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SOUTHWEST LIFE / B1

SPORTS | A6

SUPPORTING OUR HEROES

WELTON UNDER WAY

Scenes from last Saturday’s Honor Flight fundraiser

GCHS, Scott City get pair of wrestlers into Friday semifinals, but only one wins.

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Saturday, January 27, 2018

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BOE rejects demands to suspend Dennis Becky Clark is the executive director for Spirit of the Plains CASA in Garden City. Its office is located at 310 E. Waltnut St., Suite 208. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

WANTED: Volunteers CASA looking for more people to help agency be ‘voice’ for children Garden City USD 457 Superintendent Steve Karlin was among those voicing their support for Dale Dennis at the Kansas Board of Education special meeting in Topeka Friday afternoon. [THAD

By Mark Minton

ALLTON/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL]

Area residents with a calling for social work have an opportunity awaiting them with Spirit of the Plains CASA in Garden City, an organization that advocates for abused and neglected children traveling through the Kansas court and foster care systems. Becky Clark, executive director of the local CASA branch servicing children in Kansas’ 25th Judicial District, is calling on people with big hearts to get involved as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA). Clark has helmed the operation since Aug. 14. Under her leadership, the organization has redirected its focus on volunteer

Ulysses, Garden City school superintendents among those backing deputy commissioner By Tim Carpenter The Topeka Capital-Journal

TOPEKA — The Kansas Board of Education rebuffed demands Friday from Republican legislative leaders to suspend a deputy education commissioner implicated in the diversion of millions of dollars in state transportation funding to school districts in

MARKET PRICES

Grain Prices at Garden City Co-Op Wheat ..........................3.73 Corn ..............................3.37 Milo ...............................3.37 Soybeans ..................... 8.61

violation of state law. A majority on the state Board of Education gave a vote of confidence to Dale Dennis, who has worked for the Kansas State Department of Education for half a century. The 9-1 decision to keep Dennis in place after nearly two hours of closed-door meetings was applauded by as many as 100 public school administrators who packed into the state board’s office across the street from the Statehouse. See DENNIS, A5

Feb. April June High 125 125.10 116.50 Low 122.22 122.2 113.95 Last 124.75 124.60 116.10

Volume 89, Issue 27 Circulation: 1-800-766-5730 News Tips: 620-275-8500, ext. 234

Clark said. “Many times, without our services, the children’s voice would not be presented to a judge.” During a Rotary Club luncheon on Wednesday, at which Clark was the guest speaker, Finney County Magistrate Judge Christopher Sanders said CASA volunteers act as his eyes and ears when making decisions in child-in-need-of-care cases. Clark said Sanders called on volunteers to write their court reports “as though a child’s life depends on it, because it could.” There are 23 CASA programs serving 71 counties in Kansas. The first CASA program in Kansas started in 1981 in Wichita. In 1986, the Kansas Supreme Court created program standards and guidelines for every CASA program to follow in order to meet certification. See CASA, A5

Pizza and more pizza coming to Garden City By Mark Minton Staff writer

Schwieterman Inc. reported Chicago Live Cattle Futures

Staff writer

recruitment and retention efforts. A licensed social worker with 20 years of experience in public education, Clark is no stranger to the game and is positioned to receive her master’s degree in social work in May from the University of Kansas. She hopes to use that added expertise to strengthen CASA in southwest Kansas for the sake of children caught up in a fraught Kansas foster care system in which 74 children were reported missing in October. CASA reports that there are about 6,900 children in the custody of the Kansas Department of Children and Families amid a shortage of foster homes and high staff turnover. As an answer to that, CASA tasks itself with finding people willing to help. “We are the voice for the children in the court system who are abused and neglected,”

Pizza enthusiasts soon may have two new places in Garden City in which to indulge their appetites. Domino’s Pizza is making a return to Garden City, with plans taking shape to repurpose the building at 2312 E. Kansas Obituaries .................. A2 Region & State ............. A3 Opinion ...................... A4

Ave, Suite C. The project officially got underway on Dec. 29, when the City of Garden City's Neighborhood and Development Services (NDS) department approved a construction permit request filed on Nov. 6. See PIZZA, A5

Construction crews continue their work of renovating a portion of a business building Thursday for a new Domino’s pizza. [BRAD NADING/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

Advice .........................B3 Comics ....................... C2  Classifieds .................. C3 256749

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Saturday, January 27, 2018

The Garden City Telegram

FOR THE RECORD P O L I C E B E AT | The following reports were taken from law enforcement logs

Jan. 20 Darien Michael Hargett, 20, 2016 N. Old Manor Road, was arrested at 2:58 a.m. on allegations of consumption of liquor by a minor over 18, use and possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. Samuel Peter Helvey, 20, 1011 Crestline Drive, was arrested at 2:25 a.m. on allegations of furnishing alcohol to a minor, possession of marijuana and use and possession of drug paraphernalia. Scott Matthew Dunagan, 18, 101 Colton Place in Holcomb, was arrested at 2:58 a.m. on an out-of-county warrant and allegations of possession of marijuana and use and possession of drug paraphernalia. Dede Marie McDonald, 42, 303 E. Prospect St., was arrested at 10:48 a.m. on an out-of-county warrant. Aaron Patrick Hamlett, 35, 1823 Koster St., was arrested at 11:39 a.m. on allegations of battery and criminal restraint. Hector Javier Perez, 36, 205 Hart Ave., was arrested at 1:13 p.m. on allegations of failure to appear in court and probation violation. Rebecca Ann Vollbrecht, 30, 7645 Lindsay Circle in Holcomb, was arrested at 2:01 p.m. on allegations of driving with a suspended license, use and possession of drug paraphernalia, failure to appear in court and possession of a hallucinogenic drug. Daniel Segiel Tesfay, 29, 605 E. Labrador Blvd., was arrested at 3:13 p.m. on an out-of-county warrant. Jerod Thomas Herrell, 39, 1607 Labrador Blvd., was arrested at 5:30 p.m. on allegations of burglary and criminal damage to property valued at under $1,000. Jacob Matthew Eichhorn, 25, 1010 N. 12th St., was arrested at 9:03 p.m. on an allegation of driving with a suspended license. Stacy Grant McMullen Sr., 64, Augusta, was arrested at 10:19 p.m. on allegations of use and possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. Rodrecious Jermaine McFarland, 44, 1501 E. Chestnut Ave., was arrested at 10:50 p.m. on an allegation of misdemeanor criminal damage to property.

Sunday Victor Alfonso SalazarRosales, 31, 950 Jennie Barker Road, was arrested at 1:12 a.m. on an allegation of driving without a valid license. Juan Adrian Ochoa, 23, Ulysses, was arrested at 1:34 a.m. on an allegation of interference with a law enforcement officer. Maria Lizet Montano, 33, 2601 W. Mary St., was arrested at 9:44 a.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Wilbain Candio, 37, Liberal, was arrested at 3:07 p.m. on an allegation of pedestrian under the influence.

Monday Miguel Alfredo Rodriguez, 20, 307 Third St., was arrested at 2:42 a.m. on allegations of driving under the influence and consumption of liquor by a minor over 18. Cheyenne Nicole Ortiz, 29, 311 W. Fair St., was arrested at 7:45 a.m. on allegations of probation violation and parole violation. Eduardo Facio-Alvarez, 19, 1515 N. 13th St., was arrested at 11:54 a.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Sylvester Alexander Mitchell Jr., 24, 504 Prospect St., was arrested at 3:50 p.m. on an allegation of probation violation. Jesus Hernandez, 24, 1805 Benton St., was arrested at 5:43 p.m. on an allegation of probation violation. Marissa Antillon-Loera, 22, 962 Amy St., was arrested at 7:45 p.m. on an allegation of domestic battery. Jack Michael Tuls, 55, 1975 Andover Drive, was arrested at 5:23 p.m. on an allegation of an out-of-state offense. Logan Layne Kessler, 21, 1601 Vinzant St., was arrested at 8:43 p.m. on an allegation of driving with a suspended license. Jose Resendiz Saldana, 61, 812 Alfalfa St., was arrested at 8:59 p.m. on an allegation of driving under the influence. Jesus Ernesto Marinelarena, 28, 1806 W. Kansas Ave., was arrested at 4:43 p.m. on an allegation of forgery. Daniel Paul Garcia, 36, 101 S. Lynch St. in Holcomb, was arrested at 4:06 p.m. on two counts of felony stalking.

Mega Millions: 10-16-27-3943-1; Megaplier: 4

Thursday Cesar Dominguez-Mendez, 63, 340 S. Farmland Road, was arrested at 5:20 a.m. on allegations of driving in the no-passing zone, driving with a suspended license and driving with a suspended license with a subsequent conviction.

Thursday Brian Anthony Bolden, 35, 3306 N. VFW Road, was arrested at 5:27 a.m. on an allegation of criminal trespassing, violating a protection order and domestic battery.

KANSAS HIGHWAY PATROL

Tuesday

FINNEY COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Jan. 20 Paul Navis Martinez, 36, 611 N. Ninth St., was arrested at 9:35 a.m. on an allegation of probation violation.

Tuesday Norberto Chairez, 29, 270 S. Karen St., was arrested at 1:13 a.m. on allegations of interference with a law enforcement officer involving concealment of evidence, use and possession of drug paraphernalia, distribution of narcotics, parole violation and possession of a stimulant. Bradley Austin Cunningham, 23, 705 Walnut St. in Deerfield, was arrested at 2:04 p.m. on allegations of theft by deception of property valued less than $1,500 and making false information. Shaquan Maliak Titchenor, 20, 409 N. Second St., was arrested at 3:37 p.m. on an allegation of probation violation. Daniel Ontiveros, 18, 1325 Summit St., was arrested at 2:45 p.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Sandy Sue Russell, 41, 901 Harold Ave., was arrested at 5:30 p.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Maria Delores Garcia-Ortiz, 25, 4101 E. U.S. Highway 50, was arrested at 9:57 p.m. on an allegation of driving without a valid license.

Wednesday Jonathan Isac Ramirez, 22, 2201 E. McArthur Road, was arrested at 10:25 p.m. on an allegation of possession of marijuana. Miguel Ramirez, 25, Wichita, was arrested at 10:25 p.m. on allegations of driving with a suspended license, possession of a depressant, possession of marijuana and driving under the influence.

Esteban Blanco, 53, 65 S. Farmland Road, was arrested at 1:15 p.m. on allegations of driving with a restricted license, driving under the influence and driving with a suspended license.

Tuesday

Obituary policy: Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Friday for inclusion in the next day’s edition.

Samuel Gardner Samuel Melvin Gardner, 88, died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, at Clearfork Assisted Living Facility in Willow Park, Texas. He was born June 30, 1929, in Amarillo, Texas, to Reynold and Melinda Bradley Gardner. A Garden City resident since 1970, Mr. Gardner worked for the National Weather Service until his retirement. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran. On April 4, 1959, he married Eileen Mary Gardner in High Wycombe, England. She died Sept. 23, 2014. He also was preceded in death by his parents; a brother, Reynold Gardner; and a son, Samuel Melvin Gardner Jr. Survivors include a son, Richard Gardner of Denver; two daughtersin-law, Susan K. Marshall of Denver, and LaQuita Gardner of Weatherford, Texas; a sister, Jean Desha of Mansfield, Texas; four granddaughters, Shannon Gardner and Nicole

Gardner

Gardner, both of Springfield, Ohio, Christy Templeton of Weatherford, and Mandy Nation of Pflugerville, Texas; and eight great-grand-

children. Funeral will begin at 10:30 a.m. Monday at Price & Sons Funeral Home of Garden City. Burial will follow at Valley View Cemetery in Garden City. Friends are welcome to gather at Time Out at 6 p.m. to have dinner and reminisce. Visitation hours are 1 to 8 p.m. Sunday, with the family present from 6:30 to 8 p.m., at the funeral home. Memorials are suggested to the American Red Cross, in care of the funeral home, 620 N. Main St., Garden City, KS 67846.

Wanda Thompson

Robert Gain Baker, 47, 802 N. Fifth St., was arrested at 8:34 p.m. on an allegation of driving without a valid license.

Sunday

HUGOTON — Wanda Gale Thompson, 74, died Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018, at her home in Hugoton. She was born March 22, 1943, in Ada, Okla., to Burton and Jewel Stone Myers. On July 14, 1964, she married Grant Thompson in Amarillo, Texas. He survives Other survivors include a son, David Thompson of Hugoton; a daughter, Terri Starkey of Enid, Okla.; a sister, Carol Hamner of Quitaque,

Texas; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents and a brother, Deloy Myers. A memorial service will begin at 2 p.m. today at Church Of God, Hugoton. Burial will be at Hugoton Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to Pheasant Heaven Charities, in care of Paul’s-Robson Funeral Home, Box 236, Hugoton, KS 67951.

Joshua David Sondag, 39, 901 Harold Ave., was arrested at 4:37 p.m. on allegations of driving without proof of registration, driving without proof of liability insurance and driving with a suspended license. Danny Guillen, 24, 2801 N. Eighth St., was arrested at 7:12 p.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court and probation violation.

Wednesday Samantha Ramirez-Gomez, 19, 1201 N. 10th St., was arrested at 9:35 a.m. on allegations of speeding and driving without a valid license. Josh Aron Goddard, 41, 302 Laura Lane in Holcomb, was arrested at 10:48 a.m. on allegations of driving without proof of registration

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Wednesday Enrique Vejar, 49, El Paso, Texas, was arrested at 6:20 a.m. on an allegation of an out-of-state offense. Ivette Marina Cruz, 22, 4180 E. Nancy Ave., was arrested

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KA N SAS LOT T E RY The following Kansas Lottery numbers were drawn Friday:

and driving without a valid license. Jose Luis Lopez-Murillo, 53, 2103 E. Fair St., was arrested at 10:37 a.m. on an allegation of driving with a suspended license. Briana Liseth Riojas, 21, 1102 Long Blvd., was arrested at 10:43 a.m. on an allegation of driving without a valid license. Jayce Morales, 21, 803 Stafford St., was arrested at 11:16 a.m. on allegations of improperly wearing a seat belt, driving with a suspended license and racing on the highway. Jennifer Lynn Martinez, 23, 1615 Summit St., was arrested at 11 a.m. on allegations of violating child passenger safety laws and driving with a suspended license.

at 8:53 a.m. on a municipal bond revocation. Seth Alexander Escalante, 19, 1608 N. Eighth St., was arrested at 9:10 a.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Abraham Martin Montemayor Jr. 27, 608 N. 10th St., was arrested at 1:30 p.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Ashley Avelina CruzMarroquin, 18, 5500 E. Allen Drive, was arrested at 2:49 p.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court. Galen Dean Brandt, 57, 1217 Richwood Drive, was arrested at 11:38 a.m. on an allegation of driving with a suspended license. Juan Antonio Bonilla Jr., 25, 911 N. 13th St., was arrested at 5:24 p.m. on a detainer. Angel Navarrete, 34, 4101 E. U.S. Highway 50, was arrested at 6:26 p.m. on an allegation of failure to appear in court.

Kansas 2 by 2: Red: 5-8; White: 17-22 Kansas Pick 3: Midday: 6-9-6; Evening: 7-2-5

DIANE CROCKETT 620-260-6001

PEGGY GLUNT 620-272-6494

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Government, law enforcement, courts Mark Minton, reporter mminton@gctelegram.com ......................620-275-8500 ext. 232 Sports Fax: 866-410-1749 Brett Marshall, sports editor bmarshall@gctelegram.com ....................620-275-8500 ext. 227 J. Levi Burnin, sports reporter lburnfin@gctelegram.com ........................620-275-8500 ext. 240 Photos Brad Nading, photographer bnading@gctelegram.com .......................620-275-8500 ext. 228 Bridal, obituaries Debbie Schiffelbein, clerk dschiffelbein@gctelegram.com ...............620-275-8500 ext. 242

Overall news operations and corrections Brett Riggs, managing editor briggs@gctelegram.com ..........................620-275-8500 ext. 234 Education, youth Josh Harbour, reporter jharbour@gctelegram.com.......................620-275-8500 ext. 238

ADVERTISING & MARKETING Fax: 866-757-6842 Email: advertising@gctelegram.com Web & Print Advertising/Marketing DJ Gosch Richmeier, multimedia sales manager drichmeier@gctelegram.com..................... 620-276-6862 ext. 225

Online: gctelegram.com WHO’S RESPONSIBLE Overall company operations and opinion page Dena Sattler, editor and publisher dsattler@gctelegram.com ........................620-275-8500 ext. 201

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The Garden City Telegram

Saturday, January 27, 2018

A3

REGION&STATE Auditions planned next week for upcoming GCHS productions The Garden City High School’s Advanced Repertory Theatre class will hold auditions for next year’s musical and play productions from 3:20 to 5:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday in the auditorium of the school, 2720 Buffalo Way Blvd. Eighth- through 11th-grade students from Garden City public schools are eligible to audition. The Advanced Repertory Theatre is a year-long class taught by GCHS theatre instructors Barbara Hilt and Alice Hilt. Students will rehearse, design and create all elements of the productions.  The musical “Pippin” will be performed in November 2018.  The play “The Heart of Robin Hood” will be performed in April 2019. For more information, email Alice Hilt at ahilt@gckschools.com. Galen Berning, Vulgamore Family Farms place in national contest Galen Berning of Marienthal and Vulgamore Family Farms of Scott City recently placed in the 2017 National Sorghum Producers Yield Contest. Berning won first place state in the dryland conventional-till division. He won with Pioneer hybrid 85G46, which yielded 174.16 bushels per acre. Vulgamore Family Farms was awarded second place in the state in the dryland notill division, winning with Pioneer hybrid 86G32, which yielded 164.22 bushels per acre. Berning earned one of the 82 state titles won by growers planting Pioneer brand sorghum hybrids. DuPont Pioneer dominated the contest and won 76 percent of the 108 first-place state awards presented. Pioneer brand sorghum hybrid growers also won 18 of 24 national titles awarded in 2017. A detailed listing of individual winners can be found at www.pioneer.com/nsp/. Dillar family performing Tuesday at Garden Valley Retirement A musical variety program featuring the music group “Old Time Country,” the Dillar family from Garden City, will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Garden Valley Retirement Village, 1505 E. Spruce St. The public is welcome at no charge. St. Mary’s ‘Magical Night in New Orleans’ planned for Feb. 3 St. Mary Catholic School’s third annual “A Magical Night in New Orleans” will be held Feb. 3 at the Clarion Inn Ballroom.  Tickets are on sale until Monday at the school, 503 St. John St., at a price of $25 single, $45 couple or $350 for a reserved table. Tickets include a dinner, a silent and live auction and a dance featuring the Ortiz Night Shift Band.  All proceeds will go to St. Mary School.

House endorses harsher DUI sentencing By Tim Carpenter The Topeka Capital-Journal

TOPEKA — Olathe school instructor Caitlin Vogel’s death in a traffic accident caused by a two-time drunken driving offender inspired the House on Friday to endorse legislation elevating the sentence for habitual violators convicted of involuntary manslaughter or aggravated battery in DUI crashes. The reforms contained in House Bill 2439 were christened “Caitlin’s Law” to recognize tragedy of the Stilwell woman’s death in the 2016 wreck in Johnson County. The measure was advanced to final action Monday. Rep. Russ Jennings, a Lakin Republican and chairman of the House Corrections and Juvenile Justice Committee, said the driver of the vehicle that struck Vogel knew he was impaired when deciding to slip behind the wheel of a borrowed SUV not fitted with a alcohol breath-testing device.

