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FROM THE EDITOR

S

pring isn’t just a time to shed winter coats, it’s also a time to try something new, reconsider your goals, go in a different direction — it’s a time to zag. Zag Magazine helps you do just that. It’s a lifestyles magazine with a Montgomery County twist and a bit of grit. Whether it’s trying a firecracker chicken taco served inside a Wheaton gas station (don’t knock it before you try it!), forming a Skeeball team to show that all those hours at Dave & Buster’s paid off, or using big ideas to decorate a small room, Vanessa B. Harrington Zag Magazine is here for you. There’s help in these pages, too (and online at ZagMagazine.com). Get advice on how to deal with a bad boss, stop your dog from treating your phone like a chew toy and prep for the Zombie Apocalypse — then learn how to make a great spring cocktail to celebrate your success (check out our step-by-step video online)! Zag keeps you in the loop on local nightlife and shopping, and goes even further to fill you in on trends that are off the beaten path. This inaugural edition is the beginning of a fresh viewpoint too often forgotten in the daily grind. And its timing couldn’t be more perfect: spring. We’re shaking off the winter blues and ready to get into something fun, something unconventional, something different. We’re ready to stop going with the flow. Stop zigging. Start Zagging.

ABOUT ZAG MAGAZINE Zag Magazine is published bimonthly by Post Community Media LLC 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 301-948-3120 It is distributed free throughout Montgomery County, Md. Send comments to editor@zagmagazine.com. For advertising information, email ads@zagmagazine.com, or call 301-670-2654.

EDITORIAL EDITOR, VANESSA B. HARRINGTON | ASSISTANT EDITOR, WILL C. FRANKLIN ART DIRECTOR, ANNA JOYCE | PHOTO EDITOR, DAN GROSS SENIOR COPY EDITOR, GLEN CULLEN | WEB EDITOR, JESSICA LODER GRAPHIC DESIGNER, HEATHER REEVES | ILLUSTRATIONS, SERENA LODER

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS TIFFANY ARNOLD | RAISA CAMARGO | MORGAN FECTO | JEFFREY LYLES PEGGY MCEWAN | NATHAN ORAVEC | SAMANTHA SCHMIEDER | KEVIN JAMES SHAY CAROL SORGEN | ELIZABETH WAIBEL

CORPORATE CEO, KAREN ACTON | CORPORATE ADVERTISING DIRECTOR, DENNIS WILSTON SENIOR EDITOR, VANESSA B. HARRINGTON | CREATIVE DIRECTOR, ANNA JOYCE MARKETING DIRECTOR, CATHY KIM | DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER, DAVID VARNDELL ADVERTISING MANAGER, CELESTE POLSTER | ADVERTISING COORDINATOR, ASHBY RICE

ON THE COVER: Jon Rossler, owner of Corned Beef King in Olney; photo by Dan Gross/Zag Magazine. Inset, competitive eater Juliet Lee; photo from Major League Eating.

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CONTENTS Zag Magazine • March/April 2015 • Issue 1

Follow us: TheZagMag

People

6 | SAY WHAT?

This is Important

32 | FIT

What to do when zombies come for you?

Figuring out fatigue, plus how many germs are in a French kiss

8 | THIRD DEGREE

34 | TECH TALK

Chewing the fat with a professional competitive eater

Sharpen your swords. A new Elder Scrolls is on the way.

Lifestyles

36 | ON THE GRIND

10 | RETAIL THERAPY

How to survive a bad supervisor, plus words of advice for career success

Finds that would make Mother Nature proud

37 | MAKING CENTS

12 | SPLURGE

Whether you dream of seafood or a cruise, here’s how to swim in luxury

14 | HOUSE RULES

Amazing space and other home decorating advice

10 ways to save money, and other tips for making good financial decisions

On the Cover

22 | THE SECRET’S OUT There are delicious dining options hidden in Montgomery County gas stations (and convenience stores) for beef lovers and vegans alike

And Another Thing

42 | THE BACK PAGE Gen X: Millennials need to step off

Digital Exclusive!

16 | RIDES

Roll in style in the Nissan Juke

18 | PET PERKS

Doggie therapy, rat ranking and more

Eat & Drink

20 | MIXOLOGY

Celebrate the season with these spring cocktails

21 | DELISH

Make an asparagus & arugula salad, and get to know the chef

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Stuff to Do

24 | DAY TRIP

28 | NIGHTLIFE

26 | THE LIST

30 | IN THE GAME

Lancaster, Pa.: A place for foodies, art lovers — and history

Events not to be missed, like the comedy stylings of the guy who came before Fallon

Head for the front row to see these bands live Play around with trivia, skeeball, flag football and hockey (without skates)

LISTEN TO THE ZAGCAST

ZagCast is a podcast from four opinionated entertainment enthusiasts — self-described nerds. Each week, the group talks about what’s going on the world of pop culture, from movies to television to comic books and everything in between. Visit ZagMagazine.com, or look for the free podcasts in Stitcher or the iTunes Store. Zag Magazine.com


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PEOPLE

SAY WHAT?

How would you prepare for the

Zombie Apocalypse? — as recounted to Samantha Schmieder

DANIEL MUNHOZ GERMANTOWN

Stock up on supplies

I need—really good boots, heavy jacket, and pick a set amount of people I can trust and band together.

MARY GARRASTEGUI ROCKVILLE

I’d sit on a roof

with a shotgun and take out as many as I could.

PHILLIP STOTLER

WORKS IN ROCKVILLE

WILLIAM DIAZ

SILVER SPRING

All I gotta say is:

raiding party. I’d be one of the bad guys.

Beforehand, I’d get

as much resources as possible to survive as long as I can. I wouldn’t risk shooting them.

SILVER SPRING

I would hide

in my basement and keep my doggie with me. SARAH FOFANA CLARKSBURG

I plan to break

into a gun store and just go out, guns blazing.

BRADLEY TOUBMAN GAITHERSBURG

Seduce everyone to take their food.

How are you planning to survive? Tweet us: @TheZagMag, and see more online at ZagMagazine.com

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I S T O C K P H O T O . C O M / I N H A U S C R E AT I V E ; Z I G Z A G I C O N S , L I Q U I D L I B R A R Y / T H I N K S T O C K

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PEOPLE

THIRD DEGREE Read the full interview at ZagMagazine.com.

Juliet Lee, Competitive Eater

w/

A

BY NATHAN ORAVEC

What expectation do people have when they meet you for the first time, knowing what you do?

They’re surprised. They see my size. They can’t believe I can eat that much. They saw I eat so fast. But in real life, I eat very slow. I do eat a lot, just very slow. You got your start with a pizza eating contest in Greenbelt. How did things progress from there? 8

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For example, Nathan’s hot dogs—I only eat them in the contest. Never other times. ... I eat so much in the contest, I just don’t want to look at them again. But seafood, like oysters and clams—the first day after I don’t want to eat any more, but then later I still like them. What do your clients (at Juliet Hair Salon in Germantown) think about your competitive eating career?

“Nathan’s hot dogs ... I eat so much in the contest, I just don’t want to look at them again.” I heard about eating contests ... over 10 years ago. At that time, my two daughters—they were young. Most contests, you have to travel, so I couldn’t do it. The pizza contest ... was local. I found it on the Internet and just registered myself. I was very scared ... I almost gave up. Other contestants, they’re a lot younger than me. They’re twice [as big]. They’re half my age. All these big guys. I said, “I can’t do it.” My husband and daughter encouraged me and said, “We’re here. So do it.” So I did. I only had 10 minutes. ... The first five, six minutes—I ate two slices. I didn’t have the speed. I looked at it. I said, “I won’t make it like that.” Then I started eating faster. When all of a sudden you’re eating faster, you’re afraid you’re going to choke. But I made it. I ate 11 slices that day. These were big pieces, not small ones. Throughout your competitive eating career, you’ve been referred to as “The Gurgitator” and “The Lovely Juliet Lee.” If you were to give yourself a nickname, what would it be?

You know, I just like my real name. I don’t need any nicknames. But I like whatever they call me. I’m always nice. I’m always lovely. (laughs) Has any competition ever turned you off of a certain food?

Eating has become more of a hobby or a weekend job. I don’t advertise [it] or tell anybody, but people find out from TV, from the newspaper and different places. Like, one day, one of my customers was trying to make an appointment, but all of a sudden, there was my face on the TV in front of him. He just laughed. Would you be OK if your daughters wanted to pursue something like competitive eating?

You know, they think their mom’s so cool. Their mom’s so great. Their friends always ask me for my autograph and for my pictures. But both my daughters, they’re too busy for that. When they were young, they would travel with us. But since they’re older, they’re too busy ... studying and working. You’ve competed against the best of the best— men and women—in the competitive eating industry. But in 2009, you and a few of your colleagues also went head-to-head against circus elephants at Coney Island.

