multinational cooperation was in full force while the convoy system was in effect. One key route between Gibraltar and Genoa saw convoys sailing every four days escorted by British, American and Italian escort vessels, with an Italian naval officer as commodore. The positions of enemy submarines were transmitted to Gibraltar from London, Malta and Paris. The sinking of HMS Britannia by an enemy submarine in the Straits resulted in two enemy submarines being targeted and sunk in response; one by an American submarine chaser and the other by the British patrol. HMS Britannia was the last ship to be sunk in the war.

The role and sacrifice of American involvement during World War I and during later conflicts has not been forgotten in Gibraltar. At last November’s centenary commemorations marking the end of World War I, representatives of Gibraltar’s government laid wreaths at the very impressive American war memorial which towers over the steps from Reclamation Road to Line Wall Road. As a testament to Niblack’s legacy and the importance of the U.S. Naval forces’ contributions to the war, Professor Hattendorf himself was in attendance to

pay tribute to those who fought and gave their lives in the service of the common goal of the Allied nations [Fig. 1]. With the 70th anniversary of the creation of NATO taking place on the 4th of April, marking the close cooperation, common purpose and mutual defence agreed between allies by treaty, Hattendorf’s collection of Niblack’s memoirs reminds us that many of those same allies continue to work together with similar support and teamwork many decades later.

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+ 350 20 067469 | info@ifai.gi | w w w.ifai.gi


environment

POLLUTION: A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS

A new study out last month, published in the European Heart Journal, has found that estimated deaths from heart disease due to air pollution may be double than what was previously calculated. Also released last month was a new report by Public Health England, that calls air pollution the “greatest environmental risk to public health” and sets forth a series of UK-wide recommendations to improve air quality and health at the local and national level.

BY MARILIS AZZOPARDI

I

n Gibraltar, there are no significant measures or strategies in place to tackle what has been called a “public health crisis”, and an air quality action plan that had been implemented by the previous government has long been abandoned. We are exposed to a large number and wide range of pollutants due to the proximity of many petrochemical industries, but the major measured pollutants are nitrogen dioxide and particulates (PM) created during the combustion of fossil fuels. Gibraltar has failed to achieve compliance with EU annual mean limits for nitrogen 46

dioxide since monitoring began and consistently fails to achieve the World Health Organisation’s limit guidelines for particulate matter. Road traffic is one of the biggest sources of nitrogen dioxide due to the use of diesel, which leads to more NOx emissions when compared with petrol. The use of diesel for cars was heavily promoted in the early 2000s as a solution to climate change, with claims that it provided better mileage per gallon and produced

ten percent less CO2 than petrol cars. However, the drawback was that it led to higher emissions of nitrogen oxides and harmful fine particulate matter. We now know that these ultra-fine diesel particles are associated with heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular problems.

Gibraltar consistently fails to achieve the World Health Organisation’s limit guidelines

Traffic emissions also contain large quantities of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and toxic compounds such as benzene, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde,1,3butadiene and lead. Secondary GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


environment pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCS), ozone and nitrates also form when the pollutants undergo reactions with sunlight or other aerosols in the air, sometimes a distance away from the original source.

low amounts of nitrogen dioxide leads to slower or stunted lung growth in children. These effects may cause them to develop lung disorders at an earlier age and suffer more disability and ill-health as a result. Children living in polluted areas suffer more wheezing and coughs, respiratory infections as well as a higher risk of allergic conditions and asthma. Infants breathe in three times the amount of air when compared with an adult, and an active six-year old six times as much relative to their body weight, so when air is polluted, their lungs are processing and filtering more air.

These particles are associated with heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular problems.

A significant proportion of the nitrogen dioxide measured in Gibraltar also comes from the combustion of diesel fuel used in the old power stations, the many temporary generators used for power generation and shipping emissions from vessels passing through and refuelling in the bay. It is not uncommon for levels of the pollutant to be higher at night despite road traffic being very low. Nitrogen dioxide is twice as dense as air and takes around 200 to 500m to disperse, with some studies finding it takes up to 1500m. Thus, due to Gibraltar’s small size the gas is not so easily dispersed and accumulates; something that becomes dangerous when there’s little wind and periods of inversions. WHO IS MOST AT RISK? Pollution affects an individual at every stage of their life from the womb to old age. Children are more susceptible to the harmful effects of pollution and exposure can lead to problems with physical and mental development. A London study found that exposure to even GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

ARE THERE SAFE LIMITS OF POLLUTION? On my Facebook Page, Pollution Watch Gibraltar, I often draw attention to EU health limits or guidelines. It is important to note though, that there are no safe concentration limits per se, and the limits refer to concentrations that are known to pose significant risk. As time goes on, more and more research is showing how pollution impacts health at even low levels previously assumed as safe; these thresholds are having to be lowered. Unfortunately, this is not happening as fast as scientists might wish since economic interests often trump those of health.

Economic interests often trump those of health.

In adults, air pollution is also linked to asthma and respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchitis. Living near a busy road accelerates the decline in lung function that comes with ageing and also increases the risk of suffering a heart attack. The link with cardiovascular disease is well established with air pollution both causing and exacerbating existing heart disease. The main driver for the process is oxidative stress and inflammation that damage and constrict the walls of arteries leading to high blood pressure, increased stickiness of the blood, increased risk of arrhythmias

Infants breathe in three times the amount of air when compared with an adult

and risk of plaque accumulations rupture; all of which can lead to kidney damage, heart attacks and strokes. This makes the elderly and those with existing heart conditions a particularly susceptible group. Some people are also more vulnerable to the effects of different pollutants due to genetic variation in the enzymes that detoxify environmental pollutants.

As citizens, one way we can help to bring about this change is to lobby and write to our Members of Parliament, asking them what changes they intend to make to address this public health crisis that is stunting our children’s lungs and affecting their cognitive development. We also need to pressure them to improve our air quality so that we at least meet the guidelines currently in place.

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life

ORGANISMS FROM ANOTHER PLANET Genomic editing and evolutionary implications.

BY LEWIS STAGNETTO, THE NAUTILUS PROJECT

A

nyone that has studied genomics at school will remember the basic principles, which describe how gene frequency with a population is directly proportional to the environmental advantage that it may express phenotypically. Consequently, as environments change, then so do the frequencies of those genes throughout the population. This process is the precursor to evolutionary diversity as, when two genetically identical populations become isolated, the environmental conditions on either side of the divide will vary, causing differences in the gene frequency. Given enough separation time the two species will diverge enough to become separate, genetically isolated organisms. As speciation continues to produce varying forms of life then some types will outcompete others for similar biological niches. 48

The principles properly describe what is observed in the natural world, and this has been demonstrated through many lines of reasoning, fossil records, genetics, phylogenetics, embryology and so on‌ but leaves each species at the mercy of their adaptive capability through mutational rates, genetically. Or does it? A paper published in 2017 in the Journal Cell, by Liscovitch-Brauer et al, has looked at genomic evolution in the Cephalopods and found that some members of this phylum can actually edit their genetic code! The work showed that the individuals were enriching a large selection of genetic sites which related to their nervous system whilst preserving tens of thousands of segments

within the code. This seems to offer these species a massive selective advantage as they can quickly respond to pronounced environmental changes. Not only that, but this ability actually helps Cephalopods reduce the frequency of detrimental natural mutations within their genetic code and gives them a level of control that human society is only just debating the ethics of. Importantly, it adds a new method to environmental adaptations which no longer require DNA mutations, the method that humans are bound by.

Some members of this phylum can actually edit their genetic code!

"For us, generally when we have a gene, the coding can be improved through mutation. That's the general picture of evolution, where a mutation comes along GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


life to adapt the protein to the needs of the organism," co-author Eisenberg says. "But when you change the DNA, it's hardwired. You change it, and that's that". This method allows them to quickly diversify the proteins available within the genetic pool, making them highly adaptable.

In performing this trick, the implications are that it may come at the expense their genomic evolution. The types of mutations which allow humans to adapt and survive through countless generations would simultaneously prevent Cephalopods from editing their genome due to the genetic structures not being in place.

Coleoids have ‘engineered’ their brains through repeated optimisations of their nervous system.

According to Joshua Rosenthal, lead author from the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, USA, “When do they turn it on, and under what environmental influences? It could be something as simple as temperature changes or as complicated as experience, a form of memory”. Cephalopods are all Molluscs, snails, slugs and such. However, it is the Coleoids, subclass – squid, cuttlefish and octopi that display a high degree of intellectual capacity. One of the implications of the study is that Coleoids have ‘engineered’ their brains through repeated optimisations of their nervous system.

It seems that once again mother nature has developed multiple ways for organisms to adapt and evolve by using such diametrically opposed processes. This could have much wider implications with respect to climate changes. By understanding new strategies in which organisms evolve, we might garner a better appreciation as to the impacts environmental changes are having on different species. Perhaps species which employ genomic editing are far more resilient to changes than even we can be? It is certainly an enticing thought.

"You might edit the RNA in one tissue, say, the brain, and not in another, like the muscle," Eisenberg explains. "You can have the old protein produced under normal conditions, and a new one when you're under stress. You can edit it or not to varying levels; you can have the edited and unedited version in the same cell, working together".

A follow-on thought is: how many other species may have convergently evolved a similar mechanism that we have yet to discover? The paper suggests that it is a relatively recent development for the Coleoids, but surely its presence suggests that other clades might well make use of such a strategy. There certainly seems scope for such a hypothesis.

So why can humans not perform the same trick? To all intents and purposes, we do, but the events are highly infrequent.

It also demonstrates that however much we think we understand about organisms; our planet can still offer us special surprises.

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Cephalopods continue to mesmerise us with their out-ofthe-box answers for camouflage, communication, locomotion, intelligence, and now evolutionary mechanisms. It is hardly surprising that they are so frequently referred to as organisms from another planet.

PHYLUM: Mollusca

CLASS: Cephalopoda

HABITAT: Marine environments

DIET: Crustaceans, Molluscs and polychaete worms

INTERESTING FACT: They have three hearts and blue blood; they squirt ink to deter predators; being boneless, they can squeeze into (or out of) tight spaces.

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environment

THE ALAMEDA BIODOME EDUCATION PROJECT

Education is a core role of any botanic garden. Botanic gardens aim not only to bring plants to people, but also to educate people about ecology and the environment, through plants.

BY DR KEITH BENSUSAN AND CHRISTINE GILDER

T

he Alameda became the Gibraltar Botanic Gardens in the early 1990s. It has been involved in educational activities since then, but up until seven years ago, this consisted of hosting school visits and giving them informative tours of the gardens. However, as the Alameda progressed in its evolution as a botanic garden, we decided to develop a comprehensive education programme of our own. Furthermore, we have enhanced our outreach to local schools, with whom we work closely, and have appointed an education officer from among our staff. We firmly believe that it is important for children to be given the opportunity to enjoy themselves outdoors, and the natural environment is our classroom. Our education programme uses horticulture to educate children on environmental and sustainability issues. 50

We try our best to ensure that our activities are relevant to the school curriculum, but we also strive to go beyond what children learn at school. There is so much more that children can learn from the outdoors, about the world around them and about themselves. We hope that we may inspire children to view the world around them in a different way, and to eventually consider career paths that include landscaping, horticulture and the environment. Foremost among our aims is that our activities should be inclusive and embrace the abilities of all children.

from the activities, and this shows in the enthusiasm and happiness with which they engage in their tasks. How could it be otherwise, when most of us in Gibraltar grow up without our own gardens? And satisfaction among parents is very high, with a frequently emotional response to how much their children have gained.

Our education programme has proved so popular that there is now a long waiting list. But our success isn’t simply measured in numbers. Children gain so much

Our aim is to develop a secure area with a range of facilities that will allow us to enhance our education programme and make it yet more accessible to all children.

There is so much more that children can learn from the outdoors, about the world around them and about themselves.

Due to the rapid growth of this aspect of our work, we have found as the programme has developed that our facilities are no longer fit for purpose. We now need new, bespoke facilities to cater for our highly valued environmental education work.

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environment

The ‘Alameda Biodome Project’ aims to create an education zone within the heart of the gardens.

The ‘Alameda Biodome Project’ aims to create an education zone within the heart of the gardens. It will include a ‘biodome’ that will serve as a greenhouse and indoor learning space, outdoor learning space, planting beds for horticulture, a sensory garden, a dipping pond and other features that will allow children to explore the natural world.