Rep. Russ Jennings, R-Lakin, chairman of the House Corrections and Juvenile Justice Committee carried a bill on the floor of the house Friday morning that the house later endorsed. The legislation would elevate the sentence for habitual violators convicted of involuntary manslaughter or aggravated battery in DUI crashes. [THAD ALLTON/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL]

“When interviewed by law enforcement officers in this case, he told them, ‘Yes, I’ve been drinking. I just wanted to go out and drive around for a while.’ He did,” Jennings said. Jennings said testimony by Vogel’s parents in favor of legislation enhancing the criminal penalties was drenched in heartache and desire to shield other families from trauma. “It would be fair to say it was the most emotional

committee hearing I’ve experienced in the Legislature,” Jennings said. The bill amends state law in the handling of involuntary manslaughter and aggravated battery cases tied to deaths or serious injuries resulting from crashes triggered by someone found guilty of driving under the influence. Provisions of the bill would apply if the motorist responsible for a crash had been previously convicted

of a DUI and was driving despite a suspended or revoked license or having been declared a habitual violator. Under the bill, the minimum sentence for aggravated battery related to a DUI accident would escalate from the current 38 months to a new benchmark of 47 months. In addition, the minimum penalty for involuntary manslaughter under these circumstances would go up from 62 months to 89 months. “I know what kind of carnage is out there,” said Rep. Virgil Weigel, a Topeka Democrat and former law enforcement officer. “This is a very good bill.” Vogel died after James McAllister, of Overland Park, ran a stop sign and broadsided her vehicle. McAllister, who had been convicted twice previously on DUI charges, was sentenced to 108 months in prison after pleading guilty in 2017 to involuntary manslaughter. The House also vote 70-45 to advance to final

action a bill extending the hours businesses can sell liquor by the drink in Kansas. The contents of House Bill 2482 would enable public venues, clubs and drinking establishments to sell alcoholic beverages from 6 a.m. until 2 a.m. the following day. Existing state law sets the time frame for serving drinks to customers from 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. the next day. Missouri and Nebraska open the doors at 6 a.m. for sales of liquor by the drink. Rep. Sean Tarwater, R-Stilwell, said the expansion would serve businesses interested in attracting third-shift customers or individuals gathering to watch international sporting events. State law allows catering companies to begin offering alcoholic beverages at 6 a.m., said Rep. Brandon Whipple, D-Wichita. “Stand with allowing businesses a little more regulatory freedom,” said Rep. Kristey Williams, R-Augusta.

Printmaking principles Trey Morgan talks with Garden City Community College art students about printmaking Friday during a workshop in the GCCC art studio. Morgan, a graphic designer and freelance artist from Kansas City, Mo., has been the featured artist for January in GCCC’s Mercer Gallery with an exhibit titled “Geometric Mutations”. [BRAD NADING/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

Senators weigh bill strengthening human trafficking protections By Brianna Childers

TOPEKA — As part of its efforts to combat human trafficking, the Kansas attorney general’s office is pushing for a bill that would extend protections to minors who have fallen victim. Senate bill 281 would amend the Protection from Stalking and Sexual Assault Act to include relief for those who have been trafficked by allowing a county or district attorney, the attorney general or a child’s guardian to obtain a protection order for a minor who was trafficked, preventing them from being contacted or harassed by someone involved in their trafficking. Assistant Attorney General Pat Colloton, chairman of the Human Trafficking Advisory Board, said the bill would provide relief to children who had been trafficked. Colloton spoke in favor of the bill at its committee hearing Tuesday. She said children may struggle to escape trafficking because they lack family support

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and their parents don’t have enough money. “The ability to extricate is very difficult. This person is worth a lot of money to the trafficker,” Colloton said. “The trafficker is unlikely to just allow the child to go.” Colloton said a child could be worth up to

$1,000 a night. Attorney General Derek Schmidt’s office has made combatting human trafficking one of its priorities, and served more than 420 trafficking victims last year. Any violation of a protection order would give law enforcement officials the opportunity to arrest

an alleged trafficker and charge them for violation of the order. Greg Smith, a liaison for the Johnson County Sheriff’s Department, said his office supports the bill because child victims are viewed as valuable by traffickers and therefore likely to reenter trafficking. The

protection order available under the bill would prevent that by helping stop an alleged trafficker from contacting a child victim. Sen. Rick Wilborn, R-McPherson, said the bill is only one step in fixing the human trafficking problem, and it’s not a “cure-all.”

St. Catherine welcomes Dr. Scott Booker w

A partner with Plaza Medical in Garden City since 1996, Dr. Scott Booker is transitioning his practice to Siena Medical Clinic where he will continue providing a wide range of adult and geriatric primary care. Dr. Booker is looking forward to caring for his existing patients, as well as accepting new patients. He is certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians. The Siena Medical Clinic Adult Primary Care Team of four physicians and six family nurse pratitioners are available to meet all of your health care needs.

311 3 11 E E. Spruce S Garden City, KS 67846 620-275-3710 www.StCatherineHosp.org Centura Health does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age, sex, religion, creed, ancestry, sexual orientation, and marital status in admission, treatment, or participation in its programs, services and activities, or in employment. For further information about this policy contact Centura Health’s Office of the General Counsel at 1-303-673-8166 (TTY: 711). Copyright © Centura Health, 2017. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-303-673-8166 (TTY: 711). CHÚ Ý: Nếu bạn nói Tiếng Việt, có các dịch vụ hỗ trợ ngôn ngữ miễn phí dành cho bạn. Gọi số 1-303-673-8166 (TTY: 711).

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Saturday, January 27, 2018

The Garden City Telegram

OPINION OTHER VIEWS

Dena Sattler, Editor & Publisher | denas@gctelegram.com

EDITORIAL

FCEDC idea for funding worth a look T

he Finney County Economic Development Corp. has long battled funding woes in its quest to create jobs. Voters rejected previous attempts to pass a modest countywide sales tax to support economic development efforts. With limited funding from existing sources, the FCEDC can’t always offer competitive incentives required to lure businesses and industries to town as a way to create jobs needed to further stimulate the local economy. Current financial support for the FCEDC comes from Finney County ($150,000), Garden City ($130,000), Holcomb ($25,000) and Garden City Community College ($15,000). Knowing that level of funding cannot sustain an aggressive, ongoing plan to fuel investment in business growth — especially when competing with other communities — the FCEDC has discussed the possibility of making another run at a sales-tax initiative. The idea would be to devote a .15-cent sales tax now collected in Finney County and dedicated to HorseThief Reservoir — tentatively slated to sunset in 2021 — to economic development. Local voters already rejected similar attempts to pour more tax dollars into the FCEDC, and many would be wary once again. Selling the latest plan will require a clear picture of the return on investment. And not only in a pledge to deliver more goodpaying jobs, but also in specifics on how those jobs would drive quality-of-life and other community improvements. While we’ve seen notable progress in primary-job growth of more than 3,700 jobs from 2009 to 2016, according to the FCEDC, there’s still a pressing need for more workers earning higher wages and the economic gains they provide. And even with recent and notable successes — the milk powder plant, transload facility and housing, health care and retail development, for example — the community cannot rest on its laurels when it comes to growth opportunities. It’s also worth noting that a cloud of doubt hovers over the retail sector. The demise of big-box stores nationwide due to consumers shopping online — the recent closure of Sears in Garden City was an example — will continue. No community can afford to shortchange economic development strategies if it hopes to remain strong and viable, which is why the FCEDC’s latest idea warrants a closer look and consideration.

T O D AY ’ S Q U O T E S

“Lawmakers need to open their eyes to what medical cannabis can contribute to the medical community. …” Online comment selected by the editorial staff from comments at GCTelegram.com in response to a story about proposals to legalize medicinal marijuana in Kansas.

“Our biggest thing is to build a relationship with that kid because we are the one consistent thing in their life all the way through the court system. Social workers might change, case managers might change, but their CASA volunteer will stay the same.” Becky Clark, Spirit of the Plains CASA executive director, from a story in today’s edition about how the agency is in need of more volunteers.

Ready or not, campaign season is here

John Carlin

S

omeone once said that the only two things guaranteed in life are death and taxes. I’d like to add one: words that are short on truth. In campaigns, candidates often say a lot of words and they’re taken at face value. But they need to be scrutinized, evaluated and the truth shared with the voters.   Unfortunately, that is easier said than done. The hard-working press often try, but especially today the working reporters are too few and far between and often simply do not have the time to do the research. And then there is fake news and social media complicating things further. But, since the campaign season has officially begun, below are some messages that deserve some scrutiny from Kansans during this critical election year. What got me started down this path were a couple of communications that stood out as examples where pushback is needed to add some truth. The first is what I’m hearing from some outspoken far-right conservative Republican legislators. They were certainly no help in correcting the disastrous Brownback tax experiment in the 2017 Legislative session. Now they are attacking Gov. Sam Brownback

as if they had never gone along with his plan. Rep. J.R. Claeys, a Salina conservative, was quoted in The Topeka CapitalJournal calling the budget “shortsighted.” He accused Brownback of throwing all his allies under the bus. They want us to forget how they voted and simply buy the rhetoric that re-elects the incumbent. If you think for a moment these ultraconservatives criticizing Brownback have had a total conversion, please return to reality. Americans for Prosperity and the Koch Brothers do not change stripes. They just double-down. The second example comes from the message that Independent Greg Orman recently put out to jumpstart his effort to be the next governor of Kansas. Let me say first, I admire and like Greg. He is a fine man who made a valiant effort to unseat U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts in 2014. But this is 2018, and at best, all he can do is help elect Kris Kobach or soon-to-be Gov. Jeff Colyer. This would simply extend the Brownback misery for up to eight more years. Orman’s a spoiler, but what really gets me is the message he is putting out that both Kansas and Washington, D.C., are essentially political cesspools that only an independent can fix. I understand that has some fit with D.C., but to include Kansas with no effort to be fair or tell the whole story, I take serious exception. Democratic and moderate Republican legislators, backed by four former

governors of Kansas, made huge positive changes in the 2017 legislative session. As a word of advice, Greg, this only reinforces those who believe your real goal is a U.S. Senate seat, not serving as governor. Those invested in Kansas politics know that both our history and our recent success proved Kansas isn’t Washington, and bipartisanship can — and does — exist. Words used do matter, and the truth can make a real difference. I close with a personal experience to end on a softer note. When I was Speaker of the House and home for a weekend, I attended a Chamber legislative lunch. The death penalty was a frequent topic, and although I opposed it, I said little if anything. The Sunday Salina Journal really got my attention. Page 2 headline was “Carlin says the death penalty will only pass over his dead body.” With a tape of the lunchtime session, I was in the Journal office the next morning to share the record of what took place. In the Tuesday edition, I made the headlines again. “Carlin claims he did not say the death penalty would only pass over his dead body.” Clearly it was my personal lesson on not fighting with someone who buys printer’s ink by the barrel. John Carlin, a Democrat who served two terms as governor of Kansas, now is a visiting professor/executive in residence at Kansas State University in the Staley School of Leadership Studies. Read his blog at johnwcarlin.com.

O’Malley a good choice for the moderates

Michael Smith

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f you are a moderate or traditional Republican pining for the days of Govs. Bob Bennett, Mike Hayden and Bill Graves, then Ed O’Malley is your candidate. If the field does not narrow quickly, Kris Kobach will win the GOP primary in a walk, leaving only the Democratic nominee and wild card Greg Orman standing between our lawsuit-losing, anti-immigration firebrand and the Kansas governorship. Kobach ally Donald Trump won Kansas by 20 points, so his defeat by even the best Democrat is far from certain. Meanwhile, Orman is

depending on an infusion of independent votes that nearly all political scientists find highly implausible. In truth, Orman may cost the Democrats precious votes. This may leave Kobach the last man standing. Kobach’s economic and educational policies would largely mirror Brownback’s. On paper, the strongest alternative to Kobach is Governorany-day-now Jeff Colyer, who has proven quite effective at fundraising. However, Colyer will have trouble disassociating himself from the unpopular Brownback administration in which he served, and from policies he has consistently supported. Nor is Colyer much of a public speaker. Pundits may be reminded of former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, the political scion, mainstream darling and fundraising powerhouse. The conventional wisdom predicted Bush would be the 2016 Republican presidential

nominee. Yet Bush was unprepared for this age of reality-TV politics and backlash against “the establishment.” In the primaries, Bush did not even make the first cut. Colyer may face a similar fate. Furthermore, Colyer has not distinguished himself during the on-again, off-again, will-he-or-won’the saga of Brownback’s new job, stepping aside quietly while the outgoing governor gave the State of the State Address this month. This is not the kind of aggressive, no-sissies leadership that Republicans expect. Other Republicans have trouble differentiating themselves. Insurance Commissioner Ken Selzer is running on his qualifications as a CPA — outstanding for his current job, but too technical for a governor. Former state representative Mark Hutton promises to bring together the GOP factions, but that is a tall order given the vehement

opposition of moderates to Brownback’s legacy. Hutton also lacks statewide name recognition or much political experience. Former state senator Jim Barnett is a possibility, but he would have to overcome the legacy of a decisive defeat by Kathleen Sebelius in 2006. Barnett has often identified as a moderate, but he has a history of vacillation on the moderate-conservative question. Can he project the “here I am, take it or leave it” persona that Republicans demand in the Trump era? Finally, libertarian businessman Wink Hartman is a dark horse with no prior service in public office. Only O’Malley stands as unequivocally and unabashedly moderate. As a legislator, he helped negotiate a school finance formula that was fully funded for several years. O’Malley has proven a constant, vocal critic of the Brownback-Colyer-Kobach

legacy, and unlike several others, he has no ties to Brownback. O’Malley’s base includes the vote- and contribution-rich Johnson County, which he once represented in the statehouse, and Wichita, where he now leads the Kansas Leadership Center, making quiet, behind-the-scenes contacts around the state. O’Malley seems able to seek input from across the political spectrum without trying too hard to be all things to all people. The GOP field needs to narrow sharply, and soon, or it is Kobach’s to lose. One candidate stands to inherit the Graves, Hayden and Bennett mantle as a true and consistent moderate. The GOP field should narrow to a Kobach-O’Malley race, and it should do so posthaste. Michael Smith is a professor of political science at Emporia State University.


The Garden City Telegram

PIZZA

Saturday, January 27, 2018

A5

Trump declares America ‘open for business’

From Page A1 By Noah Bierman Tribune Washington Bureau

A department official estimated that the project is about halfway done, meaning Garden City residents could be able to enjoy Domino’s pizza in about a month. A representative from the Domino’s franchise was not available for comment on Friday. At the same time, another popular pizza chain is positioning itself for entry into Garden City. Pie Five Pizza Co. is setting itself up to expand its Kansas footprint into Garden City. The craft pizza shop has filed a construction permit request for an empty building located at 1110 Fleming St., next to the Mitchell Theatres Sequoyah 8 movie theater. The property has been a pizza place previously, as it was home to the old Ken’s Pizza in the 1970s and ‘80s. It also has housed a Mexican fast food restaurant. But it might soon be serving up artisan pizzas to Garden City residents. According to an NDS representative, the construction permit request is still pending approval as the City of Garden City waits for Pie Five to submit a list of construction contractors. The location would be Kansas’ 10th Pie Five location. Pie Five already has set up shop in Lawrence, Leawood, Lenexa, Manhattan, Mission, Olathe, Overland Park and Topeka. The franchise claims to make dough fresh every morning, chop vegetables by hand and mix marinara sauce with freshly picked tomatoes. The chain also offers wings and a craft beer selection. Contact Mark Minton at mminton@gctelegram.com.  

DENNIS From Page A1

The Board of Education unanimously recommended a new transparency process be developed to remove doubts about financial work at the Department of Education. “We’re looking forward to putting this behind us,” said Board of Education Chairman Jim Porter, of Fredonia. Senate Majority Leader Jim Denning, R-Overland Park, said the Board of Education ignored a legislative audit proving $9.7 million annually was being appropriated in violation of state law. He said the Board of Education refused to embrace a wider forensic audit to determine if other financial problems existed and closed ranks with a cherished employee. “They didn’t address the audit. Are they that arrogant?” Denning said. “This is about the skirting of the legislative process. It’s my understanding they have no checks and balances over there.” Sen. Laura Kelly, a Topeka Democrat running for governor, said the Board of Education acted appropriately. “Dale Dennis is the definition of a true public servant,” Kelly

CASA From Page A1

CASA volunteers are also held to a standard. Every volunteer is required to pass local, state and national background checks. While most CASA volunteers already have full-time jobs, anyone can become a CASA volunteer and no pre-existing special education credentials are required. Clark explained that each volunteer is assigned a case with a child. Volunteers meet with their kids, compile court reports filed a few weeks before hearings and include information that attorneys and judges may not otherwise know, including details about their education, placement, health concerns, hobbies, and any problems that may have been identified along the way. Volunteers are required to meet with their kids at least once a month, but Clark says

DAVOS, Switzerland (TNS) — President Donald Trump gave his salesman’s pitch for America on Friday before an international crowd of corporate and political titans, and took credit for its economic success, even as he was shadowed by fresh clouds from home about his heightened jeopardy in the Russia investigation and opposition to his immigration plan. Contrary to predictions that Trump might use his keynote address to the World Economic Forum in Davos to bash multilateral trade deals and international alliances, as he did during his campaign, he appeared to soften the edges of his “America First” policy in his speech to the elites who gather in this glitzy Alpine resort each winter to champion free trade and global cooperation. “America is open for business and we are competitive once again,” Trump told several hundred attendees, reading his speech from a teleprompter. “Now is the perfect time to bring your business, your jobs and your investments to the United States.” Given the complaints here about Trump’s aggressive trade policies and worries that America is withdrawing from its global leadership role, Trump received general credit for showing up and hobnobbing with fellow world leaders and moguls at an event that has not seen a U.S. president since Bill Clinton in 2000. Some in the crowd booed and hissed when Trump, during a question-and-answer session that followed his speech, said it

“wasn’t until I became a politician that I realize how nasty, how mean, how vicious, and how fake the press can be.” While Trump’s antimedia remarks are familiar to Americans, they struck a dissonant note on the international stage since U.S. presidents historically have been global clarions for a free press. Although the evidence was scant, Trump dropped at least one hint he might be moderating other views. Earlier this week, Canadian Prime Minster Justin Trudeau announced here that his country would join 10 others that have agreed to move forward on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact without the United States. Trump withdrew from the proposed accord shortly after taking office, calling it a “horrible deal.” In his comments here, Trump cracked the door slightly to reentering the TPP in some way, saying he was open to negotiating trade deals with the 11 countries “either individually, or perhaps as a group.” That sparked a buzz of comment here and on social media. Trump vowed to withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement during the campaign, but his administration is seeking to renegotiate it with Mexico and Canada. In contrast, the White House has shown no sign it is reconsidering its decision on TPP. And while global challenges like climate change and poverty dominate the agenda here, the CEOs and other top executives Trump met in his 36-hour visit publicly applauded the corporate tax cuts he signed into law last month. All that put Trump in a good

President Donald Trump delivers a speech during the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland on Friday. Trump said Friday that he would always put America first when it came to trade, but “America First” does not mean America alone. [XU JINQUAN/ XINHUA/SIPA USA/ TNS]

mood. “I’ve been a cheerleader for our country,” Trump said in his speech, which largely echoed familiar White House talking points. “And everybody representing a company or a country has to be a cheerleader, or no matter what you do, it’s just not going to work.” Trump said he will put America first just as other leaders should put their countries first, a line he used in a harder-edged address he delivered at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vietnam in November. Trump accused “some countries” of exploiting the international trading system at the expense of others. He said he supports free trade, but it “needs to be fair and it needs to be reciprocal.”