That was so cool. I think it was the first time a human has ever competed against an elephant. An elephant is vegan. An elephant does not eat any meat, so we had to eat the bread. Just the bread. No taste or anything. That’s the first time I was so close to an elephant. I was scared, because they are so big. But once I was close to them, they were very friendly. They allow you to touch them, [their trunks]. When we started, even though we ate so much, elephants eat 10 [buns] at a time, so we couldn’t beat them. They eat very slow, but 10 at a time. After we were finished, they still kept eating ... Actually, the elephant was my age. We were both in our 40s. (laughs) Zag Magazine.com

C O M P E T I T I O N , F R O M M A J O R L E A G U E E AT I N G ; P O R T R A I T, T O M F E D O R / Z A G M A G A Z I N E

s Juliet Lee’s size-zero frame settles into a chair, it’s easy to forget —or is that impossible to believe — that this demure Germantown mother of two college-bound girls is the same woman who has devoured more than 30 hot dogs in 10 minutes, demolished 13-plus pounds of jellied cranberries in eight and destroyed 23 dozen clams in a matter of six jaw-dropping (and churning), nerve-wracking moments. Since her competitive-eating career launched in 2006, the 49-year-old business owner has toured the globe, courtesy of her unique skills, with stops in Hong Kong, Bangkok, and Melbourne, Australia, among others, vying for large pots of cash by tackling even larger pots of grub. Here, though, as she makes a brief stop at her family’s occasional Germantown haunt, La Mexicana, not once does she touch the fresh baked tortilla chips or the carafe of chunky salsa tableside. She is soft-spoken and precise as conversation drifts to foods with the capacity to turn her stomach. “I don’t think you want to eat the bull testicles anymore,” interjects her husband, technical writer Joe Callow. At a competition in Colorado, Callow explains, Rocky Mountain oysters—the aforementioned deep-fried unmentionables of bull calves—were on the menu. Lee, a seafood aficionado who grew up on the shores of China before immigrating to the U.S. in 1992, was expecting something a bit more oceanic. But, today, Lee seems to have come around. “If you eat slow,” she counters, “it tastes very good.”


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LIFESTYLES

RETAIL THERAPY

Nature-Inspired Finds

BY MORGAN FECTO

T

1

hese earthy treats may be just the thing you need to get into the spring(time) of things.

1. Amethyst Beads

Wear the earth on a string! S&A Beads in Takoma Park specializes in handmade and antique beads that you can string into your own creations. Amethyst may be the February birthstone, but amethyst beads are the perfect complement to any spring outfit.

2. Metal Herb Compost Bucket

Do your part to kick-start your springtime gardening with this antique-looking compost pail. With a vintage-inspired “Herbs De Provence” label, ventilation holes and the option to attach a charcoal filter, this compost pail is both attractive and practical. Who said composting was hard (or smelly)?

2 4

5

3. Kelim Floating Teardrop Earrings

Modern, sleek and a little bit wild, these handmade silver earrings are reminiscent of an eagle’s talons. Or maybe chili peppers? Either way, they will liven up your wardrobe as you shed your winter layers. Made by Kelim Jewelry and sold by Amethyst in Bethesda.

4. Birch Tree Tapers

B E A D S , T O M F E D O R / Z A G M A G A Z I N E ; O T H E R P H O T O S F R O M T H E R E TA I L E R S

Mock birch tapers made in Bali bring nature’s beauty to your table. Keep it simple with two tapers, or arrange them with an array of birch pillar candles to make a pint-sized forest. They’re made from beeswax in an outdoor workshop.

3

5. Lama Li Garland Birds

Bring some of the outside inside with these handcrafted paper bird garlands. Artists in Nepal create the garlands using Lokta bush leaves and dye them as brightly as the sun. Not only do they add charm to your home, but purchasing them will support sustainability projects in Nepal.

THE DEETS

Where to get these goodies, and what they’ll run you 10

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1. 2. 3. 4.

Beads ($15-$995). Store: S&A Beads, 6929 Laurel Ave., Takoma Park. beadstore.com. Metal Herb Compost Bucket ($30). Store: World Market, 12266 Rockville Pike, Rockville. worldmarket.com. Kelim Floating Teardrop Earrings ($80). Store: Amethyst, 4808 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda. shopamethyst.com. Birch Tree Tapers ($13.50 for set of two tapers, $17.10 for a small pillar, and $39.60 for a large pillar). Store: Arhaus, 11412 Rockville Pike, Rockville. arhaus.com. 5. Lama Li Garland Birds ($7.20). Store: Plaza Art, 8209 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring. plazaart.com.

April 2015

Zag Magazine.com


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LIFESTYLES

SPLURGE:

H

Spoil Yourself Rotten Find more stuff to splurge on at ZagMagazine.com.

TREAT YOUR TASTE BUDS

BY WILL C. FRANKLIN

ave a little extra in your bank account? Treat yourself! Montgomery County offers lots of ways to soothe the ache caused by money burning a hole in your pocket. However, the ability to splurge well is a true art form. Here are a few options to help guide you.

Seafood lovers can dive into a choice dish at Brasserie Beck Kentlands in Gaithersburg. The Plateau a la Marcel includes a half lobster, six oysters, three shrimp, three clams, six mussels and calamari salad for $65. brasseriebeck.com

BOX BUY

SUPER STATUES

What better way to show your love for all things Marvel Comics than by buying a life-size bust statue of the Iron Patriot for $1,100 at Beyond Comics in Gaithersburg. For a little more, you can pick up the one-halfscale (left) Iron Man statue for $2,150. beyondcomics.com

A BETTER POINT OF VIEW

HD TVs are so 2012. If you want top quality, aim for 4K, Ultra High Definition TVs, which offer four times as much detail as other high-def models. Looking for the best? Jason Brager, general manager at The Big Screen Store in Rockville, recommends the Samsung 85-inch 4K UHD. It can be yours for $9,999. SOMEWHERE BEYOND THE SEA

ALL EARS

Best Buy has a pair of Sennheiser overthe-ear headphones for $1,499.99. The set, which comes in silver and black and can be purchased in the store or online, boasts powerful sound and Kevlar-reinforced cable (in case you’re extremely hard on headphones). bestbuy.com

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Saved up some vacation time? UniGlobe Kentlands Travel in Gaithersburg has the cruise to end all cruises. How does 53 nights aboard the Seven Seas Voyager sound? The cruise starts in Tokyo and winds its way along Asia’s coast. The deluxe suite is all yours for $33,499 per person, plus taxes and fees. uniglobekentlands.com Zag Magazine.com

S E A F O O D , R W R E S TA U R A N T G R O U P ; S M A R T T V, S A M S U N G ; W I N E , I R O N M A N , T O M F E D O R / Z A G M A G A Z I N E ; H E A D P H O N E S , B E S T B U Y; C R U I S E , R E G E N T S E V E N S E A S V O YA G E R

According to Gia Nguyen at The King Farm Wine Shop in Rockville, a box of Two Hands shiraz wine from Australia can be yours for $500. The box comes with three bottles of the red wine and is quite the bargain, considering each bottle sells for $200.


0


LIFESTYLES

HOUSE RULES

Living Large in a Small Space

F

— by Carol Sorgen

inding extra space—even in small rooms—can be a matter of design. There are plenty of tricks that can make your place appear larger than it is:

• Mirror, mirror on the wall

“Mirrors reflect light and images, which makes a room look larger,” says Bethesda interior designer and home stager Tyler Whitmore. Use in the hallway, opposite a window, or even lining the back of a bookcase.

• Ditch the drapes

• Declutter

The less stuff you have, the larger your rooms will appear. Sell, donate or throw away!

• Go see-through

Glass-topped tables take up less visual space.

• Don’t overstuff

Too many pieces of furniture make

a room look smaller. A love seat, for example, may work better than a full-size sofa. For additional seating, place two medium-sized chairs against the wall and pull into the room as needed.

• Lighten up

Light up dark corners of the room with lamps. No need to spend a lot, either, Whitmore says. Stores like Target, Home Goods and consignment shops are a great source of stylish, inexpensive lamps.

• Grab a brush

Paint is an inexpensive, easy fix, Whitmore says. “Choose a monochromatic color scheme and paint the ceiling two shades lighter than the walls for a visually enlarging effect.”

D Make a

• Double duty

Choose furniture that has more than one function. Flip-top ottomans, for example, can provide extra seating and extra storage without taking up much extra space.

• Watch where you walk

Light colors, whether for carpet or hardwood, will make the room appear larger and brighter.

room look larger by decluttering and adding

• Collections are cool

Group your favorite collectibles together for a stylized—and neater— appearance, Whitmore says.

light to dark corners.

D

TIPS & TRICKS RAIN OR SHINE Taking care of the outside of your yo home is just as important as the inside. To channel rainwater away from the foundation, Mark Simpson, president of East Coast Landscape Design in Spencerville (mdlandscaper.com), recommends creating a small landscape project; plant a garden bed where storm water puddles, for example, using gravel or hardscape features to prevent water collection, or place a large decorative container to catch and redirect downspout rainwater flow. Using native plants, quarried regional stones and organic materials also will help you keep your little patch of the world as “green” as possible! 14

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DEGREES OF CHANGE To save energy and money during the upcoming air conditioning season, Pepco (pepco.com) recommends that you regularly check your air filter, set your thermostat at 78 degrees, and be sure that all windows and outside doors are closed when the AC is on.

GREEN SPRING CLEANING If you want to avoid harsh chemical cleaners when you’re spring cleaning, try natural cleaning alternatives such as vinegar, hydrogen peroxide and tea tree oil, Mercy Garcia of Maid Brigade of Rockville suggests. For other green cleaning tips, check out maidbrigade.com/blog or download the Maid Brigade Green Cleaning GO TO Guide at maidbrigade.com. Zag Magazine.com

S M A L L S PA C E P H O T O S : T Y L E R W H I T M O R E I N T E R I O R S ; I S T O C K . C O M : C O N TA I N E R , F U E G O ; T H E R M O S TAT, B U R W E L L P H O T O G R A P H Y, G R E E N C L E A N I N G : A L E K C E Y

Heavy draperies block out natural light, making a room look dark and cramped. If you need window coverings for privacy, use sheers or shades, Whitmore says.

