GCCSA Annual Report 2016-2017

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THE GULF COAST COMMUNITY SERVICES ASSOCIATION

ADVANCING The Lives of our NEIGHBORS 2016 2017 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY


THE HEART OF COMMUNITY ACTION


CONTENT 04 - A Word from our CEO 06 - GCCSA's Mission + Vision 07 - Services to the Community 09 - Hurricane Harvey Relief Report 14 - Community Spotlights 16 - The GCCSA Food Pantry 18 - GCCSA Head Start & Early Head Start

24 - Developing Early Childhood School Readiness 28 - GCCSA Financial Position 30 - Board of Directors 32 - Leadership Team + Policy Council 34 - Community Partners


REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2016/2017

A WORD FROM OUR CEO For more than fifty years, Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. has been at the forefront of Community Action Agencies (CAAs). As champions of change, my team has made it our mission to build a strong coalition of community organizations and action-oriented individuals dedicated to building pathways of opportunity. Success in our world of community action and service is a remarkable and nuanced thing – it happens person by person, family by family, city by city. It is measured by the least amount of people suffering and declared when the War on Poverty is finally won. When communities of working poor become completely self-sufficient and are transformed from “working poor” to “middle income” or better, my job will be done and Community Action Agencies like GCCSA will no longer be needed. Until then, we will actively continue to network, coordinate and collaborate with other strategic partners to provide a seamless network of services to the most vulnerable in Harris County. I see infinite possibilities in the individuals, children and families who walk through our doors. Many of them have the same goals and aspirations of living out the American dream – finishing their education, owning a home, starting their own business, providing a better life for their family. Coupled with a corporation with a proven track record like GCCSA, not even an unexpected category 4 storm will deter us from providing the critical assistance needed to stabilize families so that they can continue that journey towards their dream. In short, advancing lives is the heart of community action… I hope that this report inspires you, as well as enlightens you to how responsive, resilient and relevant GCCSA is to the communities served. To build a pathway of opportunity to advance the lives of our unserved and under-served neighbors, will take a village of advocates who are willing to equip them with necessary tools. GCCSA is a part of that village and I am honored to lead us as we work with like-minded partners toward comprehensive solutions.

Dr. Jonita Wallace Reynolds Chief Executive Officer

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AN INVESTMENT IN KNOWLEDGE & TRAINING MAKES A CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS THE ADVANCEMENT OF OUR COMMUNITY

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52 YEARS OF SERVICE During its more than 50 years story, GCCSA has administered diverse services and programs to hundreds of thousands of under-served and un-served individuals and families in Harris County. As a result, GCCSA provides rich benefits and resources designed to eliminate the inhibitive conditions of poverty. GCCSA programs and services: assist families in earning a living wage, individuals in the advancement of their education, and communities in gaining economic security. As a Community Action Agency, our purpose is two-fold: to assist in emergency situations and to empower. We believe that there are times in life where we must "give someone a fish". Thus, we have programs such as the GCCSA Food Pantry, Clothing and Back-to-School Supply Drives, and Utilities and Rental Assistance programs. However, our primary focus is to grow a more self-sustaining community. Therefore, most of our initiatives revolve around "teaching people how to fish, and in some instances, how to buy the pond".

OUR VISION

GCCSA aims to earn the confidence from the citizens of Houston and Harris County so that we become the exemplary model for social services in the community.

OUR MISSION

The Gulf Coast Community Services Association engages partners and forges strategic alliances to educate, equip and empower individuals and families in their pursuit of economic independence.

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SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START The GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start (HS/EHS) Program is a comprehensive, early childhood development program, that has served eligible children and families with economically-challenged backgrounds in the Houston, Harris County area since 1964. GCCSA educates over 1,900 early learners and their families who reside in the Southeast Sector of Harris County, including the cities of Houston and Pasadena. GCCSA operates 20 Head Start Centers functioning as stand-alone sites that operate in collaboration with school partnerships. The HS Program educates children ages 3 to 5 years. Early Head Start supports pregnant women, infants and toddlers, ages 6 weeks to 30 months. The EHS Center operates a home-based option. GCCSA HS/EHS services include: early childhood education, family involvement, health advocacy, family literacy, fatherhood initiative, mental health services, and nutrition to all enrolled children, including in the family homes of those with disabiltiies.

ADULT EDUCATION & LITERACY GCCSA offers Educational Scholarships to qualified candidates pursuing continuing education or vocational training certifications for career advancement. Scholarships may cover tuition, books, uniforms, and other related fees. GCCSA also provides access to General Education Diploma (GED) and Adult Basic Education (ABE) classes. Students have one-on-one instruction with staff who are dedicated to helping students improve their basic skills and obtain high school credentials.

CASE MANAGEMENT Case Management services include the assessment of needs, development and implementation of a Service Plan, and monitoring and advocacy for Customers. Other services include financial coaching, budgeting, transportation vouchers, and access to other community partners. Specialists work closely with families as they strive to reach economic independence. GCCSA provides emergency assistance to individuals and families in the form of: Rental, Transportation, Electricity, and Food Assistance.

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ADVANCING LIVES There are many variables in life that can lead one down the path towards poverty. Generational cycles, medical emergency, major home or car repair, family changes (divorce, births, deaths), and natural disasters are a few turning points that can drastically alter lives, placing an unexpected hardship on the household. Our services to the community help community members establish a foundation for upward mobility, self-sufficiency and ultimately transition out of poverty.