“The United States will no longer turn a blind eye to unfair economic practices, including massive intellectual property theft, industrial subsidies and pervasive state-led economic planning,” he said, probably a reference to China. At his raucous political rallies back home, that sentiment often generates loud cheers. The crowd at Davos stayed silent, saving polite applause for the end of his remarks. As he often does, Trump claimed credit for the booming U.S. economy, citing growth numbers and the removal of business regulations. That message was partly diluted by news Friday that U.S. growth slowed slightly in the fourth quarter to 2.6 percent, which was short of Trump’s projections.

said. “We need more dedicated advocates like Dale who put our kids first.” Senate President Susan Wagle, R-Wichita, and House Speaker Ron Ryckman, R-Olathe, joined with Denning and other GOP legislators to urge the Board of Education to suspend Dennis with pay pending a forensic audit to determine whether other financial irregularities existed in allocation of billions of dollars annually by the state to public schools. Four former Kansas governors — Republicans Mike Hayden and Bill Graves, Democrats Kathleen Sebelius and John Carlin  — sent a pre-emptive letter to the 10-member Board of Education expressing unqualified support for Dennis. The dispute involving Dennis revolves around distribution of $9.7 million in special transportation aid to more than two-dozen districts serving dense population areas. GOP legislative leaders estimated the total amount of unauthorized expenditures during the past few decades could surpass $400 million. Sen. Molly Baumgardner, the Senate Education Committee chairwoman, said the paid suspension of Dennis should have been viewed as a standard procedure before accountants conducted a thorough audit of

school funding. It’s important to restore faith in financial integrity of the appropriations process, she said. “My hope is that, you know, this isn’t the worst misappropriation of funds in the state,” said Baumgardner, a Louisburg Republican. “What we are trying to do is find out what the breadth, the scope is. How deep? How long? We’re trying to get to the bottom of it.” A backdrop to this scuffle is the Kansas Supreme Court’s decision in October 2017 that state aid to K-12 public schools approved by the Legislature and Gov. Sam Brownback was unconstitutionally insufficient. The 2018 Legislature was ordered to alter the finance formula and infuse the system with enough money to achieve compliance with the Kansas Constitution. Brownback, while sharply critical of the court’s action, asked the Legislature in January to increase annual appropriations to public schools by $600 million within five years. The transportation funding allocations, confirmed in a legislative audit completed in December, have apparently existed since the 1980s. Legislative auditors recommended the special appropriation be written into Kansas law by lawmakers. Bills to accomplish that statutory

ALLTON/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL]

adjustment have been introduced in the Senate and House. Dennis, 80, said the Department of Education took steps necessary to forward the extra transportation aid to districts at the verbal direction of a state legislator without passage of a specific law. Dennis said the practice had subsequently been discussed in House and Senate hearings over the years. In response to the legislative audit limited to transportation funding, Republican lawmakers spoke with Attorney General Derek Schmidt about potential of a criminal investigation and asked the Board of Education to

suspend Dennis. Public school superintendents drove hundreds of miles to Topeka to deliver an extraordinary expression of support for the deputy commissioner. “I’m not surprised at all,” said Ulysses Superintendent Dave Younger. “There’s just as many at home who’d like to have been here.” “I just believe in Mr. Dennis and the leadership he’s provided for kids in the state,” said Steve Karlin, superintendent of Garden City schools. “I haven’t worked with a better educator in my life.” Cynthia Lane, superintendent of schools in Kansas City, Kan., said Dennis was recognized as the state’s strongest advocate of public education. She said there was no attempt to hide existence of the supplemental transportation, which this year earmarked $559,000 to her district. The most substantial recipients of extra aid are Wichita, $2.9 million; Shawnee Mission, $1.1 million; Maize, $865,000; Olathe, $860,000; and Blue Valley, $597,000. Colby Superintendent Katina Brenn said Dennis was a man of “integrity, character” who didn’t deserve to be the target of a political smear campaign. “You can call him in the middle of the night if you have a question,” she said.

volunteers often do much more. Whether it’s a trip to the zoo, the movies or a restaurant, Clark says it’s important for volunteers to spend time with their kids and build a relationship. “Our biggest thing is to build a relationship with that kid because we are the one consistent thing in their life all the way through the court system,” Clark said. “Social workers might change, case managers might change, but their CASA volunteer will stay the same. That’s one thing we ask is if somebody starts a case that they go all the way through and finish it.” CASA is currently serving 49 children in the 25th Judicial District, which includes Greeley, Wichita, Scott, Hamilton, Kearny and Finney counties. Last year, the agency served 75 children. “We are in desperate need of volunteers,” Clark said, adding that volunteer work with CASA is a “big commitment” that requires 30 hours of training specific to the program. However,

the training protocol has changed over time, and prospective volunteers can complete part of the process online. Once everything is complete, the Office of Judicial Administration determines who is eligible to work with the children. Clark says CASA currently has 14 volunteers, having just trained a class of eight that graduated in January. But even with those 14, “We definitely don’t have enough to cover our vast area,” she said. “So we are in desperate need of anyone who has a heart for making a difference with a kid.” The next training cohort will be held in the spring. Work is unpaid, and Clark described the job as “one of the hardest” volunteers will ever have. Still, she said, it’s also “one of the most rewarding,” she said. After all, CASA reports that their children spend less time in the foster care system on a national level, which puts them at less risk to fall through the cracks. They’re reported to find

permanent families more quickly and move on to adoption more quickly if their original families are unable to reintegrate. And if anything happens to the kids — if CASA volunteers suddenly can’t account for them — the program begins tracking them right away. Between Clark and CASA’s volunteer manager, the southwest Kansas branch only has two full-time staff members charged with applying for grants, managing up to 30 volunteers and safeguarding as many kids in need as possible. But despite the hard work involved, Clark says they’ll do what it takes to keep volunteers invested. “We’re not just about recruiting volunteers,” Clark said. “We’re really into the business right now of retention, so we want to make sure our volunteers have a good experience and we offer them all the support they need to do the best job that they can on behalf of their kids.” CASA isn’t without difficulties. A lack of volunteers is also

coupled with a gradual decrease in funding, Clark said. The organization is funded through grants and private donations. It’s also the recipient of several community trusts. With five months leading the organization, Clark says she doesn’t understand why funding is going away, but it’s been dwindling over the last three years. But even with less funding, Clark is powering through, and she’s calling on others with a big heart to help. “If anybody has a heart for giving back to the community and really, really making a difference with some of our most vulnerable citizens, this would be a great volunteer opportunity for them, and we would just encourage them and welcome them with open arms to contact us,” Clark said. Those interested in volunteering can contact CASA at (620) 271-6197. Contact Mark Minton at mminton@gctelegram.com.

Ulysses USD 214 Superintendent David Younger was among those voicing their support for Dale Dennis at the Kansas Board of Education special meeting in Topeka Friday afternoon. [THAD


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Saturday, January 27, 2018

The Garden City Telegram

SPORTS Young Buffs fall in Welton semifinals GCHS team sits in 8th after Day 1 By Brett Marshall Sports editor

Scott City’s Jarret Jurgens, right, works on turning Valley Center’s Chance Ramirez Friday during a 160-pound semi-final match in the Rocky Welton Wrestling Invitational at Garden City High School. Jurgens is the lone southwest Kansas wrestler to advance to today’s finals. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

Scott City duo splits semi results Jurgens reaches finals, Hayes dropped By Brett Marshall Sports editor

Jarret Jurgens and Wyatt Hayes are no strangers to highlevel competition. That’s one reason why they enjoy their half-hour trip to Garden City every late January for the Rocky Welton Invitational wrestling tournament. The two Scott City veterans — Jurgens now a senior and Hayes a junior — had hugely successful 2017 performances at the Welton. Jurgens captured the gold

medal in the 152-pound division while Hayes earned a third-place bronze medal at 160 pounds. The pair of Beaver wrestlers have each moved up a weight class this year, and they were back in business on Friday at the opening day of the 60th Welton Invitational at The Garden. Jurgens (21-1) set himself for a potential repeat by sweeping through four matches, all by falls, including a semifinal triumph over Chase Ramirez of Valley Center at the 4:58 mark of the third period. Hayes, meanwhile, had his hands full with the state’s No. 1-ranked 170-pounder in Troy Fisher of Goddard, who was

dominant in a 13-6 decision. Earlier, Jurgens had dispatched Matthew Boyer of Ulysses (2:32), Korbin Brown of Fountain-Ft. Carson, Colo. (0:35) and in the quarters over Elijah Blanco of Scottsbluff, Neb. (3:31). “It’s one of my favorite tournaments, and one that I really focus in on,” Jurgens, the No. 1 seed, said after earning a spot in the Saturday afternoon title match where he will face Franklin Cruz of Pomona, Colo., the No. 2 seed. “I may have faced him last year, and if so, it should a good, tough match.” See SCOTT, A8

It’s pretty much a given that in a 16-man field, the deeper a wrestler goes into the championship side of the bracket, the tougher the matches become. That could not have been more true for Garden City High School’s only two grapplers to reach Friday afternoon’s semifinals in the 60th Rocky Welton Invitational. The Buffs, whose lineup has been depleted by injuries, found themselves in eighth place after the opening day at The Garden with 68.5 points. Pueblo East, Colo., has a 15.5 point lead (168.5 to 153.0) over Kearney, Neb., while Goddard, Newton and Valley Center were in front of the Buffs for the Kansas

contingent. For sophomore Silas Pineda and freshman Trey Medina, the deep runs to the semifinals resulted in tough setbacks at 113 and 145 pounds, respectively. Pineda (22-11) dropped his bout in an 8-1 decision to No. 1 seed Isaiah Gamez of La Junta, Colo. Earlier, Pineda had marched through the bracket, including a win by fall (0:58) over Nathan St. Bernard of Bear Creek, Colo., a 6-4 decision over Goddard’s Lucas Glover and then a quarterfinal triumph, 1-0, over No. 3-seeded Justin Williams of Blue Valley Southwest. Medina (27-13) advanced to his semifinal showdown with an early injury default win and a dramatic 4-2 tiebreak victory over Johnney Perez of Lakin. See BUFFS, A8

Garden City High School’s Trey Medina, right, takes a crossface from Valley Center’s Dallas Boone Friday as he goes for a reversal in an 145-pounds semi final match in the Rocky Welton Wrestling Invitational at GCHS. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

GCHS’ Dingle named head coach at Heights Longtime Buffs’ defensive coordinator headed to Wichita By Brett Marshall Sports editor

Dingle

Before Tuesday, Dominick Dingle had never interviewed for a head football coaching position. But that changed when he traveled to Wichita as a candidate for the Wichita Heights position at one of the state’s storied programs. Dingle, who has been on the football staff at Garden City High School for the past 10 years, will be in a much different place come next fall. On Friday, Dingle realized

his dream when he was named the new Falcons coach by former Heights coach and now athletic director

Rick Wheeler. “There really hasn’t been anything that I felt I was having to have as far as coaching goes,” Dingle said Friday. “But it’s been a goal of mine for a long time. I’ve been a loyal coach and I’ve gotten so much from the community in Garden City. It will be really difficult to say goodbye to the Buffaloes.” Dingle, a 2002 graduate of Leavenworth High School, played defensive back in 2002

and 2003 for Garden City Community College under head coach Bob Larson and position coach Tim Schaffner, now head coach at Butler Community College. Upon his graduation from GCCC, Dingle transferred to Appalachian State in North Carolina, where he starred for a pair of NCAA 1-AA FCS championship teams. “He came with a lot of recommendations from people I know and trust, coaches I’ve known for many years, part of my network,” Wheeler said. Dingle said he chose to apply for the Heights position because of the program’s reputation and for the ability to work for somebody like Wheeler, who guided Heights to a couple of state

championships. “They’ve got a great administration, they’ve got good assistant coaches and they sold their vision to me,” Dingle said of his Tuesday trip to Wichita for the interview. “Rick Wheeler is a terrific coach and person, so I’m looking forward to working for him.” Dingle, 33, said that while growing up as an Army brat, Garden City had come to feel like home, having been with the Buffaloes longer than any other position. “The people were very welcoming, and they were awesome throughout the entire process,” Dingle said. “It just felt like home.” Dingle has primarily served on

the defensive side of the ball for head coach Brian Hill, specializing in the secondary. “Coach Hill has been terrific to me,” Dingle said. “He’s given me a lot of responsibility for the defense so I feel blessed to have that experience.” Dingle also played for Hill when Hill was on the staff at GCCC. “That was one of the toughest calls and talks I’ve had,” Dingle said of his visit with his now former boss. “I made calls to a couple of other people who have been influential in my life and in my career.” His departure comes with a sense of pride for Hill. See DINGLE, A8

GCHS girls capture Great Plains title Bowlers go to tiebreaker game for crown By Brett Marshall Sports editor

Garden City High School’s Alexis Leon winds up to throw her bowling ball during a practice at Garden Bowl this season. [JOSH HARBOUR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

In addition to battling through the January and February Western Athletic Conference schedule, there are three other major tournaments for which the Garden City bowling teams place their focus. The first comes in early January with the Bishop Carroll tournament, the second is the Great Plains Invitational in Wichita and the third is, well…third and fourth are the Class 6A regionals and state tournaments. Friday’s schedule saw the

Buffs in that second big event of the season — the Great Plains Invitational — which by all counts is the biggest high school bowling event in the state of Kansas, 30 teams. The Buffs finished the marathon day in dramatic fashion, as they won the final match of the day against Wichita Northwest in a three-game set to capture the GPIT title. “It was an amazing day, an excruciating and grueling day,” GCHS coach Kip Nichols said. “It was our 21st game of the day. The girls showed more heart and they battled all day. They were spent at the end of the day.” That final match came at See BOWLING, A8

BASKETBALL | A10

HOLCOMB HOPS HEIGHTS Longhorns rumble past Mustangs to cap long road trip.


The Garden City Telegram

Saturday, January 27, 2018

A7

SCOREBOARD ON TAP

TELEVISION

SATURDAY

Saturday Auto Racing: 1 p.m., FOX, IMSA, Weathertech Sportscar Championship. Boxing: 9:30 p.m., HBO Boxing, Lucan Matthysse vs. Tewa Kiram. College Basketball: 11 a.m., CBS, North Carolina State at North Carolina;, ESPN, Baylor at Florida; ESPN2, Texas Tech at South Carolina; 1 p.m., CBS, Virginia at Duke; ESPN2, Mississippi at Texas; 1:15 p.m., ESPN, Oklahoma at Alabama; 3 p.m., CW, Miami at Florida State; ESPN2, TCU at Vanderbilt; 3:30 p.m., ESPN, Texas A&M at Kansas; 4:30 p.m., FOX, Utah at Arizona; 5 p.m., ESPN2, Oklahoma State at Arkansas; 6 p.m., ESPN, Kentucky at West Virginia; 7 p.m., CW, Wake Forest at Louisville; ESPN2, Virginia Tech at Notre Dame; 9 p.m., ESPN2, Valparaiso at Illinois State. Pro Basketball: 7:30 p.m., ABC, Boston Celtics at Golden State Warriors. Golf: 3 p.m., CBS PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, Third Round. Horse Racing: 3:30 p.m., NBC, Pegasus World Cup Invitational. Mixed Martial Arts: 7 p.m., FOX, UFC Fight Night: Jacare vs. Brunson 2. College Wrestling: 7 p.m., ESPN2, Virginia Tech at Notre Dame. X-Games: Noon, ABC, Winter X- Games; 8 p.m., ABC, Winter X- Games.

Sunday Men’s College Basketball: Noon, FOX, Villanova at Marquette, Noon, CBS, Michigan State at Maryland; 2:30 p.m., FOX, Purdue at Indiana; 7 p.m., ESPN2, Connecticut at Temple Women’s College Basketball: Noon, FSN, Wake Forest at Louisville; 2 p.m., FSN, North Carolina State at Clemson; 3 p.m., ESPN2, Notre Dame at Florida State; 5 p.m., ESPN2, Missouri at South Carolina Pro Basketball: 5 p.m., ESPN, Philadelphia 76ers at Oklahoma City Thunder Pro Football: 1:50 p.m., ABC/ ESPN 2018 Pro Bowl, AFC vs NFC. Pro Golf: 2 p.m., CBS, PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, Final Round. Pro Hockey: 2:30 p.m., NBC, 2018 NHL All-Star Game. Tennis: 2:30 p.m.,ESPN, Australian Open Tennis, Men’s Final. X-Games: 1 p.m., Winter X-Games; 7:30 p.m., Winter X-Games.

Monday College Basketball: 6 p.m., ESPN, Notre Dame at Duke; 8 p.m., ESPN,Kansas at Kansas State.

Women’s College Basketball: 2 p.m., Garden City at Allen County. Men’s College Basketball: 4 p.m., Garden City at Allen County. Girls Prep Basketball: Newton Tournament (Garden City). Prep Bowling: 9 a.m., Garden City at Great Plains Tournament. Prep Boys Swimming: 10 a.m., Garden City at Wichita Northwest. Prep Wrestling: Garden City Rocky Welton Invitational (Garden City, Scott City, Lakin).

MONDAY Boys Prep Basketball: SW Heights at Hooker, Okla. Girls Prep Basketball: SW Heights at Hooker, Okla.

TUESDAY Boys Prep Basketball: 7:45 p.m, Garden City at Dodge City; Hugoton at Holcomb; Cimarron at Scott City; Lakin at Wichita County; Meade at Kiowa Co.; Deerfield at Sublette; Holly, Colo. at Syracuse. Girls Prep Basketball: 6 p.m., Garden City at Dodge City; Hugoton at Holcomb; Cimarron at Scott City; Lakin at Wichita County; Meade at Kiowa Co.; Deerfield at Sublette; Holly, Colo. at Syracuse.