Read more at ZagMagazine.com.


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LIFESTYLES

Get On the Road

RIDES

“Juke’s target market makes it more of a city dweller than a trail basher.”

NISSAN JUKE: JUKE:

I

BY DAN LYONS, MOTOR MATTERS

The Gen2 four-cylinder feels lively in the Juke. Push down hard on the throttle and when the turbo engages, the 1.6 responds Zag Magazine | March

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April 2015

The Juke lineup includes five models: S, SV, SL, NISMO and NISMO RS. Each is available with front- or all-wheel drive. Prices range from $20,250 to $30,020, plus $825 for destination and handling charges.

quickly, and a bit loudly, with some torque steer. The car’s tight chassis and small footprint give it a point-and-shoot kind of feel—especially fun when the roads turn twisty. Juke’s target market makes it more of a city dweller than a trail basher—“off-road” isn’t likely to be in its job description. The available AWD system has the capability to channel power not only front to rear, but also side to side across the rear axle, as needed to maximize the vehicle’s grip on the road. Traction is improved on wet or dry roads. The only drawback I see with the AWD is that it isn’t offered with the manual transmission on any model—a disappointment for shift-it-yourself enthusiasts. The most noticeable feature of the interior is still the center console, which resembles a motorcycle’s gas tank. The dash view features deep-dish dials for speedometer and tach, with a wedge-shaped insert in between, housing the gas and water temperature gauges, and programmable readouts. Wide C-pillars cast blind spots on the threequarter rear view, so drivers must resort to the large outside mirrors to keep tabs on close traffic. Newly standard on all models are

Rear View Monitor, Nissan’s Intelligent Key with push button ignition, a USB port and Bluetooth hands-free phone system. NissanConnect with mobile apps is now

available on all models. The package includes a 5-inch color display, hands-free text messaging and Bluetooth streaming audio. NissanConnect with navigation and apps features a 5.8-inch touch screen, voice recognition for audio and navigation, and Sirius/XM Traffic and Travel Link. Standard on SL-level Jukes, it’s also bundled into the Tech package ($1,490), along with an Around View Monitor with Moving Object Detection and the Rockford Fosgate ecoPunch audio system. The front row will hold 6-footers easily. With this much space up front, however, there’s very little legroom left in back. The smart move is therefore to fold the rear seatbacks forward and leave them that way, so you expand the modest cargo capacity (10.5 cubic feet) to a more usable 35.9 cubic feet. If—as Nissan’s research indicates—Juke buyers love to stand out, then the latest edition gives them more of what they’re looking for. Zag Magazine.com

M O T O R M AT T E R S , F R O M T H E M A N U FA C T U R E R

last drove the Nissan Juke at its introduction back in 2011. My first impression: small, fun-to-drive, with wild styling. Recently, I drove the 2015 edition. Second impression: small, fun-to-drive, with styling that’s even more “out there.” The design of the 2015 edition is still dominated by an “in-your-face” face. With its split headlights and dual grilles, Juke’s front end looks like a cross between a rally car and a dinosaur. Pretty, it is not. Attention-grabbing, it is, and buyer feedback told Nissan that’s just the way they like it. The envelope is pushed farther for 2015, with projector beam headlights, LED accent lamps and a split grille that incorporates Nissan’s V-Motion theme. The sawed-off, sideon look of the hatchback remains the same, save the addition of LED turn signal repeaters in the mirrors. Boomerang taillights echo the 370Z, and the flared haunches borrow from its Murano sibling, in three-quarter scale. Three new colors were added to the charts for 2015, for a total of nine. Buyers can further customize their rides with Nissan’s new Color Studio program. Choosing from eight hues and 12 accessories, accents can be added outside and in. Nine of the 12 accessories can be retrofitted to older models. All models have a 1.6-liter, turbocharged, direct injected four-cylinder engine. Horsepower (188) and torque (177) ratings are the same as they were previously, but peak torque now occurs at 1,600 rpm, yielding better lowend acceleration. Environmental Protection Agency fuel economy estimates are 28/32 (FWD) and 26/31 (AWD)—both plus 1 (city) over the outgoing model. Only NISMO and NISMO RS models with FWD are offered with a manual transmission.

16

‘Out There’ the Way Buyers Want


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Services • Live Performances • Custom Songs for Film/Tv/Ads • VoiceOver Work • Music Business Consulting • Workshops

March 21 Quench April 10 Ebenezers Coffee House April 22 Music Café May 9 Ebenezers Coffee House May 30 Main street Farmer’s MarketKentlands June 22-29 Blu Cedar Tour

(Various Locations www.blucedar.com)

Zag Magazine.com

www.michellelockey.com March l April 2015 | Zag Magazine

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photo by Renee Ruggles

17


LIFESTYLES

PET PERKS

ANYONE MISSING A COW? Read more at ZagMagazine.com.

RATS RATE AS PETS To some, they’re a very unwelcome presence, but to others, rats and mice have emerged as popular pets, said Ruth Hanessian, president of Animal Exchange, a pet store at 605 Hungerford Drive in Rockville that specializes in locally raised animals. “Rats are very smart and they’re lovely as pets and lovely to manage,” Hanessian said. “I always say they’re the last thing in the store that will bite you.” On occasion, some owners will let them roam free in the house, which she does not recommend. “They do come when called,” Hanessian said. “They’re very clean pets.”

PAWS IN THE PARK

Oh, Behave! Your mischievous pet may just have a lot on its mind

Need therapy because your dog or cat is driving you crazy? Now you can get them a little therapy, too! Animal behaviorists such as Mary Huntsberry of Gaithersburg of Helping Pets Behave (helpingpetsbehave.com) may be able to make life easier for you and your pet. Huntsberry, an associate certified applied animal behaviorist, says she looks at her goal simply as changing unwanted pet behavior. “Maybe the pet is destructive or fearful, and that’s leading to the behavior, so I work with the owner to conduct an evaluation and do an assessment,” Huntsberry said. “I take a history and determine if there are underlying factors that contribute to the negative behavior. A lot of 18

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times it’s fear. Sometimes it’s just a lack of needs being met, like not getting enough exercise.” Huntsberry said she sees about 300 pets a year. “As people come to know about animal behavior, they realize a lot can be done for their pets,” she said. “A lot of people don’t want to go straight to medicine. It’s really just a matter of finding out what those needs are.” Huntsberry said while she obviously loves working with pets, she gets the biggest satisfaction working with their owners and watching that “light bulb” come on when they understand the cause of a pet behavior issue. “It feels magical when they see their pet’s behavior change right before their eyes and everything falls into place,” she said.

I’m a dog lover and many of my employees are animal lovers, so it’s a passion for me.” — Paul Rinehart

HOUNDING FOR HOPS

Your dog does everything with you, so why stop at the bar? Baying Hound Aleworks, located at 1108 Taft St. in Rockville, welcomes dogs and their owners. “I bring my dog here and other people have been known to bring their dogs here, as well,” said owner Paul Rinehart, who added the brewpub was named in memory of his bloodhound. “We gave her a good three-year retirement and sadly we lost her in 2009, but her memory lives on at the brewery,” said Rinehart, a Silver Spring resident. In addition to catering to dog owners, Baying Hound donates to the Montgomery County Humane Society, City Dogs and Pin-Ups for Pit Bulls. Zag Magazine.com

C O W, I S T O C K . C O M / G L O B A L P ; R AT A N D B AY I N G H O U N D A L E W O R K S B Y D A N G R O S S / Z A G M A G A Z I N E

BY JEFFREY LYLES ILLUSTRATION BY SERENA LODER

The Montgomery County Humane Society is once again getting set for its annual Paws in the Park, from noon to 4 p.m. April 26 at Bohrer Park at Summit Hall Farm, 506 S. Frederick Ave. in Gaithersburg. This year marks the 17th anniversary of the event, in which pets can show off their artistic talents with paw printing and sink their teeth into some delectable dogs — hot dogs, that is — in the bobbing for hot dogs competition.


7

Caring About Animal Nutrition Since 2005 1306 E. Gude Drive • Rockville, MD 20850 • 301.217.0432 Open M–F 10–8 PM • SAT 10–7 PM • SUN 11-6 PM OTHER LOCATIONS

Ashburn Farm Market Center • 43330 Junction Plaza, Suite 176 • Ashburn, VA 20147 • 703.724.4319 BB&T Center • 304 Elden Street (at Herndon Pkwy) • Herndon, VA 20170 • 571.521.0399


MIXOLOGY

EAT & DRINK

Out for Blood

C

TRY THESE COCKTAILS TO SHAKE OFF WINTER

(Orange Margaritas)

BY RAISA CAMARGO MARGARITA PHOTOS BY DAN GROSS

elebrate spring by getting back to nature—with a cocktail, that is. The citrus flavor of a blood orange margarita might do the trick. Blood oranges, with their crimson flesh, generally are available January through May. Zena Polin, co-owner and head bartender of The Daily Dish on Grubb Road in Silver Spring, says that with an abundance of blood oranges at this time, this spring cocktail usually is in high demand, and it makes for a smooth transition from winter. “If you can go in the patio and sip a margarita in March and April, you’re kind of like unthawing from winter time,” Polin says.