192

2,061 20,775 8

Transitioned Out of Poverty

The number of GCCSA clients who, with the aid of GCCSA Case Management, obtained and kept employment for at least 90 days, where their incomes rose above poverty thresholds. *State-mandated threshold: 189

Veterans, Disabled, Homeless & Senior Citizens Served

*served using Community Services Block Grant funding

Unduplicated Individuals Served


RELIEF FROM THE STORM Gulf Coast Community Services Association has been the anchor for many people in the Harris County Community who have weathered their own personal storms. For more than 50 years, GCCSA has had the privilege to administer programs and services that enrich and uplift, infusing our population with not just hope, but a real path toward economic independence and empowerment. Our aim is that the 22.5 percent of the Houston population living below the poverty line will swiftly dwindle to less than 1 percent. There are some years, however, when that goal post gets moved by circumstances beyond anyone’s control. On August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the Texas coast as a category 4 storm. It was one of the most devasting tropical systems the Gulf Coast region had experienced in nearly 50 years. Within four days, Harris County received more than 50 inches of rain, flooding between 25 and 30 percent of the county. Thousands of households evacuated by boats, trucks, kayaks, and any other means available. The city’s two major convention centers housed an estimated 12,000 displaced residents, with shelters throughout the city taking in additional thousands. By November 2, Harris County residents submitted more than 436,000 valid applications for assistance to FEMA. Some predict that it will take years to make Houstonians whole again. After a catastrophic 15-plus trillion gallons of water was dumped by Harvey in our area, GCCSA did what we do best. We harnessed our past experience with disaster relief efforts, assessed the needs of the Community, and leveraged our community partnerships by bringing together powerful coalitions to help Houston Recover.

Hurricane Harvey: By the Numbers

60.58 inches

500,000 cars

Harvey was the most significant tropical cyclone rainfall event in United States history, both in scope and peak rainfall amounts.

Harvey’s maximum winds of 132 mph occurred during a several-hour period concluding with its first Texas landfall.

18 recorded values over 48 inches of rain

9 of 19 river gauges set records in SE Texas*

With 36 to 48 inches recorded in the Houston metro area. These rains caused catastrophic flooding in Harris and Galveston counties.

Nine out of the 19 official river gauges in Harris County (which includes the city of Houston) recorded all-time high flood stages.

“Everything I own was ruined....so anything, any little bit is appreciated. I really just hoped for a gas card to get to tomorrow, but this...this is so much more than I hoped for. Thank you!” - Dee Brown, Harvey Relief recipient

6.8 inches of water in an hour The rain rates observed in these bands on Aug. 26-27, 2017, were exceptional, with 6.8 inches of rain in just one hour documented in southeastern Houston from extremely heavy rain bands training over the same location. The front hardly moved from August 27-28, leading to the extreme rainfall totals in the Houston metro area.

Source: National Hurricane Center Tropical Cyclone Report

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OUR RELIEF APPROACH As a Community Action Agency, critical assistance and stabilizing families are at the core of our long-standing commitment to change lives. We understood that to invest in families and their communities so that they could regain their pre-Harvey security, our assistance would need to intensify over the coming months. After receiving $1.2 million dollars in disaster relief-funds from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA), GCCSA drafted an aggressive plan to identify impacted Harris County residents living at or below 125 percent of the federal poverty level. The agency was also awarded $100,000 in additional monies in support of our efforts from socially-committed organizations such as the AARP Foundation and National Celiac Association, and fellow agencies in the Community Action Network. GCCSA formed new partnerships and expanded existing relationships with local community organizations to perform relief efforts. We streamlined the eligibility process for displaced individuals and families needing interim assistance, which allowed the team to respond quickly with services and other supports. In the face of such great need, the strategy included outreach to some of the hardest hit areas and most vulnerable populations. Head Start and Early Head Start survey respondents across 21 Centers allowed us to ascertain the level of damage and loss that income-insecure households experienced. Using historical program results and housing market data assured the most impactful financial assistance, while serving as many people as possible. A look at the GCCSA Relief Package demonstates the multi-pronged approach to addressing the needs of both renters and homeowners affected by Hurricane Harvey.

Benefit Package Identified Need: Housing Income Insecurity Loss of Wages

$825 per Household

Transportation

$225 or $400 Pre-Paid Voucher Gas Card $50 or Bus Card $30

Food

Food Assistance

Loss of Property

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Household Size 1-3 or 4+ people:

Homes received significant water damage

Incurred vehicle repair costs or complete loss of transportation Income earner(s) experienced loss of wages or total job loss Total GCCSA Head Start and Early Head Start Survey Respondents: 940 Families


The Oxfords, a family of 7 children ages 4 to 15, lived in Baytown, Texas. They were forced to evacuate their home after it was overtaken by water during the rains of Harvey. After 7 shelters, they remained homeless. On October 2, 2017, the Oxfords were referred to GCCSA by Health & Human Services. Navigating the Houston Metro system, they came to us, asking only about the emergency food stores in the GCCSA Food Pantry. Thanks to the many donations we received from our community partners specifically for disaster relief, we were able to provide the Oxfords so much more: a Wells Fargo Visa Gift Card, Houston Metro bus passes, undergarments, bathroom items, meals, and hope. Hope that 7 members of the Oxford family, pictured with GCCSA staff was reflected in the story shared by Mr. Oxford, as he told us how he rescued his children from the rising water. The Oxford family was all smiles when they headed out our lobby doors, thankful to be together and appreciative of the generosity of so many whose names and faces they will undoubtedly pass anonymously on the street in the days to come.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Funding GCCSA received over $1.3 million in private and public dollars to support relief efforts.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Funding Provided By:

Hurricane Harvey Relief Community Partners Outreach Hosts Organizations and Agencies who hosted GCCSA Client Services Team Outreach Events.

l Baytown JD Walker Community Center l Bread of Life, Inc. l City of Houston Health Department, Magnolia Multi-Purpose Center Harris County Precinct One Commissioner l

