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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE March 2020 | Vol.25 #05

THE

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW FUTURE MARS WALKER

TRAVEL FEATURE

PETER SCHIRMER NO FUNERAL, THANKS

DRESS FOR

ESCAPE TO EDINBURGH

THE JOB YOU WANT

BEAUTY ADDICT

DAYS GONE BY:

SKINCARE ACIDS

LIFE IN THE PATIOS


email: gib@musicboxtv.net

|

tel:22257770


from the editor

MARCH ISSUE EDITOR’S NOTE Dear readers, I hope you’ll forgive me for forgoing my usual Editor’s letter format this month, to allow me to say goodbye to Peter Schirmer; a journalist, a fellow grammarian, and my dear friend. Peter was beyond a shadow of a doubt one of the most interesting men I had the pleasure of knowing. There was something so comforting about our conversations; the perfect balance of professionalism and side-splitting humour. In his words, we just ‘got’ each other. During his halcyon days, Peter worked for a swathe of papers on Fleet Street; The Times, the Daily Mail, and The Observer. Back in Gibraltar, he penned articles for a number of publications such as the Gibraltar Chronicle, Vox, Reach, B2B, Gibraltar International and, of course, The Gibraltar Magazine. Peter was a matter-of-fact man, with a penchant for winding me up with his naughty writing. (I once told Peter off for writing about ‘big-bottomed’ women, his response to which was to centre his next article around the world being too politically correct.) I wonder what he would have thought of our March issue, with its modern focus on strong female figures in celebration of International Women’s Day and Mother’s Day. I rather think he would have liked it. In a slight departure from Peter’s usual satirical prose about the Gods of Olympus, we have a rather more sombre (but no less humorous) piece, entitled No Funeral, Thanks. I worried that Peter would leave us before I got to publish it. And I think so did he. Peter, I’m better for having known you. I hope you approve of this issue, which we dedicate to you. And at the very least, give a nod of approval for my proper usage of the Oxford comma in my introduction.

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


Listen on 99.2 FM & DAB+ on the Mobile App or Online at www.rockradio.gi


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PETER SCHIRMER THE LAST GREAT DINOSAUR BY MARCUS KILLICK

J

ust as the magazine was going to press, we learnt about the passing away of one of our, and indeed Gibraltar’s, stalwarts of journalism, Peter Schirmer. I was lucky enough to be a friend of Peter’s, seeing him for “coffee” or lunch about every two weeks. I was lucky in two ways: firstly because I got the pleasure of his company, which was always entertaining, but also lucky as I knew what it meant for Peter not to like you. His journalist’s pen could possess a very sharp point. I always forgot Peter’s age, sometimes out of choice, sometime because I knew he was mentioned in the Bible and I could always look it up there. However I didn’t forget his birthdays, although in the latter years I always gave him his present early, advising him that, as they were bought specifically for him and would serve no other purpose, he might as well be given them and make use of them as soon as possible. I have a present which was ready for him when he was due to get out of hospital. Sadly my timing was out on this occasion. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

The last one I did get to him was an old copy of the Simple Subs Book, a grammar bible for sub editors. He had told me that his only copy had been lent to a journalist colleague whilst he was working in South Africa, who had never returned it. Peter was a stickler for correct grammar, indeed as a write this I cringe at what he would have thought of my use of it on this occasion. Nevertheless, he was a believer in the Oxford comma, which rose to recent prominence in respect of the Brexit 50p coin. His writing output was as varied as it was prodigious. It ranged from doggerel poetry, through insightful articles on matters of finance, to wry observations from the “Gods on Mount Olympus”. In 2018 he won a prize for his poetry in a Gibraltar competition. The prize turned out to be a pen. His reaction on what they could do with it was unprintable. Fortunately, last year he won the main prize and was genuinely overjoyed and slightly emotional at being given the award.

them as going with the territory, though he was irritated by the fact they sometimes stopped or delayed his full enjoyment of life. Fortunately, they rarely prevented our lunches where he never ceased to fascinate with the stories of his varied and event-filled life, including his dismissal from the Times following an altercation with the then Governor of the Bank of England about Peter’s lack of a hat. Peter, I will miss you, and this Oxford comma (as well as the one in the first paragraph) is just for you.

He was sanguine about the illnesses and medical problems brought about by old age, seeing 7


EDITOR: Sophie Clifton-Tucker editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com DESIGN: Justin Bautista design@thegibraltarmagazine.com REPORTER: Kristel Coombes Jeremy Gomez SALES: Advertising Team sales@thegibraltarmagazine.com

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DISTRIBUTION: DHL martin@matrix.gi ACCOUNTS: Paul Cox paul@thegibraltarmagazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Eran and Ayelet Mamo Shay Jorge v.Rein Parlade Alex Orfila Julia Coelho Penelope Bielckus Andrew Licudi Peter Schirmer Sophie Clifton-Tucker Elena Scialtiel Richard Cartwright

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Romina Mayani Nankani Jeremy Gomez Joel Francis facebook.com/gibmag/ twitter.com/gibmag instagram.com/thegibraltarmagazine/ The Gibraltar Magazine is published monthly by Rock Publishing Ltd Portland House, Glacis Road, Gibraltar, PO Box 1114 T: (+350) 20077748 E: editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com Š 2019 Rock Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written consent of The Gibraltar Magazine. www.TheGibraltarMagazine.com Magazine & website archived by the British Library 8

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


86

37

content 08 Who is your female hero? 09 What's On? 10 Around Town 12 News

BUSINESS 20 How To Value Your Start-Up

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54 Bookish: Join Our Monthly Book Club!

LEISURE 56 Berber Treasure: Moroccan Artisanal Shop 59 Confessions of a Beauty Addict: Skincare Acids

22 The A-Z of Business: Starting a Second-Hand Car Sales Business

62 Escape to Edinburgh

LIFE

74 Food and Wine: Edinburgh – It’s Easy

24 Life on Mars: World’s Youngest Astronaut

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51 The Tangier Exchange

28 Going Blue for Childline 30 Reach for the Stars: Gibraltar Amateur Astronomers Society 34 One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Disability Society 37 Hearts of Gibraltar: Paul Perez

69 Should I Go to the Doctor? 72 No Funeral, Thanks

76 Gibraltar International Chess Festival 80 Dress for the Job You Want

REGULARS 86 Recipes: Mandys Potato and Irish Soda Bread

38 A Lifetime in Journalism: Peter Schirmer

88 Guides and Information

42 Days Gone By: Life in the Patios

92 Schedules

SCENE 46 30 Years of Art with James Foot

91 #GibsGems 95 Coffee Time 96 Kids Korner

 on't forget to find the D Hungry Monkey!

48 All the World’s a Stage: Julian Felice Cover 1: Model: Peter Schirmer Photographer: © DM Parody Cover 2: Model: Alyssa Carson Photographer: Photo provided by Bert Carson GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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hello there In celebration of International Women’s Day and Mother’s Day, we’re asking:

WHO IS YOUR FEMALE HERO?

Justin Bautista, 29 Designer of this mag & Mama Lotties Foodie

Ronnie Alecio, 29, Volunteer at Clubhouse Gibraltar "Hildegard Von Bingen - a Christian mystic, Benedictine abbess, and polymath - for being her 12th century mystical vegan queen realness."

Amanda Richards, 32, Illustrator "Hayley Williams, lead vocalist of the rock band Paramore, for her music and how open she is about her mental health."

"It would have to be granny and mum, both women that continue to inspire me daily. No matter what life throws at them they always persevere and show up with a smile."

Gosia Prudzienica, 30, Purchasing Assistant at Standard Glas Ltd

Sophie Clifton-Tucker, 30, Editor of this mag! "Apart from the wonderful women that make up my family and friends, it’s got to be the grandma in the viral video who attacks some would-be thieves with her handbag. Chapeau!"

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"That would be my sister Kasia – a kind of everyday hero. She escaped a bullying boss, created a very successful landscaping company, and still had the time to kite surf and do crosscountry cycling while keeping an open house where everyone is welcomed. Plus, she’s always available for sisterly chats."

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


WHAT'S ON MARCH 2020 THURSDAY 5TH MARCH World Book Day John Mackintosh Hall, 10:00am - 5:00pm, £5 For further information please contact the Events Department on 20067236 or email: info@culture.gi.

WEDNESDAY 18TH MARCH Art Society Talk: The Queen of Instruments The Gibraltar Garrison Library, 6.30pm, £12 For more information visit www. theartssocietygibraltar.org

TUESDAY 10TH MARCH

SUNDAY 21ST MARCH

Senior's Tea for Two

St Andrew's Craft & Collector's Fair

Calpe Rowing Club, 2pm A free monthly social event for senior citizens offering a chance to socialise over hot drinks, sandwiches and cakes. For more information email seniorsteafortwo@gmail.com or call +350 54008999

St Andrew's Church, Governor's Parade, 10am - 2pm Entrance is £1

THURSDAY 26TH MARCH TO SUNDAY 29TH MARCH World Pool Masters 2020 Europa Sports Complex,

FRIDAY 13TH MARCH TO SUNDAY 15TH MARCH Gibraltar Snooker Open Europa Sports Complex,

throughout the day, tickets from £7 For further information and tickets visit buytickets.gi or www. worldpoolmasters.com

throughout the day, £20 - £65 Book tickets via WST.tv/tickets or buytickets.gi MONDAY 16TH MARCH Gibraltar Drama Festival John Mackintosh Hall For more information email info@ culture.gi or call +350 67236

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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around town

Parasol Foundation's 16th Anniversary © Parasol Foundation

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


around town Dog Wedding Two pups tie the leash as Hour Weddings holds a pawfect wedding ceremony for them. For all your wedding planning needs, email info@hourweddings.com

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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news MINISTRY OF EQUALITY TO MARK INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2020 WITH WOMEN IN STEM PANEL The Ministry of Equality has today announced that it will be marking

GOVERNOR BIDS FAREWELL TO GIBRALTAR Last month, His Excellency the Governor of Gibraltar Lieutenant General Edward Davis and Mrs Davis made their way from The Convent down Main Street to

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International Women’s Day 2020 with a Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) panel discussion. The event will take place on Tuesday 3rd March and feature a number of women who work in these fields locally.

awareness of different possible careers within this area.

The aim of this event is to promote positive role models from STEM fields in order to address the under-representation of women in these fields and to raise

To register for the event or for more information please contact the Department of Equality at equality@gibraltar.gov.gi or on Tel 200 46253.

Casemates. They stopped at the Law Courts to bid farewell to the Chief Justice, and at the Cathedral to bid farewell to the Bishop before arriving in the Parliament lobby where they were met by the Chief Minister Fabian Picardo and his wife Justine, before bidding an emotional farewell to Mayor Gonçalves and his wife Julie outside the City Hall.

When asked how he felt the afternoon had gone, His Excellency stated: “The overwhelming feeling was of love,” and that he will “definitely be returning”.

The event, which is open to the general public, will take place on Tuesday 3rd March at the Sunborn Hotel at 5.30pm. Whilst the event is free, registration is required.

On behalf of everybody at The Gibraltar Magazine, we thank you for your service. You will be missed!

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


news NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOK: POLITICS, BULLIES AND YOU We are all born unique, our own energy making up a part of our shared universe; through education, society and the status quo, we soon become normal. We are all part of a system, one that, at times, does not work to our advantage. It's time to open all our minds, go to sleep and listen to our dreams, learning through the night. Politics, bullies, wars, guns, famine and popups, the world needs none of that, but it does need you. This is a story about my life,

my eight-year journey through a broken system, a citizen to a government who ignored me. I stopped playing and started working, only to find myself abused by my superiors. I developed epilepsy, which led to either a mental breakdown or a spiritual awakening. I then stopped working and started playing again, in doing so I regained my confidence. As much as my bullies tried to stop me, I ended up taking legal action against my Government. Life's like a movie, write your own ending, keep believing and keep pretending, that's what I've always set out to do.

50 wines by the glass 40 small dishes of Mediterranean cuisine 30 John Mackintosh Square GX11 1AA Gibraltar. Tel: 200 70201 info@vinopolisgastrobar.gi www.vinopolisgastrobar.gi

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

15


news INCE’S HALL PROJECT

of an outdoor lift direct to the auditorium and the installation of a stair lift to the sound and lights control room.

The Ince’s Hall Theatre will be undergoing a new refurbishment project to keep in line with accessibility.

The Minister for Culture, the Hon Prof Dr John Cortes said:

The project, undertaken by Gibraltar Cultural Services for the Ministry for Culture will include, as well as essential maintenance works, providing new accessible toilets on the ground floor, refurbishment of the ground floor changing rooms, installation

MINISTER ATTENDS GDP’S FORUM FOR FEMALES Guest attendees at the event, held in the GDP Headquarters, included HMGoG’s Minister for Equality Samantha Sacramento, Commissioner of Police Mr Ian McGrail, one of the partners from Hassans Mr Ian Felices and Commodore Tim Henry In addition to GDP officers and staff, colleagues from the wider MOD community and from the Royal Gibraltar Police also attended. The FFF was set up last year for women working across all areas of the GDP. Alex Romero, Head of Business Support within the GDP and Chair of the FFF, explained that its purpose is to create a support mechanism to ensure that the workforce is more representative of the community that it serves, by working to increase the number 16

‘We are delighted to be able to proceed with another of our cultural manifesto commitments: Ince’s Hall Accessibility. The Government understands the importance of making this historical venue accessible to all. It has been a project long overdue, of female employees within the GDP and Defence Guard Service (DGS) and the number of female employees at higher ranks in these areas. In addition, the Forum seeks to identify diversity and inclusion issues encountered within the GDP, provide mutual support and encouragement, ensure a level playing field in all areas of business and provide both internal and external networking experiences. To achieve this, monthly meetings are held to facilitate general discussion and sharing of experiences in a confidential environment. Key themes can then be identified and reported to senior management for action. In addition, the Forum is a means to provide information on opportunities to increase skills and experience, to raise awareness of issues/problems experienced by female colleagues and review recruitment procedures: all designed to ensure a level playing field. The Forum aims to expose committee members to positive role models by inviting guest speakers to initiatives such as

but one that will enable everyone with mobility issues to enjoy all the cultural activities taking place at the Ince’s Hall Theatre. It will also benefit people who work in the theatre industry by making accessible the entry to the sound and lights control room located on the top floor of the facility.’ The project is envisaged to take approximately four months to complete. For further information please contact Gibraltar Cultural Services Operations Unit on 20071433 or email: info@culture.gi these coffee mornings. Finally, where possible, the forum aims to facilitate one-to-one coaching, an objective that last year was achieved through the participation of GDC members in the Women’s Mentorship Program run by the HMGoG Ministry of Equality. This was found to be extremely beneficial and those attending the coffee morning heard from participants how the Program had assisted them in both their personal and professional development. Speaking at the event the Minister for Equality said: “I am delighted to see that there has been such a positive outcome from the Department of Equality’s Women’s Mentorship Programme at this level. It is particularly important in sectors where women are significantly under-represented that a forum such as this exists to facilitate inclusion and the message that senior jobs can be undertaken by women. It is through fora such as this where professional futures are shaped. I wish to thank those who have led on setting up this forum and wish it every success.” GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


news BEREAVED PARENTS TO BE ENTITLED TO TWO WEEKS OF PAID LEAVE FROM WORK Her Majesty’s Government of Gibraltar is set to introduce ‘Jack’s Law,’ under which bereaved parents will be entitled to two weeks of paid leave from work. In the UK, this initiative became known as ‘Jack’s Law’ in memory of Jack Herd whose mother, Lucy Herd, campaigned relentlessly on the issue. Under ‘Jack’s law,’ working parents who suffer the devastating loss of a child under the age of 18, or who suffer a stillbirth from 24 weeks of pregnancy, will be entitled to two weeks statutory leave. Parents will be able to take the leave as either a single block of 2 weeks, or as 2 separate blocks of one week each taken at different times across the first year after their child’s death. This means they can match their leave to the times they need it most, which could be in the early days or over the first anniversary. This proposed initiative follows the UK’s Parental Bereavement Leave and Pay Regulations which are planned to come into effect on 6 April 2020. However, the implementation date for Gibraltar is 1 February 2020. The Chief Minister, Fabian Picardo QC, said: ‘In the UK, Lucy Herd has been tireless in her campaign for bereaved parents. She has made the UK GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

WE'VE HIDDEN A

SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE MAGAZINE...

CAN YOU FIND HIM? send us an email to

monkey@thegibraltarmagazine.com with his location by 20th March

AND YOU COULD WIN A HUNGRY MONKEY VOUCHER!!! Last month's winner:

Isabel Mogan

hungrymonkey.gi | info@hungrymonkey.gi | +(350) 200 78814 /hungrymonkey.gi/

Government aware that in the immediate aftermath of a child dying, parents have to cope with their own loss, the grief of their wider family, including other children, as well as a vast amount of administrative paperwork and other arrangements. The situation in Gibraltar is no different: I am pleased that my Government have listened to Lucy’s arguments and have taken such speedy action: indeed, we intend to implement ‘Jack’s Law’ even before it comes into force in the UK.’ The map archive is available online via the Gibraltar Garrison Library website: www.ggl.gi. For further details, please contact Chris Tavares on chris.tavares@ gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi. 17


news RUTH PARASOL CELEBRATES 16 YEARS ON THE ROCK Ruth Parasol, a self-made billionaire businesswoman, celebrated her 16 years on the Rock last week in an event that will become a tradition. Ruth Parasol is no longer in the gaming industry but is instead focused on real estate and soon a £100m+ emerging technology fund. Her headquarters remain in Gibraltar with a 20+ team of high-level investment personnel. Her fund now owns over £800m in real estate assets around the world with no outside investors and a sizable liquid portfolio above that.

Group, a consultancy firm focusing on China’s emerging identity on the world stage and Charlie Siem, one of today’s leading young violinists. But the main focus of the event was for Ms. Parasol to thank Gibraltar for being her home, to bring the community together and to provide updates on her future business endeavors.

Ruth said she “continues to gravitate to Gibraltar for business, life, family” and is confident of its potential to thrive in a post-Brexit future. She said, “Gibraltar will go from strength to strength and I am proud to be part of the Gibraltar family”.

And while Ruth is known to be a very-about-business businesswoman, she is also a dedicated hands-on mother of 5 children who is passionate about her philanthropic endeavors through The Parasol Foundation Trust. It is based in Gibraltar and has given over £30m in annual donations at a rate of £2m-£3m per year since its formation in 2004. The Parasol Foundation Trust been a great supporter of projects in Gibraltar such as the refurbishment of the Mediterranean Steps the children’s parks, the launch of the University of Gibraltar and many other local projects, but also other cutting-edge and leading programmes around the world, such as The Parasol Center for Women’s Cancer Research at TelAviv Hospital. One of the aims of the event which took place at The Rock Hotel last week was to promote young talent and hosted Zak Dychtwald, CEO of Young China 18

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


PHILLIPS - WE ARE ALWAYS IN YOUR CORNER COMMERCIAL LAW - MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE - PERSONAL INJURY - FAMILY - EMPLOYMENT CRIMINAL DEFENCE - LANDLORD & TENANT - PUBLIC LAW - PROPERTY & CONVEYANCING - PRIVATE CLIENT

WWW.PHILLIPS.GI


business

HOW TO VALUE YOUR START-UP

One of the hardest questions almost every start-up entrepreneur faces, at one stage or another, is “How much my business is worth?”