THE ART OF MUDDLING

HOW TO MAKE IT l l l l l

First, start off by wetting the rim of the margarita glass with the lime and dipping the rim into kosher salt. Muddle five blood orange slices with simple syrup, which is equal parts sugar and water. Sweeten the mix with one ounce of agave syrup and two ounces of the golden-colored 1800 Reposado Tequila (you can use different tequilas if you want a drink that isn’t as sweet). The Reposado’s rested flavor blends well with the margarita’s flavor, Polin says. Add two ounces of fresh lime juice into the blend with a scoop of ice. Shake and pour. Put a bow on it with some lime garnish. Now, you have an intensified margarita with a sweeter flavor.

Watch her whip this up at ZagMagazine.com!

TRY THIS ONE, TOO THE ROSE COCKTAIL

Polin also recommends the Rose Cocktail as a favorite for springtime because its fresh and sweet flavor reflect the season.

20

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3/4 ounce of fresh ruby-red grapefruit juice

l

2 dashes of Peychauds (or any type of) bitters

HOW TO MAKE IT

l

Club soda

l

1½ ounces of Hendrick’s (or any type of) gin

l

Lemon wheel

l

3/4 ounce of rose syrup (made from sugar, lime juice and water)

l

1/4 ounce of freshly squeezed lemon juice

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To make the syrup, bring 2½ cups of water and 4 cups of sugar to a boil in a saucepan. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add 1/4 cup of lime juice and 1/2 cup of

rose water, made by steeping rose petals in distilled water, and cook 10 minutes longer, stirring occasionally. Remove pan from heat and allow to cool. Pour syrup in bottle and keep refrigerated until it cools. For the Rose Cocktail, shake together all the ingredients with ice. Pour into a highball glass. Add a splash (1/4 ounce) of club soda. Garnish with a lemon wheel.

FUN FACT

Did you know that adding a little bit of salt can accentuate a drink’s flavor? When you make a cocktail, don’t add any salt and try it. Add a pinch afterward and stir. Taste the difference. Zag Magazine.com

I C O N , I S T O C K . C O M / L U S H I K ; R O S E C O C K TA I L , I S T O C K . C O M / S - C P H O T O ; M U D D L E R , I S T O C K . C O M / B I G B I G B B 1 2 ; S A LT, P H O T O D I S C / T H I N K S T O C K

5 slices of fresh blood orange 1/2 ounce simple syrup 1 ounce agave syrup 2 ounces 1800 Reposado tequila 2 ounces fresh lime juice (1-2 juiced limes)

To make a successful cocktail, it’s necessary to understand the basics of muddling. The process of combining ingredients in the bottom of a mixing glass and pressing down on a flat surface with a muddler— which looks like a pestle or a baseball bat—is called muddling. Grounding or mashing ingredients with a muddler can help bring out extra flavor, while infusing it with the rest of the ingredients.


EAT & DRINK

DELISH

Get the SALMON WITH WILD

MUSHROOMS recipe at ZagMagazine.com.

Ambitious But Not Hungry

I was upset, my parents were upset. I thought, what next? My aunt said why don’t you just go do what you want to do? So I went to culinary school. It was a tiny culinary school in Dover, New Hampshire. It was interesting, they had turned an old Holiday Inn into a culinary school. From there I got an A.A. (Associate of Arts) degree and a culinary certificate. While I was there, I also worked at a little cafe. I was doing what I always wanted to do and I was really happy.

BY PEGGY MCEWAN PHOTO BY DAN GROSS

D

ane Sewlall is executive chef at Black’s Bar & Kitchen in Bethesda. The restaurant, which features American cuisine with an emphasis on seafood, was named last fall as the Best Restaurant in Maryland by Vacation Home Rentals, a TripAdvisor company. It has consistently been on local best restaurant lists. So what does it take to lead the kitchen of such a popular place? Sewlall, 34, a Rockville native, dishes on restaurant life.

• What do you like most about being a chef?

Instant gratification, that’s what it is. You make something ... and you get instant feedback. The idea of putting out 300 of something — it’s amazing. Ten years I have been cooking and I still love it, I still have a passion for it. The creative aspect of it, that’s the fun part.

• What do you do as an executive chef?

Is it like being the conductor on a train who has the final say on everything?

I’m the conductor of the kitchen area. The general manager, Douglas Doyle, and I work together to make the whole restaurant work. My job is a blend of administration, there are about 30 [employees] under me, the business of being a chef ... and cooking.

• What are your favorite spring foods?

• Tell me about your background and how you decided to become a chef.

MAKE THIS

t

ICON, ISTOCK.COM/LUSHIK; PHOTOOBJECTS.NET/THINKSTOCK

I was born in Guyana but raised in Rockville. I went to Richard Montgomery High School. I’ve always had an interest in cooking. I used to watch great chefs on WETA [a public television station]. Back then they were only European chefs, and I wanted to be on that show. I knew what I wanted to do right out

Vegetables: l 1 bunch of asparagus from a local farmers market, if possible (the fresher the asparagus, the stronger the flavor) l Arugula

Zag Magazine.com

• Do you cook at home?

Both my wife and I cook at home. I bake with my daughter, Sydnee, who is four. We make cookies.

ASPARAGUS & ARUGULA SALAD

Servings: 2

Protein & Dairy: l Hard boil 2 eggs. Cut into quarters.

of high school, but when you tell your parents you want to cook ... my mother didn’t want to hear it. My family is really into education — get a degree, that’s what they wanted. I started that. I was also working at Circuit City and one day I got fired. I messed up a car stereo install.

I love spring because peas are around, and asparagus. I love green. I love working with vegetables; that’s my favorite thing. The emphasis here is on local produce. We deal with seven local farms. Through all the seasons, there is always something fresh.

l

Shave 6 to 10 strips of Parmesan cheese with a vegetable peeler

Dressing: l 1/4 cup capers l 1/8 cup lemon juice l 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard l 3 tablespoons honey l 2/3 cup champagne vinegar l 1 tablespoon chopped thyme

2 teaspoon chopped garlic 1 cup olive oil l Salt and pepper Whisk all ingredients except oil. Slowly drizzle in oil and whisk.

asparagus. After warm, charred asparagus comes off the grill, toss with the vinaigrette and dry arugula, Parmesan cheese and chopped hardboiled egg, and serve.

Fire up your charcoal grills for this one because it really brings out the flavor of the

— Dane Sewlall, executive chef, Black’s Bar & Kitchen, Bethesda

l l

March l April 2015 | Zag Magazine

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s

Anna Goree, co-owner of Seoul Food D.C., which is housed in an Exxon gas station on Georgia Avenue in Wheaton, prepares lunch.

Fuel You THERE’S FANCY FOOD @ GAS STATIONS!

F U E L P U M P, I S T O C K P H O T O . C O M / J W E B B

ANNA AND J.P. GOREE ARE AMONG A GROWING CONTINGENT OF RESTAURATEURS WHO MAY MAKE YOU RETHINK THE OLD JOKE ABOUT EATING HERE AND GETTING GAS — AT LEAST WHEN IT COMES TO FOOD MADE IN AN ACTUAL GAS STATION. The husband-and-wife owners of Seoul Food D.C. in Wheaton make their Korean/Japanese dishes from the corner of an Exxon station to glowing reviews. Step into their space from the University Boulevard entrance, and you might not even realize it’s in a gas station convenience store. Three tables and two bar counters facing the street window seat 20 in comfortable wooden chairs and tables from Ikea. Place mats and fresh flowers in vases add homey touches. Shelves are lined with John Irving and George Orwell novels, which customers can peruse (or even borrow), as they eat. Classic rock music plays; artwork dots the walls. STORY BY KEVIN JAMES SHAY PHOTOS BY DAN GROSS Zag Magazine.com

“We try to make this place different from a gas station,” says Anna, 49, a South Korean native who graduated from a Seoul university and L’Academie de Cuisine cooking school, and completed a pastry chef internship at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. “We want to make customers feel like they are at home.” Across Montgomery County and the Washington, D.C., region, there are restaurants cropping up in more and more gas stations, as well as convenience stores that don’t sell gas, says Jeff Lenard, vice president of strategic industry initiatives for the Alexandria, Va.-based National Association of Convenience Stores. “People expect food in more unusual places,” Lenard says. For gas stations, profit margins in selling gasoline are extremely thin, he notes.

The average gas station sells some 4,000 gallons per day. With the average profit margin after expenses like overhead and credit card fees being about 3 cents per gallon, that station makes only $120 per day selling gas. So gas stations have to turn to food to stay in business, and many seek gourmet eateries, Lenard says. “Gas stations can differentiate themselves with a gourmet food offer and might even take the pressure off the gas price,” he says. The not-so-common location is just fine, says Lisa Peoples, a Wheaton resident who was one of Seoul Food’s D.C.’s first customers when it opened in June 2013. “The food is just wonderful,” says Peoples, who routinely orders bibimbap, which is a large bowl of sticky rice, ~CONTINUED ON 38~ March l April 2015 | Zag Magazine

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STUFF TO DO

day trip

More photos at ZagMagazine.com

Braking Amish

NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO? Check out these websites: • padutchcountry.com • visitlancastercity.com • paartsexperience.com

Experience E xp periience a world worrld b both oth o old ld and d new jjust usst a short sh drive away

T

BY CAROL SORGEN

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annual sales to raise money for the coming year. You can buy everything from hand-stitched quilts and locally made crafts to livestock, furniture, produce, baked goods, antiques, housewares, everything up to—and even including—the kitchen sink. Check the schedules at lancasterpa.com or padutchcountry.com for dates and locations. For another authentic Amish experience, visit Lancaster Central Market at 23 N. Market St. (centralmarketlancaster.com), the country’s oldest farmers market. Munch your way through the 120-year-old red brick building, sampling such regional specialties as Pennsylvania Dutch sausage, scrapple (a breakfast meat of pork scraps and cornmeal), headcheese, (a jellied loaf of pig’s head, feet, etc.) preserves, chowchow (pickled vegetables in a spicy mustard sauce), apple butter and shoofly pie.