PREPS BASKETBALL SPIAA Tournament GIRLS Saturday’s Games Championship Kiowa County vs. South Central, 6 p.m. Third Place Ingalls vs. Spearville, 2:30 p.m. Consolation Ashland vs. Satanta, 11:30 a.m. BOYS Friday’s Semifinals South Central 51, Hodgeman County 42 South Gray 66, Spearville 34 Friday’s Consolation Games Ingalls 43, Fowler 38 Kiowa County 63, Pawnee Heights 41 Ashland 58, Satanta 35 Saturday’s Games Championship South Gray vs. South Central, 8 p.m. Third Place Spearville vs. Hodgeman County, 4 p.m. Consolation Bucklin vs. Minneola, 1 p.m. Newton Invitational Friday’s Games Semifinals Newton 25, Bishop Carroll 24 Bishop Miege 54, Olathe Northwest 36 Consolation Andover Central 54, Garden City 46 Wichita Kapaun-Mt. Carmel 52, Dodge City 45 Saturday’s Games Championship: Newton vs. Bishop Miege, 5:30 p.m. Third Place: Bishop Carroll vs. Olathe Northwest, 4 p.m. Fifth Place: Andover Central vs. Kapaun Mt. Carmel, 2:30 p.m. Seventh Place: Garden City vs. Dodge City, 1 p.m. Tournament concludes Saturday with games starting at 1 p.m. Mid-America Classic at McPherson GIRLS Thursday’s Quarterfinals McPherson 59, Shawnee Mission South 40 Olathe South 37, Ulysses 22 Manhattan 41, Shawnee Mission Northwest 40 Wichita Northwest 47, Hays 27 Friday’s Games Semifinals McPherson 57, Olathe South, 7:30 p.m. Manhattan 46, Wichita Northwest 29 Consolation Ulysses 39, Shawnee Mission South 35 Shawnee Mission Northwest 36, Hays 32 Other Friday Scores Girls Syracuse 32, Stanton County 25 Scott City 66, Goodland 32 Holcomb 37, Southwestern Heights 29 Boys Stanton County 35, Syracuse 28 Meade 79, Sublette 27 Liberal 62, Hugoton 57 Goodland 63, Scott City 59 Holcomb 66, Southwestern Heights 32

WRESTLING Rocky Welton Invitational Friday Team Scores 1. Pueblo East, 168.5; 2. Kearney, 153.0; 3. Pomona, 150.0; 4. Goddard, 149.5; 5. Ponderosa, 103.0; 6. Newton, 94.0; 7. Valley Center, 82.5; 8. Garden City White, 68,5; 9. Canon City, 64.0; 10. Howie, 61.0; 11. Lamar, 56.0; 12. Scottsbluff, 55.0; 13. Blue Valley Southwest, 53.5; 14. Scott City, 52.0; 15. Olathe South, 51.0; 16. Doherty, 45.0; 17. Great Bend, 40.0; 18T. La Junta, Santa Fe, 35.0; 21T. Lewis-Palmer, Ulysses, 31.0; 23. Hays, 30.5; 24. Bear Creek, 29.5; 25. Dodge City, 28.0; 26. El Dorado, 26.5; 27. Pine Creek, 23.5; 28. Liberal, 23.0; 29T. Fountain-Ft. Carson, Pueblo Centennial, 21.0; 31T. Andale, Holcomb, 17.0; 33T. Colby, Hugoton, 15.0; 35. Garden CityBrown, 13.0; 36. Republic County, 7.0. Area Individual Results Garden City - White 106: Sellers. won by fall over Martinez, Bear Creek, 1:09; lost by fall to Franklin, Pueblo East, 5:49; Cons.: bye. 113: Pineda. won by fall over St. Bernard, Bear Creek, 0:58; won by dec. over Glover, Goddard, 6-4; won by dec. over Williams, Blue Valley SW, 1-0; Semis: lost by dec. to Gamez, La Junta, 8-1. 120: Craig. lost by fall to Reed, Colby, 2:30; bye; lost by fall to Stephenson, Lewis-Palmer, 3:34. 126: Holt. bye; won by dec. over Dennison, Blue Valley SW, 8-6; lost to Ruona, Canon City, 8-5. 132: Perez. won by fall over Juarez, Bear Creek, 0:14; won by tech fall over Henson, Holcomb, 3:37, 15-0; lost by dec. to Pirl, Goddard, 5-0. 138: Salas. won by forfeit over Nitzel, Blue Valley SW; won by fall over Schooler, Great Bend, 4:57; lost by maj. dec. to James, Kearney, 13-0. 145: Medina: won by inj. def. over Witshoff, Pueblo East; won by tiebreaker over Perez, Lakin, 4-2; won by dec. over Martinez, Santa Fe, 6-5; Semis: lost by dec. to Boone, Valley Center, 6-2 152: Urias. bye; lost by dec. to Johnson, Ponderosa, 6-4; won by fall over Burton, Lewis-Palmer, 2:22. 160: Sims. lost by dec. to Harper, Newton, 4-0; bye; won by dec. over Duarte, Pueblo East, 5-3 170: Rodriguez. won by fall over Hoeppner,

LaJunta, 0:32; won by dec. over Mendoza, Hugoton, 6-3; lost by fall to Fisher, Goddard, 0:44. 220: Facio. won by fall over Lind, Bear Creek, 1:13; lost by fall to Cox, Hoxie, 3:11 285: Chairez. bye; won by fall over Danville, Dodge City, 0:54; lost by fall to Garcia, Pueblo East, 3:17. Garden City - Brown 126: Janas (2-1). lost by fall to Andrade, Lamar, 1:17; won by dec. over Silver, Pueblo Centennial, 9-2; won by dec. over Rundus, Republic Co., 6-5 138: Garcia (2-1). lost by fall to Weigher, Doherty, 1:52; won by fall over McDade, Bear Creek, 0:57; won by maj. dec. over Schooler, Great Bend, 8-0 145: McElroy (2-1). won by fall over Casper, Hays, 5:28; won by dec. over Hanenberg, Canon City, 6-4; Quarters: lost by fall to Wilson, Kearney, 1:13 160: Fernandez. lost by fall to Franzen, Kearney, 0:09; bye; lost by maj. dec. to Vannaman, Pine Creek, 11-3 220: Jimenez-Hernandez. lost by dec. to Seale, Ponderosa, 1-0; bye; lost by dec.to Arenas, Liberal, 1-0 Holcomb 120: Ramirez. lost by fall to Lampe, Canon City, 3:30; bye; lost by fall to Nelson, LaJunta, 2:54. 126: Munoz, lost by fall to Ernsdorff, St. James, 1:50; lost by dec. to Lovely, Lakin, 8-5. 132: Henson. bye; lost to Perez, Garden City, tech fall, 3:37, 15-0; lost to Boone, Blue Valley SW, dec., 5-1. 138: Chandler. lost by tech fall to Dunlap, Pine Creek, 4:39, 16-1; lost by maj. dec. to Tucker, Scott City, 13-0. 145: A. Medina. lost by fall to Martinez, Santa Fe, 0:38; bye; lost by fall to Baber, Lamar, 1:18. 170: Johnson. won by fall over Burton, LewisPalmer, 0:36; won by maj. dec. over Maslanik, Doherty, 16-6; lost by fall to Hayes, Scott City, 3:32. 182: C. Rodriguez. bye; won by fall over Mincer, Bear Creek, 0:30; lost by dec. to Lautt, St. James, 5-1. 285: Interial. lost by fall to Schultz, Ponderosa, 0:40; bye Hugoton 113: Meininger. won by fall over Kelly, Bear Creek, 0:41; lost by fall to Treaster, Newton, 0:53; lost by fall to Gauna, Canon City, 0:42 132: Shopteese. lost by dec. to Medina, Pueblo Cent., 6-2; lost by dec. to Clouse, Valley Center, 8-4 152: Slemp. bye; won by dec. over Rivera, Pueblo East, 5-3; lost by to Stack, Blue Valley SW, 3-0 160: Michael Mendoza. lost by dec. to Blanco, Scottsbluff, 12-10; bye; lost by fall to Taylor, Dodge City, 4:58 170: Manny Mendoza. won by dec. over Cusick, Newton, 6-2; lost by dec. to Rodriguez, Garden City, 6-3; won by fall over Jaquez, Ulysses, 4:30 182: Baeza. bye; lost by fall to Tinnes, Lamar, 3:24; won by maj. dec. over Campbell, Blue Valley SW, 10-1 Lakin 126: Lovely. lost by fall to Turkali, Valley Center, 1:15; won by dec. over Munoz, Holcomb, 8-5; lost by tech fall to Newell, Hays, 4:44, 17-2 145: Perez. won by dec. over Calonje, Pine Creek, 5-4; lost by tiebreaker to Medina, Garden City, 4-2; lost by sudden victory to Brown, Olathe South, 3-1 152: Christiansen. bye; lost by maj. dec. to McBride, Canon City, 11-0; won by fall over VanDegrift, Scott City, 3:58 285: Panzer. bye; lost by dec. to Caldwell, Valley Center, 6-1; bye Scott City 113: Roberts. lost by dec. to Sherman, Hoxie, 10-3; won by dec. over Karlin, Hays, 4-3; lost by fall to Glover, Goddard, 2:07. 126: Faurot. lost by fall to Moomey, Kearney, 2:38; won by fall over Cortez, Ulysses, 2:23; lost by fall to Gallegos, Pomona, 0:30 138: Tucker. lost by fall to Yapoujian, Pomona, 1:15; won by maj. dec. over Chandler, Holcomb, 13-0; lost by fall to Atkins, Goddard, 2:39 152: VanDegrift. lost by fall to Kuchera, Kearney, 3:27; bye; lost by fall to Christiansen, Lakin, 3:58 160: Jurgens. won by fall over Boyer, Ulysses, 2:32; won by fall over Brown, Fountain-Ft. Carson, 0:35; won by fall over Blanco, Scottsbluff, 3:31; won by fall over Ramirez, Valley Center, 4:58 170: Hayes. won by fall over Weitmer, St. James, 1:06; won by fall over Tracy, Kearney, 0:53; won by fall over Johnson, Holcomb, 3:32 ; lost by dec. to Fisher, Goddard, 13-6 182: Goodman. bye; lost by fall to Lautt, St. James, 1:28; won by dec. over Garrison, Ulysses, 3-1 195. Miller. lost by fall to Morgan, El Dorado, 1:22; bye; won by dec. over Aragon, Pueblo Cent., 8-4

JR. COLLEGE MEN KJCCC All Barton 14-2 18-2 Hutchinson 13-3 17-3 Coffeyville 12-4 16-4 Garden City 10-6 14-6 Colby 10-6 14-6 Cowley 9-7 12-8 Seward County 9-7 13-7 Independence 8-8 11-8 Butler 5-11 8-11 Pratt 5-11 8-12 Neosho County 5-11 7-12 Cloud County 4-12 6-13 Allen County 4-12 6-14 Dodge City 4-12 6-14 Saturday’s Games Dodge City at Neosho County, 4 p.m. Garden City at Allen County, 4 p.m. Cloud County at Pratt, 4 p.m. Independence at Colby, 6 p.m. Hutchinson at Coffeyville, 7 p.m. Butler at Cowley, 7:30 p.m. Barton at Seward County, 8 p.m. Women KJCCC All Cowley 14-2 18-2 Seward County 14-2 18-2 Hutchinson 13-3 17-3 Independence 13-3 15-4 Butler 10-6 13-6 Cloud County 9-7 12-7 Barton 9-7 12-8 Garden City 8-8 11-9 Coffeyville 8-8 10-10 Neosho County 3-13 6-14 Dodge City 4-12 7-12 Allen County 4-12 6-14 Colby 2-14 4-16 Pratt 1-15 2-17 Saturday’s Games Dodge City at Neosho County, 2 p.m. Garden City at Allen County, 2 p.m. Cloud County at Pratt, 2 p.m. Independence at Colby, 4 p.m. Hutchinson at Coffeyville, 5 p.m. Butler at Cowley, 5:30 p.m. Barton at Seward County, 6 p.m.

Message Of The Month: In today’s economy, what’s your game plan?

Mitch Tackett Financial Consultant

Make 2018 the year you Ànally get your Ànances in order. From mutual funds, stocks, bonds, the right mix is important! Let’s sit down and review what mix works best to work toward your Ànancial goals and future! This is not the time to worry about your future. Its the time to be educated.

Mick Hunter Financial Consultant

1807 E. Mary St. Ste. #2 Garden City, KS 67846 620-271-0008 wwwÀnancial-footnotes.com 251284

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PREP BOX SCORES GIRLS Mid-America Classic Consolation Ulysses 39, Shawnee Mission South 35 Ulysses (39): Castilleja 2-8 0-1 5, Oglevie 1-3 2-4 4, GOmez 1-5 0-0 2, Ballesteros 6-17 0-0 15, Haney 2-6 2-3 6, Kenny 1-4 1-2 4, Garcia 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 14-48 5-10 39. SMS (35): Bunker 3-8 0-2 9, Crawford 2-7 0-0 5, Shelton 3-4 2-3 8, MacDonald 2-7 0-0 4, Gerer 1-3 1-2 4, Payne 1-4 0-0 2, Whitcomb 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 13-36 3-7 35. Ulysses 7 7 16 9 — 39 SMS 10 11 9 5 — 35 3-point goals: Ulysses 6-15 (Ballesteros 3-10, Castilleja 1-2, Kenny 1-2, Garcia 1-1), SMS 6-14 (Bunker 3-7, Crawford 1-2, Gerber 1-2, Whitcomb 1-3). Rebounds: Ulysses 32 (Oglevie 11), SMS 30 (Shelton 9, MacDonald 9). Assists Ulysses 7 (Castilleja 4), SMS (Gerber 3). Other Friday Box Scores Syracuse 32, Stanton County 25 Stanton Co. (25): C, Cook 2 1-2 5, Peterson 0 1-2 1, R. Cook 3 2-4 9, Chenoweth 3 0-0 6, Snook 0-2 0, Caro 2 0-0 4. Totals 10 4-10 25. Syracuse (32): A. Coleman 1 4-4 6, Baker 7-10 7, Finley 1 1-2 3, Keller 0 2-8 2, Riley 1 2-2 4, O. Coleman 2 2-2 4, Kullot 1 0-2 2, Hemphill 2 0-2 4. Totals 8 18-32 32. Stanton Co. 6 3 3 13 — 25 Syracuse 10 4 4 14 — 32 3-point goals: Stanton Co. 1 (C. Cook 1), Syracuse 0. Scott City 66, Goodland 32 Goodland (32):Amend 0 0-0 0 Hahn 0 0-00 Siek 1 0-0 2 Drennan 0 4-7 4 Ordonez 0 0-0 0 Duell 1 0-2 2 Cure 0 0-0 0 McDaniel 5 2-3 12 Hageman 0 0-0 0 Rudolph 4 3-3 12 Totals: 11 9-15 32 Scott City (66):Vance 3 0-0 7 Roberts 3 0-0 9 McGonagle 1 0-0 3 Latta 3 0-0 7 Rumford 4 1-2 10 Smith 3 5-9 11 Weathers 5 2-2 12 Price 1 2-4 5 Shapland 0 1-2 1 Patton 0 0-0 0 Brunswig 0 0-0 0 Storm 0 1-2 1 Totals: 23 11-19 66 Goodland 7 10 10 5 — 32 Scott City 25 9 19 13 — 66 3-point goals: Goodland 1 (Rudolph), Scott City 7 (Roberts 3, Vance 1, McGonagle 1, Latta 1, Price 1) Fouls Goodland 17, Scott City 14 Fouled out: None.

BOYS SPIAA Semifinal South Gray 54, Speaville 36 South Gray (54): Askew 3 1-1 7, Peters 6 2-2 17, Jantz 6 4-6 17, Griebel 1 0-0 2, Davis 2 0-1 4, Miller 1 4-4 7. Totals 19 11-14 54. Speaville (36): Hecke 4 1-4 9, Stein 3 1-3 8, Strecker 3 0-0 7, Rich 3 0-0 7, Sites 2 1-2 5. Totals 15 3-9 36. South Gray 16 18 6 14 — 54 Spearville 10 8 9 9 — 36 3-point goals:South Gray 5 (Peters 3, Jantz 1, Miller 1), Speaville 3 (Sten 1, Strecker 1, Rich 1). Consolation Ingalls 43, Fowler 38 Fowler (38): Weber 3 0-0 6, Garcia 4 0-0 9, DeLaTorre 1 0-0 2, S. Medina 4 0-3 11, D. Medina 0 1-2 1, Watson 3 0-0 9. Totals 15 1-5 38. Ingalls (43): Osborne 5 2-4 14, Davis 3 2-4 10, Gillen 4 2-5 10, Irsik 0 0-2 0, Clark 1 0-1 2, Varela 3 1-2 7. Totals 16 7-18 43. Fowler 14 9 8 7 — 38 Ingalls 7 9 7 20 — 43 3-point goals: Fowler 7 (Watson 3, Medina 3, Garcia 1), Ingalls 4 (Davis 2, Osborne 2). Ashland 58, Satanta 35 Ashland (58): Lohrding 5 0-0 12, Grady 2 0-0 5, Cook 3 0-0 7, White 1 0-2 2, Gardiner 6 2-2 18, McPhail 1 0-0 2, Gilcum 4 0-1 8, Maule 1 2-3 4. Totals 23 4-8 58. Satanta (35): Manriquez 1 0-0 3, G. Salas 6 4-6 20, Friend 3 0-2 6, Moreno 1 0-0 2, Lynch 1 0-0 2, Ledesma 1 0-0 2. Totals 13 4-8 35. Ashland 11 24 14 9 — 58 Satanta 16 7 5 7 — 35 3-point goals: Ashland 8 (Gardiner 4, Lohrding 2, Grady 1, Cook 1), Satanta 5 (Sals 4, Manriquez 1). Other Friday Box Scores Stanton County 35, Syracuse 28 Stanton Co. (35): Corrales 2 4-5 10, Aleman 0 1-2 1, Molina 1 0-0 3, Callejas 2 0-0 4, Puyear 6 5-5 17. Totals 9 10-12 35. Syracuse (28): Chavez 6 4-4 16, Plunkett 1 0-0 3, Kullot 1 4-4 7, Ramirez 0 0-3 0, R. Hart 0 2-2 2. Totals 8 10-14 28. Stanton Co. 10 10 8 7 — 35 Syracuse 5 11 4 8— 28 3-point goals: Stanton Co. 2(Corrales 2), Syracuse 2 (Plunkett 1, Kullot 1). Meade 79, Sublette 27 Sublette (27): Dyck 0 0-1 0, Thornton 0 2-2 2, Hernandez 1 0-0 2, Willingson 0 0-1 0, Watson 0 206 2, DeLaRosa 6 0-0 14, Gareton 0 2-2 2, Isaac 2 0-0 4, Mader 0 1-2 1. Totals 9 7-14 27. Meade (79): Saucedo 3 0-3 9, Gillum 3 1-3 8, G. Haynes 1 0-0 2, Unruh 1 1-2 3, Thompson 7 0-0 16, Davis 1 2-3 4, Woodriff 1 0-0 2, Holguin 1 2-3 4, Dewell 3 0-0 6, Shewey 2 0-0 5, T. Haynes 6 0-0 15, Jones 1 1-2 3, Clawson 1 0-1 2. Totals 31 7-17 79. Sublette 9 3 6 9 — 27 Meade 25 22 20 12 — 79 3-point goals: Meade 8 (Haynes 3, Thompson 2, Saucedo 1, Gillum 1, Shewey 1), Sublette 2 (DeLaRosa 2). Liberal 62, Hugoton 57 Liberal (62): Riley 3 1-2 9, Mendoza 1 0-0 3, Hatcher 1 0-0 2, Bigham 7 0-0 14, Vongsakda 6 3-5 18, Hyde 2 0-0 4, Dunlap 2 3-7 7, Hatcher 1 3-4 5.Totals 23 10-18 62. Hugoton (57): Lewis 4 0-0 10, Gilmore 1 3-4 5, Valles 2 0-1 4, Hamlin 5 4-4 14, Luna 1 0-0 2, Hertel 2 0-0 5, Camacho 1 0-0 2, Montiel 7 1-1 15. Totals 23 8-10 57. Liberal 20 11 12 19 — 62 Hugoton 15 10 11 21 — 57 3-point goals: Liberal 6 (Vongsakda 3, Riley 2, Mendoza 1), Hugoton 3 (Lewis 2, Hertel 1). Goodland 63, Scott City 59 Goodland (63):Raymer 4 3-4 14 Rodriguez 2 0-0 4 Johnson 0 0-0 0 Biermann 2 0-3 4 Garcia 1 0-2 2 Siek 6 7-7 19 Mull 3 0-1 7 Jipping 0 0-0 0 Hendrich 5 2-4 12 Total: 23 12-21 63 Scott City (59):Yager 3 0-0 8 Vulgamore 2 0-0 4 Horn 7 0-0 20 Lewis 2 1-2 6 Smith 0 0-0 0 Brunswig 2 0-0 6 Faurot 3 2-2 10 Carson 2 0-0 5 Total: 21 3-4 59 Goodland 17 16 13 17 — 63 Scott City 5 8 22 24 — 59 3-point goals:Goodland 4 (Raymer 3, Mull 1) Scott City 13 (Horn 6, Yager 2, Brunswig 2,

Faurot 2, Lewis 1) Fouls: Goodland 12, Scott City 20 Fouled Out: Scott City (Yager) Lakin 63, Wiley, Colo., 31 Wiley, Colo. (31): Lucero, 2 0-0 5, Phillips 0 1-2, Rohr 7 3-4 17, March 0 0-2, Grogan 3 0-2 6, Tyree 1 0-0 2. Totals 13 4-10 31. Lakin (63): Chavez 1 0-0 2, Shalberg 7 1-3 19, Gilleland 1 0-0 2, Hernandez 2 1-2 5, Davila 4 0-0 9, Kirby 7 3-3 20, Daniels 1 0-0 3, Esquivel 0 1-2 1. Totals 24 6-10 63. Wiley 11 10 6 5 — 31 Lakin 20 11 22 10 — 63 3-point goals: Wiley 1 (Lucero 1), Lakin 9 (Shalberg 4, Davila 1, Kirby 3, Daniels 1). Fouls: Wiley 9, Lakin 11. Fouled out: None.