V

aluation matters to entrepreneurs because it determines the share of the company they have to give away to an investor in exchange for money. However, many entrepreneurs stumble at this question, losing the deal or most of their ownership, by having no answer, or quoting an exorbitant and indefensible number that convinces the investor that they don’t understand basic economics. Indeed, if you’ve ever watched Dragons’ Den on TV, you will have seen that valuation matters are common deal-breakers. At the early stage the value of the company is close to zero, but the valuation is a lot higher than that. How is that achieved? Early-stage valuation is commonly described as ‘an art rather than a science’. While many techniques have evolved to assist in assessing the value of early stage, ‘seed’ companies, the value of a start-up company can often be summed up as follows: The biggest determinant of your 20

start-up’s value are the market forces of the industry & sector in which it plays, which include the balance (or imbalance) between demand and supply of money, the size of recent exits, the willingness for an investor to pay a premium to get into a deal, and the level of desperation of the entrepreneur looking for money. We will now look at some of the factors that influence the valuation in more detail: Market Forces: A start-up company’s value, as mentioned earlier, is largely dictated by the market forces in the industry in which it operates. Specifically, the

If you’ve ever watched Dragons’ Den, you will have seen that valuation matters are common deal-breakers.

current value is dictated by the market forces in play today and today’s perception of what the future will bring. Effectively this means, on the downside, that if your company is operating in a space where the market for your industry is depressed and the outlook for the future isn’t any good either (regardless of what you are doing), then clearly what an investor is willing to pay for the company’s equity is going to be substantially reduced in spite of whatever successes the company is currently having (or will have) unless the investor is either privy to information about a potential market shift in the future, or is just willing to take the risk that the company will be able to shift the market. Traction: Traction is perhaps the most significant factor that can affect an investor’s decision to invest. The mission of every company is to get users (not necessarily customers!) and if the investor sees users then it means the business case is proved. The faster you get users, the more they are worth. How GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


business many users? Well that depends off-course on the sector or target market the start-up is aiming at; a biotechnology start-up may only need a handful of hospitals to implement its technology to become successful, while an online service may need several thousand users to demonstrate economic feasibility. Track Record: Entrepreneurs with prior exits in general tend to get higher valuations. The value of your start-up will be affected by yours and your team’s experience, track record and specialist skills. Distribution Channel: Even though your product might be in very early stages, if you already found a distribution channel for it, your valuation may be much higher. For example, securing a contract with a big supermarket chain to distribute a product, once its development is completed, is often highly valuable for investors. Revenues: While the existence of revenues makes it easier to value a company, they don’t automatically translate into a higher valuation. In fact, in some cases, particularly in internet B2C start-ups, charging users may actually result in a lower valuation as it slows down growth. Would Facebook been able to reach over 1 billion user accounts if it was charging users from the start? If you are charging users, you are going to grow slower. Slow growth means less money over a longer period of time, resulting in a Lower valuation. This might seem counter-intuitive because the existence of revenue means the start-up is closer to actually making money. But start-ups are not only about making money, it is about growing fast while making money. If the growth GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

is not fast, then we are looking at a traditional money-making business. Is a high valuation desirable?

The faster you get users, the more they are worth. Very few start-ups have succeeded in growing into a mature business after having only one round of seed funding. An important tip is to treat your initial funding round as a stepping stone to more significant funding when you really want to ramp up growth. The money you raise during the seed round helps you to develop the technology and test the model, but once that is done, in order to really expand, build out the features and market extensively (and hire all the people to do these jobs), you may need to ask for several millions of pounds. Thus, when you get a high valuation for your seed round, for the next round you need a higher valuation. That means you need to grow a lot between the two rounds. A rule a thumb would be that within 18 months you need to show that you grew 10 times. If you don’t you either raise a ‘down round’, if someone wants to put more cash into a slowgrowing business, usually at very unfavourable terms, or you run out of cash. In other words, an entrepreneur has two options: 1. Go for Big - Raise as much as possible at the highest valuation possible, spend all the money fast to grow as fast as possible. If it works you get a

much higher valuation in the next round, so high in fact, that your seed round can pay for itself. If a slower-growing start-up will experience 55% dilution, the faster growing start-up will only be diluted 30%. So you saved yourself the 25% that you spent in the seed round. Basically, you got free money and free investor advice. 2. Raise as you Grow - Raise only that which you absolutely need. Spend as little as possible. Aim for a steady growth rate. There is nothing wrong with steadily growing your start-up, and thus your valuation raising steadily. In conclusion, current market forces greatly affect the value of your company. These market forces are both what similar deals are being priced at (bottom-up) and the amounts of recent exits (top-down) which can affect the value of a company in your specific sector. Our Valuation Services provide entrepreneurs with the right tools and information to deal with investors and with tips to extract the optimal valuation for the business.

ERAN SHAY, Managing Director & AYELET MAMO SHAY, Business Development Director of Benefit Business Solutions Ltd. (+350) 200 73669 general@benefitgibraltar.com 21 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


business

THE A-Z OF BUSINESS How to start your second-hand car sales business.

I

t is interesting to see that there is little choice in Gibraltar to buy second-hand cars. In an ever-growing demand for motorcars, there is some room for opportunity for those that wish to enter such motoring business. There are however certain rules to follow, and regulations to comply with, as well as the usual procedures that one would go through in any new business. Business plan, site rental, sales hut, finance and the long usual etcetera that goes with every business. The first step is to find out on your own what the market is like. What are people buying in Gibraltar as far as motorcars are concerned? Is there really a market? There is a market, certainly, but how active is it? Are we going to specialise in a market of everyday utility motorcars? Or are we going to do something entirely different and sell sports cars? Or Possibly small vans? This last idea may be worth analysing.

thoroughly. Some long hours will have to be spent looking into what could it be like if we decided to go ahead with this or that particular type of car we want to sell. The following step would be to test the market. You do not have to buy big stocks to see some results. Buy one or two cars that you know people could be keen on buying and make sure you buy at the right price. And the right car. Study carefully its service history and have the vehicles inspected by a seasoned mechanic. Make sure the car is clean and never had a major accident. Insist on having this in writing in the bill of sale or contract. Your first deals are of paramount importance. This motor sales business is very much a reputation business and you want to get it straight from day one. Honesty and integrity are quintessential in any business, and probably a lot moreso if you

What are people buying? Is there really a market?

Once the idea has been decided, the next step is to study that specific market carefully and 22

are dealing in second-hand cars. There are some very bad dealers out there‌ and some honest ones as well. Make sure you become a member of the honest group. If you do, word of mouth will help you tremendously and your business will be on the way to success.

Honesty and integrity are quintessential in any business.

An acquaintance of mine, who we shall call Miguel, started off by selling the occasional German car in Marbella and Estepona, up to five years old and up to 60,000 km. He would have two or three at a time. Now he has stocks of several dozen cars and his reputation is spotless. He never took a client for a bad dishonest drive. He issues a guarantee when a sale is concluded, which is normally covered by an insurance policy he takes and pays for personally. His business is doing well. This is a case to study and copy. The market in Gibraltar may possibly be smaller. It is not a huge one, but it is certainly a market and a very healthy one as well, so it’s probably worth a good try. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


business Most routes lead to nothing whilst some lead to profit. stock from the leasing companies. You may reach some form of agreement and pay a little more to get some very good cars of them. Another source of supply is to purchase from car rental firms. You can also pick up some good deals. Worth looking them up. Basically, one should start small with a few good examples of what you intend to sell. You should import them or alternatively find out if you are allowed to do the import at a later stage. HM Customs are most helpful and they will tell you what the procedure is at the time. You should get a trading license from the Office of Fair Trading. Bureaucracy in Gibraltar is fairly simple, but like anywhere else, you need time. Bear in mind that import duty is quite different if you do the importation on a personal level or as a professional car dealer. In this last case, they will ask you to produce your trading license and your tax registration number. Once you get all the above points sorted, start marketing your product. And how? In every fair and legal way you have at hand. From parking your car in some specific spot where a lot of customers can see it and where a ‘For Sale’ sign and telephone are displayed, car sales websites, adverts in newspapers, Facebook… There is a lot on offer out there. Try and see what works best. It GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

need not cost all that much. And in the long run a lot can be learnt for not too large an investment. An extremely important point is your source of supply. You can use Spanish or European websites and buy cars privately which are in excellent condition and have a good and full service history. Always buy well since in this business the profit starts in a well bought motorcar. That will give you plenty of space to manoeuvre and even give discounts to your future clients and still make a decent profit. A great source of supply are the large leasing or hire purchase firms. You could buy really well from them but this may not be as easy in the early stages. Probably very good later on when your venture is more established. If this is not feasible in the early stages, then try a different route. Business is about trying lots of different routes. Most routes lead to nothing whilst some lead to profit. The more you try the merrier. Another route to get hold of these stocks is to find out who the big-time dealer is. The one that is buying large amounts of

Once you get more established and your reputation is spotless, you will start getting orders from clients that wish this or that sort of car and you can ask for a large down payment once a car is located in Germany, Belgium or Italy, for example. This system is brilliant and your risk is nil. It normally works when you are very established in the community. The bottom line in this business is to understand that second-hand car sales is about buying cars at wholesale prices and selling them at retail prices with a mark-up for you.

JORGE V.REIN PARLADE MBA Business Consultant +350 54045282 jorgeparlade@aol.com 23


life

LIFE ON MARS

Meet Alyssa Carson, the 18-year-old astronaut preparing for the 2030 Mars Mission. BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER

I

n pre-school, when the teacher asked our class what we wanted to be when we grew up, there were at least a dozen would-be footballers, several hopeful singers, and at least one determined astronaut. One such individual is Alyssa Carson, who’s made good on her childhood goal. Forget reaching for the stars; this girl’s reaching for Mars.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST BECOME INTERESTED IN SPACE AND SPACE TRAVEL? WHAT ABOUT IT PERSONALLY PIQUED YOUR INTEREST? I became interested when I was around 3 years old, after watching a cartoon [The Backyardigans – “A Mission to Mars”] and asked my dad whether anyone had been to Mars. He told me it would be my GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

generation that would be going, and I decided I would be one of the ones to go. I think it was the curiosity of no one being there that piqued my interest. HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE AN ASTRONAUT, OR WERE THERE OTHER CAREER PATHS TO CONTEND WITH? My plan has always to be an astronaut and go to Mars, and when I got back, then maybe I would be something else.

but my real training started when I was accepted to Possum Academy at 15 years old. They are a citizen science group that train to do research missions in sub-orbital space. I have had to go through decompression training, and the most physical being water survival. Having a space suit on in the water, which is about 40 pounds more, made it hard to pull myself up in to a life raft.

WHAT TRAINING HAVE YOU UNDERGONE THUS FAR [E.G. NASA SPACE CAMPS], AND WHAT ARE THE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL CHALLENGES YOU HAVE FACED?

IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BIGGEST ENVIRONMENTAL AND POPULATION ISSUES WE’RE CURRENTLY FACING ON EARTH, AND LOOK TO FACE IN THE FUTURE, AND HOW COULD THE MISSION TO MARS HELP ALLEVIATE THEM?

Going to space camps has given me an introduction to this field,

There are all kinds of challenges that my generation is 25


spotlight Being on Mars will be hard, we will have to change the way we live. having to work on in order to help save this planet. Going to Mars will help with learning new ideas on how to live on Mars and how to be more environmentally correct, which would in turn help here on Earth.

HOW DO YOU ENVISION LIFE ON MARS FOR FUTURE HUMAN COLONIES?

TALK US THROUGH A REGULAR WEEK AS ALYSSA CARSON! There is really no regular week. Right now, I am in college going to classes and labs just like any other

Sometimes it is hard to have a social life.

student. However, there will be weeks where I fly off to Canada to train at the Canadian Space Agency, or travel to California to speak to for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and to others to kids to get them in to STEM careers. You just never know what my week might be like.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE YOUNG PEOPLE OF GIBRALTAR ON FOLLOWING THEIR PASSIONS AS YOU DID? I would say to find a subject in school that you like, find the different careers in that field, find one you love and go after it hard. Never give up on your dream and never let anyone take your dream away from you.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

Images provided by Bert and Alyssa Carson.

Being on Mars will be hard, and we will have to change the way we live, but I believe the rewards of learning about Mars are worth it.

Sometimes it is hard to have a social life, and I have had to miss out on some things, but my dad has always made sure I had a balanced life and that I did have my childhood.

CY

CMY

K

WHAT FEARS DO YOU HAVE FOR THE 2030 MISSION? I have spent enough time around the people who are building the rockets, learning how we will live, to know that there is a lot of safety in mind. I do not have any fear, but believe the people working on the ground here to send me to Mars are very concerned with the safety of the astronauts.

BEING A TEENAGER COMES WITH ITS OWN TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS; DO YOU EVER FIND IT HARD MAINTAINING A REGULAR SOCIAL LIFE ALONGSIDE YOUR PASSION FOR YOUR CAREER? 26

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


T&Cs apply - visit u-mee.com for details u-mee.com


charity

GOING BLUE FOR CHILDLINE

March 23rd marks the start of ‘Blue Week’, which sees the local community pulling together for an impressive week of fundraising. BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER

M

arch 23rd marks the start of ‘Blue Week’, which sees the local community pulling together for an impressive week of fundraising. “The last year has certainly been one of our busiest,” admits chairperson Annie Green. “Childline received 800 calls and messages, marking more than a twofold increase in the number of contacts. “Based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, we aim to protect children from all forms of violence and exploitation. We believe that everyone has a responsibility to care for and protect children and, as an organisation, we listen to children, we respect their views and we encourage them to fulfil their potential.” 28

Blue Week, beginning 23rd March is Childline’s annual awareness raising event, when staff and volunteers will be visiting schools and local businesses in order to raise awareness about all they do, and all Childline has achieved. This busy week of fundraising and presentations culminates in the Blue Week black tie dinner at the Rock Hotel on Friday 27th March.

WHAT HAS BEEN HAPPENING RECENTLY? A WhatsApp service was launched, making Childline’s services available to young people who can get in contact by sending a WhatsApp to 58008288. A new Chief Executive Officer (a long-held ambition) was appointed - Caroline Carter Olivero, newly married and recently returned to

her home in Gibraltar. Caroline has a wealth of experience in the charity sector both here in Gibraltar and in the UK. Childline is currently running a Positive Parenting course and a Helpline Volunteer Listeners course; each of these courses require the facilitators to undertake particularly specialised training. The Childline Outreach Programme ran a Year 3 workshop to encourage children to express their feelings appropriately. Childline’s outreach activities have taken them into all the Upper Primary Schools, Loreto Convent, Hebrew Primary and to Youth Clubs including the Gibraltar Youth Service and Ministry of Defence Youth Clubs. The Childline team were delighted to enter this year’s Three Kings Cavalcade. “This was made GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


charity

possible for us by MH Bland, who have kindly dedicated a bus showing our Childline logo and

number 8008. This kind of generous gesture is invaluable, and helps us tremendously in raising awareness. Our volunteers, many of whom were accompanied by their children, and staff members from MH Bland turned out in force all dressed in blue. The responses received from everyone as we made our way along the cavalcade route was so overwhelming; lots of high fives and touching comments of encouragement.�

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE GIBRALTAR MARCH 2020 MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

Childline continues to provide their Appropriate Adult service, which provides support to juveniles who have been arrested and detained by the RGP. Childline Gibraltar are members of NAN (The national Association of Appropriate adult network). This service is provided by our volunteers on a 24-hr 365 days of the year basis, and requires specialist training which is provided by NAN. In what has been their busiest year to date, dedicated staff and volunteers continue to strive to make sure that the services provided by Childline will always be available to the children and young people of Gibraltar. It is fortunate that Gibraltar is such a generous and altruistic society. 29


REACH FOR THE STARS

Speaking to Charles Duarte, MAstr (Masters in Astronomy), Fellow Member of the Royal Astronomy Society (UK) and head of the Gibraltar Amateur Astronomer’s Society. BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER

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HAT IS THE GIBRALTAR AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS SOCIETY, AND WHO WAS IT FOUNDED BY? After obtaining a Master's Degree in Astronomy, I decided to create the GAAS back in 2013 with the help of a small group of fellow astronomers. The aims were and are to provide a forum for discussion of astronomy matters and share knowledge, as well as to meet other fellow stargazers, whether just getting started in astronomy or as a seasoned observer and/or astrophotographer. It’s also a great way to learn about telescopes, eyepieces, cameras, and the Universe.

HOW MANY MEMBERS ARE THERE? WHEN/WHERE DO YOU MEET? WHAT DO YOU DO? Since its founding in 2013, membership in the society 30

has been limited to members interested in astrophotography, and currently, we meet in Spain at least once a month. We have a Facebook page of nearly 700 followers, and Facebook groups of over 2000 members. I would like to establish a club locally to develop and create awareness of the sky above us, bring together local people from our community to share our passion for astronomy and the wonders of the Universe. I receive many requests from local parents asking how their children can join the society, but without premises, it's difficult.

WHEN DID YOUR INTEREST IN ASTRONOMY BEGIN? When I was in school from a very young age, I was interested in all kinds of science things. There weren't many books on astronomy at the time, but I read all the ones in John Mackintosh Hall library. TV series like Star Trek and Lost in Space when I was growing up did influence me quite a bit. I do remember the first trips that were

made into space, like the Gemini and Apollo missions. It wasn’t until later in life when I could afford a telescope, that I saw for the very first time a close-up of the Moon; I remember the excitement I felt seeing it.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT IT? I had to think about this for a long time. But I think the best thing is being able to share what I have learned about the Universe with others and enjoy their enthusiasm and amazement.

WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST SIGNIFICANT/EXCITING DISCOVERY, IN YOUR OPINION? There have been many significant discoveries, mostly in the past fifty years. Still, I will stick with last year's breakthrough and one in particular, which proves a theory going back decades. I am talking about the first image of GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


life I remember the excitement I felt seeing it. a black hole, taken using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87, published in April. This shows the supermassive black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy, which is about 54 million lightyears away from Earth. The black hole's mass is equivalent to 6.5 billion suns. Scientists struggled for decades to capture a black hole on camera to prove it exists, since black holes distort space-time, ensuring that nothing can break free of their gravitational pull — even light. That's why the image shows a shadow in the form of a perfect circle at the center.

HOW DO YOU SEE OUR KNOWLEDGE OF THE SKIES ADVANCING OVER THE NEXT DECADE? In the next decades, we will see a global competition between nations and the private sector to reach the Moon and Mars to establish colonies within the next twenty years. India will send astronauts into space in the next few years. Late this year ESA with Roscosmos aims to discover life in Mars. SpaceX by 2024 plan to send a crewed spacecraft to Mars. China expects a spacecraft landing on the far side of the Moon. We mustn’t forget the USA and Russia, whose sole interest is in the Moon’s minerals. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

WOULD YOU TAKE PART IN THE MARS MISSION, GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY? Sure, wouldn't you? I can picture a special tour: First a stop on the Moon, wearing spacesuits and exploring all its splendor. Second stop, Mars. There are lots of places to visit there — the Grand Canyon of Mars, the ice caps, strolling along in the morning in the ice fog. Our imagination has no limits. Even if there are no tour ships yet, it will come, but we will need to wait for some years before this is a reality. I would also like to mention that space is a dangerous place, from cosmos radiations to super-speedy

dust grains that can damage spacecrafts and astronauts, to gravitation forces that affect our bodies.

HOW MUCH OF THE OBSERVABLE UNIVERSE DO WE KNOW ABOUT? WHAT IS IT COMPRISED OF? WHAT DO YOU THINK LIES BEYOND? Ahh, the million-dollar question. Of the many ideas that have been discussed over time, the one theory that I feel is most likely is that outside this Universe, there are a bunch of others all expanding 31


life for example, is in Istan (Malaga) mountainside with a night sky reading of 21 SQM.

WHAT EQUIPMENT WOULD ONE NEED? OR WHERE CAN WE BORROW IT/USE SOMEONE ELSE’S?

just like ours, or contracting. The Universe is expanding. Space itself is expanding. That much we know from the cosmic redshift of distant galaxies in every direction and which is measurable. The fact it is expanding means it was once smaller, and carrying that to its finality is to recognise that it must have at some point been unified in some form or way. Although I have read a lot about this subject, there is no concrete answer yet. Now, to make everybody aware of how little we know about the Universe. All the stars, planets, and galaxies that can be seen today

We will see a global competition between nations to reach the Moon and Mars. 32

make up just 4% of the Universe. The other 96% is made of stuff astronomers cannot see, detect, or even comprehend.

WHAT PLANETS/ CONSTELLATIONS ARE BEST SEEN FROM GIBRALTAR/SPAIN, AND IN WHAT SPOTS? Gibraltar’s uniqueness makes it difficult for seeing. We have a big rock and quite a lot of light pollution, and there are only a few places you can appreciate the cosmos with your naked eye; one spot is on the top of the rock, but only if you’re lucky. Remember the night sky changes throughout the year and constellation position changes as well. If you look towards the North (North StarPolaris) you will see Constellations like Perseus, Cepheus, and a few others rotating around Polaris. Spain is a vast country, and there are quite a lot of pitch-dark sites nearby. My observatory,

The simple answer is minimal to get started. A clear night and a star chart are enough. Star charts can be bought from most of the larger book shops online, such as WH Smith. As you gather sky knowledge, buy a reasonably low budget telescope with a GOTO mount. This will be your starting point, and remember, do not run before walking, or it will cost you eventually.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE CONSTELLATION? Not sure, I suppose Orion given its spectacular colorful nebule images once processed. I have been observing and imaging the night sky for years. For me, the Universe is my favorite space.

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR SOMEONE WHO IS INTERESTED IN GETTING INTO THE FIELD OF ASTRONOMY? Amateur astronomy should be calming and fun. If you find yourself getting wound up over your eyepiece's aberrations or a planet's invisibility, take a deep breath and remember that you are doing this because you enjoy it. Take it only as fast or as slow, as intense or as easy, as is right for you. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


life

DHL Express is the global market leader in the international express business, so you probably already know that we can deliver your documents and parcels from Gibraltar to virtually every country in the world. What you might not know is that we can also take care of all your importing requirements.