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TOPICS COVERED INCLUDE: • Seeds and Cultivation, where the rudiments of horticulture are shown. • Growing Your Own Food, so children learn about the origin of fruit and vegetables. • Pollination, Plants and Wildlife, to demonstrate the importance of plants in ecology and the interdependence between plants and insects. • Composting and Earthworms, which explains the importance of earthworms

to soil and therefore plant growth and health. • Water Conservation, a particularly important topic, with our changing climate and the source of Gibraltar’s water, which is desalinated, a process that relies on fossil fuel. • Renewable Energy, another theme that explores the challenges faced by the planet due to a warming climate and highlights the importance of sustainable energy generation. • Trees and Climbing, so that children can learn about trees in an active and entertaining manner. • Arts, Crafts and Games using Natural and Recycled Materials, through which children learn about recycling in an engaging, fun and creative way. 51

Photo © Ruth Massias Greenberg

We have already raised some of the money and resources that we require in order to make this a reality. This includes the biodome itself, an indoor space that will serve as a greenhouse and classroom, very generously donated by a local family in memory of their daughter. But our aim is for the facilities to include more, including outdoor learning and growing space, a sensory garden, a dipping pond and more.

Your support is crucial to making the entire project a reality. For more information, please contact nlc@ gibraltargardens.gi.


scene

HEART OF GLASS AND SPACE DUST

The art of cutting and cooking vivid transparencies with Kate Davies. BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

G

lass has fascinated humanity since its accidental discovery when, legend says, a beach bonfire turned powdery siliceous sand into smooth drops with a solid jewel quality to their surface, that Phoenicians soon refined in a material at some point regarded as more precious than gold. And if nowadays glass is quite affordable, and widely recyclable for day-to-day use, in the past this unique fluid-that-is-not-liquid used to be the privilege of the elite: cups were made of clay or porcelain (still un-recyclable stuff at present, by the way) and only royalty could afford glass windows, while most European manors stormed the weather with thin slabs of alabaster, also used for crockery. The invention of large glass sheets,

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for shop windows for example, is quite recent, and so is the diffusion of flat clear glass; before, it was all about panelled windowpanes or stained glass, reserved for churches and posh drawing rooms. Priceless in the Middle Ages, this artistry became fashionable in the early 20th century with the art nouveau Tiffany lamps, yet handmade stained glass is still in demand in this mass-production era, with a number of artisans still practising it for customised commissions.

She graduated in textile design specialising in infant and child bedding, consequently being hired by a greeting card manufacturer. “I designed and crafted patchwork that was turned into Christmas cards and sold in Marks & Spencer nationwide,” she says. After moving to Gibraltar where she became a full-time mum, Kate attended a crafting course at the local college, shifted to fused glass, and went on ‘cooking glass’ to create the colourful keepsakes she is now well known for.

Handmade stained glass is still in demand in this massproduction era.

Kate Davies is one of them: she earned an HND in Crafts, specialising in stained glass at Wrexham College of Art, and she has a bachelor degree in Design from Liverpool Hope University.

“I have many returning customers, who either commission special pieces or buy the already made ones: my greatest satisfaction is knowing how someone can love

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scene highlights in her larger creations, like for instance fancy beaks for her birds or droplets decorating her multi-layered bowls.

layered for a shaded effect, as seen in her ‘wish-sticks’, one of the most affordable items in her collection at just £8.

One must respect the glass and handle it correctly.

Cooking glass is time consuming when textured items have to be fired more than once, and all objects take long to cool down: “If I put the kiln on at lunchtime, it will be ready the morning after, some 15-18 hours. In fact, if glass cools down too fast, it will crack.” what I’ve made enough to buy it as a gift,” she says. Her signature piece is the slender clear fish dusted in vibrant colours, but she also cooks mosaic hearts, flowers and plants, birds, from seasonal robins with copper-wire feet to lucky owls, as hanging ornaments or as decorative details for bowls, trays and trinket dishes. Kate has a jewellery line to her name too: geometric pendants in vivid colours that glitter almost literally with space dust. “For them, I use special dichroic glass that was first invented by NASA for space missions and later extended to ornamental objects, because of its reflecting the light in many directions and thus changing colour by the angle one looks at it.”

Kate doesn’t use recycled glass because its heterogeneous makeup is prone to cracks, but she is supplied sheets, roughly A4 sized and A3 sometimes and 3 to 5 millimetres thick, from the UK. She cuts them with specific tools – and her bare hands. “I don’t wear gloves because they would hinder my feel of the glass. One must respect the glass and handle it correctly. If you do so, it will be sufficient to gently tap it to separate the cut-out shape. Yes, I hurt my hands sometimes, but it’s more like paper cuts, no need for a trip to A&E, thankfully.”

Geometric pendants in vivid colours that glitter almost literally with space dust. I use special dichroic glass that was first invented by NASA for space missions.

This is an epensive process in which metals are added to glass not by melting small quantities into the mix as traditionally done, but actually vaporising them with electron beams. That’s why Kate uses her selected ‘space glass’ sheets for her high-end pieces as well as for GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

To pepper up the transparent elegance of basic shapes, Kate layers copper or silver foil between two thin glass sheets or she prints out lettering on special paper that stands the firing and is crystallised in the finished product. Mixed pinches of Frit - coloured powdered glass - creates a speckled effect whose final impact is appreciable only after firing, so every time she opens the kiln, a surprise awaits. Sometimes the process goes sideways, like when bowls slip in the mould they are cooked in and become asymmetric, which is the signature of any handmade piece, but when this becomes too conspicuous it can be corrected with extra firing. She dabbles in mosaic too, and likes to arrange it on clear glass so it can be translucent, ideally suited for panelled windows or doors, which she’s glad to take up commissions for. Visit Kate’s stall at the Arts & Crafts shop in Casemates and like her Facebook page: Kate Davies Glass & Crafts.

Sheets come in many colours, and she has built a varied stock over the years, so customers can be assured that her artwork is multi-coloured and visually attractive. Different colours cannot be mixed but can be

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scene

GANGSTERS OF LONDON AND GIBRALTAR

‘Billy’ Hill has been dead for thirty-five years, but the infamous London villain and regular visitor to the Rock is back in the news, because his gangland feud with Jack ‘Spot’ Comer is the subject of a new movie from Gateway Films.

BY REG REYNOLDS

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nce Upon a Time in London, written and directed by Simon Rumley (Crowhurst 2017, Fashionista 2016) and starring Leo Gregory as Billy and Terry Stone as Jack, is being promoted as the “True story of Jack ‘Spot’ Comer and Billy Hill and their respective battles to become King of London”. Hill was primarily a thief, fraudster and enforcer, but he was also a smuggler of guns and tobacco and visited Gibraltar often, usually staying at the Queen’s Hotel. Ernest Francis, proprietor of the Queen’s, got to know Hill and remarked to me many years ago that the notorious criminal was always the perfect gentleman when he stayed on the Rock. But Hill wasn’t always well behaved in other ports, such as Tangier. This 54

is documented in Wensley Clark’s biography Billy Hill, Godfather of London. On one occasion in the early fifties Hill wasn’t staying in a comfortable hotel at Gibraltar but aboard an old boat in Tangier Harbour. She was, a former Royal Navy launch powered by two diesel engines and owned by fellow smuggler, spy and war hero, Eddie Chapman (see Zig Zag by Nicholas Booth). Chapman was not part of Hill’s gang, but they were friends and in late 1953 they became involved in an ambitious plot to restore Sultan Mohammed V of Morocco to power.

Mohammed V had been exiled to Madagascar by the French who replaced him with his unpopular cousin Sultan Mohammed Ben Arafa. Hill had been approached with an offer of $50,000 by a “French Soho spiv” to take on the hare-brained scheme, but he demanded, and was promised, $100,000 for the job and $25,000 in expenses. The plan was to change the name of the launch from The Fourth Lady to Flamingo and transfer the registration from British to Costa Rican. With this accomplished, in February 1954, Flamingo sailed to Tangier and

The notorious criminal was always the perfect gentleman when he stayed on the Rock.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


scene Hill followed by air and spread the word that Flamingo was in the smuggling business. With this as a cover, the plan called for Hill and his gang to make their way along the Mediterranean, through the Suez Canal and down to Madagascar to pick up the Sultan and transport him back to Tangier. The skipper and Chapman were the only ones who knew anything about boats and engines; the rest of the so-called crew being a collection of hardened criminals, described as a “broken-nosed, chiv-scarred bunch”.

the wild goings on, with some entrepreneurial types luring the men to their bars or brothels. Hill’s team did manage one smuggling operation that brought in $50,000 but then his employers told him that the Flamingo’s presence had created so much publicity that the mission had to be postponed to a later date.

“We don’t run dope. It’s not our cup of tea.”

Not surprisingly this gang of rough-necks were soon making trouble in Tangier, fighting, drinking and partying with local women. They became so notorious that large crowds gathered each day to watch

The consortium did offer Hill a chance to smuggle some drugs but to his credit he refused. “We don’t run dope. It’s not our cup of tea.”

“I was always careful to draw my knife down on the face, never across or upwards. Always down. So that if the knife slips you don`t cut an artery. After all, chivving is chivving, but cutting an artery is murder. Only mugs do murder.”

After all, chivving is chivving, but cutting an artery is murder.

Hill and his mob sailed around the Med, checking out various ports and potential jobs, but they were followed everywhere by Interpol and police. After a drunken crew member set a fire that seriously damaged the Flamingo, Hilla decided to call it quits. He enjoyed a holiday at the casino in Cannes before slipping quietly back into London. William Charles Hill was born on December 13, 1911, one of twenty-one children born to an Irish family in St. Pancras, London. As a kid he admired the local hoodlums and turned to criminality at an early age. He started out with petty theft from small shops and buskers,

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

graduated to home burglary, and by the 1930s was running his own smash-and-grab gang, targeting furriers, jewellers and bank couriers. He committed his first stabbing aged 14 and became known for his ruthless, knife-related violence. In his autobiography, Boss of Britain`s Underworld, he wrote:

I doubt if the new movie will feature anything about Gibraltar or Tangier, but I look forward to seeing a reproduction of the London of the 1950s and the war between Billy Hill and Jack Spot. Spot, born Jacob Colmore in Mile End, London the youngest of four children to Jewish Polish parents, also took to crime at an early age. The two were originally partners but fell out and Hill arranged to have Spot badly beaten by gang members including ‘Mad’ Frankie Fraser. Spot famously said of Hill: “I made Billy Hill. Then he got over the top of me. I should have shot Billy Hill, I really should. I’d have got ten years for it, but it would have made me happy and I’d be out by now.” Billy Hill died on January 1, 1984 aged 72 and Jack Spot passed on March 12, 1996 aged 83. Once Upon A Time in London is scheduled for general release on April 19. 55


podcast

GIBRALTAR’S STRAIGHTTALKING PODCAST

The podcast has been one of the fastest growing mediums of communication. Over the past few years, more and more people have been switching from radio to stream, selecting podcasts based on their interests and mood as opposed to whatever was on the radio station‌

M

any a millennial now walks among us plugged into their podcast's latest episode. The dulcet tones of their favourite hosts accompany them on their morning commute into work, their workout session at the gym, or - when summer comes around - at the beach, just before their siesta. The podcast nation is growing and it's surprising that a popular local podcast hasn't filled this gap in the media market. Mark Montegriffo, Jeremy Sacramento, and Jonathan Jurado are determined to change that... so long as they get to enjoy some repartee while they record. It's no secret that we love talking about politics in Gibraltar. We are raised with a political identity, and

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we are invariably proud of how far we've come as a people, even if we may have very fundamental criticisms of where we currently are. The truth is that politics is, like most things in life, not black and white. Perspectives should challenge us and curiosity guide us.

and critical. They don't hide from personal philosophical biases, but neither are they held by any party. In our hyper-partisan world of press releases and oneup-manship, the conversations critically engage with a topic on its merits and argue accordingly, free of personal antagonism (though there will be plenty of banter), but full of rigorous dissection.

What does this mean for Gibraltar and is there a way to finally fix British politics?

That's why this podcast consists of three hosts with varied stories, worldviews, and political experience... oh, and most importantly, distinct personalities too. Whether you see yourself on the left, around the centre, on the right, or indeed you don't define yourself at; you'll find their discussions provoking

Aqui Que Pasa is Gibraltar's straight-talking podcast. Bringing you political analysis and debate with no punches pulled, no strings attached, and no stone unturned. Including a news round-up, a meaty debate, and the Rumour GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


podcast Mill segment, Aqui Que Pasa features everything we like about talking politics in Gibraltar. Hosts Mark, Jeremy, and Jonathan all come with their distinct perspectives, providing authentic angles and interesting points of view. Their first podcast is on SoundCloud and considers the housing debate, the future of Sir Joe Bossano MP, and much more. Since then, the hosts have taken each other to task on public sector pay, the Spanish elections, climate action, and democratic representation. In upcoming episodes, a primary

focus will be the Brexit process. With the House of Commons incapable of compromising on a deal, it looks like the UK government has been forced to postpone the withdrawal deadline into the summer. What does this mean for Gibraltar and is there a way to break the impasse and finally fix British politics?