Furniture Assistance GCCSA provided $131,000 in Furniture Assistance to our HS/ EHS Families. Furniture packages were customized by these local retailers, and included selections of children’s bedding and furniture, as well as living room sets.

l Rodney Ellis – Finnigan Park Community Center l Houston Health Foundation l North Shore Community Fellowship of Faith l Northwell Health

l Exclusive Furniture l Hilton Furniture l Katy Furniture

Relief Supplies Partners Donations of Perishable and Non-Perishable Food Items, Water, Baby Wipes and Diapers, Personal Care Items, Household Goods and Cleaning Supplies. And 13,000 sq. ft. of space to store Harvey inventory.*

l Bread of Life, Inc. l City of Houston Health Department l H-E-B l Houston Area Women’s Center l Houston Celiac Support Group

l Houston Food Bank l Individuals and Families supporting their Neighbors l TODD Events l David R. David*

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OUR RELIEF RESULTS

Over the course of 2.5 months, GCCSA provided rental payments, food, children’s bedroom sets, and financial assistance to meet the basic needs for 1,087 households in Harris County. We accomplished the goal of a thoughtful and impactful community engagement through 31 outreach events, resulting in $1,213,737 given directly to the community. Providing overhead space, outreach and staff time, our Community Partners increased that investment. With mission-driven organizations and partnerships such as: Harris County Commisioner for Precinct One Rodney Ellis and Finnegan Park Community Center, JD Walker Community Center, City of Houston’s Magnolia Multipurpose Center, Northshore Community Fellowship of Faith, and Bread of Life, Inc., we connected to families like the Oxfords. Hundreds of others with shared experiences received supportive services through donations and funding dollars for Hurricane Harvey purposes. A generous grant from the AARP Foundation allowed partnership with City of Houston’s 2100 Memorial Senior Housing to support relocated tenants. GCCSA worked closely with a property management company to develop a relocation plan for residents that removed barriers such as limited resources and financial restrictions. Outreach with Harris County Commissioner Ellis resulted in the receipt of monies towards replacing personal items for seniors who lost personal property and had minor repair needs. GCCSA’s Head Start/ Early Head Start Centers and corporate office identified impacted families and staff members. Customers enrolled in our Case Management programs received additional support in their progress toward transitioning out of poverty when their momentum was halted by the storm. GCCSA expended all federal and state-funding per compliance standards, investing in an impactful way: directly with individuals and their families. For over 50 years, we have provided opportunities to families that are economically challenged. Post-Hurricane Harvey, this remains our focus. We understand that recovery takes time, dedication from friends and neighbors, and the efforts of organizations like our own to sustain continued progress and stronger communities. Strengthening Families

322 322 families received financial assistance

101 101 families who lost everything received furniture sets, equaling $131,000 total value.

$1,150 $1,150 average financial assistance received per household, representing $432,000 total.

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Earl and Gwen are a retired couple who lived on the Southwest side of Houston. Their home was near a bayou that spilled its banks and rapidly flooded their area of the beltway. They described the floods as a hungry monster, ready to gobble up everything in its path. Before they knew it, the water had risen as high as a foot and a half up their wall before they were able to wade to safety, grandchildren in tow. Early and Gwen’s home was gutted, and they moved in with his brother while they waited for reconstruction to start. Not ones to be inactive, they did what they could to help his brother’s neighbors with clean-up. The couple came to GCCSA for emergency supplies for themselves and their grandbabies. GCCSA supplied them with: diapers, undergarments, cleaning supplies, and personal care items. Earl, recently retired from an energy company after having double bypass, open heart surgery, was grateful to have been strong enough to get his family to safety. The pair came away from the experience happy to have all made it out alive and to be in a position to help others.


Harvey Relief Summary

4,100+ HARVEY AFFECTED INDIVIDUALS SERVED

1,087 HOUSEHOLDS $1,213,737

DIRECT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROVIDED TO HARRIS COUNTY HOUSEHOLDS

31

OUTREACH EVENTS

$1,115

AVERAGE PER HOUSEHOLD ASSISTANCE

124,438 lbs

FOOD DISTRIBUTED TO RELIEVE FOOD INSECURITY

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The Gulf Coast has weathered numerous storms over the years. Each one seemingly more devastating than the last. And every time, the people who reside in the disaster zones come together for refuge, healing and rebuilding. When Twitty Carron moved to Houston from Louisiana in 2014, she was well aware of the rain storms and flooding potential of the Bayou City. What she and the city’s residents couldn’t possibly anticipate was the level of damage that could be unleashed by a single storm in 2017. While Hurricane Harvey altered whole neighborhoods, it did not change the resolve of Houstonians or organizations like Gulf Coast Community Services Association to help those in need. Before Hurricane Harvey overflowed Houston’s streets and waterways, Twitty taught English, Language Arts & Reading to third graders on the west side of town. Mother to a seventh-grade son and two high school teens, life was good. She was enrolled in Angelo State University’s Master’s in Education program for Student Development and Leadership in Higher Education, looking forward to advancement in her career. For all intents and purposes, Twitty and her family lived a comfortable life. Yet, the impending catastrophe was not something she was prepared to take on and could little afford. The floodgates opened. Literally. Their neighborhood, situated next to the west side’s Addicks Reservoir, was one of the worst hit areas of the city. When the rain stopped the water continued to rise, and Twitty and her children had lost their home, vehicle, clothes, and everything that was still in storage from their Louisiana move. Their rescue came in the form of a boat lift. Having no relatives in town and with all hotels full, the family lived with virtual strangers for a week, relying on their kindness for food, shelter and transportation. When they were finally able to get in touch with family members, another abrupt move was in store – the Carron’s were being flown back to Louisiana until it was safe to return.