If you’re with your sweetie, take note: There are more than 25 snapshot-worthy covered bridges in Lancaster County. Sometimes called “kissing bridges,” they make a romantic stop for a stolen smooch. Lancaster continues to attract both working artists and art lovers to its downtown gallery scene. Time your visit right, and you can enjoy a First Friday evening when galleries and shops stay open until 9 p.m., host exhibit openings and artists’ receptions, and offer entertainment and refreshments. Twice a year— spring and fall—the city also hosts Lancaster ArtWalk, a celebration of visual, performing and culinary arts. Save May 2-3 for this spring’s event. And finally, what goes better with art than wine? Lancaster County is home to a number of wineries and breweries. Stop in for a sampling of locally produced wines and ales, as well as events and tours.

Lancaster has more than 25 covered bridges, great locations for selfies, or for stolen kisses if you have company.

The Fulton Theatre, a recently renovated Victorian beauty in the heart of Lancaster City, is one of only three national historic landmark theaters and the oldest continuously operating theater in the country. Zag Magazine.com

PA D U T C H C O U N T R Y. C O M

hink Lancaster, Pa., and you probably think— not surprisingly— Amish! And you wouldn’t be wrong. But in addition to its many Amishrelated attractions, from quilt shops to horse and carriage rides, in recent years Lancaster also has become a popular destination for arts lovers, foodies and, of course, shoppers (a favorite for outlet bargain-hunters). You can’t go to Lancaster and ignore the Amish—nor would you want to—and a good place to start your trip is a visit to one of Lancaster County’s mud sales. Named for the condition of the thawing early-spring ground, mud sales are major fundraisers for the volunteer fire companies in traditionally Amish communities. Each weekend from late February to early April, various communities hold their


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STUFF TO DO

the list

DO SOMETHING WITH YOUR LIFE — by Elizabeth Waibel and Will C. Franklin

MARCH

17-19| Bethesda Literary Festival — at venues around

AMP by Strathmore —

One of Montgomery County’s newest music venues opens its doors this March in North Bethesda. The lineup announced so far includes family-friendly alt-rock band The Not-Its, Baltimore-based Cajun group The Crawdaddies and comedian Sheng Wang. The venue is at 11810 Grand Park Ave. in North Bethesda; check out ampbystrathmore.com for a list of performances.

downtown Bethesda. Free. Authors read and discuss their work. The festival also highlights work by local writing contest winners. Check out bethesda.org for a complete schedule and lineup.

25,26| Art Hop Arts Fest — in Takoma Park and Takoma, D.C. Local businesses display work by dozens of artists. There also will be live performances and artist demos. For a gallery map and events list, see arthoptakoma.com.

14| Gaithersburg St.

20,21| Bethesda Film

Festival — at Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda. $10. Local filmmakers share five short documentaries, with discussions after the screenings. Check bethesda.org for tickets and screening times.

22| Spring Bridal

Showcase — Noon

to 4 p.m. at Kentlands Mansion, 320 Kent Square Road, Gaithersburg. $5. Meet with wedding vendors and sample caterers’ wares in the historic Kentlands Mansion. Details at gaithersburgmd.gov.

28| National Cherry

Blossom Kite Festival — Constitution Avenue and 17th

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APRIL 8 | Jay Leno — at the Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. $39-$125. Known as the guy who took over “The Tonight Show” after Johnny Carson, Leno actually was a well-known comic in his own right beforehand. Now that Jimmy Fallon has hosting duties, Leno is back on the comedy circuit. Visit kennedy-center.org for more information. Street (Washington Monument grounds), Washington, D.C. The National Cherry Blossom Festival has events going on March 19 through April 11, but the kite festival is one you don’t want to miss. Nationalcherryblossomfestival.org. Bring your own kite or watch the experts.

APRIL 6| Major League Baseball

— The Washington Nationals home opener against the New York Mets, 4:05 p.m., while the Baltimore Orioles open their Yep. That’s a kite.

season at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m. April 10 against the Toronto Blue Jays. Visit washington. nationals.mlb.com and baltimore.orioles.mlb.com for more info.

17-19| Sugarloaf Crafts Festival — at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds, 16 Chestnut St., Gaithersburg. $10 at the door, $8 online, children under 12 free. More than 250 artists display and sell their work. Find exhibitors and entertainment information at sugarloafcrafts.com.

26| Pike’s Peek 10K — 7:50 a.m. along Rockville Pike in Rockville. Registration before April: $42; registration after March 31: $47. Cost is $15 for the 1K or 50-meter tot trot. Runners begin at the Shady Grove Metro station and follow Rockville Pike to White Flint Metro station in this race organized by the Montgomery County Road Runners Club. Visit pikespeek10k.org for de details and to register. 26| Kensington celebrates the International Day of the Book — 11 a.m. to 4

p.m. p. along Howard Avenue in Ke Kensington. Free. This street festival features author readings, music, booksellers and activities. The celebration commemorates the deaths of Miguel de Cervantes and William Shakespeare on April 23, 1616. Learn more at dayofthebook.com. Find more stuff to lure you out of the house, including cool things happening in May, at ZagMagazine.com. Zag Magazine.com

L E N O , M I T C H E L L H A A S E T H / N B C ; D R E S S , K E N T L A N D S M A N S I O N ; K I T E , N AT I O N A L C H E E R Y B L O S S O M F E S T I VA L ; L O G O , WA S H I N G T O N N AT I O N A L S

Patrick’s Day Parade — 10 a.m. to noon at the Rio Washingtonian Center, 209 Boardwalk Place, Gaithersburg. Free. Be sure to wear green as you watch Celtic dancers and bagpipers parade down Grand Corner Avenue. Live entertainment follows; for more details, see gaithersburgmd.gov.

Meet the man who wrote Muppet guy Jim Henson’s biography.


Are You Seeking…. A New Career? A Lifestyle Upgrade? Professional Credibility? A Happier Future?

Connecting tomorrow’s leaders today!

Learn more at GGChamber.org.

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Suzanne Rosetti Certified Mentor Coach, Director of Training

Let me help you become a certified Professional Life Coach. Classes are forming in a neighborhood near you. or Hire a Professional Coach to support your personal and professional growth. Call at 301-974-5098 or Visit us on line or on Mobile www.worklifedestinations.com

1909029

Discover the GGCC and it’s savvy Young Professionals Group

1931098

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March l April 2015 | Zag Magazine

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STUFF TO DO

nightlife

Because sometimes it’s not the worst idea to get off the freakin’ couch.

CHECK OUT THIS MUSIC LI VE — by Samantha Schmieder

+

TAK ING BACK SUNDAY

Progressive rockers La Dispute and punk rockers Title Fight will be at The Howard Theatre on March 25 — and for anyone interested in an emotional, heavier rock sound, it’s worth the trip. With La Dispute, every song is a story to get lost in, and when Title Fight climbs on stage, no one stands still.

For a trip down memory lane, hop on the Metro to the 9:30 Club in D.C. on March 29 to catch these guys on their spring tour. The alternative rock quintet is sure to arouse feelings from those angst-filled teenage years, and watching front man Adam Lazarra climbing on rafters is always an exciting plus.

Over in Silver Spring at The Fillmore, Mat Kearney will perform with Parachute and Judah and the Lion on his Just Kids Tour on March 28. Kearney is no stranger to the Billboard Top 40, and is sure to entertain with new music with a beat-driven twist on his usual pop-rock sound. 28

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vvv Local folk singer-songwriter Marian McLaughlin has mentioned Rock Creek Park as a place that inspires her writing. On April 8, she will share that inspiration with an audience at the Strathmore Mansion in N. Bethesda, giving them a glimpse of her drifting guitar and thought-provoking lyrics. Can’t go on the 8th? She’ll be back on April 22!

vvv

The Barns at Wolf Trap in Vienna, Va., will host Black Violin on April 30. The duo, made up of classically trained Wilner “Wil B” Baptiste and Kevin “Kev Marcus” Sylvester, perform an unprecedented mixture of classical, hip-hop, R&B, rock and bluegrass on viola and violin, effortlessly blending symphonic sounds with pop relevance.

Lera Lynn’s “The Avenues” was recently named No. 33 on Rolling Stone’s Top 40 Country Albums of 2014, but it’s hard to pinpoint just what genre she fits into. Lynn will be at AMP on April 16 to showcase her haunting voice and lyrics, leaving it up to the audience to decide for themselves.

More at ZagMagazine.com.