For further information please contact: DHL Gibraltar Unit 36 Harbours Deck, New Harbours, Gibraltar GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH Tel: 200 72210 Email: GIBSN@dhl.com GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE • JUNE 2014 2020

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life

ONE SIZE DOESN’T FIT ALL

Disability doesn’t disable individuality. BY ELENA SCIALTIEL

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ebbie took over the Disability Society chairpersonship when founder Agnes Valarino passed away over fifteen years ago, and she’s still at the helm of a support and fundraising association which aims at fully integrating people with disabilities in the community and help them live life to the fullest. “Most committee members are relatives or carers of someone with disability, whether physical or learning, so we have a firsthand insight in the challenges posed,” she says. “It is important to make everyone aware that a policy of one-size-fits-all isn’t viable, because every disability is different, and even two people with a similar disability may express different vocations, talents and ambitions, and we must assist them in realising their potential in their adult life, fulfilling their right to professional careers and to independent living 34

when possible, whether assisted or not.” Legislation has progressed, but the Society still seeks the introduction in full of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. One of the most significant achievements in the Society’s history has been the integration of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. The Society is also calling for continuity in care from childhood to adulthood and a smooth transition from school to workplace.

the cross-agency communication necessary to look at each case in an individual and holistic manner, in order to bring solutions and opportunities to the persons with disabilities, who often find themselves disoriented and stranded when they leave school and are faced with ‘the rest of their lives’. “Life expectancy is longer and we must plan ahead from their early years in order to offer them a good quality of life.”

Two people with a similar disability may express different vocations, talents and ambitions.

Debbie feels that the coordination between Government departments could improve on

Continuity of care is paramount. Staffing turnover at St. Bernadette’s, Dr Giraldi and the satellite flats is worrying the Society, especially with Brexit looming and the fate of frontier workers at stake. “Service users and carers build a GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


life Speech & Language Therapists and Adult Physiotherapists at St. Bernadette’s, and everyone relies on the Paediatric Physiotherapist, whom Debbie describes as an ‘absolute angel’. The Society is advocating the elimination of architectural barriers, at least in new buildings, and in heritage ones whenever possible. They welcome the overdue installation of lifts at St. Bernard’s Hospital, and the project at the Parliament, which is essential to allow any future politicians with disabilities to access their workplace! There’s a call for an accessible cable car, when it gets refurbished, and yet the acknowledgement that the Upper Town, because of its very nature and heritage, will be tricky, if not impossible, to fully adapt to wheelchairs. “Legislation requires full accessibility in new buildings, so no more entry through the garages, or the back door,” Debbie notes. “Wheelchairs should go in and out the main door, together with everybody else.”

relationship, and if it works, they want to keep it consistent. Service users of course experience likes and dislikes, so they may not like the carer they are first assigned to, but once the right one is found and a rapport is forged, they ease into it, and it may become GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

distressing for the user to be reassigned, especially if they are non-verbal and they feel they’re having trouble communicating with ‘the new guy’.” Furthermore, Debbie claims that there still are no dedicated

Debbie wishes for the introduction of ‘job coaches’ in Gibraltar, in line with the UK model of supported employment. These are professional figures who assist people with disabilities in finding a job and mediate between employer and employee, when the need arises. UK law promotes financial incentives to employers who need to undertake works in order to accommodate a disabled employee. This can also be of benefit to the business in the long run, because they will attract more customers, with braille facilities, ramps and lifts for example, lower checkouts and counters, wider aisles in 35


life supermarkets and so on. “People with disabilities do want to work,” she says, “They want to feel productive and contribute actively to society. Society must enable them to do so.” They can often live independently if their home undergoes a few modifications – no steps, larger corridor, adapted shower, lower kitchen counters, bed hoist – but these can be expensive and, as much as the Society is always willing to fundraise in order to support a member, it also laments that Government funds works only at Government estates, while private bills are currently footed by the tenant, no matter the household income. Assisted living may involve 24hour care, or may just mean that carers pop around every now and then to check if help is needed in performing daily chores or maintenance. Independence must be encouraged and supported, because we cannot expect parents to take care of their children for a lifetime, and even less so, siblings to take over their parents when they become unable to, or pass away. Most disabilities are permanent, and from birth, while others are acquired later in life, and require dramatic lifestyle adjustments for the whole family, sometimes bearing a considerable financial burden. Disability can be expensive indeed, Debbie says, as some disabilities entail vital equipment to guarantee a decent quality of life, and in some cases, this may be only partially funded, taking its toll on any budget, especially in a single-income family. Further to disability allowance, the Society calls for carer allowances for parents or relatives who give up 36

their careers to become fulltime carers, as well as mobility allowance to adapt one’s car. Debbie gladly acknowledges that the stigma surrounding disability has faded fast: “It no longer is something to be ashamed of and never discussed in public. Talking about it actually spreads awareness, prompts solutions, promotes inclusiveness and support networks.” Having lived with someone with profound disability when she was a young teen, and having a son who is a wheelchair user, Debbie is well aware how disability affects family life as a whole; marriages can be put to the test when a disabled child enters the equation, whether or not one of the parents gives up his or her job and career to become a full-time carer, causing financial and emotional tensions.

says, “and there’s nothing worse than being told that your child has a disability, especially when, as a mother, you’re already sensing there’s something wrong, and the diagnosis just confirms your worst fears. Early diagnosis helps come to terms with it, and prompts treatment and the devising of a life plan.” Debbie Borastero MBE has dedicated her life to volunteer work to improve inclusiveness in Gibraltar for the hundreds of people affected by different degrees of disability, and she is grateful to all those who fight at her side towards this goal. She praises Gibraltar as a safe place for people with disabilities, and although she notes some lamentable episodes of bullying, students are mostly respectful of their peers and actually helpful. “But sometimes the bullied child sadly doesn’t even realise they are being bullied and mistakes this behaviour for camaraderie; this is unacceptable.”

“They want to feel productive and contribute actively to society."

Having a disabled sibling can affect children’s behaviour and their own emotional development. Debbie laments the lack of therapy for children and teens in this situation, who usually are uncomfortable with discussing it with peers. Akin to parents’ networks, siblings’ support groups should be implemented, under the guidance of a trained professional, for them to express their worries, resentment, frustration, anger - and work them out as natural and legitimate responses to their family environment, and learn to grow from it.

In Gibraltar, Debbie appreciates that in such a small community it may be easier to seek help. “The downside, so to speak, is that a child with a specific disability may not meet likeminded individuals in such a small place, and won’t realise they’re not alone unless they fly to UK for treatment or to attend university, like my son did.” The Disability Society will be holding their Flag Day on 12th June.

“You don’t know what it is like until you actually live it,” Debbie GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


HEARTS OF GIBRALTAR Talking to Paul E. Perez.

BY ROMINA MAYANI NANKANI, CYE-CYL

I

was eager to meet with a dear friend to hear about why he is the way he is. He draws people to him, smiling and adding a few good ol’ hearty laughs here and there. I simply said, “Paul, one hour max of your time please”. 4 hours later, and we would be on our way to writing material fit for a bestseller. “Who is Paul?” I asked him, and loudly he replied, “Here goes, honey...” “I am on a journey, always willing to learn, develop and trust that whoever you are meant to be, will come. I do think I’m positive and I can proudly say that what has shaped me is having overcome mental health issues. I learnt gratitude and to not take life so seriously.” I admired his honesty and willingness to share his experience. “In my first year at University, I was experiencing highs and lows. I thought it would be best to take a gap year as I was unable to focus, and felt extremely overwhelmed by my surroundings. I flew back to Gibraltar, and with the help of the Mental Health Team at GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

Coaling Island, I began working on my thought processes to try and establish where these rollercoaster emotions were coming from.

“You are one thought away from changing the way you feel at this moment.” “I feared being diagnosed though. One day, after many months of working on myself, I met with the Mental Health Practitioner and was informed I was indeed bipolar. But it wasn’t important for me to follow the label. More often than not, patients fall victim to the words in their diagnosis and lose focus on the remedies and tools to improve themselves. I didn’t give up and was determined to reach a balance in my life. I persevered daily! I now have a motto that keeps me going and focused with little effort.” Of course, I urged him to share and wrote it as fast as I could.

“Work hard, enjoy all of life’s experiences, travel far, love intensely and appreciate all of the positive, whilst acknowledging all of the negatives.” He smiled saying it! “Romina, I heard a great person speaking and she said, “You are one thought away from changing the way you feel at this moment”. Her name is Kerstin Andlaw and she emits so much energy and wisdom with simple tools. It is important for me to advise those that may be reading this article, that if they are struggling with their mental health, they can get in touch with the GHA or even Gib Sams who are amazing at what they do. There is always a way, a person and/or an organisation who you can reach out to and address the issues you may be feeling. You are not alone.” Paul is a teacher, fashion designer, entrepreneur and a fantastic mentor. He knows how tough mental health issues can be for anyone, and truly is a great advocate to encouraging people to seek help and talk in confidential environments. 37


life

A LIFETIME IN JOURNALISM

In memory of our brilliant contributor and cherished friend, Peter Schirmer, we are re-publishing this interview from our November 2015 issue. We hope you enjoy reading it just as much the second time around.

T

he Fleet Street of the 1960s was a beautiful era of hard metal typing and boozy lunches. Each newspaper had their own pub they would frequent, veteran journalist Peter Schirmer explains to me, as we take cover in a café on the Marina, away from the almost torrential storm brewing outside. Peter, who has lived in Gibraltar for sixteen years, has the most incredible history of writing behind him. He cut his teeth at the Cape Times, fresh out of Cape Town University, where he studied English, Economics and Classical Culture. ‘The slackers course’, he tells me. During his time at the daily, he took on the role of a young political correspondent, reporting on parliamentary goings on during the early stages of apartheid. Soon after, the buzz of Fleet Street beckoned and he took up a position with the News Chronicle, a former UK daily that ceased publication in 1960. Soon after, the extremely liberal paper was absorbed by the Daily Mail, and four hundred journalists were left GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

without work. Peter explains that after a stint acting as temporary editor for a month in Glasgow, at a small town paper, he applied for an economics correspondent’s role at ‘The Scotsman’, which also circulated around the UK. Still on Fleet Street, he did some freelance work with The Guardian’s sister Sunday paper, The Observer, which once took him to Wales to cover a story about miners who were pumping gas, found in their now closed mine, into their homes.

The Fleet Street of the 1960s was a beautiful era of hard metal typing and boozy lunches. Headhunted by The Times His time in London was extended when he was headhunted by City

Staff of The Times to become the daily’s first Economics Correspondent. As part of a long standing tradition for The Times, Peter would have tea with then Governor of the Bank of England Lord Cromer, just opposite to their London Bridge Headquarters. This would always give him an insight into the week’s financial forecast, allowing Schirmer to make his predictions. In the early 60s, the Bank was still a wholly national institution. Despite his penchant for economics, Peter much preferred general news reporting. Whilst at the Times, Schirmer found himself acting temporarily as editor of the city pages, whilst full time Editor, Bill Clark and his number two were away. He chuckles as he opens up about a faux pas he made in letting a young Australian journalist take his place at an afternoon tea meeting with Lord Cromer. After refusing to take the office top hat off and mildly offending Lord Cramer with his post boozy lunch behavior, the boy was kicked out of the Bank and Peter was in dire trouble with the paper’s editor, William Haley. After a very short stint of being unemployed, 39


life organisation in Argentina. Much of his time was occupied in Africa, particularly in the South, an area of the world he desperately loved, having been born there. As he fills me in on his life, which takes two large cups of tea to fully get through, he notes the funny coincidence that his last interview with a journalist like myself was carried out fifty years ago, around the time that the Argentinian national rugby team formed to play against South Africa. This time around, our interview comes a day after the Argentinians play a World Cup match against Ireland.

Peter was brought back, but soon moved to Kenya to take up a new role with The Times, as a parttime Africa correspondent. Peter is full of fascinating tales from his vast array of journalistic roles, and the incredible moments in history that he covered throughout his lengthy career. One story that is most prominent to him is the attempted assassination of former South African Prime Minister Hendrik Verwoerd at the Rand Easter Show in Johannesburg in 1960. He also tells me that during his time in Argentina, he interviewed Horst Eichmann, Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann’s son, who at the time headed his own neo-Nazi 40

Travelling to Kenya, Peter met his wife Jill, a stewardess with East Africa Airlines. He describes 1963 as ‘the most amazing year of [his] life’ during Kenya’s era of independence. These years were filled with inebriation and hearty drunkenness, leading to a particularly hilarious incident that saw him mistakenly squat in the wrong house for a week, when he was asked to house sit for primatologist Jane Goodall and her husband Hugo. It was only when he sparked up a conversation with a friend about the lemon tree in the front garden that he realised his mistake. Peter and Jill soon decided moved their lives to South America. From Journalism to Publishing Their first daughter was born in Buenos Aires during a time that saw Peter heavily involved with the Argentinian Rugby Union as he freelanced for publications in South Africa, Australia and the UK’s Daily Express. Bouncing back and forth to South Africa every so often, Peter fell out of journalism for some time, instead editing

They fell deeply in love with the Mediterranean island life, particularly after coming across the perfect mountainside cottage to call their own. Reader’s Digest books, a job he found particularly fascinating. Due to a rise in television game shows, the readership dropped significantly. Much of the profits made on Reader’s Digest books were through the offers of competition and winning prizes. His time away from the news also saw him briefly document the topsecret process of building military hardware. Peter tells me he could only take so much of this before he commenced work with South African publishing giant Random House Struik where he edited a South African encyclopedia and, he tells me, a travel book about South Africa that was to be translated into German. He admits that he enjoyed this process hugely, often sneaking his own made up words into publications, weaving between editing books and magazines and falling back into news reporting, the Schirmers found themselves growing tired of having stayed in one place for so long. Both daughters were studying and the opportunity to up and escape to another unfamiliar corner of the world arose. Peter and Jill set their sights on Greece, specifically Spili, GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


life in Crete. They fell deeply in love with the Mediterranean island life, particularly after coming across the perfect mountainside cottage to call their own. Peter explains to me that the door-less, sea-facing outhouse is what ultimately drew him to the property. Crete, Salisbury and Gibraltar

We briefly discuss the move of the news from print to online and Peter points his two crooked index fingers at me, ‘that’s from all the years of hard metal typing’, he says. He’s a complete Luddite when it comes to social media,

shrugging off Facebook and Twitter. He tells me about the lengthy process of research that journalists had to go through before the internet came about. Hours spent pouring over encyclopedias and the seventeen volumes of the Oxford English Dictionary. Having been away from Spili for nineteen years, the Schirmer’s returned recently, during a holiday. ‘It was incredibly emotional,’ Peter insists. The trip brought up a yearn to rewrite the ‘great Cretan book’ he’d always had in his head, ‘No Problem Petrus’. The story follows life in Spili and the process of completely overhauling their beautiful mountain cottage. Falling swiftly back into Mediterranean life, Peter and Jill purchased a cottage on their own hill in Cortes de la Frontera. Each week, once Thursday rolls around, the couple escapes into the mountains to soak up the lifestyle they learnt to love in their favourite little Cretan village.

When news broke that Jill’s mothers had fallen ill, the Schirmer’s sold the restaurant and reluctantly trundled back to the UK. Living in Salisbury, Peter returned to Reader’s Digest whilst Jill studied chiropractic. After growing tired of the dull British lifestyle they considered an appropriate location for Jill to be able to continue to practice. They settled on Gibraltar, buying a home in Marina Court, Peter used his old Fleet Street contacts to string from the UK. He contacted the Gibraltar Chronicle to ensure that his freelance writing wouldn’t be stepping within their territory. It was then that former editor, GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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Photos | DM Parody (www.dotcom.gi/photos)

Peter and Jill transitioned seamlessly into their quaint Cretan life, teaching English whilst they searched for a restaurant to start up. Peter also used this time to pen his first novel, an adult fairytale featuring leprechauns and similar South African mythological creatures, tokoloshes. The story followed a theme of racial relations, with both having to learn to co-exist together. The book was never picked up by a publisher. They eventually bought a restaurant that had a few years of immense success, before picking up the 28ft boat they’d purchased before leaving South Africa, and sailing to Gibraltar where they sold her and continued their life in Crete.

Dominique Searle, asked Peter to write a financial column for the paper. Having been reluctantly dragged back into the world of finance, Peter further contributed frequent pieces to The Gibraltar Magazine, the Chamber of Commerce magazine B2B and Gibraltar International. From there, he was approached by former GSD Trade and Tourism minister Joe Holliday to assist with the independently run daily, Vox. Vox was a welcome voice for many on the Rock. Peter tells me that for whatever reason, the Government of the time withdrew all their advertising from the paper and it moved online. He continues to write for the Chronicle, covering a number of high profile court cases including the Marrache and Ken Robinson trials.


life

DAYS GONE BY: LIFE IN THE PATIOS

Happy days are what many recall when referring to ‘yesterday, when they were young’. Many remember life seemed more enjoyable and carefree then, far removed from the rat race, materialistic hubbub we experience nowadays. As we get older, those memories seem to come to the fore as the contrast with today’s clamour begins to widen... BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

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nd that’s why a group of over 60-year-olds got together a little while back to reminisce about the ‘old days’. Over a coffee, beer, or glass of wine, they reminded each other of how different life was in the 50s and 60s when they were 10, 15, or 20 years old. They met because they all happened to live in Carrera’s Passage situated just a few metres up from the bottom of Engineer Lane just off our Main Street – a very narrow passage where, as you delve into the lane, you come across government flats: homes for many families including those belonging to our group of friends sitting together having a yesteryear chat. “You know, there were no bathrooms in any of those flats,” Tommy says, “We bathed in zinc tubs which mum would fill with hot water boiled in a kettle. Can you imagine how many kettles it took to fill the tub?” Sergio remembers how two communal toilets in the patio served many families and there were no toilet rolls. You’d have to make do with newspaper or leftover brown paper from your 42

shopping, and if you visited the loo at night, you needed to take a candle with you, because there was probably no light in the closet!

They claimed older males often had lady friends in La Linea. Tony jumps in and is reminded that some parents wouldn’t let their kids use those communal toilets. “They claimed older males often had lady friends in La Linea and elsewhere during those years which seemed to be tolerated by their wives. The men tended to slip across the frontier on a Friday night for a ‘bit of fun’ and the fear was some would bring back with them diseases us kids to pick up from the toilet seats, so we used buckets in the home. Can you believe that happening now?” Five patios made up the complex

in Carrera’s Passage, not unlike similar areas found around the Rock, in the Upper Town especially and other places. At least not living in tin, Nissen huts where other families were domiciled, which were unbearable in the summer heat. The Carrera’s Passage homes comprised of just two or three, not very large, rooms each. “Yes, the flats were small, taken up by families of three, four, five and even six or more and there were also a couple of shops and workshops in the patios on the ground floor. I remember the smell of coffee beans coming from a tiny, sort of factory in one of the patios,” Tommy says. The anecdotes and stories just kept on coming as the three former neighbours chatted about times long gone: games they played were also called to mind by Tony: “The sense of community was fantastic. We’d play games outdoors, especially in summer right there in the patios. Neighbours left their front doors open and sat outside. The grown-ups would play bingo and card games and we’d play hide and seek, marbles and football. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


life The summer months seemed to be longer then, going on forever which we enjoyed, going to the Montague Sea Bathing Pavilion, where we paid four old pennies to get in, and Eastern Beach. There was a man called Mr Noguera in one of the patios who used to invite us to his home to practice singing and playing instruments for Christmas and other festivities and we’d have a great time. We were never bored.”

with everyone having a good time. Once that festive season is over and we move into spring and the summer, that’s the time to get organised... cruising and country holidays apart, it can be the Remember the Old Days event! 'Come and join us, suited for those in their 50s and over' I guess the promo would read.

We only had a valve radio tuned in to Radio La Linea, La SER and Radio Gibraltar.

Tommy, Sergio and Tony had such a good time reminding each other of those halcyon days that they went on to organise a proper get together by inviting as many Carrera’s Passage neighbours still around today - they could contact, and about 100 turned up for a meal and a whole bundle of reminiscences filling the atmosphere at a local social club. “It was an incredible Carrera’s Passage evening chatting, drinking, and talking about the old days, the really old days, with some of those present going back to stories and anecdotes of the 40s even.” Tommy tells me, “And it was such a successful night, it’s encouraged us to organise another one.”