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Weeks later, with little to hold on to and the revelation that Harvey had also deprived her of employment, a neighbor pointed her in the direction of Gulf Coast Community Services Association. The Agency’s emergency and case management services worked swiftly. GCCSA’s Hurricane Harvey disaster relief refilled the pantry of the Carron family’s temporary housing. Clothing, bedding, and other household items were provided, helping them regain normalcy in this post-Harvey world. Twitty was placed on an employment case management track and received workforce guidance from GCCSA for more than four months. Once she secured more permanent housing for her family and settled her children back in school, the Agency provided utility assistance and more than 50 percent of the household rental payments. This kind of targeted disaster relief introduces consistency when residents’ financial stability is rocked by devastating storms. After several weeks of part-time work, Twitty secured a better position as a Director of Instruction/ Instructional Coach. GCCSA stayed with Twitty through her first 90 days of employment, to ensure that she and her family were as whole as they could be given where they started after Harvey’s rains ceased. It doesn’t take much for a family of four, living on a single income, to dip into the uncertainty of poverty. There is always the specter of a medical emergency, car accident, economic downturn, or natural disaster that separates families from losing everything. This is where Gulf Coast Community Services Association exists – standing in the void between long-term, permanent or generational destitution and ongoing financial and educational durability. Before Hurricane Harvey formed in the Gulf of Mexico, Twitty Carron was a thriving Houstonian, enjoying life with her three children. Immediately after Harvey, life was uncertain. However, with the support of GCCSA’s combined disaster relief and workforce programs, long-term hardships were averted. Ms. Carron found a great job that allowed her to remain in the educational field. She was able to keep up with her master’s degree program, having an expected graduation date of May, 2018. Twitty aims to continue to excel in her career and provide a better future for her family. Thanks to Gulf Coast Community Services Association, she is well on her way.


An hour and a half after Harriet* called for her METRO Lift, she was on her way to her nearest big box grocery store. This would be the second of two trips to buy food for her household for the month. At roughly six miles away, this grocer isn’t the closest place for Harriet. That honor goes to the neighborhood corner store, with its limited selection of dated canned goods and packaged sundries. A can of soup that would cost a little over $1.00 at a regular grocer will surpass $2.00 here. The next nearest location, a meat market that specializes in exotically seasoned selections (but no fresh produce), features prices that bust Harriet’s household budget. The fixed income that she, her husband and their cat survive on each month doesn’t allow for such luxurious spending.

programs. Our own initiatives and partnerships with community organizations such as the Houston Food Bank, National Celiac Association and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension; and locallylocated national retailers such as Whole Foods Market and Sam’s Club, allows us to provide nutrition classes, budgeting workshops, and a welcoming pantry shopping environment. These services allow participants like Harriet to learn the best practices of working within their budgets while maintaining healthier, lifesustaining eating habits. Until the problem of food deserts is solved, the GCCSA Food Pantry will be available to serve the community. *GCCSA customer has voluntarily changed her name

A MAP OF FOOD DESERTS

Two hours after calling for her METRO Lift, Harriet slowly makes her way up the aisles, checking the prices against her long list of family needs and recalculating the amount in her budget. Some. . . most of those things will have to wait until next month. There is an offchance that she’ll get lucky later and one of the community food pantries will be able to supplement what she can’t afford at the larger grocery store. It will take up to another hour to make her way around the store and to check-out, and another 45 minutes waiting in the front of the store for her return Lift home. All told, this casual trip to get groceries takes 73-year-old Harriet approximately 4 ½ hours; something that would take the average adult no more than an hour and a half at a leisurely pace. In order to truly survive, this same outing must be repeated for supplemental purposes to area food pantries, such as the one here at GCCSA. Why? Because Harriet lives in one of Houston’s many food deserts. Conveniently, Harriet is one of the many senior residents receiving case management and served by the GCCSA Food Pantry. Our award-winning Pantry provides fresh vegetables, meat, bread, and other healthy staples for Harriet’s household; along with others who participate in our various

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HOUSTON FOOD DESERTS

These statistics and analysis come from the Harris County Appraisal District, the AP, as provided in the Houston Chronicle’s “Interactive: Do you live in one of Houston’s many food deserts?”; Houston Area Food Access Analysis Tool, funded and supported by the Clinton Foundation’s “Health Matters Initiative” and GE Healthymagination, and anchored by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health.

What we're talking about... A food desert is a low-income area (rural, urban or suburban) where a substantial share of residents have low access (i.e. lives more than a mile or 10 walkable blocks away) to a supermarket or large grocery store. In Houston’s low-income and minority neighborhoods, fast-food chains and convenience stores thrive, while the few markets around provide neither affordable, nutritious nor fresh food. More than 500,000 area residents (1/4 of our population) lack access to fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains and other food that constitutes a healthy diet. The Harris County Appraisal District has denoted approximately 1,000 businesses as either supermarket, meat market or convenience store in all of Houston. Most of these stores reside in wealthier neighborhoods. Sadly, the last time a supermarket was built in a Houston food desert was in 2012, according to HCAD data. The ALDI in northwest Houston was the first one in six years to be constructed in a low-income neighborhood. In wealthy and non-food deserts, a new supermarket sprung up every year consecutively since 1991. After 2011, following efforts to eliminate food deserts by the White House and local Houston leaders, 20 supermarkets were built in the city. That ALDI was the only one constructed in a low-income, low-access neighborhood.

The GCCSA Food Pantry a crises by distributing don and body c

The GCCSA Food Pantry is a Houston Food Bank Gold Status Partner. We serve an average of 700 - 1,000 individuals per month who are able to go from being food insecure to being fed because of the generous donations received. We are fortunate to be partnered with giants in the food retail industry who are able to help us ease Houston's hunger pains. Our Food Pantry serves as a place for crisis food relief and as a source for customers to regain their footing.