Zag Magazine.com

TA K I N G B A C K S U N D AY B Y R YA N R U S S E L L ; M AT K E A R N E Y F R O M R E P U B L I C R E C O R D S ; B L A C K V I O L I N B Y C O L I N B R E N N A N ; J O E R O B I N S O N B Y E T H A N J A M E S P H O T O G R A P H Y

Hailing from Down Under, vocalist and guitarist Joe Robinson is not an easy musician to describe. After winning “Australia’s Got Talent” at just 17, he toured the world and recorded multiple albums of his unique guitarfueled, rock-jazz fusion. He’ll be at AMP, Strathmore’s new digs in North Bethesda, on March 19. vvv


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STUFF TO DO

in the game

FUN FOR BODY & MIND

— by Jeffrey Lyles

v

FLEX YOUR BRAIN For the hopelessly unathletic who still enjoy the thrill of competition: try joining a trivia team. Sites in Bethesda, Chevy Chase, Gaithersburg, Silver Spring and Wheaton host games (Growlers Brew Pub in Gaithersburg boasts up to 80 people taking part in weekly competitions). Sign up on triviakings.com to win the quarterly battles and earn a shot against other regional winners.

Rolling along How’s your aim? And does it improve once you’ve thrown back a few shots with your friends? Team up with your five deadeye pals to battle it out in a Cornhole & Skeeball league in Montgomery County. Robert Kinsler, CEO of United Social Sports (dcbarsports.com), says about 12 teams in the metropolitan area participate in sevenweek seasons, tossing bags filled with corn kernels through a hole or rolling the high score in the arcade bowling spin-off. Montgomery County teams can battle it out Tuesdays at The

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Barking Dog (4723 Elm St. in Bethesda) against teams such as Rings of Fire, SkeePrize and Skeetacular. “It’s popular because it’s accessible,” Kinsler said. “There’s no skeeball superstars, so people can just enjoy it for what it is rather than be intimidated by playing against experts. It kind of brings back a

little of your youth. It’s silly and people like having an excuse to be silly.” The bar setting doesn’t hurt either, Kinsler said, as people enjoy the social aspect of getting some drinks, hanging out with friends and meeting new people. Cornhole typically attracts up to 60 people weekly, Kinsler estimates. “It helps people having a scheduled event knowing that every Tuesday they have a chance to unwind, hang out with their friends and they can kind of carve that time out for some fun,” Kinsler said.

v The goal is fun

Are your skating skills the same as they were when you were a toddler? Every Sunday, 22 teams in the co-ed D.C. Hockey League (playdchl.com) hit the Rockville SportsPlex with sneakers instead of skates. Commissioner Suds Chand said the league competes under NHL rules, with the exception of no contact. Games are recorded, complete with commentators, and uploaded to YouTube.

Find more stuff to play at ZagMagazine.com. Zag Magazine.com

T R I V I A B Y T O M F E D O R / Z A G M A G A Z I N E ; C O R N H O L E F R O M R O B E R T K I N S L E R ; F O O T B A L L B Y U Y H O A N G ; H O C K E Y B Y B I L L R YA N / Z A G M A G A Z I N E

Steve Krempasky of Gaithersburg tries to come up with a correct answer during a trivia night at Growlers Brew Pub.

Fair game

Time to perfect your touchdown dance for the start of coed flag football’s spring season! Recreational Athletics Sports League Commissioner Uy Hoang, a software engineer, founded the coed league (playrasl.com) in 2009 in hopes of bringing “gender equality to football” in Montgomery County. “It was a way for us to bring in our friends, whether they’re male or female, to come play with us,” Hoang said.


S THIS IS IMPORTANT

fit

No Rest for the Weary 3 things to help you understand fatigue

ception, a feeling. Studies suggest we might be experiencing it for a reason. “It’s sort of like the body’s alarm system,” Eldadah says. Fatigue also could be a sign that there’s something brewing in the body. A long list of illnesses — everything from cancer to certain infections — include fatigue as a symptom.

BY TIFFANY ARNOLD

T

ILLUSTRATION BY SERENA LODER

here’s actually something worse than being sick and tired of being sick and tired. It’s called fatigue, a state of tiredness that even a good night’s sleep can’t resolve. Left unchecked, it can lead to serious health problems, according to Dr. Basil Eldadah of the National Institute on Aging in Bethesda. Eldadah chatted with Zag about fatigue and how it affects our health. He advises talking to your doctor if you’re constantly feeling tired and offers the following takeaways to understand fatigue:

3 EFFECTS

1 WHAT IS IT?

t

FUN FACTS

on the other hand, is not always resolved by sleep. There’s also a condition known as chronic fatigue syndrome. “People wake up as tired as they were when they went to sleep,” Eldadah says. “It’s not the kind of fatigue where you’ve had a long, busy day, and you go to bed early

S GET ROLLING

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2 POSSIBLE BODY ‘ALARM’ While it’s a connection that is not fully understood, scientists think fatigue is somehow ingrained into our consciousness. Fatigue is a per-

Read more at ZagMagazine.com.

There’s no better way to enjoy the weather (and burn calories) than on a bike. You don’t even have to own one: There are 50 Capital Bikeshare stations in Montgomery County alone. “We saw a bump in ridership systemwide during the Cherry Blossom Festival,” says Anne Root, the county’s Bikeshare program manager. This year’s National Cherry Blossom Festival festivities are scheduled March 20 through April 12. Day trip, anyone?

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that night, and you’re pretty much back to baseline.”

April 2015

S FRENCH TWIST

Did you know an intimate kiss (yes, a French kiss!) lasting 10 seconds can transfer 80 million bacteria? According to a study published in the research journal Microbiome, that’s the case. Maybe mouthwash would be better than coffee after a steamy date?

S STAND UP FOR GOOD HEALTH Looking for an

easy way to burn calories? Take a stand while you work! “That uses a lot more calories than just sitting at a desk all the time,” says Talya Frelick, manager of Community Health and Outreach for Adventist Healthcare’s Department of Health Equity and Wellness. Zag Magazine.com

B I K E S A N D S TA N D I N G D E S K , D A N G R O S S / Z A G M A G A Z I N E ; L I P S , S T O C K B Y T E / T H I N K S T O C K

There is no universal definition for fatigue, which Eldadah says poses a challenge to researchers since fatigue is associated with so many conditions. But Eldadah says there seems to be agreement within the medical community that tiredness is a condition that can be reduced or managed by getting adequate rest. Fatigue,

Say you’re about to run a mile. With fatigue in mind, the brain influences how much effort you should put into the workout. “What this has all led to is this notion that perhaps fatigue is a good thing,” Eldadah says. “It prevents us from overdoing it.” Eldadah says this biological pacesetting is why most people feel so tired when they’re sick. “If I’m already dealing with diseases or various conditions, and I’m having to devote all my bodily resources to having to deal with those diseases or conditions,” Eldadah says, “then I’m going to be pretty tired for any other kind of activity.”


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S THIS IS IMPORTANT

tech talk

Armed TO

Kill

[your spare time]

A screenshot of “The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited” INSET: A screenshot of “Battlecry”

Two big releases coming this year from Bethesda Softworks

A

BY JEFFREY LYLES

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ger have to plunk down a monthly game subscription fee to play “Tamriel Unlimited” (giving you more money to spend on pizza so you don’t have to interrupt your marathon game sessions!). Under the free-to-play model, players can get their “Elder Scrolls” thrills without paying a monthly fee, but for the diehards, you can sign up for the monthly ESO Plus service and get game benefits, currency and access to all downloadable content packs. Beyond “Elder Scrolls,” Bethesda Softworks is launching “Battlecry,” a free-to-play 32-participant multiplayer online game set around the dawn of the 20th century. Gunpowder is banned, so combatants rely on weapons such as bows, swords that transform into shields and electrostatic blades.

“Battlecry” boasts comic bookinspired graphics, insane overthe-top action (check out those blood sprays!) and battle-adapting environments, meaning it will change whether you’re kicking tail or about to get beat down by 2Kewl4You32 again when the game is released on an as-yet-to-be-determined date this year. Bethesda Softworks announced that it will host its first Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, Conference at the Los Angeles-based convention June 14, and expectationsarehighthatthecompanycould reveal a sequel to “Dishonored,” its 2012 stealth action game, and the latest installment of first-person shooter “DOOM.” Now where the heck is that pizza delivery number? Zag Magazine.com

BETHESDA SOFTWORKS

fter a long day of slaving away at work, it’s time for “something far more productive — like taking up your sword to save Tamriel or shooting your high-powered arrow through the skulls of those annoying Enforcers. And you can thank Bethesda Softworks in Rockville for such stress-relieving video games (Tamriel is the mortal realm in “The Elder Scrolls” video game, which features clans like The Enforcers, in case you didn’t catch the references). The company, a subsidiary of Rockville-based ZeniMax Media Inc., also is the force behind other major game franchises, such as “Fallout,” “DOOM,” “QUAKE,” “Prey,”

“Dishonored,”“TheEvilWithin,” and “Wolfenstein.” “Right now, we’re actually talking about ‘Elder Scrolls Online,’” said Tracey Thompson, director of global public relations for Bethesda Softworks, referring to the company’s plans for a June 9 console launch of “The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited” for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One ($59.99 on each console). The newest version of the roleplay world fantasy game (which has sold more than 30 million copies globally) lets gamers attempt to thwart the schemes of the evil Molag Bal. Players can choose among races such as Bretons, Orcs or various classes of elves, and also play as vampires or werewolves. And as of March 17, Thompson said “Elder Scrolls” gamers no lon-


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S THIS IS IMPORTANT

on the grind

— by Vanessa Harrington

BAD BOSS CHAOS • keep

a copy of your performance appraisal to document your performance.