BASKETBALL NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Eastern Conference Atlantic Boston Toronto Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Southeast Miami Washington Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Western Conference Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Portland Denver Utah Pacific Golden State L.A. Clippers L.A. Lakers Phoenix Sacramento Southwest

W 35 32 24 22 18

L 14 15 21 28 31

Pct GB .714 .681 2.0 .533 9.0 .440 13.5 .367 17.0

W 28 25 26 22 18

L 19 22 23 24 31

Pct .596 .532 .531 .478 .367

W 27 26 20 14 14

L 21 22 27 33 34

Pct .562 .542 .426 .298 .292

W 31 28 27 25 21

L 20 20 22 23 28

Pct .608 .583 .551 .521 .429

W 39 24 19 17 15

L 10 24 29 32 33

Pct GB .796 .500 14.5 .396 19.5 .347 22.0 .312 23.5

W L Pct Houston 34 13 .723 San Antonio 32 19 .627 New Orleans 27 21 .562 Memphis 17 31 .354 Dallas 16 33 .327 Central Friday’s Games Charlotte 121, Atlanta 110 Cleveland 115, Indiana 108 Utah 97, Toronto 93 L.A. Lakers 108, Chicago 103 L.A. Clippers 109, Memphis 100 Milwaukee 116, Brooklyn 91 New Orleans 115, Houston 113 Portland 107, Dallas 93 Philadelphia 97, San Antonio 78 New York 107, Phoenix 85 Saturday’s Games Oklahoma City at Detroit, 5 p.m. Orlando at Indiana, 7 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Minnesota, 9 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 9 p.m. Sunday’s Games Milwaukee at Chicago, 3:30 p.m. Phoenix at Houston, 3:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 4 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Sacramento at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Monday’s Games Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Memphis, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Boston at Denver, 9 p.m.

GB 3.0 3.0 5.5 11.0 GB 1.0 6.5 12.5 13.0

GB 1.5 3.0 4.5 9.0

GB 4.0 7.5 17.5 19.0

AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Cincinnati 7 01.000 18 2 .900 Wichita St. 6 2 .750 16 4 .800 Houston 5 2 .714 15 4 .789 Memphis 4 3 .571 13 7 .650 Connecticut 4 3 .571 11 9 .550 SMU 4 4 .500 14 7 .667 Central Florida 4 4 .500 13 7 .650 Tulsa 4 4 .500 11 9 .550 Tulane 3 5 .375 12 8 .600 Temple 2 6 .250 10 10 .500 East Carolina 2 6 .250 8 11 .421 South Florida 1 7 .125 8 13 .381 Friday’s Games Saturday’s Games Cincinnati at Memphis, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games East Carolina at Southern Methodist, 2 p.m. South Florida at Houston, 3 p.m. Tulsa at Wichita St., 6 p.m. Connecticut at Temple, 8 p.m. BIG 12 CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Kansas 6 2 .750 16 4 .800 West Virginia 5 3 .625 16 4 .800 Texas Tech 5 3 .625 16 4 .800 Oklahoma 5 3 .625 15 4 .789 Kansas State 5 3 .625 15 5 .750 Texas 4 4 .500 13 7 .650 Texas Christian 3 5 .375 15 5 .750 Oklahoma State 3 5 .375 13 7 .650 Baylor 2 6 .250 12 8 .600 Iowa State 2 6 .250 11 8 .579 Saturday’s Games Texas Tech at South Carolina, Noon Baylor at Florida, Noon Mississippi at Texas, 2 p.m. Georgia at Kansas State, 2 p.m. Oklahoma at Alabama, 2:15 p.m. Tennessee at Iowa State, 4 p.m. Texas Christian at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Texas A&M at Kansas, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma State at Arkansas, 6 p.m. Kentucky at West Virginia, 7 p.m. Monday’s Games Kansas at Kansas State, 9 p.m.

Other Conferences ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Virginia 8 01.000 19 1 .950 Duke 6 2 .750 18 2 .900 Louisville 5 2 .714 15 5 .750 Clemson 5 3 .625 16 4 .800 North Carolina 5 3 .625 16 5 .762 Miami-Florida 4 3 .571 15 4 .789 Florida State 4 4 .500 15 5 .750 NC State 4 4 .500 14 7 .667 Virginia Tech 3 4 .429 14 6 .700 Syracuse 3 4 .429 14 6 .700 Notre Dame 3 4 .429 13 7 .650 Georgia Tech 3 4 .429 10 10 .500 Boston College 3 5 .375 13 8 .619 Wake Forest 1 7 .125 8 12 .400 Pittsburgh 0 8 .000 8 13 .381 Saturday’s Games NC State at North Carolina, Noon Virginia at Duke, 2 p.m. Miami-Florida at Florida State, 4 p.m. Syracuse at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Virginia Tech at Notre Dame, 8 p.m. Wake Forest at Louisville, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Clemson at Georgia Tech, 6 p.m. Monday’s Games Notre Dame at Duke, 7 p.m. BIG EAST CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Villanova 6 1 .857 19 1 .950 Xavier 7 2 .778 19 3 .864 Creighton 6 3 .667 16 5 .762 Providence 5 3 .625 14 7 .667 Seton Hall 4 3 .571 15 5 .750 Butler 4 4 .500 14 7 .667 Marquette 4 4 .500 13 7 .650 Georgetown 3 6 .333 13 7 .650 DePaul 2 6 .250 9 11 .450 St. John’s 0 9 .000 10 11 .476 Saturday’s Games St. John’s at Butler, 2:30 p.m. Georgetown at Creighton, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Villanova at Marquette, 1 p.m. Seton Hall at DePaul, 4 p.m. BIG TEN CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Purdue 9 01.000 20 2 .909 Ohio St. 9 1 .900 18 5 .783 Michigan St 7 2 .778 19 3 .864 Michigan 6 4 .600 17 6 .739 Nebraska 6 4 .600 15 8 .652 Indiana 5 4 .556 12 9 .571 Maryland 4 5 .444 15 7 .682 Penn St. 4 5 .444 14 8 .636 Northwestern 4 5 .444 13 9 .591 Wisconsin 3 6 .333 10 12 .455 Minnesota 3 7 .300 14 9 .609 Rutgers 2 7 .222 12 10 .545 Iowa 2 7 .222 11 11 .500 Illinois 1 8 .111 11 11 .500 Friday’s Games Michigan St 76, Wisconsin 61 Saturday’s Games Rutgers at Penn St., 4 p.m. Iowa at Nebraska, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Michigan St at Maryland, 1 p.m. Purdue at Indiana, 3:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Northwestern at Michigan, 7 p.m. Nebraska at Wisconsin, 9 p.m. MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Loyola-Chicago 7 2 .778 17 4 .810 Drake 6 3 .667 12 10 .545 Missouri St. 5 4 .556 15 7 .682 Bradley 5 4 .556 15 7 .682 Southern Illinois 5 4 .556 13 9 .591 Indiana St. 5 4 .556 10 11 .476 Illinois St. 4 5 .444 10 11 .476 Evansville 3 6 .333 13 9 .591 Northern Iowa 3 6 .333 11 10 .524 Valparaiso 2 7 .222 11 11 .500 Saturday’s Games Drake at Evansville, 2 p.m. Southern Illinois at Missouri St., 6 p.m. Valparaiso at Illinois St., 10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Bradley at Indiana St., 2 p.m. Northern Iowa at Loyola-Chicago, 4 p.m. PACIFIC-12 CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Arizona 7 1 .875 17 4 .810 USC 7 2 .778 16 6 .727 5 3 .625 11 10 .524 Stanford Washington 4 3 .571 14 6 .700 UCLA 5 4 .556 14 7 .667 Utah 5 4 .556 13 7 .650 Colorado 4 5 .444 12 9 .571 Oregon 3 4 .429 13 7 .650 Oregon St. 3 4 .429 11 8 .579 Arizona State 3 5 .375 15 5 .750 Washington St. 1 6 .143 9 10 .474 California 1 7 .125 7 14 .333 Saturday’s Games Utah at Arizona, 5:30 p.m. Oregon St. at Oregon, 8 p.m. Colorado at Arizona State, 8 p.m. Stanford at UCLA, 10:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games California at Southern California, 4 p.m. Washington St. at Washington, 8 p.m. SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE Conference AllGames W L Pct W L Pct Auburn 6 1 .857 18 2 .900 Florida 6 2 .750 14 6 .700 Kentucky 5 3 .625 15 5 .750 Tennessee 5 3 .625 14 5 .737 Alabama 5 3 .625 13 7 .650 Arkansas 4 4 .500 14 6 .700 South Carolina 4 4 .500 13 7 .650 Mississippi 4 4 .500 11 9 .550 Missouri 3 4 .429 13 7 .650 Louisiana State 3 4 .429 12 7 .632 Georgia 3 5 .375 12 7 .632 Mississippi State 2 5 .286 14 6 .700 Texas A&M 2 6 .250 13 7 .650 Vanderbilt 2 6 .250 7 13 .350 Saturday’s Games Texas Tech at South Carolina, Noon Baylor at Florida, Noon Mississippi at Texas, 2 p.m. Georgia at Kansas State, 2 p.m. Oklahoma at Alabama, 2:15 p.m. Tennessee at Iowa State, 4 p.m. Texas Christian at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Texas A&M at Kansas, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma State at Arkansas, 6 p.m. Louisiana State at Auburn, 6 p.m. Kentucky at West Virginia, 7 p.m. Missouri at Mississippi State, 8:30 p.m.


A8

Saturday, January 27, 2018

The Garden City Telegram

Holcomb girls shut down SW Heights By Kevin Thompson Staff writer

Fresh off a third-place finish last weekend at the Hillsboro tournament, the Holcomb girls looked to end their seven-game road trip with another win and a winning record. They got it, a 37-29 at Southwestern Heights, moving to 7-6 for the season — and happy to make a return to their home court Tuesday. After a slow start (2-2 in the first four minutes), the Longhorns ended the first period with an 11-2 run, including a pair of 3s in that stretch. There was a little less scoring in the second, but Holcomb led 20-8 at intermission, forcing the Mustangs into 12 turnovers

on 16 possessions in the second (17 in the half). Holcomb got up by as much as 19 points in the final period (37-18 midway into the period), and they watched the Mustangs chip that down to 37-26 with just under two minutes to play. Heights resorted to hacka-’Horn in the final minute to put Holcomb at the line. Eboni Sapien missed the front end of her bonus, and Heights followed with a 3-pointer. Courtney Wren missed her front end, and Heights got another shot at the end, but it fell short and the Longhorns had the win, despite not converting a field goal in the final 4:30. Sapien led a balanced Holcomb scoring attack with 10 points, and Madi Ruda and

Wren both added nine. Holcomb also had just 12 turnovers, while Heights finished with 26. The ‘Horns scored 16 of their 37 points following Mustang turnovers. Heights scored just six points following a turnover. Coach Nathan Novack was happy to close out the road run with the win. “It was physical,” he said of this game. “They made things difficult for us. They weren’t backing down on anything. They pressured the ball, our first pass. Defensively, that’s something we need.” Holcomb earned the win, though the ‘Horns didn’t shoot particularly well, he added. “We had a comfortable lead the majority of the game, and

still shoot that bad (15 of 50) against an aggressive defense — I feel pretty pleased with how the girls ended up,” Novack said, referencing his team’s ability to turn the Mustangs over. “That was a huge key, too. We really made it difficult for them. We put them in bad situations on the sideline, even just trying to get the ball in sometimes. We sped them up and they were trying to throw passes off the dribble. When you do that, you’re more than likely not accurate.” Brittney Jennings led Heights with 11 points and 10 rebounds. The Mustangs fall to 5-6. Holcomb (7-6) hosts Hugoton Tuesday and travels to Ulysses Friday for a pair of GWAC games.

SCOTT From Page A6

Scott City’s Wyatt Hayes, right, tries to flip Goddard’s Troy Fisher to gain control Friday during a 170-pounds semi final match in the Rocky Welton Wrestling Invitational at Garden City High School. [BRAD NADING/STAFF

Jurgens said it’s always a confidence boost when he wrestles in the Welton, so it’s something to build on for the upcoming regional and state tournaments. “You get to see where your game is and the things you need to work on to get better,” Jurgens said. “You definitely get to see what it’s like in a big tournament, and it’s just a good experience.” It was Hayes' second straight year to come up one match short of the title bout, but he took it in stride considering Fisher is now 27-0 and the No. 1-ranked wrestler in Kansas for all classes. “There’s a reason he’s ranked No. 1,” Hayes said following the match. “We’d wrestled a lot when we were younger,

Holcomb 37, SW Heights 29 Holcomb (37): Rupp 1 0-0 2, Wren 4 0-1 9, Sapien 4 1-3 10, Ruda 3 2-4 9, Mader 2 0-0 4, Sleep 0 1-2 1, Novak 1 0-0 2. Totals 15-50 4-11 37. SWH (29): Couch 1 2-4 4, Sigala 1 2-4 4, Jennings 5 1-2 11, Sutherland 1 0-0 2, Alvarado 1 0-2 3, Herrera 1 1-2 3, Guttierrez 1 0-0 2. Totals 11-30 6-14 29. Holcomb 13 7 8 9 — 37 SWH 4 4 813 — 29 3-point goals: Holcomb 3-13 (Wren 1, Ruda 1, Sapien 1), SWH 1-7 (Alvarado 1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Holcomb 26 (Ruda 10), SWH 32 (Jennings 10). Turnovers: Holcomb 12, SWH 26.

but I hadn’t seen him since I was like 10 or 12 years old. I’ve definitely got some things to improve — getting better angles and working on my shots to where they’re not just straight on. I’ve got to be more creative with them.” Fully aware that the Nos. 1, 4 and 6 seeds in his weight are all top-rated, Hayes said he’d have to be better Saturday if he wants to take a repeat third place. “You've got to be on your A-game here, and can’t make many mistakes,” Hayes said. “When you come here, you have to kind of set a new standard. Third is pretty good here, where first is what you look for at just a regular tournament. No matter who you’re wrestling, it’s gonna be tough.” Hayes had earlier won all three bouts by falls, including one over rival Tanner Johnson of Holcomb, when he earned the pin at the 3:32 mark of the second period.

PHOTOGRAPHER]

BUFFS From Page A6

Medina, who has steadily improved all season, couldn’t get the key points against senior Dallas Boone of Valley Center, falling by a 6-2 decision. The two, who are part of a strong underclassmen group for the Buffs, just couldn’t muster enough in the semis to reach Saturday’s championship matches. “My first matches went really well, but that last match I think I was just exhausted,” Pineda said. “He’s just got a lot more strength than I have right now. I’ve got to learn to do a better job of managing my weight and to be more healthy.” Pineda said that Gamez was exceptionally tough on his feet. “His shots were hard to defend,” Pineda said. “I think I got to worrying more about my weight than just going out and winning. The whole tournament is tough. There’s no cakewalk.” Medina, the younger brother of the late Braxston Medina, who was tragically shot and killed in September 2011, reached the semis with a stunning 6-5 decision over No. 2-seeded Sam

BOWLING From Page A6

the end of eight teams being paired for head-to-head competition, where they competed in a best 2-of-3 format in Baker play (5 bowlers, 2 frames each, but not rolled consecutively). After losing the first game against Northwest (151-201), which had beaten top seeded Campus in the semis, the Buffs responded with a 170147 win to set up the final game to determine the tournament champion. And again, the Buffs were dominant, winning 210-173. “It was quite an interesting series because one game, we had 6 strikes but no spares… and we lost the game,” Nichols said. “But after that, I thought the girls bowled

Martinez (30-4) of Santa Fe, N.M. Earlier, he had to go to a tiebreak in the win over Lakin’s Perez. “That kid (Boone) is really good with his technique,” Medina said after his tough loss. “I’ve just got to work a little harder, clean some things up and just work on certain things.” Medina said he was happy with the way the day’s overall matches had gone, now with an eye on a potential third-place finish. “You just learn to never stop in the match,” Medina said of one of his takeways from the matches. “If you’re down, you just don’t quit. I want to make my family proud. Even now, after losing, I like where I am. This is such a great tournament and I just want to finish as high as possible.” In his first Welton, Medina said it had been fun to go up against a talented field. “I’ve got to see a lot of great wrestlers and just trying to learn as much as I can,” he said. “As a freshman, this has been really good for me.” The tournament resumes Saturday with consolation round matches at 8:30 a.m. Championship, third-place and fifth-place matches are slated to start at approximately 4:30 p.m.

exceptionally well.” In one stretch of that final 210, the Larson team put together four consecutive strikes, and then junior Ryleigh Whitehurst finished it off with three straight strikes in the 10th frame. In the semifinals of match play, the Buffs won the first game against Wichita East (150-148), lost the second (173-178) before winning the deciding third game (192-178). The quarterfinal match-up against Junction City saw the Buffs falter 133-169 before rallying to win 185-146 and then 180-160. Three matches, three third and deciding games, and three wins for the Buffs. Tough as could be.