Food Disparity is a problem in Houston.

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# OF INDIVIDUALS WHO RECEIVED CRISIS FOOD ASSISTANCE

# OF INDIVIDUALS WHO ATTENDED NUTRITION WORKSHOPS

13,000+

700+


y addresses immediate hunger onated food, household items y care products.

Our Client Select Program gives participants an opportunity to acquire food in a meaningful way. Participants have the ability to "shop" for their food items in an environment that caters to the Client learning nutritional shopping behaviors while they receive food in a dignified manner.

DO YOU LIVE IN A FOOD DESERT? One quarter of the Houston population lives in food deserts. The majority of these areas lie in the east, far north rural suburbs and southwest sides of Harris County.

Nutrition Education Classes and Oral Health Awareness Workshops are also provided as part of the program.

# OF MEALS DISTRIBUTED

221,000+

ESTIMATED $ VALUE OF FOOD DONATED TO GCCSA FOOD PANTRY FROM SAM'S CLUB, KROGER, WHOLE FOODS MARKET, & ALDI, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH HOUSTON FOOD BANK

$380,000+

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ADVANCING

HEAD STARTS EMPOWERING THE W H O L E C H I L D. . . GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start (HS/EHS) understands that each child comes into our program with a unique personality, various abilities and a distinctive cultural background. We believe all children can reach their utmost potential when provided with a stimulating learning environment supported and fostered by adults who are nurturing and accepting. Our Child Development Team ensures that our classrooms provide quality early childhood educational and developmental services for all enrolled children, including those with disabilites. Our HS/EHS high quality, childfocused services and programming promotes children's cognitive, social and emotional growth for later success in school. Our teaching staff have the guidance, training and support needed to implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction that meet the needs of all our enrolled children and support their growth throughout their educational journey. Our child-focused program has the overall goal of increasing the school readiness of young children. We believe in partnering with parents/guardians to ensure that all the needs of our children and families are met.

NATIONAL HEAD START PROGRAM FACTS AND IMPACTS: TEXAS Texas Head Start Programs serve the largest number of children experiencing homelessness 3,259

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Head Start children reduce their vocabulary deficit by 38% during the program year.

86,064 children had continuously accessible health care 11,858 parents advanced their education level 20,017 HS and EHS jobs provided


...EMPOWERING THE W H O L E FA M I LY We believe that our HS/EHS parents are the first and most important educators of their children. Parent involvement is a core value. We invite our parents to be integrally involved in the education of their children by volunteering in the classroom, attending parent meetings, serving on an advisory committee, and making decisions about the HS/EHS Program in the parent committees. Parents can also be elected to serve on our Policy Council - an opportunity to participate in shared decision-making about the HS/EHS Program. Parents who are actively involved in their children's education ensure student success in school and in life. GCCSA's Family Empowerment Program provides many experiences at each Center aimed at empowering parents, equipping them with stronger parenting skills, and educating them in becoming full partners on their children's journey towards a superior education. Our Centers have a host of ways our parents can be involved, including: • Site-Based Parent Committees • Classroom Volunteer (i.e. reading a book!) • Fatherhood Program • Family Night, Family Fun Day, Holiday Celebrations • Policy Council Leadership

An estimated $632,331,789 funds the 89 Head Start Early Head Start Programs in Texas; with a total of 5,253 classrooms operating. *National Head Start Association, Fact Sheet; national data for Head Start, 2017-2018.

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ADVANCING

CHILD & FAMILY DEVELOPMENT

92%

of our Head Start/ Early Head Start children have an ongoing source of continuous, accessible health care. (97% Head Start; 86% Early Head Start)

of our Head Start/ Early Head Start families advanced their career prospects through job training or continuing education programs. (74% Head Start; 52% Early Head Start)

14%

decrease in the number of enrolled early learners who were considered overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's growth chart for children.

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63%


FAMILY EMPOWERMENT: FATHERHOOD PROGRAM

5 annual events 60-85

fathers/event on average

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ADVANCING

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Funded Enrollment

Head Start 1,774 Full Day, 5 days/week 90 Part Day, 5 days/week

1,864

101

Head Start Classrooms Early Head Start Classrooms

Early Head Start 72 Center-Based, 4 days/week 12 Home-Based 14 Pregnant women

Average Monthly Enrollment

Head Start Early Head Start

9

84 100% fully enrolled

Total Children Served *program year 2016-2017

22

Head Start

1,998

Early Head Start

114


HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START CENTER LOCATIONS

GCCSA operates a total of 20 Head Start and 1 Early Head Start center-based facilities, and services two program options—Full Day and Double Sessions, which vary by site. Full Day Services are available for parents who are employed or attending job training or school on a full-time basis and have no caregiver in the home. Double Session Services are available for those parents who are not employed, not attending job training and not attending school and a caregiver is present in the home.