Today’s generations have their own fun with their iPads and other gadgets and they’re happy – it’s a reflection of the times in which we live... period! That’s the way it is and has to be respected. Yesterday, we only had a valve radio tuned in to Radio La Linea, La SER in Algeciras and our own Radio Gibraltar. Into the early 60s a black and white TV set offered a choice of just two or three stations. You could go to the cinema of course, but that was it. Tommy jumps in again, “Oh yes, entertainment of that type in those days was limited and I remember we’d make our

own fun. We used to dress up in our mum’s and dad’s clothes and put on plays. Also, unlike these days, there was a lot going on in the streets, as I mentioned, playing outdoors and having a lot of fun playing all sorts of games and going up the Rock too. Something else we looked forward to was going home for lunch from school and returning at about two when we were given an old penny or two to buy some sweets, liquorice bar or, if on the rare occasion we were given a little more, we’d get a Choco Prince, chocolate wafer or an ice cream on our way to class. It wasn’t much and we never complained. That’s the way it was!” Well times change and it’s true, isn’t it? As you move on in life, not getting any younger, time flies, nostalgia builds, and reminiscing for many, is a wonderful pastime. There were tougher times of course, but pushing negative thoughts aside, one tends to recall those happy days of the past, filling your mind with pleasurable memories of days gone by... simply magic!

Well, there are so many other neighbourhoods on the Rock who could organise something similar if they felt that way inclined. Passages, lanes, streets, roads and housing estates are aplenty on the Rock, so why not? We seem to be very good at getting together at Christmas with friends and families uniting, as do work places and other groupings, who meet for meals and fun nights GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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scene BY JEREMY GOMEZ

30 YEARS OF ART

WITH JAMES FOOT

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rowing up sometimes comes from realising that there are two sides to yourself, just as there are two sides to a single coin, and that these two sides make one unique person. It is the reconciling of these, at times, opposing sides that makes us who we are. The Cornwall-born artist James Foot, who has spent the last 30 years deepening his roots in Gibraltar, is that type of person; one who appreciates the paradoxical elements that have made him who he is. In the 1980s, he was protesting in anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons marches but has also dined with the higher-ups of the armed forces; a son of a farmer who rarely, if ever, left Cornwall and yet has spent his life travelling the world; a political progressive, that paints what he describes as ‘conservative paintings’. James will be returning to Gibraltar and will be staging an art exhibition from March 24thApril 3rd comprised of sketches 46

and paintings that had been stored away in his former house in London, including works from

The exhibition will express a life lived in and around Gibraltar around the time of his first arrival to Gibraltar. The collection depicts paintings made in Tangiers and Tarifa. His time in Tarifa in the summer of 1990 is what led him to first visit Gibraltar, a place that he admits he had no intention of coming to as it was a British naval base and yet, it was through the invitation of some English naval officers that invited him to Gibraltar, a place he would come to adore. The year after his first visit, James was invited to exhibit in the John

Mackintosh Hall after the then director Manolo Galliano had seen his exhibition in Tangiers, where James was living at the time. His watercolour paintings had been collected by many in the forces and many affluent families in Gibraltar since then. Interesting clientele for someone who describes himself as usually being on the “outside of things”. However, it was with these clients that James starting laying his foundations in Gibraltar. It was with the help of the Incumbent Admiral Jeremy Sanders and his wife, who he describes as having ‘adopted’ him, that he painted alongside and organised workshops in their residence at the Mount, before it became open to public use. From then onwards, James had been living intermittently in Gibraltar whilst also exhibiting around the world and, later, finding his own artwork in homes as far as New York and Australia. In 1997, he was even commissioned to paint the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


married.” It is a part of this world that Gibraltar has loomed heavily in both James’s life and his artwork. In his art, James has often painted the architecture of ‘Old Gibraltar’, which he describes as being "extremely paintable", and in his life he has seen Gibraltar change a great deal in its form and its spirit. Having arrived as an openly gay man in 1990, when same-sex sexual activity was illegal before its decriminalisation in 1993, it might have been inconceivable at the time that he and his husband would have the first gay marriage to be officiated by a Governor of Gibraltar, His Exellency Edward Davis, in 2018. James had campaigned in Gibraltar during the 90s for equal rights and though that fight has won the day, he to this day continues enacting a “politics of compassion”. Having spent much of the 1990s onwards in Gibraltar, exhibiting his works and then painting the many scenes that our small land has provided and then to be later married on the Rock, James is hoping to create a more permanent base here.

handover ceremony in Hong Kong, and though exhibiting for just over thirty years, he also had the honour of seeing his artworks being handed down from one generation to another. His paintings of architecture and other subjects are delicate and precise, though painted by GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

an adventurous man described to have been radical in thought and life. James reflected on this, noting that psychologically it was a way of “containing one’s world”: “I neaten up my world, which has always been a bit living on the edge. Will I survive by selling enough? Never having a job; never, until recently, being

The exhibition that will take place in John Mackintosh Hall will express a life lived in and around Gibraltar, from its quaint corners and passageways in town to a painting he only recently found and will exhibit from a windy day on the Med Steps. The exhibition is sure to be a delight for many of those who have come to see his work in the past, or have bought his paintings. Likewise, it will be interesting to see art spanning thirty years in the life of James Foot: an adventurer, a watercolour painter, a rebel, a man of paradoxes. 47


theatre

ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE

Julian Felice once again takes his plays to foreign shores, as his play “Ten Minutes” is staged in London’s Camden. BY BY JEREMY GOMEZ

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ocal playwright, Gib Talks organiser, and comprehensive school teacher, Julian Felice, has had a busy few years at home that have resounded onto an international platform. As a family man and full-time teacher, it would be understandable, by any measure, to think that time would be a clear problem. However, whether it be time, actors, or venues, Julian appears to have a mind for taking projects with hard constraints and making them into in-demand talk series or into popular plays staged in the centre of the theatre world in London or in theatre competitions across America. This year he has set his eyes to further develop the craft he loves and that many have enjoyed seeing come to fruition. After another successful Gib Talks,

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many were disappointed to hear of a likely temporary break after the 6th edition. After reaching a milestone of 100 speakers at the event since its commencement in 2015, the refurbishment of the John Mackintosh Hall Theatre that has been planned to accommodate the New National Theatre has meant that Gib Talks currently does not have a venue. Julian and the organisers saw that it might be a fitting time to pause and reassess how to improve Gib Talks in the search for its next milestone. However, due to the public response over the pausing of an

event many of us anticipate to be at annually; the likely short break has now stopped being a definite one and has now turned into one to be considered. Announcements, if any, will be made later on the year, depending on whether a location can be found.

There have been approximately 27 productions of his plays across 16 states.

Beyond Gib Talks, Julian has been relentless in writing plays that have been staged locally, in the UK and across the US. A number of his tenminute plays that were staged locally were later performed professionally in London by two different theatre companies at GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


theatre two different theatres. Last year, Tiny Theatre Company staged Julian’s “Ten Minutes” at the King’s Head Theatre and Saw-ItHere-First Productions staged “Happy Birthday” at the Theatro Technis theatre in Camden, London. This year, Saw It Here First Productions is staging “Ten Minutes” on the 8th of March at the Theatro Technis (tickets available from sawitherefirst.com). Beyond British shores and across

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

the Atlantic, there have been approximately 27 productions of his plays across 16 states, where his plays that delve into the dramatic tensions of the human life in imaginative ways have even reached state finals in Drama competitions. Despite all these successes, Julian remains on the incline and not in view of a plateau as his focus this year will be to seek to improve further as he

was recently accepted on a highly selective development programme for playwrights in the UK, where he will be travelling to when possible. The Gibraltarian public will not, however, be neglected as they can watch Julian stage his plays and even perform in one Santos Productions’ plays in the Gibraltar International Drama Festival that will run through from the 16th of March to the March 21st.

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THE TANGIER EXCHANGE

Reuniting the pillars. BY JEREMY GOMEZ

T

he Roman philosopher and playwright Seneca tells the one story of how the Pillars of Hercules came to be; they were once one great mountain that Hercules had to cross, but instead Hercules tore the mountain in half to go through it. He left one half in the north and one in half in the south. As you probably already know, one half (one pillar) is the Rock of Gibraltar, and the other is likely to be Jebel Musa in Morocco. Two worlds that once were one. Throughout history these two worlds have always maintained their connection despite the geographical separation caused by our friend, Hercules. Morocco was a lifeline during the Sieges of Gibraltar and it was Moroccan men and women making Gibraltar their home that helped Gibraltar economically when the Frontier was closed. Today, however, these two worlds are in a position not just to appreciate each other out of necessity but rather out of mutual appreciation. The Cultural GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

Exchange between Gibraltar and Tangiers, organised by Gibraltar Cultural Services and the JM Memorial Foundation, does just that.

"Music brings people together, It’s a common language, something that you feel." Earlier this year, the public were invited to glimpse into the Tangiers side of the exchange as performances and art exhibitions were held at GEMA. Two musical acts and two painters came to Gibraltar to carry out workshops around local schools. The singer and songwriter Wadie Ismail, wearing a jacket with both Morocco’s and Gibraltar’s

flags displayed together on his back, opened up the evening with his first ever song written in English, which he wrote specifically for the Exchange and then later sang more of his own originals for the highly receptive audience. Wadie was followed by an energetic performance by Dakka Marrakchia, who filled GEMA with the sound of trumpets, percussion, dancing and traditional Moroccan singing. Throughout the evening, two art exhibitions were on display by artists Karima Jahidi, who famously paints with her feet, and Sanae Alami, whose art creatively explores their subject through different styles. The second stage of the Exchange will take place in Spring 2020, when local artists will travel to Tangiers. As part of the exchange, two local singer/songwriters will be collaborating with Wadie in a song that will fuse not only cultures but genres. Musician Adrian Pisarello and Rapper Liam Byrne will both be contributing 51


scene

Karima Jahidi

language, something that you feel.”

lyrically and musically to a song that would mesh their talents with Wadie’s. The trio were brought together by Mark Montovio, one of the Exchange’s main organisers. Spanning genres and languages is something that you would expect to be a difficult endeavor, as if a song that was one dimension now has to evolve to three, but each of the trio are optimistic 52

that it will be a success. Adrian noted that; “It’s going to be like a Spanish, Moroccan, English thing” bringing together the different linguistic landscapes of both sides of this exchange. However, whatever they thing they will be unified musically as Liam explained: “Music brings people together, it doesn’t matter where you are from or what language you’re speaking in. It’s a common

The Exchange spans countries, languages, and even continents, but yet these two nations have been continually been drawn closer together by history. Minster of Culture John Cortes, who spoke at the evening, noted the spirit of the exchange: “Morocco and Gibraltar are very close geographically but we hold each other very close in our hearts too. Gibraltar will never forget what Morocco and Moroccan people did for us when the border closed in 1969 and since then we have become closer and closer.” Closer and closer is the sentiment of Exchange. Closer and closer so that not even Hercules himself can tear us apart again. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


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BOOKISH... Join us for our monthly book club! BY JOEL FRANCIS

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elcome back! It's March already (how it is March already? That is insane!) and on the 5th is International Women's day. Coincidentally, my three fantastic books of the month are by highly talented female authors. I hope you’ll check them out.

LENSES, LUST AND MURDER A. M. Ialacci Genre: Murder Mystery/Thriller What’s in the pages? Allie Fox is a disgruntled private investigator. Her dreams of crime-solving and keeping Carteret County a safe place reduced to stalking cheating husbands and going after check kiters. But when her autistic brother Ryan discovers a body near the lighthouse, Allie finds herself slap bang in the centre of a murder investigation where everyone is a suspect, and anyone could be a victim... Even her! Why should you read it? A.M. Ialacci does it again. Instead of a sophomore slump, the sequel to the fantastic Diamonds, Teak, and Murder is just as good if not better than its predecessor. The aptitude that Ialacci has for crafting a mystery is second to none and will keep you gripped until the very last page. Furthermore, her characterisation of Ryan and his girlfriend Frankie, is some of the best autism representation that I have ever come across in a novel. If you are looking for a top-tier murder mystery, I would recommend Lenses, Lust and Murder. I can see it being in my top 10 reads of 2020 without a doubt!

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


HALF OF A YELLOW SUN Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Genre: Romance / Historical Fiction / Drama What’s in the pages? Half of a Yellow Sun follows three people connected by a tragic fate. Flitting between the years preceding and during the Biafran War, we follow Ugwu, Olanna and Richard as they paint a picture of the stark differences between the Nigerian class system. But as the Nigerian troops advance, and our protagonists have to run, class doesn't matter very much anymore. Why should you read it? Adichie has created a modern classic that should become implanted into the popular zeitgeist as soon as possible as one of the quintessential works of fiction about life during wartime. With prose as stunning as the greatest poem and a nuance reserved for only the best writers - Adichie manages to transport you into 1960s Nigeria during Biafran War and fully immerse you in the day to day lives of her protagonists. I highly recommend this book, if you can, go and get yourself the ‘4th Estate Matchbook Classic’ Edition - it's superbly stunning.

THE SEVEN HUSBANDS OF EVELYN HUGO Taylor Jenkins Reid   Genre: Romance What’s in the pages? The mythical Hollywood icon Evelyn Hugo has always been secretive about her life. But now, she's ready to spill beans, but instead of choosing a well-renowned author to tell her story, she wants the relatively unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant. No one is quite sure why, including Monique herself.

But being summoned to Hugo's apartment, she listens and chronicles the actress story from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to leaving show business in the 80s, and of course, her seven husbands. Why should you read it? This book is like being transported into the Golden Age of Hollywood. The glitz, the glamour and the dark underbelly that is now the stuff of legend. The character of Evelyn Hugo is reminiscent of Greta Garbo, Elizabeth Taylor and Marylin Monroe. This book is a fantastic period piece that still manages to feel like a modern love story due to its compelling narratives on race, sexuality, misogyny and societal norms. If you want a book that will transport you into a simpler and make you forget about the world for a while, I highly suggest this one! For more book recommendations follow Joel’s Instagram @neurodiversebookworm.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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leisure

BERBER TREASURE

Walking in to the Casemates Arcade armed with a copy of Gib Mag in one hand and my camera in the other, I didn’t know what to expect from Berber Treasure, but within the first few minutes it was clear I had stumbled stumbled across somewhere quite special.

BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER

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making frequent trips back to her homeland. “The last time I returned to Morocco, I went deep down into the villages in the Altas Mountains. I had never been before, even though I’m Moroccan!” she laughs.

It was here that Ahlam met some talented single women, with no husbands and no income, sitting down together making beautiful rugs. “The ladies buy all the materials for the rugs themselves. They don’t have a big market. There is a middle man who buys Shop owner Ahlam displays a special handmade 'wedding blanket'.

erber Treasure, the newly-opened Moroccan artisanal shop located at the far end of Casemates Arcade is nothing short of an Aladdin’s cave: from organic, natural skincare products, to hand-weaved Moroccan rugs and other carefully crafted objets d’art. Behind the counter you’ll find Ahlam Smith, who has made it her personal aim to unify two worlds, not only improving business relations between Gibraltar and Morocco, but helping single village women claim back their independence by introducing fairer wages. Born in Tangier, Ahlam grew up surrounded by handmade crafts. She fondly recalls the sheepskin rugs that adorned her floors, cooking in tagines, and how her mother, who used to embroider, taught her this delicate art too. Ahlam now resides in Gibraltar, where she has lived for the last 20 years, but has been 56

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


leisure

up their whole stock, giving them very little profit in return. I said to them, ‘If I can find you a market in Gibraltar, you can have the profits’.” And she remained true to her word. Today you can find these wonderfully detailed handmade rugs and blankets in Berber Treasure, at a very reasonable price (even moreso when you consider where your money is going, and the good that it will undoubtedly do). Staying within the artisanal and natural market, Berber Treasure also sells goods such as eco-certified USDA-approved organic argan oil (for glossy hair, glowing skin and stronger nails), rose water, and black soap. “We work with an artisan factory. Everything is done by hand, by women. For the argan oil, they crack the nuts themselves – it’s impossible for a machine to do the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

same job.” Ahlam reveals. “Using a stone, they crack the kernels and squeeze out the oil with a handmade machine. Nothing else is added, just the oil.” No palm oil is mixed into any of Ahlam’s products. She offers us an easy way to check if your argan oil is pure: “Put a bit in a container in fridge for 35-37 hours, and when you get it out the whole thing should be solidified like coconut oil or Vaseline. A mixed product will stay liquid.”

Seeing my delight at being able to try this simple bit of detective work at home, Ahlam also offers a way to check whether your honey is pure: “Get a plate with a bit of water covering the surface, and put few drops of honey on it. Turn the plate slowly and a honeycomb structure will form. If it doesn’t form, it’s not pure.” Everything in Ahlam’s treasure trove of a shop can be custom made to suit your tastes. Colours, shapes, design… pop in and see for yourself! 57


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CONFESSIONS OF A BEAUTY ADDICT It’s all about the chemistry! BY ALEX ORFILA

‘A

cid’ is not a word you would typically associate with skincare. Nor is it an ingredient you would ever dream of slathering on your face. This is true of the traditionally harsh and corrosive chemicals of the acid family - stay well away from those! When you break it down, acid is just a word to describe a type of chemical substance; this month we're focusing on the safe waterbased acids which are found in our skincare products, as well as other active ingredients which you may not have heard of since your Year 10 science class, but which are making serious waves in the beauty world. Each have a different purpose and can target a variety of skin concerns from acne, open pores, dryness, dullness and wrinkles. Basically everything. Perhaps I would have displayed more interest in chemistry class if I had known it would teach me which ingredients would help plump and smoothen my skin, but GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

alas my dalliance with skincare begun well after my school days! When incorporating any - or a selection - of these active ingredients into your skincare routine, research is key, and some caution is advised. It is important to know how to layer products; some of these ingredients complement each other wonderfully, whilst others don’t get along at all and combining them could be counterproductive or even damaging to your skin. A company which has revolutionised skincare particularly in recent years is Deciem (which most will know as The Ordinary). This brand has stripped back their products to the bare bones, they do not focus on advertising, branding, fancy names or any of the other factors which contribute to making beauty products all the more expensive. In fact, their products

are very inexpensive, with prices starting from as little as £5. Their serums and creams are quite literally labeled with the chemical component contained in the bottle along with a percentage relating to the strength. For example, The Ordinary’s Hyaluronic Acid serum is quite literally called Hyaluronic Acid 2% + B5, so you get the idea. These chemical components can seem quite daunting to the untrained eye, for this reason The Ordinary’s website offer detailed guidance as to how to layer these products - which is absolutely key to ensuring their effectiveness.

I saw results pretty much from the first time I used it.

The Ordinary’s success has been so groundbreaking that even beauty giants Boots have recently released their own range of stripped back products which also focus on these key ingredients. They have quite literally – and some would say rather cleverly named their range ‘Ingredients’. 59


beauty So, what exactly are these key ingredients?

The moral of the story? Don’t skip your vitamins!

ALPHA HYDROXY ACIDS AND BETA HYDROXY ACIDS These ingredients are great for maintaining youthful skin as they smoothen and resurface. In effect they act as a ‘peel’, exfoliating away excess skin cells which sit on the surface layer of our skin to reveal fresher, healthier looking skin. For this reason, it is absolutely crucial for anyone incorporating any of these ingredients into their routine to use sunscreen every day (yes even when its cloudy) as the newer skin cells underneath will be more vulnerable to sun exposure. With these types of substances, the key is always to introduce them to your routine gradually, i.e. using them perhaps once a week to begin with and then upping it to every other night as your skin builds up tolerance to them. Both these types of acids work pretty much in the same way, so what are the main differences? Alpha Hydroxy Acids or AHAs as they are known, are water soluble whilst Beta Hydroxy Acids (BHAs) are oil soluble. AHA’s are derived from various natural substances such as sour milk, fruits and sugar cane. The most widely used AHA is Glycolic Acid because of its ability to slough away excess or dead skin cells. BHA’s are found in willow bark and birch trees. Because it is oil soluble this substance is particularly effective in cleaning out pours. Salicylic acid is probably the most commonly used BHA as it is great at targeting oil excess and is therefore a 60

preferred ingredient for those with acne prone skin. Gycolic Acid picks: Pixi Glow Tonic, £18 This toner has acquired cult status and is revered as a ‘holy grail’ product for many because of its ability to deliver glowing skin. It is perfect for those who are starting to incorporate glycolic acid into their routine. Although it is a toner and therefore gentler than other glycolic acid products it is recommended that this not be used more than once a day, whilst those with more sensitive skin are urged to use it once every other day.

because when it comes to glycolic acid there is such a thing as having too much of a good thing! Salicylic Acid pick: Salicylic Acid Cleanser The Inkey List, £10.99 The Inkey list is another new brand which is taking skincare back to basics. This cleanser is great for troubled skin as it reduces oil excess.