Bringing you political analysis and debate with no punches pulled, no strings attached, and no stone unturned.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

Almost as crucial is the fact that it is election year in Gibraltar. What shape will our parliament take with a new party in the fray? Which voters will be the decisive demographic at the polling station? How will the GSD perform under different

leadership? It is these questions and so many more that they will analyse and argue over the coming weeks and months, holding candidates to account as well as doing their bit to deepen critical democratic engagement. As host Mark says, “We believe that we can improve our thinking when our views are challenged. That spirit of open dialogue and curiosity is healthy in a democratic society, where issues are not pushed under the rug�. Keep up to speed with the debates, the rumours, and the laughs, by subscribing to Aqui Que Pasa. You can also currently find episodes on YouTube and Facebook, through the Aqui Que Pasa page.

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Blands Travel are now offering two daily shuttle services to and from Malaga Airport

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To reserve your shuttle please contact: (+350) 2005 0932 or travel@blandstravel.com


leisure

AVRIL’S GRAPES

Over thick, black coffee Louis Blanchet recalled when he first realised something was very wrong. It was 2014; a year, he told me, he would never forget.

BY ANDREW LICUDI DIPWSET

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lanchet has lived all his life in Dupont-Maisey, a small town of two thousand inhabitants in upper Normandy. The town, born out of agriculture, sits in gently sloping fields with meandering streams and a small river where the locals fish for trout and children swim during hot summers. Wheat and apples were the main staples of the area until 2008, when vines were planted on its southern facing slopes. To the north of the town the area is heavily wooded - the source of its famed porcini, chanterelles and black truffles sent in autumn to expensive eateries in Paris. Blanchet tells me he is a keen mushroom hunter, a glazed look coming over his GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

face as describes freshly-picked chanterelles in butter, white wine and unpasteurized cream. Blanchet works for a dairy farm just outside Dupont. By French standards the farm is large, almost industrial - owned by a well-known insurance company. Blanchet recalls when the first herd of beef-cattle arrived in 2012. The farm, which until then had only produced milk, butter, cream and cheese for French supermarkets, was to start producing beef on a large scale. EU subsidies makes beef production hugely attractive and the insurance company, a major pension provider in France

and under financial pressure from an ageing population, was aggressively looking to maximise income where it could. Blanchet recalls vividly when he first realised he was no longer growing facial hair. It was June 2014. Two years after the first beef herds arrived in Dupont. Müller-Thurgau vines, a cross between Riesling and Sylvaner, was first developed by Dr. Herman Müller in 1882, a Swiss then working in the German viticultural station of Geisenheim. The new hybrid turned out to be early ripening, frost resistant and able

To the north - the source of its famed porcini, chanterelles and black truffles

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wine

to produce prodigious quantities of grapes. Ideal for white wine viticulture in the colder parts of Europe where other varieties struggled to survive. Winters in Dupont can be harsh and spring unpredictable with frosts not unknown in May. There is ample evidence of Roman habitation and medieval monasteries in the area, though no records of viticulture exist until Müller-Thurgau’s arrival.

eye of a German viticulturalist, 500 hectares of vines were planted in the spring of 2008. According to Blanchet, matters couldn’t have gone better and Dupont bottled its first wines in 2012 just as the first steers arrived at the farm.

It was decided time had come to bring viticulture to the town.

They say the French have wine in their DNA, and many in Dupont had looked at their southerly neighbours and wished that they too had been able to produce wine. With global warming, and a new, hardy version of MüllerThurgau known as the AF1419 variant, it was decided time had come to bring viticulture to the town. A cooperative, appropriately named ‘Terre D’Esperance’ was formed, and under the watchful 60

“The wines turned out to be wonderful, much better than anyone expected. They were minerally, with aromas of lemons and peaches.” Blanchet recounts wistfully. “The only problem was little or no marketing had been done and the wines remained unsold. Eventually the first vintage was made available to Dupont’s inhabitants free of charge. In 2014 a lot of wine was drunk in the town.” When Blanchet went to his GP, to see about his loss of facial hair, he knew he was not the only sufferer. Crowds of males waiting at the clinic entrance had become a daily occurrence.

“I was horrified to see so many friends and acquaintances affected as I was. We felt bad our manliness was being compromised though my immediate worry was not for our health but concern that we would become a laughing stock amongst neighbouring towns. I am ashamed to admit that at that moment, I hoped our neighbours would be suffering as we were.” Blanchet, in his thick French accent, recounts how things got worse. “The doctors at the clinic had no explanation, but the matter should have been taken more seriously. No formal investigation was conducted. I think the doctors were out of their depth and hoped the problem would clear itself. It was only later that year when the men of Dupont started to grow breasts that panic set in.” “When I heard what was happening in Dupont-Maisey I immediately asked if there was beef rearing in the vicinity. When the answer came back as affirmative, I knew what our team would find when we got there.” wrote Dr Pascal Bisset GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


wine analyses of samples showed nothing unusual, mice in our labs began to develop feminine traits after a few weeks of exposure to the wine. More detailed analyses of AF1419 showed two carbon atoms had attached itself to the basic form of Vitamin C. These variations are extremely rare but can occur in nature and legally there is nothing to stop the production and sale of wine made from the AF1419 variant.” explained Dr. Bisset at a press conference in the town hall. Blanchet recalls, that at this point, everyone at the meeting applauded Dr. Bisset.

in La Médecine According to Blanchet, an investigative team arrived at the end of 2014 and immediately sealed off the farm. “Administering hormones to cattle is illegal in the EU. Sure, it makes cattle grow fast and it reduces costs drastically. I knew that in Dupont someone must have been breaking the law. I was convinced we would find unheard-of levels of oestrogen in the cattle and soil. My guess was that the ground water had been contaminated by serious levels of this female hormone. It was the only rational explanation given the male population of the town had, by this time, developed large mammary glands. I was very surprised, when after months of testing, we found nothing. I mean nothing. It was hard to believe. We rechecked our findings time and time again. Not a microgram of oestrogen was ever found in the farm or the water. We were back to square one.” wrote Bisset. “Our breasts were getting larger GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

and with no cure in sight we were despondent. At least we had plenty of free wine to drown our sorrows,” says Blanchet with a weak smile. “I was lucky. My wife was full of admiration for my appearance. We were like kids with new toys. For months we didn’t watch television. Some of my friends were not so lucky. Their relationships broke down and many divorced. Some women simply couldn’t stand their husbands in bras. When Dr Bisset’s team confirmed the culprit was the wine, we were relieved, and the town went teetotal overnight. The story immediately hit the press and next day we were overrun with visitors. The cooperative inundated with orders. It was mayhem. Everyone, it seemed, wanted AF1419 wine.”

“Over the next few years DupontMaisey changed forever.” Blanchard tells me. “The cooperative, now headed by Avril Foley, a Parisienne, has been a massive success and all their wines are sold years in advance and on strict allocation. Their clients, mostly from the far east, especially Thailand, are made to sign non-disclosure agreements and we don’t even know how much the wines are sold for. We think it’s a lot and we haven’t seen a bottle of the wine in years. There are many expensive cars in Dupont these days. Nobody is willing to talk about the cooperative. It’s all very secretive. There are law suits pending. Some men went under the knife. Most of us didn’t. We just adapted and have become a tourist attraction. I wish I had invested some money in the venture. I could have retired by now.”

It was only later that year when the men of Dupont started to grow breasts that panic set in.

“After we found nothing at the farm the town’s wine, considering when it first appeared, became our next suspect. Whilst superficial

AF1419 is now available to buy in Gibraltar. For further information, see the bottom of page 93. 61


charity

MED STEPS 5 WILL MAKE YOU GET DOWN For its fifth edition, the Med Steps 5 Challenge is revamping appearance and substance with a few novelties aimed at turning what was born as a charity race into a day out for the whole family, to enjoy the Nature Reserve in the full glory of spring. BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

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rganised by the Prison Service Officers, the challenge will take place on the weekend of 18th and 19th May, Saturday dedicated to racing and trekking, and Sunday to a family fun day. “Upon suggestions by the Jewish Community, who couldn’t participate in past events held solely on Saturdays, we considered an extension to the following day. For that, we are planning a more relaxed program geared to children, with treasure hunts, face painting and other games for them to get acquainted with the Mediterranean Steps, the Nature Reserve, and to learn how to respect the environment,” says spokesperson Steven ‘Noni’ Belilo, one of the organisers and GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

front runners since the event’s inception. “We will also try to go single-use plastic-free this year, following a positive trend happening at other events. In fact, we used to distribute small plastic bottles to participants and, no matter the care taken in disposing of them at the bins provided, there always was the odd one bouncing down the Steps and littering the Nature Reserve… and we had to go up the following day to clean after ourselves. So, we will distribute plastic containers supplied by our sponsor Argus, featuring the Med

Steps 5 logo that, together with the T-shirt, will become a reusable and useful souvenir.” Last year, three hundred people of all ages and fitness levels took part in the Med Steps 5 challenge, whether racing, relaying or just strolling up at a leisurely pace, enjoying the views: “They were cancer survivors, relatives, friends, and even an eighty-two-year old man determined to prove he was stronger than cancer.”

“They were cancer survivors, relatives, friends, and even an eighty-two-year old man."

To avoid queues on the day, organisers encourage potential participants to register in advance 63


charity at Image Graphics, the sponsor that provides with all their printed material, so they can estimate numbers and cater accordingly. Noni hopes to smash the record set last year with a whopping £24,000 raised, almost doubling the 2017 grand total of £13,000! Registration is just £10, but if you can prove you have raised at least £100 in your personal fundraiser in connection and in the build-up to the event, you are entitled to a ‘free ticket’.

Spain to take part, and help us promote the challenge and fundraise for Cancer Relief.”

There will be a ‘rope of hope’ to which colourful ribbons will be tied.

IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP! “Several ideas are in the pipeline as a warm-up to ours, such as quiz nights, bake sales, karaoke, concerts and sporting initiatives. In order to set the good example, we will walk the distance from Castillo de Castellar to the top of the Rock, an estimated 30km of countryside walk, uphill and downhill included. Anyone is invited to join and we warmly welcome trekking clubs from

Wanting to contribute to a cause beneficial to the whole community, the Prison Officers selected the Cancer Relief Centre because they appreciate that it needs consistent funding to continue caring for not just patients, but survivors and their families, with a comprehensive approach to healing, from practical support, aesthetic treatment and alternative medicine to nursing,

counselling and most importantly providing a positive environment for socialising and not feeling lonely during testing times. Noni says: “The most striking characteristic as soon as you step in the Centre is in fact positivity: all staff there deals with the most heart-wrenching situations with an empathetic smile on their face and ever-encouraging words.” THE CHALLENGE WITHIN THE CHALLENGE Every year, the team poses an extra challenge to attract extra attention - and donations, of course. Two years ago, Neil Hayes pledged to make the climb in high heels at least once; he managed to complete all five! Last year Mark Cooper - who had previously biked from the

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


charity Tower of London to Gibraltar concurrently to the first edition - went on hand-painting stones with colourful flowers and decorative motifs (which he has a definite talent for). Members of the public could dedicate them to a loved one in exchange of a donation, writing names or messages on them in multicoloured Sharpie ink. Later, during the challenge, all stones were taken to the top of Rock where a tree was planted and the stones arranged around it. Mark was a victim of his own success, so to speak, when he loaded all the dedications into his backpack, and he realised he needed his mates’ help to carry them to the top, because they were too many and too heavy for one person! Hence, this May he’s going for a lighter way of involving the community in remembering victims or survivors: there will be a ‘rope of hope’ to which colourful ribbons will be tied, a different colour for each cancer, with names written on them. The rope will be arranged around the tree planted in 2018, and the ribbons

will float in the wind, Himalayan style, to keep loved ones’ names resonate. Prison Service officers will man stalls around town in the lead to the big day, to give everyone the opportunity to ‘buy & tie’ a ribbon. Shoppers can find Mark, Noni or Kareem Pacheco at Morrisons and at the Piazza in April (dates TBA). RACE AND AMBIENCE They are catering for participants’ welfare down to the finest detail to make your day memorable: shuttle service from Grand Parade to drive participants up, to avoid traffic jams in the area, and refreshments stalls at key points. “This jog is intensive, so we recommend you take time out to feed properly and replenish on your nutrients, whether bringing your own sandwiches or enjoying our menu. Local health stores will also supply capsules and supplements for instant energy and glucose boost. We will only ask you not to set up for picnic at the top of the Steps, because of the apes.”

The competitive racers go first, at 8.30am, and they will sprint up, later followed by the strollers. The relay race is for teams of five athletes, each completing the circuit once. To achieve their medals, runners should factor in two to three hours to complete the challenge: “Last year there were about fifty runners, and the record was 2 hours and 4 minutes!” Noni says. “And the winner gets a trophy.” Busy traffic up the Steps, then! “We are asking all participants to abide some rules, to respect fellow climbers and to respect the environment, and to guarantee safety first to all. For example, if someone is coming up running, just step aside and let them shoot past. We expect to have an ambulance on stand-by at Jews’ Gates for the duration of the event, just in case.” Safe, practical and beautiful: thanks to the generous sponsors’ donations, organisers were able to improve the visual impact at start, with an inflatable arch, banner and all that: “We wanted to make it look professional and welcoming, but we didn’t want to subtract funds from donations, so we requested sponsorship for the infrastructure aspect, which is improving every year. Morrisons, for example, will provide fruit and vegetable snacks; last year AquaGib set up a water dispenser at O’Hara’s Battery for participants to refill their bottles, so this time we hope to have one at Jews’ Gates too.” For a taste of the ambience, visit the Med Steps 5’s Facebook page where you can also find details of connected initiative, including JustGiving supporting this fundraiser.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

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leisure

RAGE ON WITH YOGA The all-new fitness craze involving stretching, positional exercises and bad humour.