B

B

C

E

E

F

F

G

astian Elementary

5051 Bellfort Houston, TX 77033

arly Head Start

2020 Solo St Houston, TX 77020

J

F

oshee House of Tiny Treasures

2323 Francis St Houston, TX 77011

G

7647 Bellfort Houston, TX 77061

ast End

222 South 66th Houston, TX 77011

ranklin Elementary

7101 Canal St Houston, TX 77011

layton Homes

1919 Runnels St, #B1 Houston, TX 77003

oster Elementary

3919 Ward St Houston, TX 77021

G

elso Elementary

K

K

P

P

P

R

R

K

5800 Southmund St Houston, TX 77033

asadena

902 South Wafer Houston, TX 77506

aul Yzaguirre

2950 Broadway Houston, TX 77017

regg Elementary

6701 Roxbury Houston, TX 77087

IPP Explore

5402 Lawndale Houston, TX 77047

atterson Elementary

5302 Allendale Houston, TX 77017

eveille

3716 Reveille Houston, TX 77087

arden Villa

6724 Telephone Rd Houston, TX 77061

olfcrest Elementary

7414 Fairway Dr Houston, TX 77033

L

ellfort Early Childhood Center

H

artsfield Elementary

K

5001 Perry St Houston, TX 77021

IPP Zenith

11000 Scott St Houston, TX 77047

lum Creek

6969 South Loop East Houston, TX 77087

R

ichey Road

611B South Richey Rd Pasadena, TX 77506

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DEVELOPING

HEAD START/ EARLY HEAD START CHILDREN FOR READINESS

The Gulf Coast Community Services Association Head Start/ Early Head Start Program promotes school readiness by enhancing the physical, social, emotional, linguistic, and cognitive development of children through the provision of educational, health, nutritional, social, and other services. We regularly assess all children to determine their strengths, needs and progress toward school readiness goals, guiding individualized learning plans. Our teaching staff use informal observations and information from parents/guardians to assess children’s progress. In Head Start, the average progression rate is 24% in 7 key child development and early learning checkpoints. These evaluations are assessed at the start and completion of the school year, demonstrating that our educators provide our children with enriching activities that prepare them for the future.

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Gross Motor

Fine Motor

Pre-Writing

Cognitive

61.00

58.00

55.00 83.00

40.00 68.00

85.00

86.00

Language

Self-Help

37.00 64.00

70.00 87.00

Beginning of the Year

End of Year

Personal/ Social

70.00 88.00


The chart below summarizes the progress of our enrolled Early Head Start children. An average growth rate of 17% in the 6 key areas assessed at the start and end points of the school year shows that our scholars are making astronomical strides and are entering Kindergarten ready to take on the world.

Gross Motor

86.00

96.00

Fine Motor

Cognitive

70.00 90.00

66.00 85.00

Language

Self-Help

Social/ Emotional

63.00 79.00

58.00 79.00

71.00 85.00

Beginning of the Year

End of Year

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EQUIPPING & EMPOWERING

HEALTHY HEAD STARTS

Children’s nutrition is no small issue at GCCSA. Our HS/EHS Programs provide free meals sponsored by the Department of Agriculture’s Child Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). GCCSA promotes lifelong healthy eating and physical habits in children enrolled in Head Start and Early Head Start. Our primary goal is to serve nutritious meals. Secondary intentions are: 1) establishing positive eating habits at the earliest stages of development; 2) reduction of future health care and education costs due to lack of proper early development; and 3) providing training and support to Head Start/Early Head Start staff.

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The goals of the CACFP are to improve and maintain the health and nutritional status of children and adults, promote development of good eating habits, and integrate nutritious food service with organized child and adult day care services.

1,612

Head Start and Early Head Start children are benefited by being fed nutritious USDA regulated meals that ensure their proper development. These children gain from early nutrition education that helps them establish positive eating habits that will enrich the quality of their diet throughout their lives.

Eligible Sites

Eligible Children

134,117 Breakfasts

The program makes healthy eating an integrated part of their active play as they learn and experience new things. Parents are assured that their children receive high quality meals. With proper nutrition, the child is less likely to experience illness, fatigue or obesity and will develop at a normal physical and intellectual pace. Good nutrition is the recipe for an all-around happier child!

134,584 Lunches

231,377 P.M. Snacks

$867,301.61

Reimbursement to GCCSA In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, and reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the responsible State or local Agency that administers the program or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202)720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Services at (800)877-8339. Additionally, program information is available in languages other than English. To file a program complaint alleging discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov. This institution is an equal opportunity provider. For more information about the Gulf Coast Community Services Association. Head Start & Early Head Start Program, please contact Head Start/ Early Head Start Director Tiamoiya Lee at (713) 393-4700.

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* Child & Adult Care Food Program Claim for Reimbursement Summary Reports, 2016-2017.


GCCSA Head Start 96% have Medical Homes

96% have Dental Homes

100% had Well-Child Exams

77% had Dental Exams

96% Immunizations

82% have Health Insurance

GCCSA Early Head Start 98% have Medical Homes

98% have Dental Homes

100% had Well-Child Exams

85% had Dental Exams

93% Immunizations

83% have Health Insurance

Health is the foundation of school readiness. Our early learners’ overall health and development is necessary for a healthy and happy child who is ready to experience new things on a daily basis. We work with our families to help children thrive, providing standardized health and developmental screenings which include speech, hearing and vision. We are dedicated to ensuring that all GCCSA Head Start and Early Head Start children are meeting their developmental milestones. We work with community partners so our families can access health services and learn the importance of setting a strong physical, medical and educational foundation for their children.

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GCCSA FINANCIAL POSITION GCCSA’s organizational impact on the community is supported via an annual operational budget that is nearly $30 million. The financial position for the October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2017 reporting period is reflected below. TOTAL REVENUE $29,026,012

FEDERAL & STATE GRANT REVENUE $23,109,537 OTHER REVENUE $72,358 IN-KIND REVENUE $5,844,117

Expenditure for the Period October 1, 2016 - September 30, 2017

SALARIES & WAGES FRINGE BENEFITS

Program Indirect Expenses 2,420,217

Total Expenses 13,121,686

3,226,312

611,130

3,837,442

TRAVEL

33,189

4,645

37,834

PARENT SERVICES

50,566

-

50,566

FOOD EXPENSES

892,607

7,411

900,018

CHILDREN’S SERVICES

171,591

3,574

175,165

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT

144,942

11,134

156,076

EQUIPMENT LEASES

324,485

81,003

405,488

CONTRACT SERVICES

12,361

62,512

74,873

1,598,607

74,649

1,673,256

UTILITIES

154,617

7,143

161,760

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DIRECT SERVICES

116,630

42,997

159,627

2,140,079

-

2,140,079

IN-KIND EXPENSES

5,844,117

-

5,844,117

25,411,572

3,326,415

28,737,987

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

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Program Direct Expenses 10,701,469