Drunk Elephant TLC Framboos Glycolic Night Serum, £76

HYALURONIC ACID

There is a lot of hype around the Drunk Elephant Brand so I approached this product with some skepticism. However, this has now become my go-to Glycolic product and one which has revolutionised my skincare routine as I saw results pretty much from the first time I used it. I only have to use it about twice a week, which is enough for me…

This acid is renowned for its hydrating properties as it attracts one thousand times its own weight in water. It is a substance which is naturally present in skin, although its primary function is not actually to provide hydration because naturally its molecules are too large to be absorbed into the skin and instead tend to sit on the surface. However Hyaluronic GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


beauty Acid products have been formulated to penetrate the skin and offer maximum hydration. Hyaluronic Acid picks: The Ordinary Hyaluronic Acid

2% + B5, £5.90 This is hydration in a bottle. The Ordinary’s formula is also packed with Vitamin B5 which plumps skin beautifully. This will be the best £5.90 you will ever spend!

antiaging option. Possibly the only downside of vitamin C is that it has to be used quickly as it doesn’t stay ‘fresh’ for long and products can become less effective if not sealed properly or left unused for weeks (although the same is true of the vitamin C supplements we ingest.) Also, as with all active ingredients, those with more sensitive skin should tread with caution and try gentler formulations. Vitamin C is also renowned for its antioxidant qualities; just as taking vitamin c supplements and foods can help your body combat free radicals, using vitamin c products on your skin helps to shield it from various pollutants. It also brightens skin and evens skin tone, so it seems the benefits are endless – the moral of the story? Don’t skip your vitamins! Sunday Riley C.E.O Rapid Flash Brightening Serum, £70 This potent vitamin C serum does exactly what it says on the bottle, brighter looking skin anyone?

Origins Drink Up Intensive, £22

NIACINAMIDE

An intense overnight mask packed with hyaluronic acid, avocado and Swiss glacier water. Perfect for when dry skin needs a little pick me up. It will quite literally quench your skins thirst.

Granted this word may sound like a type of poison, but it is anything but! Niacinamide is actually vitamin B3 and helps build keratin, which is a type of protein that helps keep skin firm. Niacinamide is praised for its ability to reduce enlarged pores and skin blemishes, thus improving uneven skin tone. This ingredient is a bit of a hybrid as it can target troubled skin whilst also containing antiaging properties.

VITAMIN C (ASCORBIC ACID) Sure, we’ve all heard about the benefits of ingesting vitamin C, but incorporating it into your skincare is somewhat lesserknown. This ingredient is great at repairing damaged skin cells and promoting the production of collagen, thus making it a potent GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

contains a small percentage of zinc to balance oil control, making it a great option for congested skin.

RETINOL Retinol is a buzzword in the beauty community at the moment and is dubbed as one of the most powerful ingredients out there with many referring to it as the only proven anti-aging ingredient. So what makes it so effective? It works by boosting collagen production and exfoliating skin, meaning that skin appears more plumped and fine lines are reduced. Although highly effective at combating signs of aging, retinol is very potent and can be quite drying on the skin and perhaps too harsh for those with more sensitive skin types. For this reason, it is recommended that it only be used at night and that a high factor SPF be incorporated into your daytime routine. As is the case whenever trying out a new ingredient start gradually and use a gentler formula. Murad Retinol Youth Renewal Night Cream, £70 This award-winning product is a great option for retinol beginners, it brings you the antiaging powers of retinol in the form of a rich and hydrating cream.

The Ordinary Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1%, £5 This offering by The Ordinary also 61


travel

ESCAPE TO EDINBURGH An Edinburgh adventure with easyJet’s new route.

BY PENELOPE BIELCKUS (THE FLYAWAY GIRL)

E

asyJet announced that they were launching a route from Gibraltar to Edinburgh, providing the first direct route from Scotland to the Rock. This is ideal for jetting off to Edinburgh for a city break or as a starting point for a longer trip, hitting up places like the Highlands or the Isle of Skye. With two departures weekly, the Gibraltar - Edinburgh route launches on the 31st March with the first flight heading to the Scottish capital at 16:00. Flight prices start at £15.99 and depart on Tuesdays and Saturdays. This schedule makes it perfect for a long weekend break as you can fly out on a Saturday and come back on the Tuesday, giving you two full days to explore Edinburgh. Prices at the time of writing this for return tickets start at around £64 per person in April (Tuesday to Tuesday) and £64 in May (Tuesday to Tuesday) or £84 for a long weekend (Saturday to

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

Tuesday). To find the best prices, head to easyJet.com and use their ‘3 week view’ to see the lowest fares in a three-week period. As with all other easyJet fares, these prices are for standard tickets that include one item of cabin baggage only and randomly allocated seats. To add extra luggage or to select seats, these start at £5.99 one way (for standard seats with no extras) and from £18.99 each way for Up Front or Extra Legroom, which include a second small cabin bag, use of a dedicated bag drop and speedy boarding. Hold luggage for this route starts at £20.11 for a 15kg bag (per flight, remember to select it for both flights for a return flight).

THINGS TO DO IN EDINBURGH Choosing flights is generally the boring part (unless you’re a bit of an aviation geek like me) so let’s

get into the juicy details of what you can actually do in Edinburgh! Edinburgh is an ideal city whether you are looking for nightlife, architecture, museums, nature or festivals. A short city break is the perfect amount of time for an introduction to Edinburgh with two full days to check out the sights in one of the UK’s prettiest cities. Edinburgh Castle is probably one of the most iconic places in Edinburgh and is a great place to visit while you’re there. I visited the castle, Arthur’s Seat, St Giles’ Cathedral and the Camera Obscura on my first ever visit and it was the perfect selection of Edinburgh’s tourist highlights. Edinburgh Castle is home to a variety of exhibitions as well as artefacts like the Scottish Crown Jewels. You can also see the firing of the ‘One O’Clock Gun’ - this tradition dates back to 1861 and ships docked in the Firth of Forth would set their maritime clocks by 63


Snake charmers in the Kasbah. Mohammed can be seen on the extreme left.

It is one of the streets that is thought to have inspired Diagon Alley. the firing of the gun. The firing of the gun now happens every day (at 13:00, as you probably already guessed) except Sundays, Good Friday and Christmas Day. Tickets: Adults £19.50 (£17.50 online), concessions £16 (£14 online), children 5-15 £11.50 (£10.50 online) and under 5s go free. All tickets also include an optional guided tour that last 30 minutes. 64

St Giles’ Cathedral is known as the High Kirk of Edinburgh as is a parish church of the Church of Scotland. The cathedral dates back to the 12th century and is located on the Royal Mile, a mile-long route that forms the main thoroughfare of the Old Town of Edinburgh and connects Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace. The distinctive crown steeple of St Giles’ Cathedral is one of Edinburgh’s most recognisable landmarks. Entry to the cathedral is free, although a

£5 donation is recommended and goes towards the upkeep of the building. 30-minute guided tours of the cathedral are also free. Guided tours of the cathedral: 10:30 and 14:30 MondaysSaturdays, Sundays 14:30. Guided rooftop tours: £6 per person, maximum 4 people. The Camera Obscura is an awesome place to visit for adults and kids alike. This interactive GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


travel museum and ‘World of Illusions’ dates back to 1827 and has been at its current location since 1851. The museum nowadays has puzzles, mazes and lots about optical illusions, as well as still having the original Camera Obscura on the top floor. The Camera Obscura projects a ‘virtual tour’ of the city and the rooftop of the museum provides excellent views over the city. Ticket prices: Adults £16.50, students £14.50, senior (65+) £14.50, children 5-15 £12.50, children under 5 free. Tickets can be purchased from the admission desk and are not available online currently. If you’re looking to learn more about Scottish whisky (or simply want to sample some), the Scotch Whisky Experience opposite the Camera Obscura is well worth a visit. Tours start at £17 for a one-hour tour and tasting while a tutored tasting of single malt whiskies matched with Scottish food starts at £39. At the end of the Royal Mile you will find the Palace of Holyroodhouse, also known as Holyrood Palace. This is the Queen’s official residence in Scotland and is a must visit if it is open during your visit (check online to see whether it is open to the public - it’s used by the Queen when she has official engagements in Scotland and has planned closures in April, May, June and July 2020). Ticket prices: Adults £16.50, students and seniors (60+) £14.90, under 17s £9.50, under 5-year-olds go free. Another spot to visit along the Royal Mile is the Grassmarket, GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

a historic market place that is now home to lots of independent shops. The Vennel Steps lead from Lauriston Place (where you will find George Heriot’s School, a possible inspiration for JK Rowling’s Hogwarts!) and this spot is a perfect location for photos of the castle. If you’re a Harry Potter fan then Greyfriars Kirkyard, Victoria Street and The Elephant Cafe should be on your Edinburgh bucket list. Greyfriars Kirkyard is a church and graveyard with graves dating back to the 16th century. If you’re a Potter fan, you might notice some familiar names and surnames such as ‘Thomas Riddell’ (Tom Riddle), William McGonagall and Elizabeth Moodie. JK Rowling has stated that she used to sometimes wander around the cemetery and it inspired her with some of the names for her characters! Victoria Street is a wonderfully colourful, curved street in Edinburgh’s Old Town that ends at the Grassmarket. It is one of the streets that is thought to have inspired Diagon Alley and you can find excellent restaurants here as well as the official Harry Potter store, Museum Context. There is also another Harry Potter themed store called The Boy Wizard if one shop isn’t enough for you!

FLIGHT TIMES ARE AS FOLLOWS: GIBRALTAR - EDINBURGH Saturday: Departing 16:15, arriving in Edinburgh at 18:45 Tuesday: Departing 16:00, arriving in Edinburgh at 18:30

EDINBURGH - GIBRALTAR Saturday: Departing Edinburgh at 11:15, arriving in Gibraltar at 15:40 Tuesday: Departing 11:00, arriving back in Gibraltar at 15:25

The Elephant Cafe is known as the location where JK Rowling would write Harry Potter as she loved the view of Edinburgh Castle from this cafe. Pop in for a tea or a slice of cake and imagine her being inspired by the views from here.

a statue of a dog just opposite Greyfriars Kirkyard. Bobby was a Skye Terrier who was often seen with his master John Gray, who was a night watchman for the Edinburgh Police Force. Sadly, John died of tuberculosis in 1858 and was buried in Greyfriars Kirkyard. Bobby kept watch over his master’s grave every single day for 14 years until he died in 1872. The President of the Ladies Committee of the RSPCA was so touched by the story of the faithful dog that she asked the City Council for permission to erect a statue to him!

Even if you’re not a Harry Potter fan then this area has places of interest. Greyfriars Bobby is

For anyone who wants to be active then climbing Arthur’s Seat is a must. Arthur’s Seat is 65


travel This beautiful cobbled street is one of Edinburgh’s most Instagrammable locations. just outside of Edinburgh and was the location of a grain milling area for over 800 years. It is now within the city of Edinburgh and only a 10-15 minute walk from the city centre. It’s a wonderful tranquil area that is the perfect escape from the city and it makes you feel like you’re far away from a big city rather than still in it! actually part of the 640-acre Holyrood Park but is completely free to climb. The 251-metre peak is an extinct volcano and offers excellent views over Edinburgh. Allow around two hours for the walk there and back doing the ‘red route’, the most popular route up to Arthur’s Seat from Queen’s Drive. Calton Hill is another excellent spot for views over the city and is also the location of the National Monument of Scotland as well as many other monuments such as one to Robert Burns, one to philosopher Dugald Stewart and one to Admiral Horatio Nelson. To get to Calton Hill you can walk from the east end of Princes Street, Edinburgh’s main shopping street. Don’t miss visiting Princes Street Gardens, two adjacent public parks separated by The Mound where you can find the National Gallery of Scotland (national art gallery with free admission). The best spot is, in 66

my opinion, at the Ross Fountain as you get beautiful views of this cast iron fountain painted in turquoise and gold as well as Edinburgh Castle in the background. Princes Street is also the location of the Scott Monument, dedicated to Sir Walter Scott, the second largest monument to a writer in the world! This Victorian Gothic monument is over 200 feet high and you can climb the 287 steps for beautiful views over the city. Tickets: Adults £8, concessions (students, seniors, and children) £6 Aside from these classic spots in Edinburgh, I also have some favourite places that are somewhat ‘hidden gems’ in the city. They won’t be on most tourist itineraries but they are well worth a visit if you have the time. Dean Village is a former village

The Royal Botanic Garden is a must visit if you enjoy exploring gardens and learning more about different place species. The Botanic Gardens are mostly free to visit, although my favourite places are the ten Glasshouses which do have a fee for entry. They are well worth it though as they are both amazing works of architecture as well as housing exotic plants from around the world. Tickets: Free for the main gardens; Adults £7, seniors £6 and under 15s are free for entry to the Glasshouses On your way to the Royal Botanic Gardens, don’t miss stopping by the beautiful Circus Lane. This beautiful cobbled street is one of Edinburgh’s most Instagrammable locations but is worth a wander whether you are an Instagram fan or not. The mews (former row or courtyard of stable-houses) are covered with ivy and flowers and are a lovely historic spot in the GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


travel

area of Stockbridge. Finally, for those who love a good bookshop, make sure to stop by Armchair Books. This cosy second-hand bookshop is located just off Grassmarket and is the perfect place to hide out if you get a spot of bad weather (or just want to escape into book heaven). If you are flying in on Saturday and out on Thursday, then I would recommend an itinerary such as: DAY ONE

kids, then dedicate a full half day to here!)

Arrive at Edinburgh airport (18:45) and head to your hotel. The Airlink 100 bus takes you directly from the airport to Prince Street or Waverley Bridge (for Edinburgh Waverley Station) in less than 30 minutes.

Edinburgh Castle (in time for the One o’clock Gun)

DAY TWO

DAY THREE

St Giles Cathedral

Palace of Holyroodhouse

Victoria Street

Arthur’s Seat

Camera Obscura (unless you have

Greyfriars Bobby and Greyfriars

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Dean Village Royal Botanic Garden via Circus Lane

Kirkyard Vennel Steps and Grassmarket Princes Street Gardens, Ross Fountain and Scott Monument Visiting in the summer? Head to Calton Hill for sunset! DAY FOUR Head back to the airport for around 9am. Either take the Edinburgh Airport tram from Princes Street (08:20) or the Airlink 100 bus from Waverley Bridge (08:26). 67


travel FOOD & DRINK For some excellent coffee head to Gordon St Coffee (opposite Edinburgh Waverley Station) as well as Brew Lab on South College Street and Cairngorm Coffee on Frederick Street. For proper Scottish scran (or food to you and me), Howies on Victoria Street serves delicious local fare and also has an excellent selection of whiskies. Bow Bar on West Bow is a recreation of a one room Scottish alehouse and has a good selection of whiskies (almost 400 single malts) and Scottish beers. Oxford Bar on Young Street is best known for being featured in Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus novels and is also known as the local police force’s drinking spot. Guildford Arms on West Register Street has a spectacular Victorian interior and has been run by the Stewart family since 1896. They serve real ale and have a great menu of Scottish delicacies as well as sandwiches and steaks. Halfway House on Fleshmarket Close is another one-room pub popular for its local food, in particular the Cullen Skink (a thick soup of smoked haddock, potatoes and onion).

WHERE TO STAY IN EDINBURGH You’re very likely going to be looking for somewhere to rest your head for the night so here are some of the best hotels in the city for every budget. The 5* Balmoral Hotel on Princes Street is best known for being 68

where JK Rowling completed the last book of the Harry Potter series. She left a signed statement on a marble bust in her suite and the suite has been renamed the JK Rowling Suite and is priced at almost £1,000 per night! A double room starts at £624 for a 3-night stay for two people.

is the ideal place for meeting fellow travellers or simply having a budget bed to sleep in. Dorm beds start at £62 for three nights and there are also private rooms available. Drinks are cheap, food is decent and it’s a great place if you don’t mind a bit of backpackingstyle travel!

The 4* InterContinental Edinburgh The George starts at £480 for a 3-night stay for two including breakfast. This elegant 18th-century building is conveniently close to Edinburgh Waverley Station and Princes Street Gardens.

Edinburgh is a wonderful city to spend a long weekend or to use as a base for exploring other nearby places in Scotland. You will be sure to make some amazing memories, whether you just want to explore the city or if you fancy setting off from Edinburgh to explore places like Aberdeen, Glasgow, the Highlands, Isle of Skye, Isle of Arran and other amazing spots in Scotland.

The Mercure Edinburgh Haymarket starts at £229 without breakfast or £300 with breakfast for a 3-night stay for two. This 4* hotel is located very close to Haymarket Station and is a short bus or train ride to the centre of the city or a 20-minute walk away. For families, the 4* Novotel Edinburgh Centre starts at £322 for a room for two adults and two children for a 3-night stay. Its central location makes it perfect for getting out in the morning and immediately being at a spot for exploring! For those on a budget, the Travelodge Cameron Toll starts at only £185 for a double room for three nights. This 2* hotel is a 35-minute walk from the centre or a 10-15 minute bus journey away. The centrally located hub by Premier Inn is only a few steps from Princes Street and starts at £159 for three nights in a compact standard room. If you’re looking for a hostel vibe or just something super low cost, St Christopher’s Inn Edinburgh

Follow Penelope’s travels on Instagram: @the_flyaway_girl or visit www.theflyawaygirl.com.

IMPORTANT DATES FOR 2020: Edinburgh ComicCon (11th - 12th April) Edinburgh Whisky Festival (6th June) Foodies Festival Edinburgh (31st July - 2nd August) Edinburgh International Book Festival (15th - 31st August) Edinburgh Military Tattoo (7th - 29th August) Edinburgh Fringe (7th - 31st August) Christmas Market at East Princes Street Gardens (November to January) Hogmanay (31st December)

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


health

SHOULD I GO TO THE DOCTOR?

When should you visit your doctor, and when should you try and treat the illness at home (and how do you do just that)?

BY SOPHIE CLIFTON-TUCKER

W

ith the winter season comes a cacophony of coughs, sniffles and sneezes. In an effort to reduce the bottleneck caused by the sheer volume of people that flock to A&E with a simple common cold, using up valuable time and resources, we speak to Dr Krishna Rawal.

HOW DO I KNOW WHETHER I HAVE THE FLU, OR A COMMON COLD? ​ he common cold is of course T the most 'common' and is a viral illness that can vary from just feeling a little 'out of sorts' to feeling tired and feverish with muscle aches, nasal congestion, sore throat, coughs and sneezes. Sometimes you may cough up some green sputum, but this in itself is not a sign of a secondary bacterial infection. Influenza or the flu is also viral but can last longer or be more severe with more extreme symptoms of fever, exhaustion, muscle aches and cough. However, for both GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

the common cold and the flu, the symptoms can vary from so mild you do not even know you have it, to being quite unwell, depending on your own state of health and immunity.

HOW CAN EACH OF THESE BE TREATED? Both the common cold and the flu are viral illnesses, so there is no definitive treatment that will get rid of the virus. The key is to support the immune system to do the job it is designed to do, by keeping warm and hydrated, avoiding strenuous exercise (which can aggravate the muscle aches), and using supportive medications such as paracetamol for general muscle aches, sugar free cough linctus or honey and lemon in hot water for a cough or sore throat. Often people worry about the fever and think this is a sign of a secondary infection or that the fever needs to be treated with paracetamol, however, fever itself is a sign of the immune system

working to fight the infection. The cold virus lives at body temperature, so the response in the body is to raise the body

Fever is a sign of the immune system working to fight the infection. temperature to kill the virus. In many cases a bit of fever, especially early on, is not a bad thing and 'sweating out' the cold is a way to fight the virus naturally. It is also worth considering staying at home so as not to pass the cold on to friends and colleagues at work, and also preventing spread using a tissue for coughs and sneezes – Catch it. Bin it. Kill it. Influenza that is bad enough to need medical treatment or admission may need specific anti-viral medications, but these are only considered in cases of rapidly spreading flu infections such as the ‘bird flu’ epidemic 69


health that occurred in 2008, or under specialist guidance.

HOW CAN I BEST PREVENT CATCHING THE FLU/A COLD?

AT WHAT POINT SHOULD I SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION?

The best way is to keep healthy and support your immune system with a healthy diet, drinking plenty of fluids daily, regular exercise and sleep, and not smoking as this reduces defences in the lungs. This is really the same recommendation for preventing any ill health. If

It is difficult to be exact with this, as it varies with every person, but prolonged symptoms lasting more than a week, very high or persisting fevers, a cough with brown or dark sputum, or feeling so unwell that you are bed-bound are good reasons to seek medical advice. The medical advice may be to just continue supportive treatment with bed rest and fluids, or it may mean further treatments such as antibiotics if there is a secondary infection.   WHEN IS HIGH TEMPERATURE DANGEROUS?