Garden City High School’s Silas Pineda, right, looks for an opening to shoot Friday against Isaiah Gamez of La Junta, Colo., during an 113-pounds semi final match in the Rocky Welton Wrestling Invitational at GCHS. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

The Buffs earned a No. 3 seed for the match play by a combination of a threegame series where the top five scores counted, and then each team bowled 12 games of the Baker format. In the three-game series, Karly Larson (209-163-167) and Alexis Leon (211-136192) shared top honors for the team at 539. Whitehurst was right behind at 538 (195-208-135) with Faith Whited close at 532 (212-173-147). Rounding out the team scores were Emily Giger (173173-137—483) and Angelina Leeper (141-175-175—471). “The balance was really good, and we didn’t have anybody in the top 10 series,” Nichols said. “I think it’s the depth and balance that really showed up today.” Following that the Buffs were in that 12-game Baker marathon.

They rolled games of 135167-197-236 in the first set, 202-158-159-143 in the second set and then 150-171178-171 in the third set. Nichols, who keeps a frame by frame tally on his bowlers in the Baker format to see how they’re faring, said that during the 12-game set, Whitehurst at one point rolled eight consecutive strikes once, six another time and then had two sets of four consecutive strikes. The GPIT turns to the boys side for Saturday’s competition. First ball will be thrown at 8:45 a.m. And the format is the same for the boys as it is for the girls. “Not much late stuff tonight,” Nichols said of the early bedtime. “The boys are tired, too, from cheering on the girls. It will be the same tomorrow.”

DINGLE From Page A6

“Dom has been a tremendous asset to our program, to the school and to the community,” Hill said. “He’s a terrific coach and he’s just a great fit for Heights. I’m so happy for him. He was, and is, ready for this move.” Dingle currently is an assistant track coach, working with GCHS sprinters. He also is a physical education teacher and the strength and conditioning coordinator for grades 7 through 12 in USD 457. Dingle has a bachelor of science degree from Appalachian State, and a master of science degree from Pittsburg State. Dingle and his wife, Jessica, have four children, son Dominick Jr., 13; twin sons Donte and Donovan, 8, and daughter Jessiah, 10.


The Garden City Telegram

Saturday, January 27, 2018

A9

Report puts Michigan State athletics under fire By Chris Solari Detroit Free Press

EAST LANSING, Mich. (TNS) — Michigan State athletic director Mark Hollis announced his retirement Friday, the same day an explosive ESPN story detailing a number of allegations of sexual assault and violent attacks on women occurred with Spartan football and basketball players. Hollis had been athletic director since he took over for Ron Mason on Jan. 1, 2008. He began his athletics career as a student manager for Jud Heathcote and is a 1985 MSU alum. Hollis’ resignation also comes days after Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics doctor who also was employed by Michigan State, was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing more than 150 girls and young women, including some MSU athletes. “Michigan State University is a great institution and its greatest strengths are the people that call themselves Spartans. Many if not all of those Spartans are hurting, especially the courageous survivors of Larry Nassar’s abuse,” Hollis said Friday. “My heart breaks, my heart breaks thinking about the incomprehensible pain all of them and their families have experienced. Along with many I was brought to tears as I listen to statements. There simply aren’t the right words to express our sympathy.

“Our campus and beyond has been attacked by evil, an individual who broke trust and so much more. As a campus community, we must do everything we can to ensure that this never happens again and make sure that any sexual assault never occurs.” ESPN released an in-depth investigative story about two hours after Hollis’ announcement, and scrutinized the way both football coach Mark Dantonio and basketball coach Tom Izzo handled allegations of sexual assault against their players. ESPN’s report details incidents involving MSU’s football program involving 16 players since Dantonio took over in 2007. Four Spartan football players — Josh King, Donnie Corley and Demetric Vance in a January 2017 incident, and Auston Robertson in an April 2017 incident — were dismissed last year and are facing criminal sexual conduct charges. The ESPN report overlapped a Free Press investigation that began in 2017, which uncovered four more allegations of sexual assault against MSU football players, bringing the total to six cases under Dantonio. Each of the four incidents were investigated by authorities, but no charges were filed. The Free Press investigation found 11 players were accused in the six cases on Dantonio’s watch since 2007.

The four sexual assault allegations run countercurrent to what Dantonio said in June when he discussed the two sexual assault cases opened against four of his players. “We’ve been here 11 years. It’s not happened previously,” Dantonio said. “This has been a little bit of a learning experience. As you all know, when you look across the country right now, there are issues. There are issues that need to be explored, and people need to continue to be educated. You do the very best that you can do in that endeavor.” Attempts to contact Dantonio on Friday were not immediately successful. Hollis in June said the athletic department rarely deals with sexual assault cases. “To the best of my recollection,” he said, “there is just a few where there has been allegations.” Asked then if his department has a policy to immediately suspend any athlete being investigated for sexual assault, Hollis said: “I think there’s a wide variety of issues that you could look at where a suspension would be in play.” “Generally, when a university becomes aware of a situation that involves a legal remedy, what you want to do is allow those student-athletes have full energy to resolve that,” Hollis said. “At the same time, you

Kansas’ Newman regains confidence Sophomore guard coming off back-toback 20-point games

Kansas guard Malik Newman shoots a three over Baylor guard King McClure during the first half of Saturday night’s game at Allen Fieldhouse.

By Matthew Galloway matthew.galloway@cjonline.com

LAWRENCE — Are Kansas basketball fans finally seeing the real Malik Newman? The sophomore guard isn’t ready to say that yet himself, but he did make one declaration Thursday. “I can say it’s a better Malik Newman than you guys have been seeing,” Newman said. “I mean, it was about getting my confidence back and just going out, playing and trying to make winning plays.” True form or not, Newman has of late shown the skillset that made him a five-star recruit and Rivals’ eighthranked player nationally in the Class of 2015. It’s a roll the Jackson, Miss., native will look to continue when the No. 5-ranked Jayhawks (16-4) host Texas A&M (13-7) at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse. It at times seemed doubtful Newman would ever reach his ceiling at KU. He laid an egg in KU’s third conference contest, a victory at TCU in which Newman scored just one point on 0-for-2 shooting and committed four fouls in 15 minutes. That rock-bottom effort followed two earlier instances where true freshman Marcus Garrett supplanted Newman in the starting lineup — Nov. 10 against Tennessee State and Dec. 29 at Texas. After a rocky freshman campaign with Mississippi State before his transfer to Lawrence, one could imagine frustration setting in for the former McDonald’s All-American. Newman, though, tried to keep his slump in perspective. “It’s basketball,” Newman said. “It’s going to be a lot of ups and downs. There’s times where you’re going to be all the way up and times where you’re going to struggle, so I just try not to get down on myself. I knew that it was fixable. “It wasn’t like it was the end of the world or anything like that. I just wanted to come out and just bring my game each and every night.” That process began in the Jayhawks’ first game after the win against the Horned Frogs, a five-point home victory over Iowa State in which Newman scored a career-high 27 points. While the volume it took to get there irked the guard — he went 10 for 21 from the floor and 5 for 13 from 3-point range — it was good enough to earn Newman the Big 12 newcomer of the week award. Newman has become a bit of a closer since that contest.

[CHRIS NEAL/ THE CAPITALJOURNAL]

His pair of free-throw makes with 15 seconds left broke a tie and gave the Jayhawks a home victory over Kansas State in their next contest. He’s also coming off of back-to-back 20-point efforts against Baylor and at Oklahoma, scoring 12 of the Jayhawks’ final 14 points in the comeback victory over the Bears to finish with 24 points on 7-for-11 shooting. Finding his confidence, Newman said, was a process that began with a look in the mirror. “It just took time,” he said. “I do think a lot of good was done in practice, just getting extra reps in, doing things I knew I was capable of doing and seeing myself doing it and realizing, ‘Man, this is what I should be doing, what I’m supposed to be doing,’ and just carrying it over to the game.” Coach Bill Self and Newman’s teammates took a mostly hands-off approach in letting the guard fight through the funk himself, another key in helping him rediscover his aggressiveness. Self has long said Newman is the best player on the team at finding his own shot, and that’s shown of late in the latter’s ability to finish at the rim. “I think that was one of the most important things when I was going through my little phase,” said Newman, who is averaging 11.8 points on 44.9 percent shooting this season. “They didn’t really pressure me to hurry up and find myself or anything like that. They worked with me each and every day and it was just being patient. They kept confidence in me.” One area the former top recruit has almost always contributed this season has been rebounding, a bit of a surprise from the 6-foot-3 Newman. The two-guard is averaging 4.8 boards and has 30 in the Jayhawks’ last five contests,

Texas A&M at No.5 Kansas Tipoff: 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Allen Fieldhouse, Lawrence Line: KU by 7.5 TV: ESPN Next: at Kansas State, 8 p.m. Monday, Bramlage Coliseum, Manhattan

more than doing his part to augment arguably the team’s biggest weakness through 20 games. “Not being able to go to the offensive rebound, just being able to defensive rebound, I kind of have surprised myself,” Newman said. “With guys like Udoka (Azubuike), athletic guys like Lagerald (Vick) and Svi (Mykhailiuk), and then you’ve got people like me and Devonte’ (Graham), the smallest people on the court, going in and getting rebounds. It did kind of surprise me how good I’ve rebounded this year.” Unfortunately for the Jayhawks, Newman’s ascent has coincided with another player’s tailspin. Vick has been held to a single-digit point total in six of the team’s last seven contests, the lone outlier a 10-point effort against K-State. He’s averaging 6.6 points on 36.5 percent shooting and 4.1 rebounds over that stretch. Working off his own experience, Newman is optimistic about Vick’s immediate future. “Lagerald’s a great player. I think it would be the same thing for him,” Newman said. “If he is going through it I think he’d be able to change it soon. Maybe it’s just that one day in practice or one half maybe with Lagerald. “Right now he is kind of struggling, but I’m pretty sure he’ll be able to turn it around soon.”

want to ensure that you continue on with the medical and educational opportunities they have to be successful and healthy.” ESPN also detailed two incidents that allegedly involved former MSU point guard Travis Walton that were made during his time as a student assistant coach for Izzo during the 200910 season, in which the Spartans went to the Final Four. Walton reportedly punched a woman in the face at a bar in one incident. Walton, along with two members of the basketball team, also were alleged to have sexually assaulted a different woman off campus, according to ESPN. The network said no police charges were filed in that case, but reported the woman went to Hollis with the allegations that she was raped. According to records obtained by the Free Press, Keith Appling and Adreian Payne were accused of sexually assaulting a woman during the fall of their freshman year in 2010. Dunnings declined to press charges in the matter, citing insufficient evidence. In 2015, the Office for Civil Rights determined MSU’s handling of some Title IX cases had created a “hostile environment” on campus for individuals who complained about relationship violence or sexual misconduct. The federal oversight agency also found that there was confusion among MSU’s athletic department staff about who

should report sexual assault claims to the university’s investigation office. In the two most recent cases, law firm Jones Day investigated and found Dantonio followed the policy and procedures for employees to report suspected sexual assaults to the university’s Office of Institutional Equity. The OIE handles Title IX investigations into cases involving relationship violence and sexual assault allegations. Izzo has been MSU’s head basketball coach since 1995 and has been on the Spartans coaching staff since 1983, when Hollis was a student manager for Heathcote. MSU is currently under investigation by the NCAA for how it handled the Nassar allegations, and Hollis said in a statement Wednesday that MSU would “cooperate with any investigation.” “Since my first day on the job as athletic director, my focus has always been on the student-athlete,” Hollis said Wednesday. “They are at the core of our athletic department mission statement,” Hollis said. “Our first priority has always been and will always be their health and safety. In regards to the letter we received from the NCAA last night, the athletic compliance and university general counsel offices are preparing a comprehensive response.”

No peeking: Wildcats vow not to look ahead to KU clash Wildcats hope to bolter nonconference resume with win vs. Georgia By Tim Bise tim.bisel@cjonline.com

Barry Brown, one of the Big 12’s straightest shooters in recent weeks, wasn’t about to be disingenuous. Sure, Brown admitted, it is tempting for him and the Kansas State Wildcats to peek ahead to Monday’s Big 12 showdown against rival Kansas — a game that suddenly has league title implications. But Brown also understands K-State (15-5, 5-3 Big 12) has more immediate — and, at least for now, important — concerns with a dangerous Georgia team set to visit Manhattan’s Bramlage Coliseum at 1 p.m. Saturday as part of the Big 12/ SEC Showdown. “It’s pretty tough (not to look ahead),” Brown said, “but like Dean (Wade) said, you’ve got to be in the present. You’ve got to worry about what’s now and then what’s next. One game at a time. “I’ve been trying to stress that to our guys, just to worry about Georgia because it’s still a big win.” That message also is being conveyed by coach Bruce Weber and his staff. A win against the Bulldogs (12-7, 3-5 SEC) would strengthen the Wildcats’ nonconference resume and apply at least a little makeup to the unsightly blemish that resulted from K-State’s 61-54 loss to Tulsa in early December. “I’ve emphasized since we got on the bus after Baylor, ‘This is the most important game of the year,’ ” Weber said. “It really is. To protect home court, solidify your nonconference, get a good win against a pretty good RPI team that potentially is an NCAA team — it’s the most important game. “That’s got to be the main focus.” Under former K-State assistant Mark Fox, Georgia has lost four of five, including an 80-77 double-overtime setback to Arkansas on Tuesday. Still, the Bulldogs should have K-State’s attention after splitting a recent home-and-home series that saw Georgia win at Bramlage in 2014 and the Wildcats return the favor Dec. 21, 2015, in Athens on a game-winner from Wade. Georgia also features 6-foot-8 forward Yante Maten, the SEC’s Preseason Player of the Year. Maten tops the SEC in scoring at 19.9 points per game and ranks second in rebounding at 9.4. Guards William Jackson and Juwan Parker back Maten with

Georgia at Kansas State Tipoff: 1 p.m. Saturday, Bramlage Coliseum, Manhattan TV: ESPNU Line: -7.5 Next: vs. Kansas, 8 p.m. Monday, Bramlage Coliseum, Manhattan

averages of 9.7 and 8.2 points, and the Bulldogs enter with a No. 58 RPI, four spots lower than K-State. “Georgia’s good,” Wade said. “I think it’d be a big win for us if we can get it. “I’m pretty excited. They have a couple pretty good players and I’m excited to see how we do against them.” K-State has a couple pretty good players in its own right — namely Brown and Wade. The Wildcats have won three straight and four of five, thanks largely to the elevated play of that junior duo since point guard Kamau Stokes suffered a foot injury on Jan. 6. Brown and Wade are second and third in scoring in the Big 12 since the beginning of conference play, with Brown scoring at a 22.8-point clip and Wade close behind at 20.3. They also rank among league leaders in field goal percentage (Wade fourth at .606, Brown 10th at .518) and 3-point percentage (Wade second at .536, Brown 11th at .405). Brown also is one of the league’s top defenders, ranking second in steals (2.5 per game). “Barry Brown and Dean Wade are first-team all-conference guys right now, if the balloting were today,” Baylor coach Scott Drew said Monday night after watching the pair combine for 58 points in a 90-83 win against his Bears. But remember, Saturday isn’t about the Big 12. And it certainly isn’t about Kansas. All that will have to wait until Monday. This is K-State vs. Georgia. It’s the Big 12 vs. the SEC. It’s the here and now — nothing more, nothing less. Wade said K-State’s coaches constantly implore the Wildcats “to be where your feet are at,” a reminder to stay in the present and not look too far ahead or behind. Brown insisted that is exactly what he and his teammates intend to do. “Maybe it is a good break away from the Big 12 for some of our guys to play someone different, someone new we haven’t seen,” Brown said. “Maybe it will relieve some of our guys. “We’ll still come out with that same fire, but maybe it’s good break from the 12.”


A10

The Garden City Telegram

Saturday, January 27, 2018

The Weather

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5-Day Garden City Forecast Garden City Almanac

TODAY Sunny

By Brett Marshall Sports editor

High Low Normal high Normal low Record high Record low

54° 22° Wind: SW 7-14

SUNDAY

Statistics are through 7 p.m. yest.

Temperature 60° 26° 45° 16° 74° (1951) -8° (1966)

Precipitation

Mild with plenty of sunshine

24 hrs through 7 p.m. yest. 0.00” Month to date Trace Normal month to date 0.39” Year to date Trace Normal year to date 0.39” Record for the date 0.39” (1973) Days of precipitation in Jan. 6

54° 18° Wind: NNW 10-20

MONDAY Mostly sunny and mild

Today’s Wind Chill An indication of how cold it feels based on temperature and wind speed.

57° 23° Wind: S 7-14

53

41

41

20

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny, pleasant and warmer

9 a.m. Noon 3 p.m. 6 p.m.

65° 30°

Sun and Moon______________

Wind: SSW8-16

Sunrise today Sunset tonight Moonrise today Moonset today

1

WEDNESDAY Cooler with times of clouds and sun

7:51 a.m. 6:00 p.m. 2:18 p.m. 3:47 a.m.

Full Last New First

O0ii

57° 24° Wind: N 10-20

State Forecast Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight's lows. Belleville» «.Colby

48/22

Hutchinson

Garden City Dodge City

54/22 «.

57/27

*55/25

By Kevin Thompson

53/26

Staff writer

Topeka^ City

56/29

*■55/23

Atchiso Kansas

Salina

Hays

55/28 54/29

ft. Emporia Wichita 56/28

58/29 «.

Liberal

Coffeyville

a.54/22

59/28

Agriculture Report Forecast for Garden City and the surrounding area

Growing Degree Days

Sunny today. Winds southwest 7-14 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 30%. Clear tonight. Winds south 7-14 mph. Average relative humidity 40%. Mild tomorrow with plenty of sunshine. Winds north-northwest 10-20 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine.

Soil Temperature Yesterday

34°

Used to measure crop development. They are determined by subtracting 50 from the day's average temperature with negative values counting as zero.

Yesterday Season to date Normal season to date

0 4013 3418

Livestock Stress Index Temperature-Wind Chill Cattle Stress Category Poultry Stress Category Swine Stress Category Mild

Dept, of Agronomy Kansas State U.

18 Mild Mild

source: Iowa State University

National Forecast Sun.

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Hi/Lo/W 58/45/r 31/23/sf 41/25/pc 34/22/pc 65/39/s 47/24/pc 32/15/pc 82/69/pc 66/44/pc 45/24/pc 83/57/s

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Hi/Lo/W 79/72/sh 21/6/c 54/36/r 32/13/c 54/36/r 82/55/s 59/43/c 50/24/s 48/30/pc 54/47/r 55/39/r

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-raln, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-lce.