2016-2017 Audit Results “In our opinion the financial statements referred to...present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Organization [Gulf Coast Community Services Association] as of September 30, 2017 and 2016, and the changes in its net assets and its cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.” - McConnell & Jones, LLP, Certified Public Accountants


HEAD START/ EARLY HEAD START

FUNDING

The financial position for the June 1, 2016 to May 31, 2017 reporting period is reflected below. TOTAL REVENUE $23,130,757

GRANT REVENUE $17,266,142 IN-KIND REVENUE $5,864,615

Expenditure for the Period June 1, 2016 - May 31, 2017 Budget SALARIES & WAGES

Actual

11,240,867

11,502,041

FRINGE BENEFITS

29,787

329,822

TRAVEL

25,500

38,086

PARENT SERVICES

82,500

56,037

FOOD EXPENSES

86,000

59,031

CHILDREN’S SERVICES

195,500

151,294

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT

233,390

240,158

EQUIPMENT LEASES

179,462

291,731

CONTRACT SERVICES

105,000

79,767

1,143,088

1,250,969

UTILITIES

126,750

143,067

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE IN-KIND EXPENSES

172,736

126,382

5,964,761

5,864,615

22,985,341

23,133,000

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

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2016-2017 GCCSA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Officers Marcos Alvarez 2016 Chair Under-Served Sector B

Jay Griffin 2016 Vice Chair 2017 Chair

Chrystal Hicks 2017 Vice Chair

Private Sector H-E-B

GCCSA Policy Council Representative (2016)

Tracy Whitehead 2016 Treasurer

Robin Anderson 2017 Treasurer

Rev. Lee Skinner 2016 Secretary

Under-Served Sector C

Under-Served Sector D

Under-Served Sector A

Pam Guthrie

Elizabeth Humphrey

Cedric Johnson

Public Sector City of Pasadena Mayors Johnny Isbell (2016) & Jeff Wagner (2017)

Under-Served Sector C (2017)

Public Sector Harris County Commissioner, Precinct 1 Gene Locke (2016)

William Paul-Thomas

Rodolfo Reyes

Carolyn Scantlebury

Public Sector City of Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner (2016, 2017)

Public Sector State Representative (2016)

Private Sector NAACP (2016, 2017)

Andrea Usanga

Johnathan Walker

Public Sector Harris County Commissioner, Precinct 1 Rodney Ellis (2017)

GCCSA Policy Council Representative (2017)

Dr. Vanese Delahoussaye 2017 Secretary Private Sector Early Childhood Expert

Members

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Elected Officials Represented on the Board Johnny Isbell

Sylvester Turner

2016 Mayor City of Pasadena

2016, 2017 Mayor City of Houston

Gene Locke

Jeff Wagner

2016 Harris County Commissioner Precinct One

2017 Mayor City of Pasadena

Carol Alvarado

Rodney Ellis

2016 State Representative District 145

2017 Harris County Commissioner Precinct One

Advisory Members to the Board of Directors Sivam Mahasivam, CPA

Olayini Oyedele, CPA

2016 Fiscal Expert

2017 Fiscal Expert

Charles Wilson, J.D.

Daniel Ramirez Monty & Ramirez Law Firm

Legal Counsel to the Board Legal Expert

Legal Counsel

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GCCSA LEADERSHIP TEAM

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Chief Executive Officer

Chief Financial Officer

Dr. Jonita “Dr J” Wallace Reynolds

Debra Fisher, MBA

Head Start/ Early Head Start Director

Director of Client Services

Tiamoiya K. Lee, M.Ed.

Amanda Shelton, MBA

Director of Operations

Compliance & Accountability Director

Horace Grant, MBA, MCSE, VCP

Al Maldonado, III, J.D.

Marketing & Community Relations Specialist

Executive Assistant to the CEO + Board Liaison

Ja’Milla C.K. Lomas, MIB

Sue Kriegel


GCCSA POLICY COUNCIL The Policy Council is involved in planning GCCSA’s Head Start and Early Head Start future. It is made up of elected representatives, one from each of our Head Start and Early Head Start Centers, plus Community Organizations. The Council is a volunteer, parent-led governing body that meets monthly to help with the development of program activities. The Policy Council is responsible for planning, reviewing and approving all Head Start program areas and assists the Agency in promoting Parental Engagement to Centers and communities.

B

B

C

E

F

F

astian Elementary

Brittney Miller ast End

Lourdes Pacheco

G

ellfort Early Childhood Center

oster Elementary

Karen Colindres

April Blake

K

L

P

lum Creek

P

R

P R

ichey Road

Roselin Flanders

Hugo Rodriguez

Yvette Ross

Kenia Esquivel

S

EARCH

Latrence Robinson

artsfield

Johnathan Walker eague of United Latin American Citizens

Herlinda Garcia aul Yzaguirre

Alicia Quiroz

arden Villa

Tatiana Lambert

IPP Zenith

K

Ana Lopez

Fatima Rodriguez

G K

IPP Explore

atterson Elementary

ranklin Elementary

Ana Romero

H

G

Estrella Rivera

Chrystal Hicks

E

arly Head Start

regg Elementary

olfcrest Elementary

April Henriquez

layton Homes

elso Elementary

Jerilyn Bob

asadena

Viridiana Galvan

R

eveille

Kathy Rubio

P

arent (former)