People in Gibraltar visit A&E on average 3 times more often than in the UK

someone has another medical condition, such as lung disease or diabetes, then having the annual flu vaccine is also a very good idea. This year in Gibraltar we have extended the flu vaccine to include children, so that more sections of the community are protected.   DO YOU HAVE A ROUGH FIGURE FOR HOW MANY A&E PATIENTS COULD HAVE BOOKED A REGULAR GP APPOINTMENT OR SELFTREATED AT HOME? ​ This is impossible to quantify as every person has a different interpretation of how well or unwell they feel. We do know that

The advice here is that anything above 37°C is considered a fever but does not always require medical attention, especially if patient is physically stable. In children under 6 months, medical advice should be sought if the temperature is above 39°C, and in children under 3 months if the temperature is above 38°C. In these cases, the child should be assessed by a doctor. In older children and adults, if physically stable with no difficulty breathing, most episodes of fever can be treated with over the counter medication such as paracetamol and ibuprofen, as long as someone is able to take these medications. Bed rest and fluids are very beneficial and a reminder that sick certificates can be obtained without the need to see a doctor via the Primary Care Centre sick certificate telephone service on 2000 7888. 70

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


health people in Gibraltar visit the A&E department on average 3 times more often than in the UK, but Gibraltarians are not unhealthier than their UK counterparts. Patients do attend A&E for conditions that would be better treated by a GP, and the A&E Consultant argues that perhaps half of all those who attend A&E would have been better seeing their GP, seeking advice from a Pharmacist, or using simple medications at home. However, there are many factors for this including convenience and worry that it might be something more severe. However, we must always

A&E is there for accidents and emergencies such as heart attacks and strokes. bear in mind that the best way to treat a cold is rest and supportive treatment, and not sitting in an A&E department or GP surgery where you may feel more unwell, and you may also pass the virus on to others who may have chronic health conditions and may be severely affected by your cold.   WHAT IS THE MOST COMMON AILMENT PEOPLE VISIT A&E/ THEIR GP FOR?  Again, this is impossible to say. Patients attend their GP for anything from chronic ill health such as diabetes and high blood pressure, to GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

backaches and arthritis, to common colds or throat or chest infections. Every day patients come with different problems. A&E also sees the same medical conditions, but is there for accidents (anything from a road traffic accident to a fall or laceration) and emergencies such as heart attacks and strokes.    DO YOU HAVE ANY PARTING ADVICE FOR OUR READERS? The key is that we must all as a community use medical services appropriately, so for routine medical conditions, reviews and minor illnesses go to the GP. For accidents and emergencies go to A&E. If we use A&E for minor

illnesses for example, we are stretching resources that should be focused on caring for those most unwell, and certainly I would want the A&E department to be ready and free to deal with me or my loved ones in an emergency where time is of the essence. The same applies to the GP. If we stretch GP time and resources with minor ailments such as the common cold which can just be treated at home, then those who are chronically unwell may struggle to get the appointments they need. It really is about all of us being wise with how we seek medical advice, and how we need to ensure that medical services are kept free to care for the most unwell or vulnerable.

71


leisure

NO FUNERAL, THANKS.

After an urgent call from the Gibraltar Cardiologist’s office, Peter ponders the rather macabre issue of what should be done with one's remains, when the clock chimes.

BY PETER SCHIRMER

F

or almost a century, Cape Town’s leading firm of undertakers was Human & Pitt, a partnership established in the 1870s between a local Dutch entrepreneur and a newly-arrived English settler who had worked for a mortician in London. They prospered – and though eventually adsorbed by a country-wide group – their apposite names provided a source of jokes or momentary amusement for generations of school-children; while a local academic and poet saw their apt naming as a ‘fine example of funeral humour’… In truth, there’s nothing funny about funerals, and few Westerners enjoy them – other than, perhaps, coffin-makers and morticians. I certainly don’t, though as a journalist I have reported on several, of prominent people, in various countries and of various faiths. Even when accompanied by singing and flowers and a local belief that death should be celebrated as a blessing, they’ve felt unduly morbid, and unnecessarily costly 72

to the corpse’s family… or nation. So I will not be having one. And, contemplated for years, that’s finally official – duly signed and sorted, in a trilingual encounter which had all the makings of an episode in a third-rate sitcom. This was never a spur of the moment decision. Though it was finalised only this week because, at 85, and lungs battered by 60-a-day habit for more than half those years, I face two separate heart operations, either of which could prove fatal. But over several years of ‘No Funeral’ thought, I always faced the same eventual question: Without a funeral, and thus no coffin, nor a burial or cremation, how does one dispense with a cadaver… preferably in a useful way? Probably the logical answer was obvious, but somewhere in my subconscious I was not quite ready to come to terms with the actual end itself, for I found ‘obstacles’ to making a final

Without a funeral, how does one dispense with a cadaver? commitment. My abused liver and other overworked or run-down organs were long past their sellby-date and would be useless as transplants. Harmful rather than helpfully life-giving. That sort of thing. Then, five years ago, while thumbing through an illustrated history of Dutch art – and with nary a thought of funerals or cadavers in mind – Rembrandt came to my aid in the intense light and deep shadows of The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp painted in 1632. The cadaver at the centre of the work even shared my beard. I, or rather what was left of me, could be used to help future doctors or surgeons to study anatomy. It was an option GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


leisure which, in the following months, became increasingly appealing; but arranging it seemed an insurmountable barrier. St Bernard’s wasn’t interested in my cast-off remains. Nor were three Spanish medical schools I approached. As I noted in my will, drawn up at that time: ‘As far as disposing of my physical being: I have attempted (so far without luck) to find a nearby medical school in Spain with an anatomy department that would be glad of my cadaver. Things may have changed by now so it might be worth trying again - anything to avoid a funeral.’ Things have changed. Admitted to urgently to Xanit Hospital with a malfunctioning heart valve in need of swift surgical attention, I was checked by a youthful cardiologist who, when I mentioned my final wish a couple of days becoming confident of her, knew precisely whom to phone.

I looked up into a surround of concerned faces. In less than 24 hours, preceded by one of the hospital’s welfare officers, a charming middleaged Spanish woman arrived in my room, chirrupy as a sparrow, clutching a shopping bag. It bulged, not with greens or groceries, but reams of documents rife with Spanish legal terminology. She spoke no English. My Spanish GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

is unashamedly minimal. Hence the welfare officer - Spanish born of Belgian parents, she spoke not only competent English, but Flemish so that a mutual familiarity with Afrikaans would help us over trickier terms, like the unintentionally black-humoured ‘legal undertaking’ or the unfunny ‘obligation to inform’, and a string of other technical/legalistic terms. With mirth we managed. I signed numerous papers (witnessed by my wife and the lady with the shopping bag, whose name I never learnt) and was given a number to phone within twelve hours when, finally, my clogs were popped. It came with a verbal caveat that, unfortunately, it remained unanswered from late on Friday to mid-day on Sunday… or was it from Saturday until Monday morning? I can’t recall. Not that I shall be able to do anything about it. I handed that phone number to my wife, and hope, for her sake, that I get my timing right. We parted with smiles and a handshake, though I wondered at the macabre aspect of her work, I couldn’t fault the Malaga anatomy department’s comfortably homely choice of a Thanatos handmaiden. The image of Dr Tulp and his

anatomy class returned with a distorted bang twelve days into this extended wait for heart surgery when, at 4:30 in the morning, after a minor heart infarction I looked up into a surround of concerned faces. A sharp contrast though, for instead of sombre-suited garb off-set by the white ruffs of the bearded, elderly Dutch students of Nicolaes Tulp, these were all young Spanish women - a doctor and nurses in sky blue or white uniforms, a few wearing multicoloured cardigans against the night’s chill. My beard is fuller, greyer than that of Tulp’s cadaver, but as I lay there – uncertain for a while of whether this was actually the end – its struck me that while the religious rites of the dead have probably changed little between the age of Rembrandt van Rijn and our modern Cyberworld, in those four centuries, WOW how our thoughts of the afterworld and the steps to it have changed… and WOW, how the gender gap has narrowed. It is with a small proud smile on our face and a tear in our eye that we confirm Peter did indeed get his timing right, valiantly giving his body to science. 73


food and wine

EDINBURGH – ITS EASY Grave robbers, murderers and fine wine. BY ANDREW LICUDI DIPWSET

I

feel I ought to write something about Edinburgh; after all, with easyJet’s direct flights starting in March I suspect Scotland’s capital may well become a favourite destination for us Gibraltarians. Today it’s snowing and its rare enough for me to take a photo and send to my brother who responds by sending one of a warm and sunny day in Gib. Strangely I am not jealous. I guess I am used to the weather here because even in winter I rarely wear gloves or a scarf and dress as I would in Gib under my coat. Edinburgh is said to be one of the best-looking cities anywhere. Its divided into two distinct parts the ‘Old Town’ and the ‘New Town’ either side of Princes Street. Both have their charm. The old town has the High Street, the Castle and Holyrood Palace and of course the buildings there are ancient. This is where most tourists congregate. For me however the New Town is the truly unique part of city. It’s a wonderful collection of Georgian residential houses, restaurants and tiny shops in cobbled streets and charming gardens now a UNESCO World Heritage site. Here we bought our first flat when the New Town was a happy 74

hunting ground for impecunious, first-time buyers. These days are long gone and flats here are expensive and hard to come by. The best time to see the New Town is at dusk when one can peer into people’s living rooms, through large astragal windows and see paintings and furniture from an era long-gone in most other cities. You can even look into Robert Louis Stevenson’s house - a brass plaque telling the passer by the house is private and not a museum!

The star attraction is a book covered in the human skin of William Burke. Edinburgh and wine go back a long way. It was the signing of the Auld Alliance back in 1295 which set the Scots and the French against the English. It it gave Scottish Merchants the privilege of selecting the first choice of Bordeaux’s finest wines - a privilege which was eagerly protected for hundreds of years. Wines were landed at Leith and

taken to the wine vaults which to this day still overflow with fine wines from France and beyond. In Leith today (a short bus ride from the centre of town down Leith Walk towards the river) you will find excellent fish restaurants, pubs with good food and of course the Royal Yacht Britannia. One can still imagine smugglers pushing barrels of claret up its cobbled, narrow streets which remain virtually untouched to this day. I can’t remember exactly when I first met Silvio Praino probably ten or fifteen years ago at a now defunct restaurant he managed called Vintners located over the ancient wine vaults in Leith. I still remember their ravioli with veal and sage the restaurant excelled at. I still meet Silvio now and then. He is an easy-going, affable man who today runs Divino Enoteca in Merchant Street a short walk from the High Street. He is an expert on Italian wines and loves talking wine or arranging small informal tastings, so don’t hesitate to call him or dine at Divinos when you are next here. The restaurant’s ambience is exceptional and has a very good reputation for its Italian cuisine. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


food and wine Nearby is the famous pub The World’s End. Famous for all the wrong reasons. It was here on a Saturday night on October 1977, two seventeenyear-old friends Helen Scott and Christine Eadie went for a night out in Edinburgh’s Old Town. They met up with some friends at The World’s End but the two of them separated from the group. They were never seen alive again. Their bodies were discovered miles outside the city having been strangled and raped. Edinburgh went into shock and it sparked one of the largest investigations in British criminal history but to no avail. Forty years later however, cutting edge DNA forensics finally nailed Angus Sinclair painter and decorator. Sinclair died in prison in March 2019. If a beer at the World’s End has not dampened your enthusiasm for the morbid then head out to the 1505 Café nine minutes’ walk away in Nicolson Street. The Café has wonderful sandwiches, roast peppers in pastry and luscious cakes. It is owned by the Royal College of Surgeons. Behind the café is surely one of the world’s most bizarre museums. It’s a medical museum. Here the visitor can see some of the largest tumours removed, hundreds of body parts preserved in formaldehyde and even penises, some injected with mercury - presumably early and unsuccessful attempts to cure syphilis! The star attraction however is a book covered in the human skin of William Burke of Burke and Hare fame. These two

grave robbers, who running out of cadavers to sell to the anatomists, murdered eighteen people. Burke was hanged in 1828. A plaster cast of his face taken after death can be seen next to the book. Recently, we dined at the The Timberyard. As the name suggests, the restaurant is a former warehouse where we used to buy bits of wood, glues and tools when obliged through lack of cash to indulge in DIY. The Timberyard today is a restaurant in the Scandinavian style where, regretfully, one needs to book weeks in advance. The décor reflects its former use and waiting staff are heavily tattooed, so much so I wonder if being tattooed is a pre-condition of employment. Foraging, Nordic pickling, smoking and the committed use of local Scottish produce is what Timberyard is about. Personally, I have never tasted anything quite like it except perhaps in expensive Reykjavik.

I have never tasted anything quite like it.

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Both Sandra and I started with a small dish of langoustine, celeriac, pepper dulse and tarragon. Utterly delicious. The bread is home-made and totally moreish. A small dish of smoked salt comes with the pure white, homemade butter which is unsalted. Sandra follows the langoustines with another small dish of trout, fennel, sorel and dill. I go for the coley, cockles, wild leek, capers and garlic. Delicate and so, so good! We both then order the vegetarian glazed cauliflower, spiced yoghurt, kale, herbs and caper. This is so far removed from the usual,

nondescript, utterly boring, ghastly vegetarian pap it’s difficult to over stress. It’s delicious! For dessert we both go for rhubarb with sheep’s yogurt. For wine we had a bottle of Austrian Grüner Vetliner by Christoph Hoch. Very good. I have just ordered a case of Viña Ardanza Selección Especial 2010. This is only the fourth time in the bodega’s 80-year-old history they have given their Ardanza the elevated status of ‘Seleción Especial’ after the great vintages of 1964, 1973 and 2001. I am told it’s as good as the bodega’s Gran Reserva 890. In Edinburgh the wine is available at £22.50. In Gibraltar it should be considerably cheaper. 75


leisure

GIBRALTAR INTERNATIONAL CHESS FESTIVAL Young Russian ranked 22 in Gibraltar Chess Masters takes top prize.

I

n an extraordinary finish at the end of 10 days of solid chess, 21-year-old Russian grandmaster David Paravyan, ranked only 22nd in the list of starters, won a tie-break rapid chess final against the tournament’s third highest rated player Wang Hao (China) to clinch the £30,000 first prize in the 18th Gibraltar Masters of the Gibraltar International Chess Festival. Dubbed ‘the Russian submarine’ by chess festival director Stuart Conquest, Paravyan was an unknown name to expert chess pundits outside Russia before the tournament held at the Caleta Hotel last month. Ranked 165th in the world, he went through the tournament almost unnoticed as it was assumed that bigger names would ultimately prevail. The winner of the other major prize, the £20,000 awarded to the highest placed female competitor went for the second year in succession to 28-year-old former women’s world champion Tan Zhongyi (China). In many ways, it was appropriate 76

that a Russian player should have won the tournament as the festival started and ended with visits from major figures in chess from Russia. Legendary and former world chess champion Anatoly Karpov opened the tournament by giving a ‘simul’, playing 29 opponents at the same time over five hours, and the festival closed with a visit from the president of FIDE (World Chess Federation) Arkady Dvorkovich, who attended the gala dinner and prizegiving. The president gave a speech in which he recognised Gibraltar as an important centre of world chess and spoke of further cooperation between the

international federation and the local chess organisation. Gibraltar is not a member of FIDE but Mr Dvorkovich told the large gathering of titled players at the Gala that it should become “a member of the chess family”. Being in Gibraltar at a festival which in 18 years had established itself as “a great tradition” in the world of chess, he said, had been a “huge experience” and as a member of the chess family Gibraltar players and the community would benefit, and FIDE would also be able to foster tournaments here. “Let’s start this endeavour together and achieve some results,” he said. Festival founder and organiser, GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


leisure

The event again saw a good participation from Gibraltar chess players, most holding their own. Joseph Greco, 17, showed GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

progress in the game when in the first amateur event he reached the prize list for the first time, finishing in joint second place on 4/5. Anthony Farrell took the Gibraltar prize in the first week and Freddie Poggio in the second of the amateur events. Meanwhile, Russian chess legend Anatoly Karpov, a renowned philatelist owning one of the greatest stamp collections on chess, was presented with a framed set of the Gibraltar Stamps issued in the year 2012

to commemorate the 10th Anniversary of the Gibraltar International Chess Festival - the Gibraltar collection of stamps from 2015 to 2019 on behalf of Her Majesty’s Government of Gibraltar by Deputy Chief Minister Dr Joseph Garcia. To everyone’s surprise, Mr Karpov explained he already owned the complete collection of Gibraltar stamps since 1886 when the first stamp was issued. The next Gibraltar International Chess Festival will be held from the 18th-28th January, 2021. 77

Photos: © Niki Riga and © John Saunders

Brian Callaghan, in welcoming the president of FIDE for the first time, said he looked forward to a solid co-operation with Gibraltar going forward with FIDE. Sports Minister Steven Linares described the 2020 tournament as “yet another year of total success in the chess world” and spoke of the Gibraltar Government commitment in its support of the festival.


Indulge in our distinctive New Ă la carte menu, curated by award-winning Executive Chef, Alfred Rodriguez

3 Europa Road, Gibraltar Tel. +350 200 73000 www.rockhotelgibraltar.com

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Show Us Your Mag! Top Left - Ella - Top Right - Leon - Bottom Left - Lukas - Bottom Right - Emma

Baby Ella

Baby Leon

LITTLE READERS COMPETITION Want to enter our next competition? Snap a picture of your little one holding a copy of Gib Mag and send it in to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com, and you’ll be in the running to win a week’s worth of meals at Supernatural! (Competition ends 20 th March. Winner announced in our April issue.) GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

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fashion

DRESS FOR THE JOB YOU WANT Inevitably, how you dress and how you present yourself to the world sends a whole array of signals about how you view your environment, and most importantly, how much respect you have for the work itself and to a degree, for yourself.

TOP RIGHT: DOUBLE BREASTED BLAZER IN TAN CHECK, SELECTED FEMME, £120.00 BOTTOM RIGHT: ORGANIC RIB ROLL NECK IN CAMEL, NEW LOOK, £8.99

BY JULIA COELHO

W

e’ve all heard the age-old saying, “Dress for the job you want, not the job you have”. Regardless of the weight you may put on that notion, it can’t be denied that, whether it’s a job you’ve been at for over 10 years or an interview for your dream role, we are constantly being evaluated by those around us. There’s a case to say that without even realising it, most of us dress in a manner that reflects where we think we belong, be it for the good or the bad. Some people relish the thought of getting dressed for work in the morning, whilst others (me) groan at the never-ending daily hassle. Having a decent selection of office outfit ideas when you don't have a uniform to adhere to is about as tricky as a dress code could possibly get. Are you successfully teetering on that fine line between too smart and too casual? Throw in the fact that different industries and jobs have totally opposing expectations, 80

as well as an increasingly evolving work culture, and the process can become a real psychological burden, and one we shouldn’t have to add onto the many challenges presented to us by the work itself. Even if you work in a relaxed or creative environment, there are still plenty of elements to consider, whether it's keeping warm

in a nippy air-conditioned office or looking appropriate for a postwork event. Ultimately, it all comes to down finding those winning combinations you can rely on time and time again. With even higher stakes, choosing what to wear for a job interview can be a daunting task. No matter where you’re interviewing, I think it’s important to GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


fashion remember to never wear anything that doesn't represent your style or who you are. When something really suits you, and you feel comfortable and relaxed, any level of confidence you exude reflects how you are likely to conduct yourself in many capacities. A common mistake that some people make is trying too hard to stand out and sacrificing professionalism as a result. Of course, every job will be different, but it’s important to strike an appropriate balance and ensure that you're remembered for all the right reasons. It may be useful to consider that the people doing the hiring are probably likely, and even hardwired, to pick a candidate who is similar to themselves. It’s probably not a bad idea to do some research on the sort of people who may be your future colleagues and suss out their general vibe, including how they dress for work! No matter what you do, and what your goals may be, always dress with intention and purpose.

COLOUR PALETTE & PRINT Depending on your job and environment, there may be some ensembles better suited to your

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

TOP LEFT: SLIM LEG TROUSERS IN ORANGE CHECK, WAREHOUSE, £39.00 TOP RIGHT: SIX BUTTON DOUBLE BREASTED SUIT BLAZER, TOPSHOP, £65.00

needs than others, but softening the colour palette to neutrals is always a failsafe way to adhere to a stricter dress code. Toned down all-cream or beige looks always win on the sophistication front, no question. If you want to shake things up a bit but still keep it professional, opt for a classic print like checks, stripes or polka dots. My personal staple has become a pair of checked tapered trousers; they’re a little more exciting than simple

black trousers while still being appropriate, and easy to style with smart blouses and shoes.

SUITS & TAILORING A black blazer is something that everyone should own. Not only does it work with practically every outfit, but if you end up feeling overdressed, then you can take it off, and fling it over an arm for a ‘cool and confident’ vibe. If you’re not sure about a full suit, then mix and match your textures, prints and colours instead. Chic tailored separates are always a good idea, especially when paired with stylish shoes and accessories.