DON’T ... • talk about your boss behind his/ her back; it’s likely to get back to him/her. • go over your boss’ head when trying to solve a problem. It shows a lack of respect and will not engender sympathy or cooperation. • blow up or cry in front of your boss; it shows a lack of control. If you need to vent, do it away from the workplace. • talk disparagingly about former bosses in a job interview. • be accusatory or nagging.

Finally, if the conflict with your boss is creating a mental health issue (depression, for example), you may need to consider counseling, coping mechanisms or finding another job, Pauli says.

How to cope when you love your job but despise your supervisor

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She offers the following advice for handling a bad supervisor situation: DO ... • discuss problems you are having with your supervisor at the earliest opportunity. • review your position description and know what’s expected of you. • know company policies. • work with your supervisor to set clear, measurable, quantifiable goals with time frames attached.

Career Advice Zag asked the following Montgomery County professionals: What’s the best career advice you received? Check out their answers!

possible.”

“Early in your career, gain as much real-life work experience in as many things as

—Brett Friedman, 31 Senior manager, DeLeon and Stang CPAs and Advisors, Gaithersburg

[My supervisor at Zengo Cycle] explained that sometimes I need to grow a thicker skin because I often let my emotions get the best of me. … I became more confident in myself, and it has made me a better person, instructor, employee and colleague. —Teryn Hann, 25 Instructor and events coordinator, Zengo Cycle, Bethesda

“Constantly challenge yourself. The more well-rounded you are in your field, the more effective you will be at work and the more attractive you will be to prospective employers.” —Brittany Hilton, 26 Senior marketing associate, Mid-Atlantic Federal Credit Union, Germantown

“The single greatest piece of career advice that I ever got was to spend all of my time and energy on the tasks that I was good at, enjoyed, and were profitable. Delegate the rest.” —PJ Horan, 31 Senior partner, MassMutual Greater Washington, Rockville Zag Magazine.com

B R E T T F R I E D M A N B Y J O H N K E I T H , O T H E R P H O TO S F R O M T H E I N T E RV I E W E E S

Is your supervisor a pain in the ass? You’re not alone. According to a 2014 “Workplace Stress” online survey conducted by employment website Monster, “supervisor relationship” was cited as the most common workplace stressor. Dana Pauli, a Silver Springbased career counselor who has conducted workshops on dealing with difficult employers, says she often works with people who want to stay in their jobs but are having problems with their boss.

BEAT THE ODDS Pauli says there are steps job hunters can take to improve the chances of getting a supervisor they’ll work well with. Before you get the job: • Know what your work values are. What’s important to you in the workplace? • Know your work style. Do you work better independently or with oversight? • Be sure to interview with your prospective supervisor before you accept the position. • Know what questions to ask the interviewer or supervisor to assess your compatibility with that person. • Ask other employees who have worked for that supervisor about their experiences.

LISTEN & LEARN:


S THIS IS IMPORTANT

making cents

— by Carol Sorgen

10

It might be hard to hear, but it’s critical for your future : suck it up and save 20% of your income.

Ways to Save Money

S CREDIT POWER

Value your credit score, says Michael Richardson, vice president of community relations at Mid-Atlantic Federal Credit Union. Review your credit report annually, Richardson advises. The higher your score, the less financial risk you are perceived to be, which means easier access and better rates for mortgages, loans, etc. You can get your free annual credit report online once a year at annualcreditreport.com.

You’re never too young to plan your financial future, says Michael Richardson, vice president of community relations at MidAtlantic Federal Credit Union. Here are some tips to get you started and keep you motivated.

M O N E Y, S T O C K B Y T E / T H I N K S T O C K ; I S T O C K . C O M : C R E D I T C A R D , PA G E D E S I G N ; C O L L E G E , A L E X S L

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2

3

Prioritize your spending,

counsels Anna A. Behnam, managing director of Rockville-based Behnam & Associates. “Put your dollars where they count the most. Your most important expenses are housing, food and yourself.”

4

Pay your bills on time.

5

Avoid impulse buying,

6

Avoid check-cashing and

Make a budget, Behnam

says. Write down what you spend, categorize those expenses, then compare each category to your monthly income as a percentage and see whether your expenditures make sense.

Can you trim certain

expenses without sacrificing your lifestyle? Check your cellphone, Internet and cable bills for a less expensive plan that would serve you equally well. Look at annual credit card fees; call your credit card company and ask if they can lower your rate.

Zag Magazine.com

7

Late fees and penalties cost you additional money, in addition to damaging your credit score. Behnam advises. Ask yourself whether the item is worth the splurge, then wait at least a week and see if you still feel the same.

payday loans. The high interest will eat up more of your money, says Richardson of Mid-Atlantic Federal Credit Union, which has offices in Germantown, Gaithersburg and Silver Spring.

Save 20 percent of your

income each pay period, Behnam suggests: 10 percent to retirement savings, 5 percent to cash reserves, 5 percent to other goals such as buying a car, home, etc.

S HOME HUNTING

8

Make sure that you are

9

Shop for credit, Richardson

withholding enough to cover your tax bill but not so much that you’re getting a large refund at the end of the year, Behnam adds. Your refund should be in the $500 range. If it’s more than that, it that means the IRS is using your money instead of you using it—or saving it and earning interest.

advises. Lower interest rates mean a shorter loan lifespan, which means more money in your pocket.

10 If you do have a loan or

are carrying a balance on your credit card, pay more than the minimum monthly amount, Richardson says. If you don’t, you’ll just extend the life of the loan.

To share these tips, go to ZagMagazine.com.

Should you rent or buy? Renting or buying a home depends on several factors, according to Anna A. Behnam, managing director of Behnam & Associates in Rockville. Buying a home requires a down payment, closing costs and maintenance/ongoing costs. If you can’t do this without depleting your savings and cash reserves, then consider renting for a period of time before committing to such a big financial obligation.

S AIMING FOR COLLEGE

College may be years in the future for a young family, but you can get a head start by opening a 529 savings plan, offered by all 50 states and the District of Columbia. For plans offered in Maryland, visit College Savings Plans of Maryland (collegesavingsmd.org). You can start out small so you’re not stretching your current budget beyond your comfort level, and then increase the savings as your child gets closer to college age. March l April 2015 | Zag Magazine

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“It doesn’t look, feel, sound or smell like a gas station.” — Jon Singer, Seoul Food D.C. patron

s Samples of chicken and vegan tacos, soup and chili during lunchtime at Seoul Food D.C. ~CONTINUED FROM 23~

meat or tofu, mixed greens, carrots, daikon and red radish with a cage-free, sunny-sideup egg, or the pork superbowl. “Everyone I have taken here has just raved about it.” The gas station’s racks of snacks are a mere few steps away, but Seoul Food D.C.’s ambience holds the attention of Peoples’ boyfriend, Jon Singer. “It doesn’t look, feel, sound or smell like a gas station,” he says. STATION STIGMA

U

p Georgia Avenue, in another Exxon station in Olney, sits Corned Beef King. Customers order corned beef, prime brisket, pastrami and more from a brick-veneer counter with a marble top along the back of the convenience store. Restaurant industry veteran Jon Rossler, 48, opened his place about six months before the Gorees launched theirs. “The stigma about eating out of gas stations is changing,” says Rossler, sitting at one of his tables near the store entrance, where racks of beef jerky and beer nuts are located. “People want better food when they stop at a gas station. We work hard at giving them that.” 38

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At the table next to him, Laura and Rich Roemer savor a hot pastrami sandwich and a chicken dish, respectively. The couple has driven here from their Brookeville home not to get gas, but to eat. “We were hungry, so we said, ‘Let’s go to the gas station,’” Laura says with a laugh. “The food is really tasty. I love the five-cheese macaroni.” Portions are hearty, Rich says. Most sandwiches, including the classic corned beef on rye, come piled high with a half-pound of meat and a variety of toppings. “I refuse to make smaller sandwiches,” Rossler says. Rossler and the Gorees say they get some new customers going there initially to purchase gas, but the majority of their new business is through word-of-mouth and social media. Leslie Rubin, who lives in the Kensington area, regularly tells friends about Seoul Food D.C. and meets some here. “The food is delicious, freshly made and different,” Rubin says. The Gorees use local grassfed beef, local chicken, organic tofu, cage-free eggs, and pole- and troll-caught tuna. “I am a huge fan of the cinnamon ginger iced tea.” ~CONTINUED ON 40~

s Juan Lara stirs a large pot of chicken vegetable soup at Corned Beef King. Zag Magazine.com


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THE TAVERN IS THE OLNEY PLACE TO GO FOR AMERICAN CUISINE! 18200 GEORGIA AVE., OLNEY • 301.260.0500 • olneytavern.com Hours: Tuesday - Friday 11am - 10pm Saturday 8am - 10pm Sunday 8am - 9pm Breakfast: Saturday & Sunday 8am-3pm “Every neighborhood wants a tavern at its main intersection - a place that functions as a pleasant destination for a date night or a family outing as well as a quick stop on the way home for a nourishing, uncomplicated meal... Olney now has such a restaurant. It features a dining room that is not too compact, a discreet bar and a generous patio on Georgia Avenue, just a few blocks north of Route 108.” Zag Magazine.com

Lunch: Appetizers $8.89-$11.59 Entrees $7.89-$13.49 (soup & salad combo, entree salads, burgers and sandwiches) Dinner: Appetizers $8.89-$11.59 Entrees $7.89-$29.99

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s Husband and wife J.P. and Anna Goree offer Korean/Japanese food at their restaurant in an Exxon station. Right: J.P. serves a kimchi and tofu bowl to Ariel Maiselman.