Crystal Warner

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GCCSA FOUNDERS Mr. Abner Anderson, Jr. Mr. Norman Anderson Mr. W.V. Ballow, Jr. Mr. Claud Barrett Mr. Spencer Bayles, M.S. Mr. Hamilton Brown Mr. Harry Burk Hon. George H. W. Bush Mr. Joe Kelly Butler Rabbi Moshe Cahana Mr. Pedro C. Caram, M.D. Mr. Julius P. Carter Rt. Rev. Msgr. John J. Cassata Mr. Robert A. Childers Mr. Manuel Crespo Mr. John H. Crooker, Jr. Mr. Maurice Dannenbaum Mrs. Barbara Dillingham Mr. Chris Dixie Mr. Robert Dundas Mr. Clifford M. Dunn, Jr. Mr. Robert Y. Eckels Mr. Aaron Farfel Mr. Harry W. Ferguson Mr. Felix Fraga Mr. Jules R. Frankel Mr. T.F. Glass, Jr. Mr. Marion A. Graham Rev. Harstell H. Gray, Jr. Mr. Charles W. Hamilton Mr. Sid Hilliard

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Hon. William P. Hobby, Jr. Mr. Donald A. Horn Mr. Leon Jaworski Mr. Arthur E. Jones Mr. Wendel Ley Mr. Daniel Martin Mr. John McClelland Mr. Pat McDowell, Jr. Rev. A. Aaron McCardell Rev. James V. Navarro Mr. George T. Nelson Mr. Francis N. O’Bryan, Jr. Mrs. Marcella Perry Mrs. W.E. Perry Mr. Truman Reed Mr. J. Robert Reynaud Mrs. Olon (Verna) Rogers Mr. H.R. Safford, Jr. Mr. Marlin Sandlin Col. Henry A. Sherman Mr. Lonnie E. Smith. D.D.S. Mrs. Robert D. Straus Mr. William Steven Mr. Ed A. Stumpf, III Mr. Howard Tellepsen Mr. Bernard Weingarten Rev. Horace Westwood Ms. Gail Whitcomb Francis Williams Mrs. Queen Ethel Young


COMMUNITY PARTNERS • Houston Food Bank • My Brother’s Keeper Houston (MBK) • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs • U.S. Department of Health & Human Services • Texas Association of Community Action Agencies • Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs • City of Houston Community Re-Entry Network Program • City of Houston Health & Human Services • Tavis Smiley Foundation • Shell Oil Company • BBVA Compass Bank • CenterPoint Energy • SER Jobs for Progress • Career and Recovery Resources • Goodwill Industries of Houston • Goodwill Industries Job Connection Centers • H-E-B • Kroger - Houston • Kroger - South Houston • Be The Match Marrow Donor Program, Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center • University of Texas Health Sciences Center • Harris Health Systems • Harris County Healthcare Alliance • Harris County Social Services • St. Luke’s Episcopal Health Charities • Prevent Blindness Texas • Sienna Dental • ABC Dental • Hispanic Health Coalition • National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) • League of United Latin American Citizens • National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO) • National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling • Aldape Legal Firm, PLLC • Legal Aid • Lone Star Legal Aid

• Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services • Houston-Galveston Area on Aging Agency • Area Planning Advisory Council for Harris County Area Agency on Aging • Collaborative for Children/ College Bound from Birth • Workforce Solutions/ Gulf Coast Workforce Solutions • Houston Police Department’s Youth Policy Advisory Council • Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County

On behalf of the thousands who walk through our doors yearly, we say thank you to our Community Partners. We, the stakeholders of this GCCSA Village, (children, employees, Board of Directors, Policy Council, funding sources, legislators, clients, parents, and volunteers) are indebted to our Community Partners who have generously contributed their time and resources to our mission of strengthening the educational, social and economic well-being of the Community children, youth, seniors, and adults. Without the support of local businesses, banking partners, individuals, independent school districts, faith communities, community organizations, financiers, legislators, and institutions of higher learning alike, Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. could not make a difference in the lives of so many Harris County area residents. With their aid, GCCSA has been able to make an indelible mark on the lives of millions over the past five decades. Contributions from Community Partners come in many forms - in-kind donations, special pricing, large financial donations, and volunteerism - and are each of extraordinary value to us and the Community. Together, we are building a better Community, and for that, we are eternally grateful.

• United Way of Greater Houston • Texas Workforce Commission • Houston Housing Authority • Harris County RIDES • Commission of Adult Basic Education • Houston Launch Pad • Open Door Mission, Inc.

• Texas Foreclosure Prevention Task Force • Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/ Harris County • Hunger Free Texans Regional Coalition • City Wide Club of America • Houston Money Week

• Harris County Department of Education • Houston Independent School District • AVANCE - Houston, Inc. • Neighborhood Centers, Inc. • Young Learners School • KIPP Houston Public Schools • Raul Yzaguirre School for Success • Kashmere MultiService Center • Houston Training and Education Center • Texas Gulf Coast Consortium of Community Colleges • Lone Star Community College • Houston Community College (HCC) • HCC Literacy Consortium • Industrial Welding Academy • Southeast Vocational Alliance • Sparc Academy • Professional Career Training Institute (PCTI) • Houston Center for Literacy • Worklife Institute for Parenting Programs and Seminars • Children’s Museum of Houston • Houston Public Library • Veggie Pals, Inc. • Dispute Resolution Center • Missouri City LINKS, Inc. • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Alpha Kappa Omega Chapter • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Houston Metropolitan Alumnae Chapter

• Sheltering Arms • The Fountain of Praise • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church • Annunciation Orthodox School • New Life Church • Ben E. Keith • Grocers Supply Company

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GCCSA

EDUCATE. EQUIP. EMPOWER. 9320 KIRBY DRIVE HOUSTON, TX 77054 WWW.GCCSA.ORG (713) 393 4700

A Community Action Agency.

© 2018 Gulf Coast Community Services Association. All Rights Reserved.