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fashion

LEFT: PINAFORE DRESS WITH BLOUSE INSERT IN CHECK, MISS SELFRIDGE, £45.00 RIGHT: WIDE LEG JUMPSUIT WITH RUFFLE SLEEVE, VERONA, £45.00

Fling it over an arm for a ‘cool and confident’ vibe. 82

LAYERING Layering is key, especially when we’re talking about the cooler months. Layer a shirt or roll-neck under a pinafore summer dress, blouse or crew neck jumper for a simple yet perfectly put-together look. Jumpsuits and boiler suits may be a new avenue to explore this year. When layered over elegant

roll-necks and paired with smart shoes, they can lend themselves to a stylish yet appropriate tonal look, perfect for the spring chill.

ACCESSORIES & SHOES It can often feel like there’s not much variation in bog-standard workwear outfits, but you can always opt for minor details that make you stand out and let your personality shine through. Add a hint of playfulness to slick tailoring GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


fashion with a pair of quirky shoes, or lift your ensemble with some classic jewellery; both fantastic ways to personalise any outfit.

LEFT: LEATHER MOCK CROC BROGUES IN BLACK, & OTHER STORIES, £120 BOTTOM RIGHT: ORGANIC OVAL HOOP EARRINGS, & OTHER STORIES, £23 BOTTOM LEFT: MOTTLE LEATHER FLAT BROGUES IN BURGUNDY, ASOS DESIGN, £35.00

OUTERWEAR It’s all well and good having an awesome outfit underneath, but in the cooler months, there’s an added pressure to ensure that

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your coat game is strong too. A lightweight trench coat for the spring or a checked tailored coat when you’re feeling a little more chilly - both are practical, stylish and bang on-trend. 84

TOP: CURVE CLASSIC TRENCH COAT IN BEIGE, VERO MODA, £50.00 TOP RIGHT: TALL BELTED TRENCH COAT IN CHECK PRINT, MISSGUIDED, £65.00 BOTTOM LEFT: WOOL BLEND OVERSIZED BLAZER, & OTHER STORIES, £165

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Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/thegibraltarvegan

MANDY’S POTATO AND LEEK SOUP

This potato and leek soup is the perfect accompaniment to the Irish Soda Bread. It is argued by people in the soup world that the dish is actually the traditional French soup Vichyssoise served hot. But, let’s face it, most of us associate it with St Patrick’s Day rather than with a French Chef who claimed to have created it in the Ritz-Carlton New York in 1917. This recipe is named after my friend Mandy because it does not contain any celery, a food she firmly believes should become extinct. However, if you are not like Mandy and like celery, you can add two stalks (chopped) to the recipe. INGREDIENTS • 86

6 leeks (the white part only)

500g white potatoes

1 large white onion

4 clove garlic

1500ml vegetable stock

500ml oat milk

2tbsp olive oil

1 pinch salt and pepper

METHOD 1. Chop both the onions and the garlic finely. 2. Wash, peel and chop the potatoes into cubes. 3. Slice the leeks. 4. Heat the oil on a low heat and add the onions, garlic and leeks.

Let it ‘sweat’ until the vegetable become soft; do not let them brown. 5. Add the vegetable stock, potatoes, salt and pepper and bring to the boil. Once it is boiled let the soup simmer for 30 minutes. 6. Once it is ready carefully scoop it into the blender. I like to cover the blender with a towel in case anything goes wrong, you will be more protected from the hot liquid as will your walls, floors etc. When the soup is blended pour it back into the saucepan. 7. Add the oat milk and stir bringing the soup back to the boil. 8. Serve with Irish Soda Bread. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


IRISH SODA BREAD

Recipe by The Gibraltar Vegan instagram.com/thegibraltarvegan

Toasted for breakfast, served with soup for lunch or used as something to soak up your sauce at dinner - soda bread does it all. It is also great sustenance at the start, middle or end of St Patrick’s Day. This recipe is a ‘chuck everything in the bowl and mix’ recipe; no kneading, proofing and praying to St Patrick that it turns out right is required. The best part is that is done in less than 45 mins. If you want to great creative, you can add some chopped nuts like walnuts or even sultanas into the mixture. INGREDIENTS: •

150g whole-wheat flour

200g plain white flour

60g porridge oats (50g for cooking and 10g for ‘decoration’ on the top of the

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

bread) •

1tsp table salt

1tsp bicarbonate of soda/ baking soda

1tbsp fresh lemon juice

300ml unsweetened oak milk

METHOD: 1. Mix the plain white and wholewheat flour together with the oats, salt and bicarbonate of soda/baking soda in a bowl. 2. Add the milk and lemon juice and stir until it is blended and you have a nice dough. 3. Scoop the dough out and place

it on a baking tray/pizza tray that has been dusted with wholewheat flour. 4. Cut a deep cross in the middle of the bread (if you don’t the bread will not cook properly) and sprinkle the remainder of the oats over it. 5. Bake in a fan assisted oven at 200°C for 30 minutes. 6. To check if the bread is ready, remove it from the oven using a towel or oven glove to protect your hands from the heat, turn the loaf upside down and tap the bottom. If it has a hollow sound your bread is done. If it doesn’t pop it back in for five minutes. 87


restaurants, bars & pubs THE LOUNGE

SOLO BAR & GRILL

ALL’S WELL

Stylish Lounge Gastro Bar on Queensway Quay Marina serving best quality food prepared by passionate, qualified chefs. Popular quiz on Sundays from 7pm and a relaxed friendly atmosphere. A separate Lounge Bar Area serving a wide range of hot drinks, wines, beers, spirits and cocktails at reasonable prices, with large TV’s for sports and events coverage.

Solo Bar and Grill is a stylish and modern eatery — perfect for business functions or lunches — and part of the popular Cafe Solo stable. Serving everything from Goats’ Cheese Salad, Mediterranean Pâté and Cajun Langoustines to Beer Battered John Dory, or Harissa Chicken, and Chargrilled Sirloin Steak. This is a delightful venue in Europort with a cosy mezzanine level and terrace seating. Well worth a visit, or two! Available for private functions and corporate events — call 200 62828 to book your function or event.

In the fashionable Casemates square stands Gibraltar’s last historical themed pub, named for the 18th-century practice of locking gates to the city at night when the guard called ‘All’s Well’. Their food menu caters to all cravings; whether it’s fish and chips, a homemade pie, or maybe even a delicious sharing platter, they have it all. All’s Well have an amazing range of bottled beers as well as being the only pub in Gibraltar to offer craft beer on tap. Happy hour is daily from 7-9pm. Large terrace. Karaoke Mondays & Wednesdays until late.

Open: 10am-late Mon - Sun Be sure to arrive early to ensure a seat! The Lounge, 17 Ragged Staff Wharf, Queensway Quay Marina Tel: 200 61118 info@thelounge.gi

Open: 12-8pm. Solo Bar & Grill, Eurotowers Tel: 200 62828

All’s Well, Casemates Square. Tel: 200 72987

NUNOS ITALIAN Nunos Italian Restaurant, overlooking the Mediterranean, is popular with hotel guests, tourists and local residents. This 2 rosette rated, AA restaurant is renowned for its eclectic interior, intimate atmosphere and fine cuisine. Savour a wide selection of freshly prepared Italian delicacies, including bread, pasta, meat and fish, followed by delicious desserts. In the summer months, the hotel offers alfresco dining for private parties in the Garden Grill. Sitting nestled in the colonial garden you can enjoy a mouth-watering menu of charcoal-grilled meats and freshly prepared salads in candlelit surroundings. Open: Mon-Sun 1-3pm lunch, 7–11pm dinner Nunos Italian Restaurant and Terrace Caleta Hotel, Catalan Bay Tel: 200 76501

Email: reservations@caletahotel.gi

CAFÉ SOLO Modern Italian eatery set in lively Casemates square. Everything from chicory and crispy pancetta salad with walnuts, pears and blue cheese dressing, or king prawn, mozzarella and mango salad to pastas (eg: linguine with serrano ham, king prawns and rocket; smoked salmon and crayfish ravioli with saffron and spinach cream) to salads (eg: Vesuvio spicy beef, cherry tomatoes, roasted peppers and red onions; and Romana chorizo, black pudding, egg and pancetta) and pizzas (eg: Quatto Stagioni topped with mozzarella, ham, chicken, pepperoni and mushroom) and specialities such as salmon fishcakes, beef medallions and duck. Daily specials on blackboard. No smoking. Café Solo Grand Casemates Square. Tel: 200 44449

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


information EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY: ALL EMERGENCIES................................. 112 FIRE...............................................................190 AMBULANCE.............................................190 POLICE.................................................................199

Business Information Financial Serv. Commission Tel: 200 40283/4 Chamber of Commerce Tel: 200 78376 Federation Small Business Tel: 200 47722 Company Registry.Tel: 200 78193 Useful Numbers Airport (general info.) . Tel: 200 12345 Hospital, St Bernards. . Tel: 200 79700 Weather information. . Tel: 5-3416 Frontier Queue Update Tel: 200 42777 Gibraltar Museum Tel: 200 74289 18/20 Bomb House Lane 10am-6pm (Sat 10am-2pm). Admission: Adults £2/Children under 12 - £1. Exhibitions also at Casemates gallery.

Police 200 72500

Gibraltar Garrison Library Tel: 200 77418 2 Library Ramp Mon-Fri: 9am-5pm. Free Library tour offered every Friday at 11am. chris.tavares@gibraltargarrisonlibrary.gi Registry Office Tel: 200 72289 It’s possible to get married within 48 hours. A fact taken advantage of by stars such as Sean Connery & John Lennon. Rock Tours by Taxi Tel: 200 70052 As well as offering normal fares, taxis provide Rock Tours taking in the Upper Rock, Europa Point etc. John Mackintosh Hall Tel: 200 75669 Includes cafeteria, theatre, exhibition rooms and library. 308 Main Street 9.30am - 11pm Mon-Fri.

Gibraltar Services Police Emergency Nos: (5) 5026 / (5) 3598 Gibraltar Public Holidays 2020 New Year’s Day Commonwealth Day Good Friday Easter Monday

Monday 1st Jan Monday 09th Mar Friday 10th Apr Monday 13nd Apr

Workers Memorial Day Tuesday 28th Apr May Day

Friday 1st May

75th anniversary of VE Day Friday 8th May Spring Bank Holiday

Monday 25th May

Queen’s Birthday

Monday 15th June

Late Summer Bank Holiday

Monday 31st Aug

Gibraltar National Day Tuesday 10th Sept Christmas Day Boxing Day

Friday 25th Dec Thursday 28th Dec

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD Gibraltar adhdgibraltar@gmail.com facebook.com/ADHDGibraltar/ Alcoholics Anonymous meet 7pm Tues & Thurs at Nazareth House Tel: 200 73774. A Step Forward support for single, separated, divorced/widowed people, meet 8pm Mon at St Andrew’s Church. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group those who are pregnant, breastfeeding or have breastfed to get together for coffee / support. Partners and older children welcome. Meets 1st Wed / month at Chilton Court Community Hall at 1.30pm. Enquiries and support 54014517. Childline Gibraltar confidential phone line for children in need. Freephone 8008 - 7 days a week 5pm - 9pm Citizens’ Advice Bureau Open Mon-Thur 9:30am-4:00pm, Fri 9:30am- 3:30pm. Tel: 200 40006 Email: info@cab.gi or visit at 10 Governor’s Lane. Free & confidential, impartial & independent advice and info. COPE Support group for people with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia or Rheumatoid Arthritis. Meetings at Catholic Community Centre Book

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

Shop at 7.30pm first Thur of each month. Tel: 200 51469 Email: copeadsupport@hotmail.com Dignity At Work Now Confidential support and advice for those who are being bullied at work. Tel: 57799000. Families Anonymous Support group for relatives and friends concerned about the use of drugs or related behavioural problems. Meet weekly on Thurs at 9pm at Family and Community Centre, Mid Harbours Estate, Bishop Caruana Road. 54007676 or 54014484. Gamblers Anonymous Telephone: 54001520 Gibraltar Cardiac Rehabilitation and Support Group meets on the first Tues of every month at 8.30pm at John Mac Hall, except for Jul & Aug. Gibraltar Dyslexia Support Group 72 Prince Edwards Rd Tel: 200 78509 Mobile: 54007924 website: dyslexia.gi Gibraltar Hearing Issues & Tinnitus Association Voicemail: (+350) 200 66755, Text Message (SMS): (+350) 54066055, Correspondence Charity P.O. Box 90220, Gibraltar. Email: info@ ghita.gi, Facebook: Gibraltar Hearing Issues & Tinnitus Association (GHITA & BSL Club), Our support group meets the first Monday of every month at Suite 3, Kings Bastion Leisure Centre as from 5pm.

Gibraltar Marriage Care Free relationship counselling, including pre-marriage education (under auspices of Catholic Church, but open to all). Tel: 200 71717. Gibraltar Society for the Visually Impaired Tel: 200 50111 (24hr answering service). Hope miscarriage support Tel: 200 41817. Mummy & Me Breastfeeding Support: Meets every Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous Tel: 200 70720 Parental Support Group helping parents and grandparents with restrictive access to their children and grandchildren. Tel: 200 46536, 200 76618, or 54019602. Psychological Support Group, PO Box 161, Nazareth House. Meet Tuesdays at 7pm, Fridays 8pm. Tel: Yolanda 54015553 With Dignity Gibraltar support for separated, divorced/widowed or single people. Meet Weds 9pm, Catholic Community Centre, Line Wall Rd. Outings/activities. Women in Need Voluntary organisation for all victims of domestic violence. Refuge available. Tel: 200 42581 (24 hrs).

89

The Gibraltar Magazine is published and produced by Rock Publishing Ltd, Gibraltar. Tel: (+350) 200 77748

NON-URGENT CALLS: Ambulance Station 200 75728


clubs & activities Arts & Crafts Cross Stitch Club: John Mackintosh Hall, 1st Floor, Mon 6-8pm, fee £1. Gibraltar Arts & Crafts Association: Children: Mon&Fri 12.30-2pm, Mon-Fri 3.45-5.15pm Adults: Wed 5.45-7.15, Sat 10.30 to 12.30, Tel: 20073865 email: gibartsandcrafts@hotmail.com Knit and Natter Group: Tues 11am-3pm, Thurs 5.30-7.30pm, at Arts & Crafts Shop, Casemates balcony. Free to join and refreshments provided. Tel: 20073865. The Arts Centre: Prince Edward’s Road, Art classes for children and adults. For more info call Tel: 200 79788. The Fine Arts Association Gallery: At Casemates. Open 10am-2pm, 3-6pm Mon-Fri, Sat 11am-1pm. The Arts Society Gibraltar: Monthly illustrated talks open to the public. Registration from 6:30pm every 3rd Wednesday of the month. Guest fee £12. We meet at The Garrison Library. Contact gibraltar@theartssociety.org or Claus Olesen on 54036666. Website with all informaiton is gibraltar.theartssociety.org Board Games Calpe Chess Club & Junior Club: meets in Studio 1, John Mackintosh Hall Thursday, Juniors: 5p.m. - 7 p.m. / Tuesday & Thursday 7p.m. - 10:30 The Gibraltar Scrabble Club: Meets on Tuesdays at 3pm. Tel: Vin 20073660 or Roy 20075995. All welcome. The Subbuteo Club: Meets in Charles Hunt Room, John Mackintosh Hall. Dance Adult Dance Classes: Wed evenings at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre from 7-8.30pm. Contact Dilip on 200 78714. Art in Movement Centre: Hip-hop/Break Dance, Contemporary Dance, Pilates, Capoeira, Acrobatics, Street Kids & Tods, Modern Dance. Performance and Film opportunities. Judo & Jujitsu Classes: Tue/ Thur with Sensei Conroy. All ages. Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. www. artinmovement.net FB: Art In Movement A.I.M, tel 54025041 or 54007457 Ballet, Modern Theatre, Contemporary & Hip-hop: weekly at Danza Academy. Training from 3 years to Adult Advanced. 68/2 Prince Edward’s Rd Tel: 54027111. Bellydance Classes, all levels, Tue 8-9pm at the Ocean Village Gym (non–members welcome). Contact 54005593. DSA Old & Modern Sequence Dancing: Sessions at Central Hall Fri 8.30pm, beginners 8pm. Tel: 200 78901 or tony@ gibraltar.gi Everybody welcome. Modern & Latin American Sequence Dancing: Mon at Catholic Community Centre 8pm. Tel. Andrew 200 78901. Modern, Contemporary, Lyrical, Flexibility, Hip Hop & Dance Theatre: Classes weekly at Urban Dance Studio, 2 Jumpers Bastion. Tel: Yalta 54012212 or Jolene 54015125. Rockkickers Linedance Club: Governor’s Meadow 1st School. www.rockkickers.com Salsa Gibraltar Salsa: Tues at Laguna Social Club, Laguna Estate. Beginners 7-8.30pm. Intermediates 8.30-10pm. Tel: Mike 54472000 or info@salsagibraltar.com Zumba Classes at Urban Dance: Jumpers Bastion, with certified instructor Tyron Walker. Tel: 20063959 or 54012212 or Twitter: @UrbanDanceGib History & Heritage The Gibraltar Heritage Trust: Main Guard, 13 John Mackintosh Sq. Tel: 200 42844. The Gibraltar Classic Vehicle Association: Dedicated to the preservation of Rock’s transport/motoring heritage. Assists members in restoration / maintenance of classic vehicles. New members welcome. Tel: 200 44643. Garrison Library Tours: at 11am on Fri, duration 1h 50mins. Tel: 20077418. History Alive: Historical re-enactment parade. Main Street up to Casemates Square every Sat at 12 noon. Music Gibraltar National Choir and Gibraltar Junior National Choir: Rehearses at the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Tel: 54831000. The Calpe Band: Mon & Wed. For musicians of brass/woodwind instruments of all standards/ages/abilities 7-9pm. Tel: 54017070 or thecalpeband@gmail.com

90

Jazz Nights: Thurs at 9pm at O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel. Tel: 200 70500. Outdoor Activities The Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award Gibraltar: Exciting self-development programme for young people worldwide equipping them with life skills to make a difference to themselves, their communities and the world. Contact: Award House, North Mole Road, PO Box: 1260. mjpizza@ gibtelecom.net, www.thedukes.gi. Social Clubs The Rotary Club of Gibraltar meets the Rock Hotel, 7pm Tuesday evenings. Guests welcome. For contact or info www.rotaryclubgibraltar.com Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes: (Gibraltar Province) meets RAOB Club, 72/9 Prince Edward’s Road - Provincial Grand Lodge, Thu/month, 7.30pm. William Tilley 2371, Thurs 8.30pm. Buena Vista 9975, monthly, Social Lodge. www.akearn1.wix. com/raob-gibraltar, william.tilley.lodge@ hotmail.co.uk, Clive, tel: 58008074 Special Interest Clubs & Societies Creative Writers Group: meets up on Tuesday mornings at 10.30 in O’Reilley’s Irish Bar and it is free to attend. Tel: Carla 54006696. Gibraltar Book Club: For info Tel: Parissa 54022808. Gibraltar Horticultural Society: meets 1st Thurs of month 6pm, J.M. Hall. Spring Flower Show, slide shows, flower arrangement demos, outings to garden centres, annual Alameda Gardens tour. All welcome. Gibraltar Philosophical Society: devoted to intellectually stimulating debate. Frequent lectures and seminars on a range of topics. Tel: 54008426 or Facebook: facebook.com/gibphilosophy Gibraltar Photographic Society: Meets on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. Wellington Front. Induction courses, talks, discussions, competitions etc. For details contact the secretary on, leslinares@gibtelecom.net Harley Davidson Owners’ Club: www.hdcgib.com Lions Club of Gibraltar: Meets 2nd and 4th Wed of the month at 50 Line Wall Road. www.lionsclubofgibraltar.com St John’s Ambulance: Adult Volunteers Training Sessions from 8-10pm on Tues. Tel: 200 77390 or training@stjohn.gi The Royal British Legion: For info or membership contact the Branch Secretary 20074604 or write to PO Box 332. UN Association of Gibraltar: PO Box 599, 22a Main Street. Tel: 200 52108. Sports Supporters Clubs Tottenham Hotspur Supporters Club: Meets at Star Bar, Parliament Lane, when Spurs games are televised - call prior to matches to check game is televised. Great food for a lunch if KO is early or an early supper if the game is later. Gibraltar Arsenal Supporters Club: Meets match days upstairs at Time Out Café, Eurotowers. Gooners of all ages welcome. For info/news visit www.GibGooners.com Tel: 54010681 (Bill) or 54164000 (John). Gibraltar Hammers: Meets on match days at the Victoria Stadium Bar, Bayside Road. All league games are shown live. All West Ham supporters and their families are welcome. For details visit www.gibraltarhammers.com or gibraltarhammers@hotmail.com Leeds United Gibraltar Supporters Club. Meet at The Trafalgar Sports Bar 1 Rosia Road when live matches are on. All Leeds United supporters and their families are welcome. Join Leeds United Gibraltar Supporters club at: facebook.com/luscgib Sports & Fitness Artistic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Artistic Gymnastics Association. Tel: Angela 200 70611 or Sally 200 74661. Athletics: Gibraltar Amateur Athletics Association holds competitions through year for juniors, adults and veterans. Two main clubs (Calpeans 200 71807, Lourdians 200 75180) training sessions at Victoria Stadium. Badminton: Recreational badminton weekdays at Victoria Stadium (Tel: 200 78409 for allocations). Gibraltar Badminton Association (affiliated to BWF& BE) junior club/tournaments, senior leagues/ recreational. www.badmintongibraltar.com