BY RESHAM KHIANI

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eace. Flexibility. Core strength. This is what I believe are some of the commonly-touted benefits of taking up a weekly yoga class. But this ancient practice has taken a modern turn to help you release all those angry emotions you have bottled inside you. Maybe you find traditional yoga a bit too gentle, too serene. Maybe all the quiet exhaling, namastes and long pauses aren’t quite your speed. Maybe you’d rather scream obscenities and then drink a beer, in which case, ‘Rage Yoga’ could be the latest trend to help you find calmness and release pent-up frustrations during stressful times. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

Lindsay Istace, founder of Rage Yoga, explains it as “A practice involving stretching, positional exercises and bad humour, with the goal of attaining good health and to become zen.” The classes were born after Istace experienced a painful breakup and traditional yoga classes did not provide the solution to all the anger she felt deep inside. “The super serene and ultra-calm environment works well for a lot of people but it made me feel like I was standing in a library full of gymnasts,” says Istace. She continues to say that combining swearing and screaming with her yoga practice helped her overcome addiction and anger issues.

During the classes, the instructor invites people to yell, vent, and release whatever tensions and stresses they’re holding inside. Accompanied by loud heavy metal and followed by cold beers, this new trend has an aggressive yet cathartic feel, and takes place in alternative locations (one of them being Brash Brewery in Houston). This practice is based on Vinyasa yoga, but slowed to a lesser pace. In the ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ section, Rage Yoga notes that attendees should prepare for “foul language, laughter and shenanigans. If these offend you, Rage Yoga is not for you”. 67


leisure Ashley Duzich, based in Houston, Texas, who also teaches Rage Yoga says: “We are all angry about something and we all have been holding onto an ‘F’-bomb for a little bit too long. So that’s what this does: it allows you to have a safe space to let go of your and frustration and rage in a healthy way”. Make no mistake, this is real yoga and the instructors are all appropriately qualified, holding a certification obtained after at least 200 hours of yoga instructor certification. The founder of this practice emphasised how on the surface Rage Yoga may seem like the antithesis of what the peaceful

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practice is supposed to be about, however, they’re helping people feel better physically, and channelling unpleasant thoughts and emotions into something positive—despite how it may look or sound on the outside.

themselves falling over during a tricky pose, laughter is definitely encouraged.

Combining swearing and screaming with her yoga practice helped her overcome issues.

I´ve watched some videos on YouTube, and I noted with awe, if the stretching is a bit too much, people can take “hydration breaks” to grab an alcoholic beverage before continuing. And, if anyone finds

While Rage Yoga may not be for everyone, those who teach the classes say they draw on traditional yoga practices — while helping people find calm in an ‘alternative’ way that makes them feel ‘empowered’. Sometimes, the way to peace is to let go of toxic anger – and it seems Rage Yoga could be the answer.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


travel

THE 5 TYPES OF JAPANESE ONSEN

Hewn into the rock of a mountainside is a natural hot spring pool. It’s not deep, but it does have a vibrant blue tinge. Steam comes off it in irregular waves, filtering the sunrise. Snow piles up in banks around the pool, the valley opening out in front of it, the mountains rising and falling into the distance like a grand painting. This is a Japanese Onsen.

BY DENICA SHUTE

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nsen translates to ‘hot spring pool’, and Japan has a great many. The water is heated by volcanic activity, and depending on the area can produce water infused with iron, sulphur, and plenty of other minerals that are said to heal rheumatism, boost fertility, or reduce high blood pressure. Being as old as Japan itself, they’re deeply rooted in history, representing wellness, status, and the arts. There remains no better way to sink into Japanese culture than slipping into a bath. While it may feel a world away from heading down to Eastern beach with your sombrilla, cooler

and family, it’s nonetheless imbued in tradition and custom. Here is your personal run-down of the five different types of onsen you can find while exploring Japan. 1. THE HIDDEN BOUTIQUE ONSEN Nestled in the mountains are family-run onsen serving freshly farmed, traditional food. This type of place is where the treats in your bedroom were made by the grandmother, and the fish for dinner was caught by their next door neighbour. Taking the Japanese tradition of omotenashi, ‘want for

Being as old as Japan itself, they’re deeply rooted in history, representing wellness, status, and the arts.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

nothing’, to new heights, they’ll give you everything you could want as if you were one of the family. Being isolated, this type of onsen is usually a ‘ryokan’, a traditional Japanese hotel with futon beds and multi-course meals. While incredibly accommodating, be aware their English may be limited. Luckily, Wadokosen Yunoyado Wado is the exception and will happily welcome you in English. Set in Chichibu (a two hour train ride from Tokyo), they have onsen baths on the balconies overlooking the gorge, making this a truly boutique mountain escape. 2 THE ONSEN COMPLEX Huge sprawling baths, massage parlours, restaurants, relaxation 69


travel rooms, hammock rooms, saunas, reading rooms… These complexes are purpose-built for spending the whole day soaking, eating, and sleeping. Pay for everything using an electronic wrist band so that you can wander around at ease wearing Jinbei (Japanese pyjamas) doing whatever you please. I usually recommend this for people who’ve been sightseeing hard and need a catch-up day. Tokyo has Oedo Onsen Monogatari, which is Edo themed. All patrons are given a yukata (easy Kimono) to wander around in, lending it the look of an Edo-era town. This option is great for groups and has great English support. 3 THE OLD AND UNCHANGED ONSEN Doggedly unaltered from hundreds of years ago with no intention of ever updating its facilities, this type of onsen is rare and hard to reach. If that doesn’t scare you, then be prepared to step back in time and

soak as those in ancient Japan did. This means rustic thatch roofs, minimal electronic devices and near bare facilities. It’s you, a jug of water to wash down with, and naturally occurring rock pools. At 500 years old, Tsuru No Yu (Nyuto) is the oldest in Japan. In the old ways of onsen, it even has

a rare, mixed bathing pool. Women enter through a hole in the rock face, obscured by trees, so that they can duck down beneath the pure white waters before they’re seen. Men have no such luck and walk in with everything swinging. However, it is incredibly remote and only accessible by car. A far more accessible one is Dogo Onsen, a day from Hiroshima, which Hayao Miyazaki (co-founder of film and animation studio Studio Ghibli) used as a setting for the onsen house in Spirited Away. 4. THE ONSEN VILLAGE If the lack of modernised devices sounds a little much for you, then the onsen village should fit your bill. These are traditional mountain towns that have dedicated their communities to providing luxurious weekend breaks mixed with small town aesthetics. These onsen villages often have hundreds of years of history, entertaining nobles and famous poets, and as such strive to keep the inns, shops and shrines of the town as intact as possible. The most charming aspect of an onsen village is their main water feature, around which

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travel

THE RULES OF BATHING Japan being a rule-oriented culture, make sure you remember what to do for a stress-free soak! • Enter via the correct curtain! Red is for girls, blue is for boys. • Get Naked. Terrifying, I know, but you’ll have access to bigger baths, sauna rooms and stunning views. If you can’t, then book into a private bathing room.

visitors walk while wearing yukata and geta (wooden sandals), and munching on pork buns or ice cream.

the wall to wash in, maybe a tiny crammed sauna, maybe there’s a pay-to-use hairdryer, but there will definitely be no free shampoo

Women enter through a hole in the rock face, obscured by trees, so that they can duck down beneath the pure white waters before they’re seen. The most accessible from Tokyo is Kusatsu Onsen Village, a magical place written about by Edo-era philosophers and poets alike. As it’s a village, you can take your pick of cheap hostels or upmarket, private bathing inns. 5. THE LOCALS’ ONSEN The most charming feature of a true locals’ onsen is the incredibly old shrunken woman sat on a high shelf overlooking both of the gender segregated changing rooms. After paying this woman, it’s entirely down to luck what you find next. A pipe sticking out of

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

or conditioner, which all the other options will have. The meet up and gossip centre of town for the majority elderly clientele, this is a truly 50s era local onsen. Expect many stares and curious people. You can find them in most small towns if you look out for the neon red onsen sign. While they’re not glamorous, they’re great for road trippers and budget tourists. For more of an in-depth guide on using the onsen, visit: kyushujourneys.com/japan/ how-to-onsen.

• No tattoos. (Tattoos are strictly forbidden in most onsen due to their links to organised crime, such as the yakuza. Luckily, lots of onsen are starting to make exceptions for foreigners. Have your hotel desk call in advance to check, or book a private bath.) • The water is shared communally so everyone washes down, sometimes twice, before getting in. Grab a plastic stool and wash sitting down. • Take an onsen towel. A very small rectangular towel that a lot of onsen sell or will give you for free. People use this to wash with but then hang it over the front of their body when they move between baths for privacy. • Don’t put the towel in the water. Leave it on the side, or do what the grannies do, and pop it on your head. • Sit, relax, and contemplate. (No swimming or splashing.)

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leisure

SPRING CLEANING WITH THE QUEEN OF CLEAN BY

Lynsey, the ‘Queen of Clean’ is nothing short of a household name within the cleaning community. She is one of the stars of Channel 4’s Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners and runs her own successful social media management company, all whilst entertaining her 119,000 followers on Instagram with daily stories involving top tips for cleaning the home. And now, she’s here to share her secrets to a spick-and-span home with The Gibraltar Magazine…

BY LYNSEY 'QUEEN OF CLEAN' CROMBIE

I

t good to get your home ready for the warmer weather and this often comes in the form of a spring clean. But really, spring cleaning can happen at any time of year, and in any type of weather. Many of us like to clean while temperatures are mild, the sun is shining, there are fewer bugs, and pollen and other allergens have not become problematic. Plan your spring clean and work together as a family. Allocate everyone in the family tasks to do and remember the spring clean is not just for the inside of your home but the outside too. TOOLS Before you start, make sure you have everything you need from

your mop and bucket to your bin bags, and turn off any distractions. One text message is all it can take for you to stop in your tracks and forget about your spring clean. Pop your phone onto aeroplane mode so you can still listen to your cleaning playlist and really go for it! Write a list of the tasks that need to be completed and tick them off as you go. On my blog (queenofclean.blog) I have a ‘Spring Cleaning’ checklist that is really useful and keeps you on track. METHOD Throw open those windows and let the air circulate and freshen up all your rooms.

house and work your way down. Work room by room and get into all those cupboards. Pull everything out, have a really good sort through and then only put back what you really need. You need to be ruthless; don’t hang onto clothes you haven’t worn for years and toys the children no longer play with. There are plenty of people who will really appreciate your unwanted items, so take them down to your local charity shop or have a car boot sale. Always dust first and start up high using a reachable duster and get rid of those cobwebs, use a flat microfiber headed mop and run dry over walls to remove dust and then carry on with general furniture dusting and vacuuming.

Always start at the top of your 73


leisure Once the bedrooms are done, move onto the bathrooms and in here check expiry dates on products and clear out those bathroom cabinets, refresh toothbrushes, toilet brushes and any towels and mats that are looking old and tatty. A good tip is to take everything out of your bathroom, giving you a clear canvas getting into all those corners. For any mould patches use a white wine vinegar spray and for any hard water marks or limescale use half a lemon. Once upstairs is done move downstairs, but don’t forget to give your stairs and landing a good clean too. Use your vacuum nozzle to get deep into stair carpet, and if you can, hire a carpet cleaner for a total refresh. Hallways can take a lot of wear and tear so use a new fluffy tennis ball or diluted fabric conditioner to remove any marks on the wall.

For any mould patches use a white wine vinegar spray and for any hard water marks or limescale use half a lemon.

Your kitchen is probably your hardest room to spring clean as it’s a high-traffic area, so maybe tackle this on a separate day. Getting all those kitchen cabinets clean and decluttered is quite a big job. Never be afraid to ask for help if the spring cleaning is a little overwhelming!

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


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FAVOURITE CLEANING PRODUCTS High reach duster – Perfect for getting into those hard-to-reach areas. Bowl full of lemons – Every home needs a bowl full of lemons. They are great for almost any cleaning job - lemon juice is great for stains on clothing!

Vacuum Cleaner – Choose one that is lightweight and easy to carry around the house. Ear buds - Great to get into those extra small areas.

Bicarbonate of soda - It’s a great deodoriser and can make a lovely room refresher spray when mixed with water and your favourite essential oil.