~CONTINUED FROM 38~

s Jon Rossler, shown in the back cooking, runs Corned Beef King in Olney out of an Exxon. His classic corned beef on rye, below, features a half pound of meat.

Kathy Morgan of Kensington and Sue Michailidis of Chevy Chase are among the friends who meet Rubin here. “Although it’s in a gas station, you forget because it’s very clean and organized well,” Morgan says. The Gorees operated a food truck before a college friend of Anna’s who owns the Wheaton Exxon approached her about leasing space. “It seemed like a no-brainer. Overhead is relatively low, compared to going into our own space,” J.P. says. “We heard about Wheaton being a good place to have a restaurant. … It has worked well for us.” Parking can be an issue at such places. The gas station eateries have a few spots customers can use, but during busy times, those spaces are at a premium. “It really hasn’t been much of a problem,” Rossler says. “We make sure our employees park behind the building and leave all the spaces for customers.” COOKING, WITH GAS

T

here is a good variety of dining options at unusual locations. Taco Bar is connected to the Washingtonian Express gas station’s convenience store at the Rio in Gaithersburg and also is part of a wine and beer store. China Best is in an Exxon in Silver Spring, while Mediterranean Corner sits in a Shell station in Germantown. Pho Chi makes Vietnamese food in a Montgomery Village Avenue wine and beer store, though the restaurant dominates the space.

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Taco Bar was founded by Jose Valdivia after his brother, Raul, opened the first Taco Bar in downtown Gaithersburg in 2002. The downtown location is in a more traditional small shopping center. At the Rio location, customers can either enter through a door from the convenience store or two doors leading directly outside. There is both indoor and outdoor seating. “It’s convenient, and the staff is friendly,” says Jabari Beverly of Upper Marlboro, who goes there for lunch about twice a week while working for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority in Rockville. “It’s authentic Mexican food.” China Best has only a few tables in the back of the station on Veirs Mill Road near Randolph Road, where it serves dishes like jumbo Szechuan shrimp and sesame beef. Mediterranean Corner contains only tables for customers to stand while eating beef shawarma and more. Another hidden eatery gem — known to attract customers from as far away as Virginia—is a grill that serves burgers in the back of one of the oldest running convenience stores in the county, Sunshine General Store in Brookeville. It’s busy on a Saturday afternoon, with the line of customers blocking the view of a game shown on a cathode-ray tube TV for some patrons devouring burgers at a few tables and counter stools. In a given day, the grill of the cash-only store, which originally opened in the 1940s, can go through 60 pounds of burgers and 40 Zag Magazine.com


“It’s not that much to look at from the outside. It’s a working man’s kind of place. ... But the burgers will make you return.” — Laura Roemer, speaking about the grill at Sunshine General Store in Brookeville

pounds of bacon. A community bulletin board is covered with business cards advertising services such as tool sharpening and paving. Notices include a horse saddle and a 1996 Chevy Tahoe for sale. Fish bait, rods and reels, and hunting vests are for sale among chips and soft drinks. “Our cooks know many of our customers’ orders by heart,” says Laura Pullen, co-owner with her husband, Neil. She took over the store in 2002. “We’re old-fashioned, but our customers like us that way.” The store sold gasoline until a few years ago, when new regulations made that part of the business too expensive, Pullen says. The pumps remain on the premises. “It’s not that much to look at from the outside,” says Laura Roemer, a frequent diner there. “It’s a working man’s kind of place. ... But the burgers will make you return.” Zag Magazine.com

s Jon Singer of Silver Spring and Lisa Peoples of Wheaton share lunch at Seoul Food D.C.

‘RICH, OR DEAD’

M

ost restaurateurs possess a strong entrepreneurial streak. Rossler was general manager of family-owned Celebrity Delly in Falls Church, Va., when he caught the urge to venture on his own. His parents started Celebrity Delly in Rockville in 1975, eventually opening another restaurant in Cabin John. While those have since closed, Rossler’s sister, Julie, and her husband still run the one in Virginia. “I wasn’t really interested in being a restaurant manager after a while,” Rossler says. “I’m more of the entrepreneurial type.” The idea to provide high-quality corned beef sandwiches came to him as he viewed a television show about food trucks. “I thought I could do this better,” Rossler says. He bought a truck that previously sold

burgers and hot dogs and hit the road, working as many as 80 hours a week. After about a year, the Olney Exxon owner approached him about leasing space. “It works out better for him to rent to a restaurant than use this space for snacks and that kind of thing,” says Rossler, who has cut down his work week to about 45 hours. He’d like to provide more space for tables by leasing an area now occupied by aisles of products, but has to figure out if the economics of expanding will work. Some 13 employees work in the eatery and a food truck that continues to operate in the county. Rossler is working on opening a 50-seat corned beef and craft beer restaurant in Gaithersburg’s Kentlands — but not in a gas station. “That will keep me busy,” he says. “I’ll end up either rich or dead.” March l April 2015 | Zag Magazine

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+ AND ANOTHER THING

X toY: Quit Stealing Our Stuff Generation Xers—those of

Take the Polaroid OneStep, a

camera popular in the ’70s and ’80s that’s most recognizable to young ’uns as Instagram’s icon. It’s aiming to resurrect itself as a millennial thing vis-à-vis new cameras like the just-released Socialmatic, which allows social sharing of photos as well as instant prints, just like the OneStep did in the “olden days.” Meanwhile, if you

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It all reminds me of a line in the

Gen Xer, am remembering that wrong, because the promo copy on the Urban Outfitters website says: “The 90s are back and it’s time to celebrate with this rad vintage cassette player housed in its original packaging.” If the Urban Outfitters site says it’s actually a relic of the ’90s, when many millennials were fledglings, it must be so! Oh, and by the way, thanks to nostalgia trends as well as “Guardians of the Galaxy,” yeah, cassettes are kinda sorta back in style with young adults, too, even though Xers totally invented the mixtape.

If this mania continues, in a couple of years, the millennials— with their vinyl record fixation and their 1987 Def Leppard concert T-shirts that they bought last week at Target—will have convinced the world that Pac-Man Fever, Young MC and Kurt Cobain all belong to them. Meanwhile, Generation X will be lying in some nostalgia gutter, babbling dialogue from “The Breakfast Club” and “Reality Bites” while millennials kick the dirt off their vintage Vans into our faces. Vans: those are ours, man!

forthcoming film “While We’re Young,” a comedy about a pair of forty-somethings (Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts) who befriend a pair of twenty-somethings (Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried). At one point, Watts’ character says of the younger couple: “It’s like their apartment is filled with everything we once threw out. But it looks so good the way they have it.”

Of course, if the choice comes down to having our cultural signifiers be completely forgotten or having them be co-opted by enthusiastic young fans who can’t quite remember their initial heyday, I’ll live with co-opted. After all, I consider the music of The Doors, and “The Wonder Years,”—a TV show that looked back wistfully at the 1960s—an integral part of my high school experience, and clearly I wasn’t alive during the Woodstock era. Every generation cherry-picks from the pop culture that preceded theirs. It is, perhaps sadly, as close as most of us get to honoring history in our consumer-driven society. Right now, the “history” garnering the most “honor” happens to coincide with the decades when I came of age and experienced young adulthood. Which makes me feel old. But, on the plus side, it also recently allowed me to buy a set of note cards designed to look like old mixtapes. They were overpriced, and I’ll probably never write a single note to anyone on them. But I like to look at those silly pieces of stationery. They remind me of the cheap, plastic TDKs and Maxells that once held my carefully curated music mixes, the very real cassette tapes that felt like they were mine and no one else’s. Jen Chaney is a pop culture critic whose work appears frequently in Vulture, The Washington Post, The Dissolve and other outlets. She also is the author of the book “As If!: The Oral History of Clueless,” to be published this summer, just in time for the movie’s 20th anniversary. You know, because: nostalgia. Zag Magazine.com

TA P E , I S T O C K . C O M / F R E I E - K R E AT I O N ; I L L U S T R AT I O N , A N N A J O Y C E ; H E A D S H O T F R O M J E N C H A N E Y

us born, roughly, between 1965 and 1980 —have a bit of a middleBY JEN CHANEY child chip on our shoulders. Can you blame us? We’re sandwiched between the baby boomers, one of the largest generations in American history, and the millennials (aka Generation Y), who, according to a recent Pew Research Center report, have surpassed boomers as the country’s largest age demographic. We’re basically being smothered by people who remember watching The Beatles on “The Ed Sullivan Show” and people who considered Britney Spears a childhood role model, and we can barely get enough air in our lungs to say Duran, let alone Duran followed by another Duran. In short, we 1970s babies may be a little paranoid about being marginalized. That said, I believe I have a justifiable concern about the fact that millennials, as well as various companies aiming their marketing strategies at millennials, keep pillaging our pop cultural touchstones.

head to Urban Outfitters—official home of retro stuff that’s been repackaged for the millennial generation—you can buy an actual, vintage Polaroid OneStep camera from the ’80s for $180. While you’re there, you could also spend $99 on a “vintage cassette player” that’s basically the same AM-FM radio/tape player with extendable antenna that I had in the early ’80s. But surely I, the irrelevant


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Profile for The Gazette

Zag Magazine - March/April 2015  

Zag Magazine - March/April 2015  

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