Ballet Barre Fitness: Adults on Wed 10am & Fri 6pm at The Arts Centre. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Basketball: Gibraltar Amateur Basketball Association (affiliated FIBA) leagues/ training for minis, passarelle, cadets, seniors and adults at a variety of levels. Tel: John 200 77253, Randy 200 40727. Boxing: Gibraltar Amateur Boxing Association (member IABA) gym on Rosia Rd. Over 13s welcome. Tuition with ex-pro boxer Ernest Victory. Tel: 56382000 or 20042788. Cheerleading: Gibraltar Cheerleading Association, girls and boys of all ages. Cheerleading and street cheer/hip-hop at Victoria Stadium. Recreational / competitive levels. Tel: 58008338. Canoeing: Gibraltar Canoeing Association. Tel: Nigel 200 52917 or Arturo 54025033. Cricket: Gibraltar Cricket, National Governing Body & Associate Member of ICC. Governs International & Domestic Men’s, Women’s, Boys’ & Girls’ cricket- league & cup competitions and in-school coaching. www.gibraltarcricket.com, info@gibcricket. com, Twitter: @Gibraltar_Crick Cycling: Gibraltar Cycling Association various cycling tours. Darts: Gibraltar Darts Association (full member of WDF & affiliate of BDO). We cater for men, ladies & youth who take part in leagues, competitions and a youth academy for the correct development of the sport. Tel: Darren 54027171 Secretary, Alex 54021672 Youth Rep, Justin 54022622 President. Email: info@ gibraltardarts.com Football: Gibraltar Football Association leagues/competitions for all ages OctoberMay. Futsal in summer, Victoria Stadium. Tel: 20042941 www.gibraltarfa.com Gaelic Football Club (Irish sport): Males any age welcome. Get fit, play sport, meet new friends, travel around Spain/Europe and play an exciting and competitive sport. Training every Wed on the MOD pitch on Devil’s Tower Road at 7pm. Andalucia League with Seville and Marbella to play matches home and away monthly. Visit www.gibraltargaels. com or secretary.gibraltar.europe@gaa.ie Hockey: Gibraltar Hockey Association (members FIH & EHF) high standard competitions/training for adults/juniors. Tel: Eric 200 74156 or Peter 200 72730 for info. Iaido: teaches the Japanese sword (Katana), classes every week. www.iaidogibraltar.com Ice Skating: Gibraltar Rock Stars Figure Skating Club lessons every Tuesday evening & Saturday morning, all levels including adults. Contact grsfsc@gmail.com or 58700000 Iwa Dojo, Kendo & Jujitsu: Classes every week, for kids/adults. Tel: 54529000 www. iwadojo.com or dbocarisa@iwadojo.com Judo and Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Budokai Judo Association UKMAF recognised instructors for all ages and levels at Budokai Martial Arts Centre, Wellington Front. Tel: Charlie 20043319. Ju-jitsu: Gibraltar Ju-jitsu Academy training and grading for juniors/seniors held during the evening at 4 North Jumpers Bastion. Tel: 54011007. Karate-do Shotokai: Gibraltar Karate-do Shotokai Association - Karate training for junior & seniors at Clubhouse, Shotokai karate centre, 41H Town Range. Monday: 9:30 p.m. & Wednesday 9:45 p.m. Karate: Shotokan karate midday Mon beginners, other students 8.30pm. Thurs 8.30pm. In town at temporary dojo or privately by arrangement. Contact Frankie 54038127 or info@fhmedia.co.uk. Motorboat Racing: Gibraltar Motorboat Racing Association Tel: Wayne 200 75211. Muay Thai and Muay Boran Club: Tues & Thur at Boyd’s Kings Bastion Leisure Centre at 6:30pm, Tel: John – 54024707 FB: Gibraltar Muay Thai Netball: Gibraltar Netball Association (affiliated FENA & IFNA) competitions through year, senior/junior leagues. Tel: 20041874. Petanque: Gibraltar Petanque Association. New members welcome. Tel: 54002652. Pilates: Intermediate Pilates: Tues & Fri 9.30am, beginners Pilates: Fri 10.50am at the Shotokai Centre, 41H Town Range. Tel: 54033465 or pilatesgibraltar@hotmail.com Gibraltar Pool Association: (Member of the

EBA) home and away league played on Thurs throughout the season, various tournaments played on a yearly basis both nationally and internationally, Tel: 56925000 gibpool@ gibtelecom.net, www.gib8ball.com Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gibraltar Rhythmic Gymnastics Association runs sessions from 4 years of age, weekday evenings. Tel: 56000772 or Sally 200 74661. Rugby: Gibraltar Rugby caters for all ages from 4 years old to veterans (over 35’s). It organises competitions and sessions for Juniors; 4 x Senior Clubs; Veterans team; Touch Rugby and a Referees Society. Email admin@gibraltarrfu. com or visit www.gibraltarrfu.com Sailing: Gibraltar Yachting Association junior/ senior competitive programme (April - Oct) Tel: Royal Gibraltar Yacht Club at 200 78897. Shooting: Gibraltar Shooting Federation. Rifle, Europa Point Range (Stephanie 54020760); Clay pigeon, East Side (Harry 200 74354); Pistol, near Royal Naval Hospital (Louis 54095000). Snooker: Members of European Billiards & Snooker Association - facilities at Jumpers Bastion with 3 tables. Professional coaching for juniors/seniors. Organised leagues/ tournaments and participation in international competitions. Tel: 56262000 / 54000068, or info@gibraltarsnooker.com Squash: Gibraltar Squash Association, Squash Centre, South Pavilion Road (members WSF & ESF). Adult and junior tournaments and coaching. Tel: 200 44922. Sub-Aqua: Gibraltar Sub-Aqua Association taster dives for over 14s, tuition from local clubs. Voluntary sports clubs: Noah’s Dive Club and 888s Dive Club. Tel: 54991000. Commercial sports diving schools available. Time - Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.. Telephone, Jenssen Ellul - 54027122 Swimming: Gibraltar Amateur Swimming Association (member FINA & LEN) opens its pool for leisure swimming. Junior lessons, squad for committed swimmers, water polo. Pool open Mon&Thurs: 7-10am, 12.30-4pm. Tue, Wed, Fri: 7-10am, 12:30-5pm. Sat: 3-5pm. Sun: closed. Mon to Fri from 5-6pm groups training. 6-7.30 squad training. Mon, Wed, Fri 7.30-8.30 swimming joggers, Tues & Thurs 7:30-8:30 junior Water polo. Mon, Tues & Thurs 8:30-10pm Adult water polo. Tel: 200 72869. Table Tennis: Gibraltar Table Tennis Association training and playing sessions, Victoria Stadium, Tues 6-10pm and Thurs 8-11pm with coaching and league competition. Tel: 56070000 or 20060720. Taekwondo: Gibraltar Taekwondo Association classes/gradings Tel: Mari 20044142 or www. gibraltartaekwondo.org Tai Chi: Tai Chi for children and adults. MonThur 6.30-8pm at Kings Bastion Leisure Centre and Sat 9am-1pm at the Yoga Centre, 33 Town Range. Tel: Dilip 200 78714. Tennis and Paddle Tennis: Sandpits Club. Junior and adult training available. info : www. sandpits.club. Tel (Louis) 20077035 Ten-Pin Bowling: At King’s Bowl in the King’s Bastion Leisure Centre every day. Gibraltar Ten Pin Bowling (members FIQ & WTBA) leagues, training for juniors and squad. Tel: 200 52442. Triathlon: Hercules Triathlon Club organises swimming, running and cycling training sessions and competes regularly in Andalucia and Internationally. Contact chris.walker@york. gi or Facebook “Hercules Triathlon Club” Volleyball: Gibraltar Volleyball Association training, indoor leagues, beach volleyball competition, 3 v 3 competition, juniors and seniors. Tel: 54001973 or 54885000. Yoga: Integral Yoga Centre runs a full programme of classes from Mon-Fri at 33 Town Range. Tel: 200 41389. All welcome. Theatrical Groups Gibraltar Amateur Drama Association: Meet at Ince’s Hall Theatre Complex, 310 Main Street. Tel: 20042237. Trafalgar Theatre Group: Meets 2nd Wed of month, Garrison Library 8pm. All welcome.

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


Š MARK GALLIANO

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information

CRUISE SCHEDULE MARCH 2020 ARRIVAL

VESSEL

ETD

PASS

OPERATOR

CAPACITY

Mon 02 Mar 20, 09:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

Tue 10 Mar 20, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

Sat 14 Mar 20, 08:00

MARELLA DREAM

20:00 British

Thomson Cruises

1506

Tue 17 Mar 20, 07:00

MARELLA CELEBRATION

19:00 British

Marella Cruises

1264

Tue 17 Mar 20, 12:00

OCEANA

23:00 British

P&O

2000

Wed 18 Mar 20, 09:00

MARELLA CELEBRATION

18:00 British

Marella Cruises

1264

Thu 19 Mar 20, 08:30

MARCO POLO

13:00 British

Cruise & Maritime Voyages

850

Sat 21 Mar 20, 11:00

MAGELLAN

19:00 British

Cruise & Maritime Voyages

1452

Mon 23 Mar 20, 09:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

Wed 25 Mar 20, 08:00

VENTURA

14:00 British

P&O

3096

Thu 26 Mar 20, 14:00

OCEANA

21:00 British

P&O

2000

Sat 28 Mar 20, 08:00

MARELLA DREAM

20:00 British

Thomson Cruises

1506

Mon 30 Mar 20, 12:00

COSTA MAGICA

18:00 Italian

Costa

2702

Tue 31 Mar 20, 08:00

MEIN SCHIFF 4

18:00 German

TUI Cruises

2506

03 Mar '20 - 09 Mar '20

DUTY PHARMACY OPENING HOURS

92

10 Mar ‘20 – 16 Mar ‘20

Monday to Friday (7pm to 9pm) Weekends & public holidays (11am to 1pm & 6pm to 8pm)

17 Mar ‘20 –23 Mar ‘20

For updates, check facebook.com/PharmaGuide

24 Mar ‘20 – 30 Mar ‘20

Bell Pharmacy

27 Bell Lane  200 787289

Valmar Ph. Eurotowers

1.0.08 Eurotowers   200 63868

Wesley Pharmacy

299b Main Street  200 67567

Trafalgar West One

Unit G1 Eurotowers  200 44406

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


information

FLIGHT SCHEDULE MARCH 2020 DAY

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

FLIGHT NO.

AIRLINE

FROM

ARRIVES

FLIGHT NO. DEPARTS

TO

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

EZ8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZ8902

11:30

Gatwick

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

15:55

EZY2246

16:30

Luton

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

19:20

EZY6300

20:00

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

Britsh Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

16:55

EZY1964

17:35

Manchester

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

10:55

BA491

11:30

Heathrow

EZ6299

easyJet

Bristol

16:30

EZ6300

17:15

Bristol

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

19:25

AT991

20:05

Tangier

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

10:55

EZY8902

11:30

Gatwick

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:15

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

19:20

EZY6300

20:00

Bristol

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

19:55

EZY1964

20:35

Manchester

EZY2245

easyJet

Luton

10:55

EZY2246

11:30

Luton

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:50

EZY8902

12:25

Gatwick

BA492

British Aiways

Heathrow

14:25

BA493

15:15

Heathrow

BA490

British Airways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:20

Heathrow

EZY6299

easyJet

Bristol

10:50

EZY6300

11:25

Bristol

EZY8901

easyJet

Gatwick

11:10

EAZY8902

11:45

Gatwick

EZY1963

easyJet

Manchester

11:15

EZY1964

12:00

Manchester

BA492

British Airways

Heathrow

14:25

BA493

15:15

Heathrow

BA490

British Aiways

Heathrow

16:30

BA491

17:30

Heathrow

AT990

Royal Air Maroc

Tangier

19:25

AT991

20:05

Tangier

This schedule is correct at time of print. For up to date details and changes visit www.gibraltarairport.gi CHESS PUZZLE ANSWER: 1 Bb5 increases the pressure to intolerable proportions since the defence 1...Re7 fails miserably to 2Qb8 checkmate, when Black's bishop is pinned. GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

93


R U N W A Y

Victoria Stadium

3

4

REFERENDUM HOUSE ←→ SOUTH BARRACKS

GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019

Market Place loop (Eastbound)

http://www.gibraltarbuscompany.gi

Routes operated by

BOTH WORLDS ←→ ROSIA

Rosia loop (Northbound)

MARKET PLACE ←→ EUROPA POINT

3

Midtown loop (Southbound) Midtown loop (Northbound)

Ocean Village

Glacis Kiosk

WILLIS’s ROAD

MOUNT ALVERNIA ←→ ORANGE BASTION

AIRPORT/FRONTIER ←→ TRAFALGAR

EUROTOWERS ←→ ROSIA

http://citibus.gi

H

Bishop Canilla House

PLACES OF INTEREST

Coach Park

Cable Car

Airport

Lighthouse

Cathedral

Museum

BI

Taxis

Seaport

Castle

Beach

Stadium

Trafalgar Cemetery

QUEENSWAY

King’s Wharf

Queensway Quay

Referendum Gates

MAIN STREET

Commonwealth Park

Mid-Harbour Estate

Europort Building 8

A AN RU CA D OP A SH RO

Edinburgh House

58

10

PRINCE EDWARDS ROAD

Eliott’s Way

48 BOTH WORLDS

ROSIA ROAD

Alameda Governor’s House Meadow House Victoria House

H KS RO AD

BA RR AC

Mount Pleasant

3

New Harbours

Cumberland Jumpers Road Building

South Gates

New Mole House

Garrison Gym

© VK (2018)

ce ur So

Gibraltar Bus Network

rg p.o ma et tre ns pe O :

Rosia Plaza

North Gorge

Eliott’s Battery

March 2019 version : correct at time of going to print

Map of Gibraltar

University of Gibraltar

EUROPA POINT

2

Schematic Diagram of Bus Network (not to scale)

Buena Vista

Mosque

BUS NETWORK

GIBRALTAR

9 ROSIA ROSIA 4

Brympton

EUROPA ROAD

SOUTH BARRACKS

SOUTH PAVILION ROAD

St. Joseph’s School

MOUNT ALVERNIA

Schomberg

SO UT

Shorthorn Farm

7

R e s e r v e

Rock Old Hotel Casino

RED SANDS ROAD

Lower Flat Bastion Rd Wilson’s Gardiner’s Ramp Road

Morello’s Ramp

TRAFALGAR Convent Place

Blackstrap Cove

N a t u r e

FLAT BASTION ROAD

Sacred Heart Church

Flat Bastion Rd

R o c k

Caleta Hotel

RECLAMATION Cathedral ROAD Square

King’s Bastion

Arengo’s Palace

PORT St. Bernard’s EURO Hospital GASA Swimming Pool

ROAD

Varyl Begg Estate

MONTAGU GARDENS

9

British War Memorial

LINE WALL ROAD

BOTH WORLDS ←→ RECLAMATION ROAD

Artillery Arms

WILLIS’s ROAD

MAIN STREET MAIN STREET

Moorish Castle Estate

AIRPORT/FRONTIER ←→ RECLAMATION ROAD

Albert Risso House

Sir William Jackson Grove

Waterport Road

QUEENSWAY

Orange Bastion

Fishmarket Steps

1

William’s Way

U p p e r

SIR HERBERT MILES ROAD

1 2 MARKET PLACE

CASEMATES

Routes operated by

10

9

8

7

5

Notre Dame School

Faulknor House

Constitution House

REFERENDUM HOUSE

WINSTON CHURCHILL AVENUE

Park & Ride

MARKET PLACE ←→ WILLIS’S ROAD

R U N W A Y

2

1

BUS ROUTES

5 10

AIRPORT/ FRONTIER

DEVIL’S TOWER RO AD

St. Theresa’s Church

GLACIS ROAD

Eastern Beach

CORRAL ROAD

WATERPORT ROAD

C A R C A B L E

Catalan Bay

N

94


coffee time CROSSWORD 1

1

2

4

3

4

5

6

8 8 10 11

10 2 12

1

13

13

14 17

17

15 6

18

18

20

1. Women’s quarters in a Muslim house (6)

1. Budapest is its capital (7)

4. Tidbit (5)

3. Hindu religious instructor (9)

2. Thrashing (7)

7 17

4. Paces; stages (5)

9. Hindu queen (4)

6. Satirical imitation (6)

12. Citizens of Belgrade no longer use this national epithet (11) 17. Epithet of one born north of the border with English (8)

19

19. & 22. One’s old school (4,5)

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22

8. Bowler but not a spinner (6) 10. Thought out (8)

14

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7. Sufficient (6)

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ACROSS

20. A dried grape (6) 22

21. The parts when divided by 33 1/3 (6)

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5. Bucharest is its capital (7) 11. Without interest in; indifferent (9) 13. One who lives in Thomas More’s perfect world (7) 14. One born in Tehran (7) 15. Without a settled home (7) 16. Hindu religious retreat (6) 18. One who does not give up (5)

22. See 19. 23. Visually attractive (6)

& YOU COULD WIN

SUDOKU

lunch for two at

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Either SNAP and SEND your completed crossword to editor@thegibraltarmagazine.com or RETURN TO THE CLIPPER by 20 th March. 1

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

Brenda Santos

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GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


CHESS COLUMN BY

GRANDMASTER RAY KEENE OBE The 2020 Gibraltar Masters held at the Caleta Hotel in Catalan Bay over January resulted in yet another huge success for the visionary triumvirate of Organisers: Brian Callaghan OBE, Franco Ostuni and tournament Director Grandmaster Stuart Conquest. The winner was the young Russian David Paravyan , who won £30,000 and who will be seen in action in this month’s puzzle. The sensation of the tournament was however the fourteen year old Indian prodigy Rameshbabu Praggnanandhaa who wins this Month’s game against the strong Bulgarian Grandmaster and former World Chess Federation champion Vesselin Topalov.   

Qc7 when Black has some counterplay. 11.Nxd4  Nxd4 12.Bxd4 Nb8 13.Bf2 Ba6 14.Bxa6 Nxa6 15.f5 exf5 Again the former champion errs. By capturing on f5 Black weakens his central defences . Instead the experienced Grandmaster should fight back with the more complicated variation: 15...Nc7 16.g4 f6 17.exf6 Bxf6 18.Bg3 Rc8 19.Rae1 Bh4  16.Nxd5 Nb4 17.c4 Rc8 18.a3 Also good is 18.b3 Re8 19.Rae1 g6 20.h3 b5 21.e6 Nxd5 22.cxd5 fxe6 with advantage to White . The more active text sets a long range trap.  18...Nc6 19.Rfe1 Bc5 20.b4 Bxf2+ 21.Qxf2 Qd7 22.Qh4 Qd8 23.Nf6+ A beautiful sacrifice which devastates the black defences. 

a rook lift to the third rank after which Black has no way to ward off White’s Kingside onslaught. 25.Rxd8 Rfxd8 26.Qxf6 Ng6 27.h4 h5 28.Rf1 f4 29.g4 Rd3 30.gxh5 Rg3+ 31.Kf2 Nxh4 32.Qxh4 Rxc4 33.Re1 and faced with an enormous material disparity, Black resigned.

PUZZLE

White to play and win

The Gibraltar Masters is also celebrated for its promotion of female chess and this year the women’s laurels went to Tan Zhongyi of China who picked up a munificent £20,000 in prize money.

A position by the winner. How does White score the knockout blow?

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 The French Defence came as a surprise to the young prodigy who , as he admitted after the game, was very much on his own in the opening. 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 6.Nf3 Be7 7.Be3 b6 8.Qd2 Nc6 9.Be2 O-O 10.O-O cxd4 The text mistakenly permits White to establish a central blockade. Better is 10...Bb7 11.Nd1 cxd4 12.Nxd4 Nc5 13.Nxc6 Bxc6 14.c3 GIBRALTAR MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

23...gxf6 Topalov had probably overlooked White’s coming intermezzo. 24.Rad1 Nxe5 If Black moves his queen then white will continue with exf6 and

Answer on page 93

97


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