White wine vinegar – Perfect for any mould patches. Baby oil – Will shine up your stainless steel with just the tiniest drop. Washing up liquid – Cleans almost anything; you can’t beat good old soapy water. Microfiber cloths – Lift the dirt rather than push it around. Use different colours to code your cleaning and stop crosscontamination. Blue for loo, pink for sink, green for clean!

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fashion

SUSTAINABLE DENIM

A great pair of jeans blends fashion and utility in a way that no other item of clothing can. We live our lives in denim; it’s our official go-to garment, available in a multitude of styles, an array of colours, and suitable for so many occasions, personalities and ages

BY JULIA COELHO

I

recently read a statistic that stated: “It is thought that approximately 70 million pairs of jeans are sold in the UK alone every year”. This gobsmacking fact led me, as procrastination often does, down a rabbit hole of Google searches and articles, delving into the ugly reality of denim production. At some point on this journey, and with a desire to start making more conscious fashion decisions, I began reading about sustainability. Fast fashion is one of the key reasons for humanity’s gross environmental impact, and much to my dismay, I learned that the production of denim specifically is actually one of the worst offenders. The most pressing issue is the fact that the extraction of cotton is by far one of the largest contributing factors towards water wastage and water pollution in the world. It 76

is said that in order to create just one kilogram of cotton (roughly the amount needed for a pair of jeans), a jaw-dropping 10,00020,000 litres of water is required. Despite all of this, I am, just as much as everyone else, victim to the powerful allure of fast fashion. It’s hard not to feel overwhelmed by the social and environmental issues at hand. It is virtually impossible to become fully sustainable in every aspect of our lives, but that shouldn’t stop us from making small steps in the right direction and, most importantly, educating ourselves.

prices of environmentally-friendly fashion. This tends to be true in most cases and will continue to be an inevitable reality until ethical practices become more commonplace. Having said that, considering the amount of money we probably spend on fast fashion every year, a pair of sustainable jeans wouldn’t even come close to denting that figure.

Fast fashion is one of the key reasons for humanity’s gross environmental impact.

A question that arises often is that which concerns the elevated

There is a light at the end of the tunnel, no matter how dim it may look at the moment. The denim industry is now teeming with innovators, and slowly, we’re seeing an emergence of forward-thinking brands that are committed to sustainable practices, in the attempt to marry GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


fashion ethics and quality. As always, money talks, and demand from an increasingly socially aware consumer has also led to a rise in brands that are now dedicated to cleaning up the denim industry’s bad rep.

RIGHT: SILVER CLASSIC INDIGO SKINNY SALTSPIN, £80.00,

BELOW: CRYSTAL WHITE SKINNY, SALTSPIN, £85.00,

has now introduced a laserwashing technique which uses 60% fewer chemicals, as well as less energy and zero water.

SALTSPIN London-based denim label Saltspin use BCI cotton (a global non-profit initiative that standardises cotton farming and production), factories that are REACH certified (accredited by Intertek) and OEKO-TEX certified (a worldwide independent testing and certification system) to ensure that both people and the environment are considered in the manufacturing process. As well as using natural dyes, Saltspin GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

E.L.V.

ABOVE: BLEACH JEAN, E.L.V. DENIM, £340,

E.L.V. Denim (an acronym for East London Vintage) was established by London-based stylist Anna Foster, and is now available to purchase online at Selfridges and Net-aPorter. It is a zero-waste denim brand that takes old, discarded jeans and transforms them into new styles (both ready to wear or made-to-measure). 77


fashion

MUD JEANS

BELOW: SKINNY HAZEN, MUD JEANS, 119EU

Dutch denim brand MUD Jeans started out as an innovative new concept: the option to "lease" a pair of jeans. After leasing your jeans for 12 months, you can decide to swap them for a new pair or keep them. The old ones are recycled into new items, saving water, resources and waste. Their 100% Peta-approved vegan jeans use GOTS-certified (Global Organic Textile Standard) organic cotton and ensure workers are paid fair wages.

G-STAR Finally, a brand many of you may actually know, G-Star Raw is making moves to becoming more sustainable throughout their entire range. Their collection of recyclable denim is made with upcycled fabrics from old jeans, and many of their collections now feature several key environmentally-friendly elements, such as buttons without toxic chemicals, air-drying technology to save energy, and 100% organic cotton.

BELOW: REGULAR DUNN, MUD JEANS, 119EU

ABOVE: TYLER JACKET, MUD JEANS, 119EU

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ABOVE: 3301 SADDLE MID BOYFRIEND, G-STAR RAW, £105

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


fashion

WEEKDAY Weekday is actually one of my personal favourite streetwear brands, and also happens to be where I’ve purchased my last three pairs of jeans, quickly becoming my go-to shop for all denim purchases (yup, it’s overtaken old favie, Topshop).

BELOW: TRIP TANGERINE DENIM JACKET, WEEKDAY, £50

LEFT: JUNIP DENIM JUMPSUIT, WEEKDAY, £55 BELOW: VEER CAMEL JEANS, WEEKDAY £40

Weekday has a comprehensive sustainability commitment and places an emphasis on partnering with suppliers that are constantly striving towards fair and sustainable production. All 3 pairs of my jeans from Weekday are made of organic cotton.

TOP TIPS

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1 2 3

A great way to reduce your environmental impact is simply by shopping from thrift or second-hand stores. Wash your jeans less often (within reason), and try and wash them with colder water if you’re keen on saving energy. Donate your jeans once you're done with them. Don't throw them away, but rather, look to charity shops and resale sites like eBay and Depop.

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recipes Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/thegibraltarvegan

VEGAN FULL GIBRALTARIAN

It’s Easter, the one long weekend of the year where the vast majority of workers have four days in a row off. The weekend lends itself to DIY projects, a trip away and late breakfast/brunch feasts. Not all of the ingredients are made from scratch, this breakfast is all about enjoying your time off and not working hard in the kitchen.

This Vegan Full Gibraltarian (a play on the traditional full English) hits the spot and will leave you full until dinner time but not too full you can’t tuck into your Easter Eggs. P.S. scrambled egg and beans on toast is a handy post work or school meal, so keep this recipe handy. This is enough food for two hungry adults.

12 Cherry Tomatoes 8 Mushrooms ½ Tsp Mixed Herbs ½ Tsp Garlic Pepper 1/3 Tsp Black Salt (Kala Namak) – this gives it the eggy taste and smell 1/3 Tsp Turmeric 1 Slice Bread (I Used The Cranberry And Pumpkin) METHOD

INGREDIENTS 280G Block Of Firm Tofu (I Use Tofoo) 1 Can Five Mixed Beans 1 Box Vegan Sausages (I Use Linda Mccartney Red Onion And Rosemary) 1 Packet Vbites Rashers

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1. Cook the sausages, rashers and beans as per instructions, timing them to be ready when the rest of the food is 2. Place the tomatoes into an oven dish and cook for 13-15 mins at 200c 3. Prepare the scrambled tofu. • Work the tofu roughly with

either a fork or your hands, until it is crumbly • Heat a little oil in a frying pan and add the tofu together with the black salt, garlic pepper and turmeric • Cook on a high temperature for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally • Taste and see if you would like to add more black salt, although be careful not to overdo it and leave it too eggy! 4. Prepare the mushrooms. • Slice the mushrooms and sauté in some oil • When cooked add the mixed herbs and garlic pepper 5. Place all the ingredients to the Full Gibraltarian on a plate, pour a large coffee and tuck in. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


recipes Recipe by Mama Lotties: www.mamalotties.com Find this Recipe and more in their Mama Lotties: 100 Everyday Recipes Cookbook

MAMA'S SAMOSAS

I have tried many different types of samosas, so I wanted to give them a go myself. These vegetarian samosas are crunchy on the outside and soft in the middle, a great side or starter to a meal.

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Filo Pastry Sheets

1. Peel and dice the potatoes and cauliflower and place to boil, when soft remove from pot and drain.

4 Potatoes 1 Tin Fresh Peas 2 Garlic Cloves 200G Lentils 1 Small Cauliflower Grated Ginger Fresh Coriander

2. Chop the onion into very small pieces and do the same with the garlic. Fry these in a pan with a splash of oil and grated ginger. When softened, pour in the lentils and the peas.

4. Cut the filo into rectangles and place it upwards in front of you, and spoon a bit of the mixture on the bottom corner. Fold a triangle across and continue folding a triangle upwards, until you get near the top. Butter the remaining edge and fold over, sealing the edges.

3. Transfer everything into a large bowl and blend together the ingredients including the coriander

5. Finish off by brushing over with oil and placing in the oven at 180°C for 30 – 40 minutes.

1 Shallot 2 Tsp Garam Masala

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

and garam masala, leaving some potato chunks and lentils aside.

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SOVEREIGN CORPORATE SERVICES Establish and Support your Business Market Entry Corporate Insurance Packages SOVEREIGN PRIVATE CLIENT Family Office Wealth Management Asset Protection Insurance SOVEREIGN RETIREMENT PLANNING Global Personal and Occupational Pensions

SovereignGroup.com To contact us email: gib@SovereignGroup.com or call +350 200 76173

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


restaurants, bars & pubs THE LOUNGE

SOLO BAR & GRILL

ALL’S WELL

Stylish Lounge Gastro Bar on Queensway Quay Marina serving best quality food prepared by passionate, qualified chefs. Popular quiz on Sundays from 7pm and a relaxed friendly atmosphere. A separate Lounge Bar Area serving a wide range of hot drinks, wines, beers, spirits and cocktails at reasonable prices, with large TV’s for sports and events coverage.

Solo Bar and Grill is a stylish and modern eatery — perfect for business functions or lunches — and part of the popular Cafe Solo stable. Serving everything from Goats’ Cheese Salad, Mediterranean Pâté and Cajun Langoustines to Beer Battered John Dory, or Harissa Chicken, and Chargrilled Sirloin Steak. This is a delightful venue in Europort with a cosy mezzanine level and terrace seating. Well worth a visit, or two! Available for private functions and corporate events — call 200 62828 to book your function or event.

In the fashionable Casemates square stands Gibraltar’s last historical themed pub, named for the 18th-century practice of locking gates to the city at night when the guard called ‘All’s Well’. Their food menu caters to all cravings; whether it’s fish and chips, a homemade pie, or maybe even a delicious sharing platter, they have it all. All’s Well have an amazing range of bottled beers as well as being the only pub in Gibraltar to offer craft beer on tap. Happy hour is daily from 7-9pm. Large terrace. Karaoke Mondays & Wednesdays until late.

Open: 10am-late Mon - Sun Be sure to arrive early to ensure a seat! The Lounge, 17 Ragged Staff Wharf, Queensway Quay Marina Tel: 200 61118 info@thelounge.gi

Open: 12-8pm. Solo Bar & Grill, Eurotowers Tel: 200 62828

All’s Well, Casemates Square. Tel: 200 72987

CASA PEPE

NUNOS ITALIAN

CAFÉ SOLO

A delightful terrace, bar, restaurant on the prestigious Queensway Quay Marina. Wonderful location for business meetings, weddings, anniversaries and other special occasions. Specialising in fresh fish caught locally with daily specials including seabass, dorada, sole, and bream, plus a very comprehensive a la carte menu. Also available are tapas and raciones (double size tapas) to share (or not!) prior to a main course. Mixed paellas also available, as well as fish cooked in rock salt, whole suckling pig and baby lamb to order.

Nunos Italian Restaurant, overlooking the Mediterranean, is popular with hotel guests, tourists and local residents. This 2 rosette rated, AA restaurant is renowned for its eclectic interior, intimate atmosphere and fine cuisine. Savour a wide selection of freshly prepared Italian delicacies, including bread, pasta, meat and fish, followed by delicious desserts. In the summer months, the hotel offers alfresco dining for private parties in the Garden Grill. Sitting nestled in the colonial garden you can enjoy a mouth-watering menu of charcoal-grilled meats and freshly prepared salads in candlelit surroundings.

Modern Italian eatery set in lively Casemates square. Everything from chicory and crispy pancetta salad with walnuts, pears and blue cheese dressing, or king prawn, mozzarella and mango salad to pastas (eg: linguine with serrano ham, king prawns and rocket; smoked salmon and crayfish ravioli with saffron and spinach cream) to salads (eg: Vesuvio spicy beef, cherry tomatoes, roasted peppers and red onions; and Romana chorizo, black pudding, egg and pancetta) and pizzas (eg: Quatto Stagioni topped with mozzarella, ham, chicken, pepperoni and mushroom) and specialities such as salmon fishcakes, beef medallions and duck. Daily specials on blackboard. No smoking.