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Coming off a tournament win in Hillsboro last week, the Holcomb Longhorns wanted to continue their hot play. They traveled to Southwestern Heights, their seventh straight road game, and the result was the same, a 66-32 win over the Mustangs. It was Holcomb’s 16th win in 17 games against Heights, with its only loss occurring in 2010. Holcomb started hot, taking a 21-6 lead after the first quarter on nineof-17 shooting, with Kobe Dickson scoring six of his eight points in the period on offensive putbacks. Heights started the second quarter with four 3-point plays to close the gap to 27-18, but the ‘Horns responded with a 9-2 run to close out the half, leading 38-20. By halftime, Holcomb was 17 of 34 from the floor, while the Mustangs were just 8 of 23. A 12-7 third period (Parker Jantz hit a buzzer three) gave the ‘Horns a 50-27 lead. Holcomb got the 30-point running clock at the 3:30 mark in the final period, when Dickson put back Carter Blackburn’s miss for a 59-29 lead, and the Longhorns closed out the game with a 7-0 run for the win. Dickson led the ‘Horns with 21 points, including a 3-pointer on his final shot. He also had 15 rebounds. Trey Gilbert finished with 18 points, all from inside the line. Holcomb shot 30 of 56 from the floor (five of 16 behind the arc), but only one of seven from the freethrow line. They also outrebounded Heights 41-14, including 15-1 on the offensive end. Coach Chad Novack was happy with the win, and the way his team competed following the win at the tough Hillsboro tournament last week. “I thought we played pretty well for the most

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Holcomb High School’s Paden Cornelsen, center, is fouled as he goes in for a basket against Wichita Collegiate during a December game at Garden City High School. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

part,” he said. “Our first quarter was really good. We came out with a lot of energy, we passed the ball extremely well, rebounded the ball on the offensive side, and we held them to six points.” Second period, not as good, he noted, when the Mustangs went on their short run. “Same thing that’s happened at times this year, when we relaxed a little bit and had some

INVITATIONAL INVITATIONAL CONSOLATION ANDOVER CENTRAL 54, GARDEN CITY 46 Garden City (4-8): Jos. Calzonetti 5-18 5-5 16, Guymon 3-6 6-6 14, Turner 5-7 1-2 11, Gerber 1-3 0-0 3, Rodriguez 1-3 0-0 2, Jul. Calzonetti 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 15-41 12-13 46. Andover Central (8-4): Newfarmer 6-15 6-9 18, Brown 5-8 2-2 13, Wilborn 4-7 0-1 11, Maddex 2-4 2-4 8, Wolf 2-3 0-0 4, Boline 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 19-38 10-16 54. Garden City 12 16 11 7 — 46 Andover Central 15 10 15 14 — 54 3-point goals: Garden 4-12 (Jos. Calzonetti 1-7, Guymon 2-4, Gerber 1-1), Central 6-17 (Newfarmer 0-4, Brown 1-2, Wilborn 3-6, Maddex 2-3, Wolf 0-1, Boline 0-1). Rebounds: Garden 26 (Jos. Calzonetti 10), Central 20 (Newfarmer 10). Turnovers: Garden 12, Central 11.

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HOLCOMB 66, SW HEIGHTS 32 Holcomb (66): Gilbert 9 0-0 18, Leyva 1 0-2 3, Mader 3 0-2 8, Dickson 10 0-0 21, Crain 3 0-0 6, Cornelsen 1 1-2 3, Blackburn 3 0-0 7. Totals 30-56 1-7 66. SWH (32): Garcia 3 1-1 7, Olvera 2 0-0 4, Mercado 4 0-3 9, Alvarado 2 0-0 6, Jantz 1 0-0 3, Gonzalez 1 0-0 3. Totals 13-38 1-4 32. Holcomb;21;17;12;16;—;66 SWH;6;14;7;5;—;32 3-point goals: Holcomb 5-16 (Leyva 1, Mader 2, Dickson 1, Blackburn 1), SWH 5-11 (Mercado 1, Alvarado 2, Jantz 1, Gonzalez 1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Holcomb 41 (Dickson 15, Gilbert 5, Crain 5), SWH 14 (Garcia 3, Olvera 3). Turnovers: Holcomb 12, SWH 16.

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unforced turnovers,” Novack said. “We didn’t play bad, but overall, our kids played extremely well and extremely hard.” This was a good game to play following the mid-season tournament, he said. “We’ve talked about how this could be a trap game,” he said. “And these guys didn’t let that happen tonight.” Shooting just five of 16 from outside was

disappointing, Novack noted, but his team found other means of scoring. “When you’re not shooting the ball well, you have to make an extra pass to get a better shot, number one,” he said. “And number two, rebound. Our kids did.” Heights (5-6), which entered the game averaging 63 points a game, highlighted Holcomb’s defensive effort, which limited the Mustangs to just 13 of 38 from the floor and 1 of 4 from the free throw line. Leading scorer Raul Alvarado, averaging 17 points a game, had just six on a pair of three-pointers. Efren Mercado had nine points to pace the Mustangs. Holcomb (12-1) will host Hugoton Tuesday and travel to Ulysses Friday to continue conference play.

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50 percent (19 of 38). The Buffs hit 12-of-13 free throws to 10 of 16 for the Jaguars. On the rebounding side of things, the Buffs had a 26-20 lead. Calzonetti finished with 10 boards to earn a double-double while Newfarmer matched that for the Jaguars. The turnovers were also fewer as the Buffs finished with 12 and the Jaguars 11.

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kind of worked off from that.” But a 15-11 third-quarter Central advantage made it that oh-so slender one-point deficit for the Buffs. For perhaps the first time all season, the Buffs had three players in double figures, with seniors Josie Calzonetti and Beth Guymon leading the way with 16 and 14 points, respectively. Freshman Keyhana Turner chipped in with 11, but only two other players scored, those combining for only five points. For Central, which improved to 8-4, Jaden Newfarmer had a gamehigh 18 points, followed by Ashtyn Brown’s 13 and Bailey Wilborn’s 11 points. The Buffs finished the game hitting 37 percent off 15-of-41 shooting while Central was right at

Longhorns wreck SW Heights, 66-32

Jan 31 Feb 7 Feb 15 Feb 23

51/27

The scoring as a team was up. The balance on the offensive side of the court was improved. Turnovers were down. Still, the Garden City High School girls basketball team couldn’t convert that improvement into a victory Friday, falling 54-46 to Andover Central in the consolation bracket of the 42nd Newton Invitational. The Buffs trailed by just one, 40-39, heading to the fourth quarter against the No. 7-ranked team in Kansas Class 4A-I. But they could manage just seven points over the final eight minutes while Central finished with 14 points to secure the eightpoint triumph. “Overall, we were just better,” GCHS coach

Matt Pfeifer said. “We were more consistent in everything we did. The effort was better and we rebounded the ball better.” The loss drops the Buffs to 4-8 overall, and they will play in the 1 p.m. Saturday game for seventh place against Western Athletic Conference rival Dodge City, which lost to Wichita-Kapaun Mt. Carmel in the other consolation bracket game. After trailing 15-12 at the end of the first quarter, the Buffs outscored the Jaguars 16-10 in the second to go up 28-25 at intermission. Included in that second period surge, the Buffs went on a 10-0 run, produced by solid defense that transitioned into better shots on the offensive end. “The defensive intensity was so much better,” Pfeifer said. “Everything

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|


The Garden City Telegram

Saturday, January 27, 2018

B1

SOUTHWESTLIFE

Members of the Garden City High School drumline perform Jan. 20 during the Finney County 4-H clubs fundraising event for the Kansas Honor Flight in the Finney County Fairgrounds exhibition building. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

Supporting Members of the Holcomb High School dance team perform routines Jan. 20 as one of the entertainers during the Finney County 4-H clubs fundraiser for the Kansas Honor Flight program in the Finney County Fairgronds exhibition building. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

our

heroes

Joe Rainman was one of eight military veterans to be wrapped in quilts Jan. 20 during a Quilts of Valor ceremony during the Finney County 4-H clubs annual fundraiser for the Kansas Honor Flight program. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

Area residents check out vehicles on display Jan. 20 during a car show in the Finney County Fairgrounds exhibition building. The show was one of the activities held during the Finney County 4-H clubs annual fundraiser for the Kansas Honor Flight program. [BRAD NADING/STAFF

Members of the Garden City High School JROTC, right, shake the hands of veterans who have been on honor flights Jan. 20 during a Finney County 4-H clubs fundraiser for the Kansas Honor Flight program. [BRAD

PHOTOGRAPHER]

NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER]

PICTURE THIS A sunset at Centennial Colorado’s airport. [PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY PAUL KARKIAINEN, DENVER]

We want to see your photos: Email your picture along with a short description to bnading@ gctelegram.com.

YO U D O C S | B 2

CARROT TOPS AND ROOTS ARE PACKED WITH PHYTO POWER


B2

Saturday, January 27, 2018

YO U D O C S

Carrot tops, roots packed with phyto power

The Garden City Telegram

E N G AG E M E N T

SUPPORT GROUPS

KucharikDodson

For a support group to be included, call The Telegram at (620) 276-6862 Ext. 242 or (800) 475-8600. For information about other support groups in the state, call the Center for Community Support & Research at (316) 978-3843 or (800) 445-0116, or visit www. ccsr.wichita.edu. In case of emergency, call the 24-hour crisis hotline at (316) 660-7500.

Dr. Mehmet Oz & Dr. Michael Roizen

W

hen redheaded Scott Thompson, aka Carrot Top, told his friends he wanted to get into the comedy business, they laughed at him. He thought that was a really good sign! Now, after major success for a couple of decades, he says that when he gets older and turns gray, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll change his name to Cotton Top. He never thought of dying his hair green, we guess, even though thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the color of actual carrot tops. And they are, like the orange (and now multicolored) roots, packed with serious nutrition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Superfood.â&#x20AC;? That word gets tossed around a lot, but researchers have found that carrots are packed with powerful phytochemicals that are antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anticancer (for example, research has found that they may help fight the recurrence of breast cancer). Interestingly, the powerful punch of disease-fighting chemicals is greatest in white carrots, followed by orange, purple and yellow. Well, at least orange is second. Carrots also deliver beta (and alpha) carotene, essential for forming vitamin A in your body. That vitamin promotes eye, skin, mucous membrane and immune system health. As for carrot greens; they add great flavor when sprinkled into chicken broth or salsas. And according to the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carrot Museum (we kid you not!), these greens contain six times more vitamin C than the root, and lots of potassium and calcium. We recommend organic carrot tops. Juiced, grilled, sliced into a salad or a soup, various colored carrots can help you top off your dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nutrition; the greens are an added bonus.

Domestic violence

Krista Ann Kucharik, of Scott City, and Reid Addison Dodson, of Hopkinsville, Ky., announce their engagement. They plan to marry May 26, 2018, in Manhattan. Parents of the brideto-be are Steve and Cheryl Kucharik of Scott City. Her grandparents are Andy and Cindy Stewart of Liberal; Ron and the late Carole Crook of Garden City; and the late George and the late Christine Kucharik of Wheat Ridge, Colo. Her fiancÊ is the son of Terry and Carla Dodson of Hopkinsville. His grandparents are June Ubelhor and the late Robert Ubelhor of Newburgh, Ind.; and the late Leonard and the late Lettie Mae Dodson of Hayti, Mo. The bride-to-be graduated from Scott Community High School in 2012, from Coffeyville Community College in 2014 with an associate degree and from Kansas State University in 2016 with a degree in family studies and human services. She is employed by Fort Riley Child Youth and School Services. Her fiancÊ graduated from Heritage Christian Academy in 2010 and from the University of Kentucky in 2014 with a degree in business management. He is an explosive ordnance disposal officer with the U.S. Army.

Support Group. For survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. For more information, call Family Crisis Services Inc., (620) 275-5911. Teen-Talk Support Group. For victims of domestic violence, dating violence and sexual assault. Time/ Location: 5 p.m. on the ďŹ rst and third Mondays of each month at Family Crisis Services Inc., 106 W. Fulton St. Contact: Susan at (620) 275-2018.

Substance abuse Alcoholics Anonymous Hotline. Information for AA groups in the Garden City area. Contact: Hotline, (620) 287-6330. 12 Step Group of Alcoholics Anonymous. Time/ Location: Daily at 116 1 /2 E. Chestnut St. For meeting times, call (620) 287-6330. Al-Anon Family Groups. For friends and families of alcoholics/addicts. Time/ Location: 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. each Thursday at 116 1 /2

E. Chestnut St.

 Health Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Support Group. The support group welcomes any family members or friends caring for someone with Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease and other dementias. Time/Location: 2:30 p.m. the third Monday of each month in the South Conference Room of Garden Valley Retirement Village, 1505 E. Spruce St. Contact: Shirley at (620) 275-9651. TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury). To aid and support people with brain injuries and their families. For information, contact Logie Asebedo, (620) 384-5048. Breast Friends Cancer Support Group. Featuring educational materials, local resources, speakers and various activities. Time/ Location: 6 to 7 p.m. on the second Wednesday of each month at Heartland Cancer Center, 410 E. Spruce St. Contact: (620) 272-2360. Garden City â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolf Packâ&#x20AC;? Consumer Run Organization (C.R.O.) Inc. A non-proďŹ t organization that serves persons with self-identiďŹ ed mental illness. It is a member run organization that is centered on peer support. The CRO focuses on leadership, education and community involvement. Time/Location: 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday at 409 N. Eighth St. Contact: Alexis Fluellen (620) 260-9970. Cancer Support Group.

Open to anyone ďŹ ghting the disease, as well as survivors. Time/Location: 5:30 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at Heartland Cancer Center, 410 E. Spruce St. Contact: (620) 765-1443.

Weight loss TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly). An affordable group for those wanting to lose weight. Time/Location: Weigh-in is from 8:15 to 9 a.m., with the meeting starting at 9 a.m. each Thursday in the Blue Room at the Senior Center of Finney County, 907 N. 10th St. Contact: Betty Schaffer at (620) 275-9792. Garden City Weight Watchers. Time/Location: 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tuesday at the First United Methodist Church, 1106 N. Main St. (use the east entrance on Seventh Street). Contact: Norma Nolte, (620) 276-2520. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly). NonproďŹ t organization providing weight-loss support since 1948. Contact/more information: (800) 932-8677 or email Bednasek@networksplus.net.

Other Celebrate Recovery. A faithbased, Christ-centered, 12-Step recovery program for people struggling with all kinds of issues and is not just for those struggling with chemical and alcohol addiction. Time/

Location: Meal at 6 p.m. Mondays, followed by large group meetings at 7 p.m. and splitting off into small groups at 8 p.m. at Area 96, 308 W. Fifth St., Scott City. Contact (620) 8722339 for additional information or visit www. fbcscott.com/#/ministries/ celebrate-recovery. Divorce Care. A support network for people who have gone through or are going through a divorce. Time/Location: 7 p.m. each Tuesday at Garden City Church of the Nazarene, 2720 N. Campus Drive. Contact: Becky at (719) 289-8743 or Phil at (620) 640-6849. Celebrate Recovery. A faithbased, Christ-centered, recovery program for people struggling with all kinds of issues and not just for those struggling with chemical and alcohol addiction. Time/ Location: 12-Step Program at 7 p.m. Mondays and the Open Share Group at 6:15 p.m. Fridays, both at Bible Christian Church, 1501 E. Mary St., Garden City. Contact (620) 276-8356 for additional information. High Plains Zen. A Zen discussion on Skype every Monday at 6 p.m. Contact: (785) 798-3703 or highplainszen@gmail.com. My Hope. A support group for adults who are grieving the death of a loved one. Time/Location: Noon on the second Tuesday of each month at High Plains Public Radio, 210 N. Seventh St. Contact: (620) 272-2519.

For more news visit GCTelegram.com

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dr. Oz Show,â&#x20AC;? and Mike Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, visit www.sharecare.com.

Open Your Home to aWaiting Child

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The Garden City Telegram

Saturday, January 27, 2018

B3

M U R P H Y ’ S L AW

Love of a woman puts smile back on son’s face Patrick Murphy

A

couple years ago my son, Alek, called and said he was dating a girl from Iowa who loves Pizza King. I told him I had never been more proud of him. He’s topped that. He asked that girl from Iowa, who loves Pizza King, to marry him, and she said yes.

There’s no date set yet, but Alek and Anna are making plans for sometime in 2019. We celebrated last week — at Pizza King, of course — with her family, and if dinner was any indication, the good times are just beginning. As a parent you want certain things for your children — health, happiness and success in whatever they do. Alek has checked those boxes. When he was growing up, I loved watching Alek play baseball. It wasn’t because he was good, it was because

he was happiest on the ball diamond. He never smiled as much as when he was on a baseball field. That was where he found joy. People probably thought I loved watching him play just because he was good, but I enjoyed watching him because I knew he was happy. There was a sense of confidence, a feeling of security and comfort for him when he walked onto a baseball field. Little did he know that those feelings were fleeting. An arm injury took baseball away from

him. I’ll never forget the conversation we had the night he called me from college and said he couldn’t do it anymore. His arm had betrayed him and took his smile with it. He wasn’t the same kid for a while. Everything he had worked for was gone; his plans changed; all the hours he put into the sport seemed to be for nothing. At the same time, Alek was winding his way through college, trying to find the right career. He tried a few majors, but nothing seemed to fit. He finally settled

on one, which led him in another direction. It’s funny how we think our lives are going a certain way and they end up in another completely different direction. That’s where Anna comes in, and that’s when his smile returned. He was finally able to put baseball behind him and move on with his life, and that life now includes the girl from Iowa who loves Pizza King. Just one look at those two together and you know they belong. The planning is already under way. There is a date to

be set, a dress will be chosen, the wedding party will be organized, the place for the nuptials, reception and the list goes on. There will be lots of suggestions, and they will get a lot of advice along the way. The fun is just beginning for my boy and his girl from Iowa, who loves Pizza King. Patrick Murphy, editor-publisher of the Humphrey Democrat and Newman Grove Reporter in Nebraska, is a former assistant managing editor of The Telegram.

DEAR ANNIE

HINTS FROM HELOISE

Replacing a beloved pet

The lingering scent of mothballs

Annie Lane DEAR ANNIE: Our

beloved family dog, Dasher, passed away last year. Dasher was a husky. She was the sweetest and best dog I ever could imagine. When I contacted the breeder I bought her from, he said that he is no longer breeding. My friend suggested I look at adopting a dog from the local shelter or a rescue group. I really want a husky, and our shelter didn’t have any but suggested I reach out to local husky rescue groups. Well, I did, and I found a great one. After I filled out the application, a volunteer called me within 24

hours. She thanked me for considering adoption and gave me some very sad statistics about how many dogs get euthanized because of overpopulation. She then said my house will be a tricky place to find the right dog for. Most huskies have a strong prey drive and are not great with cats, small dogs or small children. I was taken aback because Dasher was so great with all of the above. When I told her this, she said my best bet would be to get a puppy and socialize the dog around kids and cats as much as possible. She said that her rescue group rarely gets pups in and that it could take a long time. I want to adopt, but I also don’t want to put the lives of my cat and kids in danger. Do you have any advice as to what I should do? — Adopt or Shop? DEAR AOS: Whenever

possible, adopt; don’t shop. I understand loving a particular breed and wanting a puppy of that breed. You have three options: 1) Wait until the husky rescue gets a puppy in. 2) Go on Petfinder and search for husky puppies. You may have to travel a bit to find a puppy, or it may not be a purebred husky, but chances are great that you can find a husky puppy. 3) If you do decide to buy a puppy, at least be sure you know where you’re buying from. Kristina Lotz wrote a wonderful article for iHeartDogs titled “10 Signs That A Puppy Is From a Puppy Mill,” and I would recommend reading it before buying from a pet shop or breeder. Send your questions for Annie Lane to dearannie@creators.com.