Open: Tues-Sat lunch & evening, Sunday lunch only, closed Mondays. Casa Pepe, 18 Queensway Quay Marina, Tel/Fax: 200 46967 casa.pepe.gib@gmail.com. www.casapepegib.com

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

Open: Mon-Sun 1-3pm lunch, 7–11pm dinner Nunos Italian Restaurant and Terrace Caleta Hotel, Catalan Bay Tel: 200 76501

Email: reservations@caletahotel.gi

Café Solo Grand Casemates Square. Tel: 200 44449

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information EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY: ALL EMERGENCIES................................. 112 FIRE...............................................................190 AMBULANCE.............................................190 POLICE.................................................................199

Business Information Financial Serv. Commission Tel: 200 40283/4 Chamber of Commerce Tel: 200 78376 Federation Small Business Tel: 200 47722 Company Registry.Tel: 200 78193 Useful Numbers Airport (general info.) . Tel: 200 12345 Hospital, St Bernards. . Tel: 200 79700 Weather information. . Tel: 5-3416 Frontier Queue Update Tel: 200 42777 Gibraltar Museum Tel: 200 74289 18/20 Bomb House Lane 10am-6pm (Sat 10am-2pm). Admission: Adults £2/Children under 12 - £1. Exhibitions also at Casemates gallery.

Police 200 72500

Gibraltar Garrison Library Tel: 200 77418 2 Library Ramp Mon-Fri: 9am-5pm. Free Library tour offered every Friday at 11am. chris.tavares@gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi Registry Office Tel: 200 72289 It’s possible to get married within 48 hours. A fact taken advantage of by stars such as Sean Connery & John Lennon.

Gibraltar Services Police Emergency Nos: (5) 5026 / (5) 3598

Gibraltar Public Holidays 2019 New Year’s Day Commonwealth Day Good Friday Easter Monday

Monday 1st Jan Monday 11th Mar Friday 19th Apr Monday 22nd Apr

Workers Memorial Day Monday 29th Apr May Day

Wednesday 1st May

Rock Tours by Taxi Tel: 200 70052 As well as offering normal fares, taxis provide Rock Tours taking in the Upper Rock, Europa Point etc.

Spring Bank Holiday

Monday 27th May

Queen’s Birthday

Monday 17th June

John Mackintosh Hall Tel: 200 75669 Includes cafeteria, theatre, exhibition rooms and library. 308 Main Street 9.30am - 11pm Mon-Fri.

Late Summer Bank Holiday

Monday 26th Aug

Gibraltar National Day Tuesday 10th Sept Christmas Day Boxing Day

Wednesday 25th Dec Thursday 26th Dec

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD Gibraltar adhdgibraltar@gmail.com facebook.com/ADHDGibraltar/ Alcoholics Anonymous meet 7pm Tues & Thurs at Nazareth House Tel: 200 73774.

COPE Support group for people with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia or Rheumatoid Arthritis. Meetings at Catholic Community Centre Book Shop at 7.30pm first Thur of each month. Tel: 200 51469 Email: copeadsupport@hotmail.com

A Step Forward support for single, separated, divorced/widowed people, meet 8pm Mon at St Andrew’s Church.

Dignity At Work Now Confidential support and advice for those who are being bullied at work. Tel: 57799000.

Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group those who are pregnant, breastfeeding or have breastfed to get together for coffee / support. Partners and older children welcome. Meets 1st Wed / month at Chilton Court Community Hall at 1.30pm. Enquiries and support 54014517.

Families Anonymous Support group for relatives and friends concerned about the use of drugs or related behavioural problems. Meet weekly on Thurs at 9pm at Gladys Perez Centre, 304A Main Street, Tel: 54007676 or 54014484.

Childline Gibraltar confidential phone line for children in need. Freephone 8008 - 7 days a week 5pm - 9pm Citizens’ Advice Bureau Open Mon-Thur 9:30am-4:00pm, Fri 9:30am- 3:30pm. Tel: 200 40006 Email: info@cab.gi or visit at 10 Governor’s Lane. Free & confidential, impartial & independent advice and info.

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Gibraltar Cardiac Rehabilitation and Support Group meets on the first Tues of every month at 8.30pm at John Mac Hall, except for Jul & Aug. Gibraltar Dyslexia Support Group 72 Prince Edwards Rd Tel: 200 78509 Mobile: 54007924 website: www.gdsg.co.uk Gibraltar Marriage Care Free relationship counselling, including pre-marriage education (under auspices of Catholic Church, but open to all). Tel: 200 71717.

Gibraltar Society for the Visually Impaired Tel: 200 50111 (24hr answering service). Hope miscarriage support Tel: 200 41817. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support: Meets every Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous Tel: 200 70720 Parental Support Group helping parents and grandparents with restrictive access to their children and grandchildren. Tel: 200 46536, 200 76618, or 54019602. Psychological Support Group, PO Box 161, Nazareth House. Meet Tuesdays at 7pm, Fridays 8pm. Tel: Yolanda 54015553 With Dignity Gibraltar support for separated, divorced/widowed or single people. Meet Weds 9pm, Catholic Community Centre, Line Wall Rd. Outings/activities. Women in Need Voluntary organisation for all victims of domestic violence. Refuge available. Tel: 200 42581 (24 hrs).

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

The Gibraltar Magazine is published and produced by Rock Publishing Ltd, Gibraltar. Tel: (+350) 200 77748

NON-URGENT CALLS: Ambulance Station 200 75728


BY @SWISSTRAVELGUY

TAKEN A GREAT PHOTO OF GIB AND THINK EVERYONE SHOULD SEE IT? Email your high resolution photo to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com and you might see it published here!


satire

POSEIDON AND PLASTIC POLLUTION Marine plastic pollution gives Poseidon a nasty cough. BY PETER SCHIRMER

T

he deep-throated cough exploded across the open-plan communal space of the large penthouse, rattling the sliding doors with their view of the Bay and Algeciras on the far shore, A second, deeper cough set the crystal champagne flutes a-tremble on the shelves of the cocktail cabinet, and brought with it a gust of the ocean – a mix of sea spume and rotting fish which offended the senses. ‘If you can’t do something about that cough, at least take it and the stink onto the patio,’ grumbled Athena, looking up from texting on her 5G Huawei phone and wrinkling her nose at the smell. Hera nodded her agreement. In spite of the clement Spring weather Poseidon’s bouts of “

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coughing were worsening, and even the self-centred Father of the Gods had expressed concern – though Hera was uncertain whether Zeus cared more about their son’s health or merely was irked by the miasma of kelp and decomposing fish that accompanied the sea god’s coughs.

Hippocrates fellow sat under a tree on Kos dispensing his thoughts. They’re bright doctors at A&E and they’ll find out what’s wrong...’ ‘I know what’s wrong. It’s those damned plastic micro-fibres. The oceans are full of them, Can’t avoid them,’ Poseidon rasped through a fusillade of hacking coughs, and headed for the patio.

Medical treatments have come a long way since Hippocrates sat under a tree dispensing his thoughts.

‘You should go down to St Bernard’s – get a check-up’, offered Apollo, who had taken time off from his global rounds to watch what was expected to be a spectacular lunar eclipse. ‘The guys in A&E did wonders for Pop’s aches and pains. Medical treatments have come a long way since that

‘Micro-fibres, what on earth are they?’ Artemis asked of her brother’s retreating back. But Poseidon, burdened by his trident and a long-handled fishing net, was wrestling to slide back the patio doors, and it was left to GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


satire Athena to answer. ‘They’re minute molecules of plastic, so small you need a special microscope to see ‘em, and scientists reckon they are as toxic as the tiny globules formed when plastic bags and bottles and flip-flops degrade in the sea,’ she explained. ‘Fishes and dolphins ingest the globules, and they pass into the mortal food chain. We’ve seen TV programmes about them. Well these are invisible but just as dangerous.’ ‘I thought he wore some sort of filtering mask as protection against those plastic bits.’ ‘Yes. But there’s no mesh small enough to stop the micro-fibres produced by washing machines. That’s where they come from, a woman MP at Westminster told the British Parliament last month. She said that every week washing machines in Britain alone produce 9.5 trillion of them. They’re washed into rivers and then swept down to the sea...’ ‘A trillion?’ Artemis raised her eyebrows in query. ‘That’s a helluvalot of zeros, and if they can’t be seen by the naked eye, who is counting them? Must take hundreds of bureaucrats with microscopes to check that total in a week.’

‘It’s more likely to be some sort of scientific guesstimate... or even a figure pulled out of the air. You know what politicians are like – they make up things they think people want to hear,’ said Apollo. ‘Not ALL politicians,’ thundered Zeus stumping into the room, catching the tail end of Apollo’s remarks. ‘My Codswallop Coalition stands for the truth and utter transparency in politics. A new broom sweeping away the cobwebs of the past in a mixture of mature wisdom and youthful enthusiasm. None of the school playground name-calling and spiteful behaviour we see telecast from Westminster PMQs by the BBC’. Zeus thumped his right fist into his other hand for emphasis – forgetting that he still clutched the loosely wrapped portion of fish and chips he had collected in Casemates. A greasy mix of oily batter and cheap vinegar splattered the white linen jacket – the one he wore on his forays to canvas support for the CC Party in Main Street... and to collect up his daily lunch.

Every week washing machines in Britain alone produce 9.5 trillion of them.

‘If Brit bureaucrats are anything like the Civil Service, or my colleagues at the parcels office, it would take them a month.’ This, gloomily, from Hermes who still smarted from his latest clash with the TGWU over his speed in sorting and deliveries. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

‘Better take your jacket off. I’ll run it through the washingmachine before the grease soaks in’, urged Hera. Zeus, who had begun picking at the double portion of battered cod and chips, peeled off his jacket – leaving oily finger-marks on the sleeves. Hera sighed, shook her head wordlessly. ‘Rather wash it by hand, so you won’t make thousands more

micro-fibres’, Athena muttered as her mother passed en route to the utility room. ‘You should really cut down on you fish intake, Pops,’ Apollo observed as he watched Zeus scoop up a piece of cod and add several chips. ‘Look what a seafood diet is doing to Poseidon... all those thousands of micro-fibres and polluting plastic...’ ‘And I’ve noticed you coughing quite a lot recently,’ Artemis added innocently. ‘Micro-fibres? What have they got to do with coughing?’ demanded the Father of the Gods who wasn’t quite sure what “microfibres” were, but was damned if he was going to admit not knowing. So Athena explained. And yes, Zeus had seen the ‘Blue Planet’ on TV; and of course the Codswallop Coalition was concerned with environmental issues and was tackling these in its manifesto; and he had been concerned about Poseidon’s cough – though this was nothing like his own stentorian clearing of the throat which was brought about by poor quality Cuban cigars. But as he listened to Athena’s chronicle of toxic marine pollution, Zeus quietly and unobtrusively folded the wrapping over the half-eaten portion of cod. He would give the remaining chips to the seagulls. That might stop their screeching. At least while he had his siesta. 87


little dictionary

esurient WE'VE HIDDEN A

SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE MAGAZINE...

adjective

CAN YOU FIND HIM?

hungry or greedy

email monkey@thegibraltarmagazine.com with his location by 20th April

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clubs & activities Arts & Crafts Cross Stitch Club: John Mackintosh Hall, 1st Floor, Mon 6-8pm, fee £1. Gibraltar Arts & Crafts Association: Children: Mon&Fri 12.30-2pm, Mon-Fri 3.45-5.15pm Adults: Wed 5.45-7.15, Sat 10.30 to 12.30, Tel: 20073865 email: gibartsandcrafts@hotmail.com Knit and Natter Group: Tues 11am-3pm, Thurs 5.30-7.30pm, at Arts & Crafts Shop, Casemates balcony. Free to join and refreshments provided. Tel: 20073865. The Arts Centre: Prince Edward’s Road, Art classes for children and adults. For more info call Tel: 200 79788. The Fine Arts Association Gallery: At Casemates. Open 10am-2pm, 3-6pm Mon-Fri, Sat 11am-1pm. The Gibraltar Decorative and Fine Arts Society: Affiliated to UK NADFAS meets third Wed of the month at 6.30pm at Eliott Hotel - lecturers & experts from the UK talk on Art etc. Contact: Chairman Claus Olesen 200 02024 claus.olesen@sghambros.com. Membership Ian Le Breton 200 76173 ilebreton@SovereignGroup.com Board Games Calpe Chess Club & Junior Club: meets in Studio 1, John Mackintosh Hall Thursday, Juniors: 5p.m. - 7 p.m. / Tuesday & Thursday 7p.m. - 10:30 The Gibraltar Scrabble Club: Meets on Tuesdays at 3pm. Tel: Vin 20073660 or Roy 20075995. All welcome. The Subbuteo Club: Meets in Charles Hunt Room, John Mackintosh Hall. Dance Adult Dance Classes: Wed evenings at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre from 7-8.30pm. Contact Dilip on 200 78714. Art in Movement Centre: Hip-hop/Break Dance, Contemporary Dance, Pilates, Capoeira, Acrobatics, Street Kids & Tods, Modern Dance. Performance and Film opportunities. Judo & Jujitsu Classes: Tue/ Thur with Sensei Conroy. All ages. Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. www. artinmovement.net FB: Art In Movement A.I.M, tel 54025041 or 54007457 Ballet, Modern Theatre, Contemporary & Hip-hop: weekly at Danza Academy. Training from 3 years to Adult Advanced. 68/2 Prince Edward’s Rd Tel: 54027111. Bellydance Classes, all levels, Tue 8-9pm at the Ocean Village Gym (non–members welcome). Contact 54005593. DSA Old & Modern Sequence Dancing: Sessions at Central Hall Fri 8.30pm, beginners 8pm. Tel: 200 78901 or tony@ gibraltar.gi Everybody welcome. Modern & Latin American Sequence Dancing: Mon at Catholic Community Centre 8pm. Tel. Andrew 200 78901. Modern, Contemporary, Lyrical, Flexibility, Hip Hop & Dance Theatre: Classes weekly at Urban Dance Studio, 2 Jumpers Bastion. Tel: Yalta 54012212 or Jolene 54015125. Rockkickers Linedance Club: Governor’s Meadow 1st School. www.rockkickers.com Salsa Gibraltar Salsa: Tues at Laguna Social Club, Laguna Estate. Beginners 7-8.30pm. Intermediates 8.30-10pm. Tel: Mike 54472000 or info@salsagibraltar.com Zumba Classes at Urban Dance: Jumpers Bastion, with certified instructor Tyron Walker. Tel: 20063959 or 54012212 or Twitter: @UrbanDanceGib History & Heritage The Gibraltar Heritage Trust: Main Guard, 13 John Mackintosh Sq. Tel: 200 42844. The Gibraltar Classic Vehicle Association: Dedicated to the preservation of Rock’s transport/motoring heritage. Assists members in restoration / maintenance of classic vehicles. New members welcome. Tel: 200 44643. Garrison Library Tours: at 11am on Fri, duration 1h 50mins. Tel: 20077418. History Alive: Historical re-enactment parade. Main Street up to Casemates Square every Sat at 12 noon. Music Gibraltar National Choir and Gibraltar Junior National Choir: Rehearses at the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Tel: 54831000. The Calpe Band: Mon & Wed. For musicians of brass/woodwind instruments of all standards/ages/abilities 7-9pm. Tel:

54017070 or thecalpeband@gmail.com Jazz Nights: Thurs at 9pm at O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel. Tel: 200 70500. Outdoor Activities The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award Gibraltar: Exciting self-development programme for young people worldwide equipping them with life skills to make a difference to themselves, their communities and the world. Contact: Award House, North Mole Road, PO Box: 1260. mjpizza@ gibtelecom.net, www.thedukes.gi. Social Clubs The Rotary Club of Gibraltar meets the Rock Hotel, 7pm Tuesday evenings. Guests welcome. For contact or info www.rotaryclubgibraltar.com Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes: (Gibraltar Province) meets RAOB Club, 72/9 Prince Edward’s Road - Provincial Grand Lodge, Thu/month, 7.30pm. William Tilley 2371, Thurs 8.30pm. Buena Vista 9975, monthly, Social Lodge. www.akearn1.wix. com/raob-gibraltar, william.tilley.lodge@ hotmail.co.uk, Clive, tel: 58008074 Special Interest Clubs & Societies Creative Writers Group: meets up on Tuesday mornings at 10.30 in O’Reilley’s Irish Bar and it is free to attend. Tel: Carla 54006696. Gibraltar Book Club: For info Tel: Parissa 54022808. Gibraltar Horticultural Society: meets 1st Thurs of month 6pm, J.M. Hall. Spring Flower Show, slide shows, flower arrangement demos, outings to garden centres, annual Alameda Gardens tour. All welcome. Gibraltar Philosophical Society: devoted to intellectually stimulating debate. Frequent lectures and seminars on a range of topics. Tel: 54008426 or Facebook: facebook.com/gibphilosophy Gibraltar Photographic Society: Meets on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. Wellington Front. Induction courses, talks, discussions, competitions etc. For details contact the secretary on, leslinares@gibtelecom.net Harley Davidson Owners’ Club: www.hdcgib.com Lions Club of Gibraltar: Meets 2nd and 4th Wed of the month at 50 Line Wall Road. www.lionsclubofgibraltar.com St John’s Ambulance: Adult Volunteers Training Sessions from 8-10pm on Tues. Tel: 200 77390 or training@stjohn.gi The Royal British Legion: For info or membership contact the Branch Secretary 20074604 or write to PO Box 332. UN Association of Gibraltar: PO Box 599, 22a Main Street. Tel: 200 52108. Sports Supporters Clubs Tottenham Hotspur Supporters Club: Meets at Star Bar, Parliament Lane, when Spurs games are televised - call prior to matches to check game is televised. Great food for a lunch if KO is early or an early supper if the game is later. Gibraltar Arsenal Supporters Club: Meets match days upstairs at Time Out Café, Eurotowers. Gooners of all ages welcome. For info/news visit www.GibGooners.com Tel: 54010681 (Bill) or 54164000 (John). Gibraltar Hammers: Meets on match days at the Victoria Stadium Bar, Bayside Road. All league games are shown live. All West Ham supporters and their families are welcome. For details visit www.gibraltarhammers.com or gibraltarhammers@hotmail.com Sports & Fitness Artistic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Artistic Gymnastics Association. Tel: Angela 200 70611 or Sally 200 74661. Athletics: Gibraltar Amateur Athletics Association holds competitions through year for juniors, adults and veterans. Two main clubs (Calpeans 200 71807, Lourdians 200 75180) training sessions at Victoria Stadium. Badminton: Recreational badminton weekdays at Victoria Stadium (Tel: 200 78409 for allocations). Gibraltar Badminton Association (affiliated to BWF& BE) junior club/tournaments, senior leagues/ recreational. www.badmintongibraltar.com Ballet Barre Fitness: Adults on Wed 10am & Fri 6pm at The Arts Centre. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Basketball: Gibraltar Amateur Basketball Association (affiliated FIBA) leagues/ training

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

for minis, passarelle, cadets, seniors and adults at a variety of levels. Tel: John 200 77253, Randy 200 40727. Boxing: Gibraltar Amateur Boxing Association (member IABA) gym on Rosia Rd. Over 13s welcome. Tuition with ex-pro boxer Ernest Victory. Tel: 56382000 or 20042788. Cheerleading: Gibraltar Cheerleading Association, girls and boys of all ages. Cheerleading and street cheer/hip-hop at Victoria Stadium. Recreational / competitive levels. Tel: 58008338. Canoeing: Gibraltar Canoeing Association. Tel: Nigel 200 52917 or Arturo 54025033. Cricket: Gibraltar Cricket, National Governing Body & Associate Member of ICC. Governs International & Domestic Men’s, Women’s, Boys’ & Girls’ cricket- league & cup competitions and in-school coaching. www.gibraltarcricket.com, info@gibcricket. com, Twitter: @Gibraltar_Crick Cycling: Gibraltar Cycling Association various cycling tours. Darts: Gibraltar Darts Association (full member of WDF & affiliate of BDO). We cater for men, ladies & youth who take part in leagues, competitions and a youth academy for the correct development of the sport. Tel: Darren 54027171 Secretary, Alex 54021672 Youth Rep, Justin 54022622 President. Email: info@ gibraltardarts.com Football: Gibraltar Football Association leagues/competitions for all ages OctoberMay. Futsal in summer, Victoria Stadium. Tel: 20042941 www.gibraltarfa.com Gaelic Football Club (Irish sport): Males any age welcome. Get fit, play sport, meet new friends, travel around Spain/Europe and play an exciting and competitive sport. Training every Wed on the MOD pitch on Devil’s Tower Road at 7pm. Andalucia League with Seville and Marbella to play matches home and away monthly. Visit www.gibraltargaels. com or secretary.gibraltar.europe@gaa.ie Hockey: Gibraltar Hockey Association (members FIH & EHF) high standard competitions/training for adults/juniors. Tel: Eric 200 74156 or Peter 200 72730 for info. Iaido: teaches the Japanese sword (Katana), classes every week. www.iaidogibraltar.com Ice Skating: Gibraltar Rock Stars Figure Skating Club lessons every Tuesday evening & Saturday morning, all levels including adults. Contact grsfsc@gmail.com or 58700000 Iwa Dojo, Kendo & Jujitsu: Classes every week, for kids/adults. Tel: 54529000 www. iwadojo.com or dbocarisa@iwadojo.com Judo and Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Budokai Judo Association UKMAF recognised instructors for all ages and levels at Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. Tel: Charlie 20043319. Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Ju-jitsu Academy training and grading for juniors/seniors held during the evening at 4 North Jumpers Bastion. Tel: 54011007. Karate-do Shotokai: Gibraltar Karate-do Shotokai Association - Karate training for junior & seniors at Clubhouse, Shotokai karate centre, 41H Town Range. Monday: 9:30 p.m. & Wednesday 9:45 p.m. Karate: Shotokan karate midday Mon beginners, other students 8.30pm. Thurs 8.30pm. In town at temporary dojo or privately by arrangement. Contact Frankie 54038127 or info@fhmedia.co.uk. Motorboat Racing: Gibraltar Motorboat Racing Association Tel: Wayne 200 75211. Muay Thai and Muay Boran Club: Tues & Thur at Boyd’s Kings Bastion Leisure Centre at 6:30pm, Tel: John – 54024707 FB: Gibraltar Muay Thai Netball: Gibraltar Netball Association (affiliated FENA & IFNA) competitions through year, senior/junior leagues. Tel: 20041874. Petanque: Gibraltar Petanque Association. New members welcome. Tel: 54002652. Pilates: Intermediate Pilates: Tues & Fri 9.30am, beginners Pilates: Fri 10.50am at the Shotokai Centre, 41H Town Range. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Gibraltar Pool Association: (Member of the EBA) home and away league played on Thurs throughout the season, various tournaments played on a yearly basis both nationally and internationally, Tel: 56925000 gibpool@ gibtelecom.net, www.gib8ball.com

Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Rhythmic Gymnastics Association runs sessions from 4 years of age, weekday evenings. Tel: 56000772 or Sally 200 74661. Rugby: Gibraltar Rugby caters for all ages from 4 years old to veterans (over 35’s). It organises competitions and sessions for Juniors; 4 x Senior Clubs; Veterans team; Touch Rugby and a Referees Society. Email admin@gibraltarrfu. com or visit www.gibraltarrfu.com Sailing: Gibraltar Yachting Association junior/ senior competitive programme (April - Oct) Tel: Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club at 200 78897. Shooting: Gibraltar Shooting Federation. Rifle, Europa Point Range (Stephanie 54020760); Clay pigeon, East Side (Harry 200 74354); Pistol, near Royal Naval Hospital (Louis 54095000). Snooker: Members of European Billiards & Snooker Association - facilities at Jumpers Bastion with 3 tables. Professional coaching for juniors/seniors. Organised leagues/ tournaments and participation in international competitions. Tel: 56262000 / 54000068, or info@gibraltarsnooker.com Squash: Gibraltar Squash Association, Squash Centre, South Pavilion Road (members WSF & ESF). Adult and junior tournaments and coaching. Tel: 200 44922. Sub-Aqua: Gibraltar Sub-Aqua Association taster dives for over 14s, tuition from local clubs. Voluntary sports clubs: Noah’s Dive Club and 888s Dive Club. Tel: 54991000. Commercial sports diving schools available. Time - Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.. Telephone, Jenssen Ellul - 54027122 Swimming: Gibraltar Amateur Swimming Association (member FINA & LEN) opens its pool for leisure swimming. Junior lessons, squad for committed swimmers, water polo. Pool open Mon&Thurs: 7-10am, 12.30-4pm. Tue, Wed, Fri: 7-10am, 12:30-5pm. Sat: 3-5pm. Sun: closed. Mon to Fri from 5-6pm groups training. 6-7.30 squad training. Mon, Wed, Fri 7.30-8.30 swimming joggers, Tues & Thurs 7:30-8:30 junior Water polo. Mon, Tues & Thurs 8:30-10pm Adult water polo. Tel: 200 72869. Table Tennis: Gibraltar Table Tennis Association training and playing sessions, Victoria Stadium, Tues 6-10pm and Thurs 8-11pm with coaching and league competition. Tel: 56070000 or 20060720. Taekwondo: Gibraltar Taekwondo Association classes/gradings Tel: Mari 20044142 or www. gibraltartaekwondo.org Tai Chi: Tai Chi for children and adults. MonThur 6.30-8pm at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre and Sat 9am-1pm at the Yoga Centre, 33 Town Range. Tel: Dilip 200 78714. Tennis: Gibraltar Tennis Association, Sandpits Tennis Club. Junior development programme. Courses for adults, leagues and competitions. Tel: Louis 200 77035. Ten-Pin Bowling: At King’s Bowl in the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre every day. Gibraltar Ten Pin Bowling (members FIQ & WTBA) leagues, training for juniors and squad. Tel: 200 52442. Triathlon: Hercules Triathlon Club organises swimming, running and cycling training sessions and competes regularly in Andalucia and Internationally. Contact chris.walker@york. gi or Facebook “Hercules Triathlon Club” Volleyball: Gibraltar Volleyball Association training, indoor leagues, beach volleyball competition, 3 v 3 competition, juniors and seniors. Tel: 54001973 or 54885000. Yoga: Integral Yoga Centre runs a full programme of classes from Mon-Fri at 33 Town Range. Tel: 200 41389. All welcome. Theatrical Groups Gibraltar Amateur Drama Association: Meet at Ince’s Hall Theatre Complex, 310 Main Street. Tel: 20042237. Trafalgar Theatre Group: Meets 2nd Wed of month, Garrison Library 8pm. All welcome.

89


information

CRUISE SCHEDULE April 2019 ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY

Mon 01 April, 08:00

VENTURA

14:00 British

P&O

3096

Tue 02 April, 08:00

SAGA SAPPHIRE

18:00 British

Saga Shipping Company

700

Sun 07 April, 07:30

CLIO

18:00 American

Grand Circle Cruise Line

89

Sun 07 April, 07:30

HAMBURG

22:00 German

Hapag Lloyd

420

Mon 08 April, 08:00

JEWEL OF THE SEAS

16:30 International

Royal Caribbean International

2122

Tue 09 April, 12:00

COSTA PACIFICA

18:00 Italian

Costa

2977

Wed 10 April, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 2

22:00 -

-

-

Thu, 11 April, 07:00

SAPPHIRE PRINCESS

16:00 -

-

-

Fri 12 April, 08:00

AZURA

22:00 British

P&O

3100

Mon 15 April, 09:00

STAR PRIDE

21:00 American

Windstar Cruises

212

Mon 15 April, 12:00

SEA SPIRIT

20:00 -

-

Wed 17 April, 12:00

COSTA MAGICA

18:00 Italian

Costa

2702

Sun 21 April, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 6

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2500

Sun 21 April, 08:00

ORIANA

14:00 British

P&O

1880

Tue 23 April, 09:00

WORLD EXPLORER

20:00 -

-

Wed 24 April, 21:00

ROYAL CLIPPER

18:00 International

Star Clipper Monaco

227

Thu 25 April, 08:00

SEA CLOUD II

14:00 German

Sea Cloud Cruises

94

Thu 25 April, 09:00

MARELLA CELEBRATION

22:00 British

Marella Cruises

90

-

-

1264

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


information

ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY

Fri 26 April, 09:00

WIND SURF

18:00 American

Windstar Cruises

Sun 28 April, 07:00

MEIN SCHIFF 1

14:00 -

-

Sun 28 April, 08:00

PRINSENDAM

13:00 American

HAL

835

Sun 28 April, 14:00

LE PONANT

20:00 French

Ponant Cruises

67

Sun 28 April, 14:00

BERLIN

19:00 German

FTI Cruises

456

02 Apr '19 - 08 Apr '19

DUTY PHARMACY OPENING HOURS

09 Apr ‘19 – 15 Apr ‘19

Monday to Friday (7pm to 9pm) Weekends & public holidays (11am to 1pm & 6pm to 8pm)

16 Apr ‘19 – 22 Apr ‘19

For updates, check facebook.com/PharmaGuide

23 Apr ‘19 – 29 Apr ‘19

310 -

New Chemist

19 Main Street  200 45039

Valmar Pharmacy Europort 1.0.08 Eurotowers  200 63869

Wesley Pharmacy

299b Main Street  200 65767

Crown Pharmacy

4 Casemates Square  200 78598

CHESS PUZZLE ANSWER: 1...Qxe1+

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

91


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE APRIL 2019 DAY

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

92

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

18:25

BA2663

19:15

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

10:50

EZY2246

11:30

Luton

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:00

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:35

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:05

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

EZY8905

easyJet

Manchester

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Manchester

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

12:05

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

20:35

AT991

19:50

Tangier

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE APRIL 2019 DAY

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:30

Heathrow

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:30

BA2663

21:40

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:45

EZY8902

12:15

Gatwick

BA492

British Aiways

Heathrow

14:20

BA493

15:20

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:20

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

20:00

EZY2246

20:40

Luton

BA2662

British Aiways

Gatwick

20:05

BA2663

20:55

Gatwick

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

10:25

EZY1964

11:00

Manchester

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:30

EZY6300

11:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:00

EAZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

11:05

BA493

11:55

Heathrow

BA490

British Aiways

Heathrow

15:30

BA491

16:35

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

19:35

AT991

20:15

Tangier

BA2662

British Airways

Gatwick

20:20

BA2663

21:45

Gatwick

EZY8905

easyJet

Gatwick

20:35

EZY8906

21:05

Gatwick

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 61... APRIL FOOLS - GOTCHA!

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL2019

93


CHESS COLUMN BY GRANDMASTER RAY KEENE OBE Levon Aronian, triple Chess Olympiad gold medallist, won the £25,000 first prize in the 2018 Tradewise Gibraltar Masters. Britain’s leading grandmaster, Michael Adams, also tied for first place but the regulations for breaking the deadlock catapulted Aronian into a final shoot-out with grandmaster Maxime VachierLagrave. This decided the destination of the £25,000 first prize, which could not be shared or divided in any way. Here is the decisive game that clinched Aronian’s triumph.


White: Levon Aronian Black: Maxime Vachier-Lagrave Gibraltar Masters 2018 Tie-break 2018 Queen’s Pawn Game London System 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 Bf4 The combination of d4 and Bf4 has become highly fashionable. 4 ... Bg7 5 Nb5 Apparently easy to parry, as Black’s c7 pawn can be defended and White’s knight will be driven back. However, the advance of White’s knight has a deeper purpose. 5 ... Na6 6 e3 c6 7 Nc3 0-0 More cautious is 7 ... Nc7.

12 ... a5 13 Nc5 Nxc5 14 bxc5 Ba6 15 Re1 a4 16 Qd2 Bb5 17 e4 Black has successfully salvaged his queenside, so White commences central operations. 17 ... dxe4 18 Rxe4 Bc4 19 Bh6 Bxh6 20 Qxh6 f6 Black can now laterally defend his h7-pawn with ... Rf7.

26 ... Bg6 27 R4e2 But not now 27 exf6 as 27 ... Qxf6 gives Black counterplay. 27 ... Rb2 28 Nf3 Rxe2 29 Rxe2 fxe5 30 Rxe5 Qd1+ 31 Re1 Qc2 32 a3 Qxc4 33 Qxg5 Rf5 The extra material guarantees White an easy win.

21 Nd2 Bd5 22 Re3 Rb8 Black mistimes his break for freedom. Necessary is 22 ... e5, as 23 dxe5 fxe5 24 Rxe5 Qf6 gives Black counterplay. 23 c4 Bf7 24 Re4 g5 25 Rae1 e5?

8 Bxa6 The point of the bishop for knight exchange is to wreck Black’s pawn structure and gain influence over c5. In compensation Black gains the bishop pair and some control over the light squares. 8 ... bxa6 9 h3 Nd7 10 0-0 Bb7 11 Na4 Rc8 12 b4 White’s plan is to blockade Black’s queen’s flank.

fails to 27 exf6.

34 Re8+ Kg7 35 Qe7+ Kh6 36 Qe3+ Qf4 37 Qxf4+ Rxf4 38 Re6 Rc4 39 Rxc6 Kg7 40 Ne5 Rc1+ 41 Kh2 Be4 42 Ra6 Rxc5 43 Rxa7+ Kg8 44 Nd7 Rf5 45 Rxa4 Bc6 46 Rg4+ Kf7 47 Nb8 Bb7 48 f3 Rb5 49 Rb4 Rxb4 50 axb4 Black resigns

PUZZLE Black to play. This position is from Gonzalez-Prasanna, Gibraltar 2018. How did Black engineer a winning endgame? This is a miscalculation but, in any case, passivity with either 25 ... Re8 or 25 ... Rb7 permits White to attack with 26 h4. Meanwhile, the counterattack 25 ... Rb2 is even worse for Black after 26 Nf3 again followed by h4, prising open Black’s defences on the kingside. 26 dxe5 Exposing the flaw in Black’s calculations, given that 26 ... Qxd2

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Answer on page 91

95


coffee time CROSSWORD 1

2

3

4

4

5

6

7

8 9

10

ACROSS

DOWN

1. Hard worker; citizen of ancient city which fought with an equine deception (6)

1. Small garden tool (6)

4. Romantic liaison (6)

3. Saudi perhaps (7)

2. Popular Mediterranean fruit; Popeye’s girlfriend (5)

9. Paper folding art (7) 11

12 14 13

14

17 19

20

22

23

24

24

21

6. Semitic language used by Mel Gibson in The Passion of the Christ (7)

11. Resin used in varnish (5)

15

16 18

5. Natural talent (5)

10. Cremona based Italian violin making family (5)

7. Held back (eg a horse) (6)

12. Raised area outside a house, bar, restaurant etc. (7)

8. One of a faction in Gulliver’s Travels who disagreed on how to open a boiled egg (6,5)

13. Keeping in a good state of repair (11) 18. Wild plant with pink or white star-shaped flowers (7)

25

14. Republic with Yerevan as its capital (7) 15. Radio aerial; insect’s radar device (7)

20. Italian City home of Fiat and Juventus (5)

16. Conceal; broadcast (6)

22. Mr Wise perhaps; premium bond winner selector (5)

17. Junior doctor (6) 18. Goodnight - - - - -; girl’s name (5)

23. To dub “Sir” (7) 24. Less generous; not so far away (6)

21. Jewish teacher (5)

25. Country (6)

& YOU COULD WIN

SUDOKU

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lunch for two at

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Either SNAP and SEND your completed crossword to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com or RETURN TO THE CLIPPER by 20th April

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


coffee time CRYPTIC CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Pollock and other fish numbers returning (7) 5, 26. Actor producing a cliche in a state (7,5) 9. Since I wear layers, it’s more cold (5) 10. Promenades that are out of this world (9) 11. Cable binds black line after home’s impossible to conquer (10) 12. Nothing evil in short book? (4) 14. Squeeze right into ship where hacks might be found (5,7) 18. Joy for old Benn is without end: people oust leader! (12) 21. I career around, then collapse (4) 22. Unorthodox final position of Humpty Dumpty? (3,3,4) 25. Spoiled cat: “I loved the good life” (5,4) 26. See 5 27. Always in favour of First Lady (Republican) (7) 28. Welcome tale from the past (7)

DOWN 1. Legless man, one goes into pub to participate (4,2) 2. Badger picks up virus No 5 within city limits (6) 3. Season and turn Chinese food (6,4)

13. Prepare clues for Everyman to begin with, Sunday lights up (10)

19. Boxer carries cold, firm cloth (6)

15. Tailor cries over Trump becoming more untidy (9)

20. Feeling tired, Mole takes shelter (6)

16. Remove dish to fridge (3,3,2)

23. Train tickets over 85% off per person (5)

17. Time after time, I shall get the queen in sensational film (8)

24. Fuel stored in older vehicles (4)

We made a mistake with last month’s crossword. Please accept our sincerest apologies in the form of a poem:

6. Allegedly, media mogul’s a hood (4)

We put out our crossword this month, Which left you all rather stumped, You see we used the wrong grid And we’re sorry we did, But don’t worry, our designer’s now dumped.*

7. Revised bible held by a theo­logian’s all made up (2-6)

*We didn’t really sack him he’s fantastic.

8. Armageddon might take a while? (4,4)

We’ve also added an extra crossword this month. Enjoy

4. Clouds rising from Maghrib mines (5) 5. Film work on a second job (9)

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

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news

£26.50 per person

Easter Sunday Lunch Menu Starters Garden Pea Soup Flavoured with Iberian Ham Duck & Mandarin Salad with Pomegranate & Chia Dressing Wild Mushroom & Truffle Cream Risotto with Parmesan Tuile

Main Course Roast Rib Eye Beef with Yorkshire Pudding & Horseradish Relish Grilled Salmon Fillet with Prawns Pil Pil and Café de Paris Beurre Baked Rosada Moroccan Style Flavoured with Ground Cumin & Leaf Coriander Beetroot and Caramelised Onion Tarte Tatin with Char-grilled Vegetables All Served with Seasonal Vegetables and Potatoes

Dessert Selection of Chefs’ Sweet Tapas | Tea / Coffee

Contact: +350 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

200 73000 / events@rockhotel.gi to reserve your table

The Rock Hotel, 3 Europa Road, Gibraltar. Visit us online at: rockhotelgibraltar.com

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Profile for Rock Publishing Ltd

The Gibraltar Magazine April 2019  

I’ve found it hard to write my editor’s letter this month as I’m full of beans about my upcoming Easter holiday. Are you going anywhere nice...

The Gibraltar Magazine April 2019  

I’ve found it hard to write my editor’s letter this month as I’m full of beans about my upcoming Easter holiday. Are you going anywhere nice...