Heloise DEAR HELOISE: I bought

a beautiful chest at an auction. It has the smell of mothballs, though, which I can’t remove. Needless to say, everything I store in it smells like mothballs. Is there anything I can do about this problem? — C.D., Monroe, La. C.D., YOU CAN bank on this tried-and-true Heloise helper: Mix equal parts rubbing alcohol and vinegar or lemon juice. Moisten a cloth with this mixture and

wipe out the inside of the chest. Important: Leave the lid open until the chest dries, and for a couple of days after that. Another hint to try is putting a big bowl of baking soda inside the chest, along with some crumpled newspaper. Keep the chest closed for one week. These hints should help lessen the smell of mothballs in your newto-you chest! Thanks for writing in! — Heloise CLEAN LITTER BOX DEAR HELOISE: My cat, Mr. Kitty, likes his litter box immaculate. Most cats are very clean! I’ve found that a thin layer of baking soda under his cat litter keeps the

box fresh-smelling. I still clean it out every day, of course, and scrub it once a week, but the baking soda helps a lot! — Carrie W. in Pittsburgh CARRIE, BAKING SODA

is a workhorse in the home — I’m sure Mr. Kitty would agree! It’s cheap, safe and readily available. REFRIGERATOR REDUX DEAR HELOISE: To check the efficiency of your fridge, close the door on a dollar bill. If you can pull the bill out, your seal is loose, and it’s time to replace it. — Rodney the Refrigerator Man in Illinois

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B4

Saturday, January 27, 2018

The Garden City Telegram

Breaking down barriers

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S UP

Unique PE class pairs students with special needs peers By Jim Paulsen Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Wayzata senior Raâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;king Skelton-Wilson, left, runs through tennis drills with Jagger Zoller during UniďŹ ed PE on Jan. 18 at Wayzata High School in Plymouth, Minn. [ELIZABETH FLORES/MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE/TNS]

adapted sports and hands out water for the boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball team. The addition of the unified PE class has been a vital part of Matthew becoming just a typical student, say his parents, Kevin and Nicole St. John. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids with special needs are very aware of their surroundings. They want to be included. They want to be just like everyone else,â&#x20AC;? Kevin St. John said. Said Nicole: â&#x20AC;&#x153;His activities were always adapted athletics, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until this unified PE class that some of the general ed kids have come to his games to cheer him on.â&#x20AC;? Added Kevin: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go from one classroom to another without 12 people saying hi to him.â&#x20AC;? That enthusiastic response of the general student body has made the unified PE class an unexpected success. Senior Markus Braun is a member of the Wayzata boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cross-country team that won the Class 2A team championship last fall. Braun has a great uncle with cerebral palsy and knows the importance of giving to people with special needs, which is why he took unified PE. He never expected how much he would get in return. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to give back, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting a lot back, too,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You learn so much. You hear people in the halls say things about them and you think, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why not be friends with them?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They have social skills. They talk about the same things we all talk about.â&#x20AC;? Maggie Allen is a junior with special needs at Wayzata, and her mom, Penny, credits the class for giving her daughter a chance to experience the everyday lifestyle of a high school student. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teaching my daughter independence that I never thought sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have,â&#x20AC;? Allen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She wants to be like her friends in the class. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get a text and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey, Mom, so-and-soâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s picking me up and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to a movie.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You are? Oh, OK.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; As a parent, this is not something I thought my child would ever see. It is amazing.â&#x20AC;? Word of the class has spread quickly. Only Wayzata and Proctor, near Duluth, offered unified

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PE in 2016-17, but that number is expected to grow to by nearly 50 across Minnesota next year. Edina is one school that added unified PE this year. Mellanie Pusateri is a co-instructor, alongside Tracy Bergo, and is effusive about what the class accomplishes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been much better received than I expected,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The response from the student population has been amazing. It breaks down barriers. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen (special needs and general education) kids in the hall exchanging phone numbers. That never would have happened before.â&#x20AC;? With student demand exceeding available class sessions, Schrader and a few others formed Club US (Unified Students). The club organizes social get-togethers, including a snow-tubing excursion that is in the works. As of now, it has nearly 160 students, 130 of them from the general student body. On Jan. 12 members put on choreographed dance routine at halftime of the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball game. Students performed to â&#x20AC;&#x153;All In This Togetherâ&#x20AC;? from the movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;High School Musicalâ&#x20AC;? and received a standing ovation. A plan is in place to provide fan buses to a couple of adapted floor hockey games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had a fan bus go to an adapted sport,â&#x20AC;? Doyle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been the most rewarding thing for me: how happy the parents of the special needs kids are that their sons and daughters are finally getting included in things like dances and going to football games and all of these daily things most kids take for granted.â&#x20AC;? Schrader committed last week to play basketball at the U.S. Naval Academy. Her team is currently undefeated and ranked No. 2 in Class 4A. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the unified PE class and Club US that is her passion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anyone will care 20 years from now how many points I scored against Hopkins,â&#x20AC;? Schrader said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the coolest thing I will leave at this school. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to see, when I come back, where this is and how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grown.

Jillian Artus, right, spells â&#x20AC;&#x153;galliantâ&#x20AC;? correctly to win last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finney County Spelling Bee over Jessica Pammenter in Garden City High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s auditorium. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contest will be at 9 a.m. today in the GCHS auditorium. [BRAD NADING/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER] SPECIAL EVENTS

PUBLIC MEETINGS

TODAY, JAN. 27

These meetings are open to the public under Kansas law. Portions of the meetings may be closed to the public, but only under speciďŹ c exemptions cited in Kansas law.

Shop Til You Drop: Featuring vendor booths and a silent auction, with proceeds from the auction going to the Finney County Humane Society, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Clarion Inn, 1911 E. Kansas Ave. Vendors include Laurenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Treats, Scentsy, Thirty-One, LipSense, Essential Oils, Gold Canyon, Norwax, Mary Kay, LuLaRoe, Lilla Rose, Premier Jewelry, Vesseti, Interior Homes, OneHope Wine, Tastefully Simple, KK & Lulu, Perfectly Posh, Keep Collective and more. Winter Wonderland Family Fun Night: Featuring inďŹ&#x201A;atables, drawings, carnival games, swimming and prizes, with snacks and drinks available on a ďŹ rstcome, ďŹ rst-served basis, 7 to 9 p.m. at the Garden City Family YMCA, 1224 Center St. Free admission; membership not required.

TUESDAY, JAN. 30 Musical variety program: Featuring the music group â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Time Countryâ&#x20AC;? (the Dillar family), 7 p.m. at Garden Valley Retirement Village, 1505 E. Spruce St. Open to the public at no charge.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 Deerfield Brotherhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Groundhog Supper: Featuring sausage patties, applesauce, corn, mashed potatoes, Texas-sized biscuits and ice cream, 4:30 p.m. at the DeerďŹ eld Community Building on Main Street. Cost is $7 for

TUESDAY, JAN. 30

MONDAY, JAN. 29 HASKELL COUNTY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Haskell County Commission: 8 a.m. in the commission meeting room at the county courthouse, 300 S. Inman St., Sublette. KEARNY COUNTY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kearny County Commission: 8 a.m. in adults; $4 for kindergarten through ďŹ fth grade; free for preschoolers. For delivery of meals (DeerďŹ eld only), call (620) 426-2600 on the evening of the event.

Health Department and WIC

SUNDAY, JAN. 28 Groundhog supper: Featuring whole hog sausage, biscuits and gravy, mashed potatoes, corn, sauerkraut, Koolaid, coffee and ice cream, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Knights of Columbus, 205 N. Eighth St. Cost is $8 for adults; $4 for children age 12 and younger; free to children younger than 5. Bingo: Doors will open at 1 p.m., with bingo starting at 2 p.m., at the VFW, 1101 W. Mary St.

the county courthouse, 304 N. Main St., Lakin. GARDEN CITY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Garden City Recreation Commission: 5:15 p.m. at GCRC, 310 N. Sixth St.

Hours at the Finney County Health Department, 919 Zerr Road, and WIC are 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday; closed on Friday. For more information, call the health department at (620) 272-3600 or WIC (Women, Infant and Children) at (620) 272-3615.

Senior Center The following events are scheduled at the Senior Center of Finney County, 907 N. 10th St., unless otherwise noted. Anyone 55 years of age or older is welcome to participate. Quilts of Valor: 9 a.m. today. Billiards: 1 to 4 p.m. today. Fiddlers, Pickers and Singers: 5 to 9 p.m. today. Duplicate bridge: 2 p.m. Sunday. Dominoes and open billiards: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Lunch: Served at noon Monday through Friday. Double pinochle: 12:30 p.m. Monday. Enhance Fitness: 2 p.m. Monday. Strength training: 4 p.m. Monday.

GARDEN CITY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Garden City Commission town hall meeting: 7 p.m., City Commission Chambers, 301 N. Eighth St.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 GRAY COUNTY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gray County Commission: 9 a.m. in the county courthouse, 300 S. Main St., Cimarron.

Duplicate bridge: 7 p.m. Monday. Walking: 9 a.m. Tuesday at Walmart. Gentle exercises: 11 a.m. Tuesday. Pitch: 12:30 p.m. Tuesday. Bingo: 1 p.m. Tuesday. Bridge: 1:15 p.m. Tuesday. Yoga: 6 p.m. Tuesday. Line dancing: 8:30 a.m. Wednesday. Pinochle: 12:30 p.m. Wednesday. EnhanceFitness: 2 p.m. Wednesday. Dance: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday featuring â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Joe and Continental Carl.â&#x20AC;? TOPS: 9 a.m. Thursday. Ambassador Singers: 1 p.m. Thursday. Skip-Bo: 1 p.m. Thursday. Strength training: 4 p.m. Thursday. Yoga: 6 p.m. Thursday. Line dancing: 8:30 a.m. Friday. Craft Shop check-in/out: 10 a.m. Friday. Bridge: 12:45 p.m. Friday. EnhanceFitness: 2 p.m. Friday. Quilts of Valor: 9 a.m. Jan. 27. Fiddlers, Pickers & Singers: 5 to 9 p.m. Jan. 27. Meals on Wheels is available by calling (620) 272-3620; Mini-bus, (620) 272-3626; senior center, (620) 272-3620. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Up is published each Saturday. Submit calendar items for upcoming events by 5 p.m. Wednesday by calling (620) 276-6862 Extension 242 or (800) 475-8600.

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MINNEAPOLIS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Filtering into a final-period physical education class at Wayzata High School in Plymouth, Minn., students put on heart-rate monitors, then mingle quietly until class begins and each finds a partner. The dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus is tennis â&#x20AC;&#x201D; temporary nets are strung up across the gym floor  â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but first things first. Partners play catch, then deliver the ball on one bounce. Simple, progressive steps follow. Most of the class period is over before physical education instructor Mike Doyle breaks out modified rackets, and they barely get used. To the participants and their families, the seemingly uneventful hour â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with no sweat involved  â&#x20AC;&#x201D; marked another rewarding afternoon in what has become one of the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most sought-after classes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called unified physical education, and it pairs students with special needs with those of the general population. By all accounts, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been wildly successful. Demand for the class has created a waiting list and an after-school club. As many as 50 other high schools in Minnesota have either started or are in the process of starting a similar class. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was part of the first group to take the class last year and after I took it, I was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is so cool,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153; said junior Mimi Schrader, a starting point guard for the Wayzata girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball team. Doyle came up with the idea when he was teaching basketball to a group of students with special needs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why not get the basketball players to teach basketball?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Doyle recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went to a physical education teachers convention and Special Olympics did a presentation on unifying athletes with kids with special needs. It was the same thing I wanted to do.â&#x20AC;? After he put in long hours developing a curriculum, the class was added to the Wayzata course catalog last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fear was creating a class that no one wanted to take,â&#x20AC;? Doyle said. He neednâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have worried. As the year went on, the class grew in popularity, primarily with students from the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general population. Now, it is in such high demand that it fills up quickly. Originally intended to have 15 general education students per 10 special education students, the class exceeds that by a few kids each session. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a surprise, yes, and it was definitely fun to see,â&#x20AC;? Doyle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bridging the gap between the special education and the general student populations campuswide.â&#x20AC;? While the class itself is the focus, its influence is obvious. Kids with special needs are sprinkled in with the general education students, mainstreamed in ways they never had been before. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can tell a lot about a school by looking at its lunchroom,â&#x20AC;? Schrader said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before the class, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d see the special needs kids sitting off at their own table, empty chairs around them. Now, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all over the place, chatting with their new friends. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just one small part of it.â&#x20AC;? Matthew St. John is a senior who has always been one of the more socially outgoing special needs students. He plays


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Black And Light One of the many perks of writing a column is being given the opportunity to share what’s new and exciting in the home and lifestyle world. The digital age has sped up changes in all facets of our lives. It’s not just computers and phones. How furnishings are designed and built, the wildly imaginative execution of patterns on fabrics and paper, these have all been touched by the techno age. The universal need to conserve natural resources has pushed the limits of what we accept as practical household products that are also beautiful, fresh and affordable. That’s a big jump, and there is always something new and impressive just around the corner. The lighting industry is one of my favorites to watch. The emergence of power-saving and thus dollar-saving LEDs has challenged the hydro hungry standard wattage light bulbs, and new lighting designs emerged. The first LEDs were a bit harsh, a bright white that didn’t suit many interior needs. Warm whites and colors are now available, as well as LEDs that fit older fixtures. Some LEDs are dimmable, which is a major bonus for controlling the mood in any space. Choices have never been so versatile. Although the price of LEDs is higher than the standard light bulbs, they last for years, so cost is not an issue. Be sure to buy good quality, or you will be disappointed at their performance. Black and white are always an impressive mix. And so is black and light. I discovered this contemporary dining vignette at uplightgroup.com. It has bold, youthful energy. The matte black Pilke pendant lights show off a unique geometric design that is soft and inviting. The award-winning wooden structure from Finland is assembled using interconnected birch plywood parts. The light source is E26LED, a warm white LED globe bulb that twinkles through the slats. Another striking example of black and light is the Fahrenheit pendant by Troy Lighting. A series of nested and tiered cones form an unusual cylindrical shape. The outer cone, finished in textured black satin, frames the inner cones that have hand-applied gold leaf, so that light is reflected in a warm golden hue. It’s available in a one- or three-light LED pendant If you are thinking of introducing the defining presence of matte black to your decor, why not change up a few of your existing lampshades with a dramatic black style? Visit your favorite lighting store or check out what’s new online. At lampsplus.com you’ll find a dizzying array of choices. Their black faux suede shade lined in leopard print introduces exotic themes. Black fabric pleated, trimmed with beads, sparkling with sequins, and shapes large and small range from sophisticated to frilly. A black metal lamp, pendant or chandelier will become a statement piece in your room. As with any new design direction or dramatic change in color, it is always best to experiment. Take your time; drape some black fabric over a lamp to get the feel (don’t leave it too long or you could start a fire). Then go on a search for a pendant light, sconce or bedside light that captures your interest. An unusual shape or style will steal your heart.

Sports

Features

Opinion Multimedia

SATURDAY, January 27, 2018

UNDER CONTRAC

T

909 N. 7th St. - G.C. - $234,900 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

SOLD

SOLD 1611 N. B St - G.C.- $181,500 Kathie Maestas - (620) 271-4777

3113 Hopper Ct. - G.C. - $216,500 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

5675 N. 16 Mile Rd- G.C. - $189,500 Kathie Maestas - (620) 271-4777

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

1211 N. Belmont Pl. - G.C. - $168,500 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-4777

1611 N. 10th St. - G.C. - $146,900 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

404 Russell Rd. - Holcomb - $175,000 Chad Novack - (620) 805-4365

308 W. Barber Ave. - Holcomb - $139,900 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

501 W. Center St. - Bucklin - $225,000 Jody Thompson - (620) 277-5895

2725 N 7th St. - G.C. - $29,500 Kathie Maestas - (620) 271-4777

Robin Hawkins

Jarrod King

Laura Liebelt

Kathie Maestas

Chad Novack

Mike Salem

Jody Thompson

785-577-3908

620-290-0949

620-271-3809

620-805-9641

620-521-6508

620-271-4777

620-805-4365

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312 W. Fair ..................................... 1:00-2:00 .........Carmen Guzman 3617 Cole Cir .................................. 2:00-3:00 ................ Missy Baier 1306 W. 9th, Scott City .................... 2:00-4:00 .......... Alex Messenger 1536 N. 13th .................................. 2:15-3:15 .........Carmen Guzman

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7. 308 Barber Ave. Holcomb. ............... 1:30-2:30 .......... Jody Thompson 8. 3113 Hopper Ct............................... 1:30-3:00 ........... Robin Hawkins

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JC ST

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SPRUCE JAN ST

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COLLEGE DR

PALACE DR

MAC ST

JENNIE BARKER

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CHEROKEE

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F BUF ESTES PL

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KOSTER ST

DENNISON

FARMLAND RD

YELLOWSTAR ST

ST. JAMES PL

BROADMOOR PL

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PEARLY JANE

HENDERSON ST

FLEMING JOHNSON ST

FLEMING

GLENELLEN

HENDERSON DR

BISON

ANTELOPE

PHEASANT CT

WILLOW LN

FLEMING

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ANDERSON ST

MAGNOLIA ST

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DAVIS ST

CASTLEWOOD

LOST RIVER RD

WINDMILL REBEL RD

EASY ST COACHMAN LN

CARRIAGE LN

PRAIRIE PARK

CENTER ST

ANDERSON

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JANICE LN LYLE BALLINGER ST

BLUFF CT

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LAUREL ST ANDERSON ST

EVANS ST

THERON ST

HUDSON ST

CASEYS DR

HINEMAN

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2. 603 E. Johnson ............................... 1:15-2:15 ............... Peggy Glunt

GARDEN CITY HIGH SCHOOL

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1. 7285 Lindsay Dr. ............................. 1:00-2:00 ....Clemencia Zermeno

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SUNDAY, January 28, 2018

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CEMETARY

OPEN HOUSES

FOXTAIL RD

HIGHLAND DR

GARDEN CITY

GIBSON To Lindsay Dr. GEORGE WALLACE

www.UCrxl.com today!

Mike Regan

HAMLINE ST

KELLO

507 E. Lincoln Ave. - Lakin - $199,900 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

Brian Rose

EMERSON AVE

1.

T

256845

Big Lowe Rd - Holcomb - $425,500 Mike Regan - (620) 290-0949

FOREST PARK

NES AV HAR E RIS

206 Dickinson St. - Lakin - $256,500 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

PRICE REDUCED

FRONTAGE RD

LO JO

UNDER CONTRAC

423 N. Main, Garden City, Kansas Ɣ 620-276-3525 Ɣwww.UCrxl.com

DIANE ST

BUFFA

602 Jake St. - Holcomb - $147,500 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

For our complete listings visit

ZERR RD

ST

T

815 Sage Hill Cir. - G.C.- $299,500 Kathie Maestas - (620) 271-4777

SOLD

PROSPECT AVE

OLIVE

UNDER CONTRAC

607 N. 1st St. - G.C. - $225,000 Kathie Maestas - (620) 271-4777

BELLEVUE AVE

WILCOX

C1

3104 Yellowstar St. - G.C. - $349,900 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

STONE ST

ALLEN ST

Contests

SOLD

INDIGO

THOMPSON ST

Bargains Plus

SOLD

PRICE REDUCED

To Scott City

BENTON ST

Obituaries uar arie es Autos tos Classifieds Cla lassifie

7+(*$5'(1&,7<7(/(*5$0

2816 Barons Pl. - G.C. - $389,000 Robin Hawkins - (620) 271-3809

5.

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www.GCTelegram.com

HOMES

Jump to Real Estate Open Houses: C3

JULIE ST

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c)2017 Debbie Travis Distributed by King Features Syndicate.

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The Garden City Telegram

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FUNKY WINKERBEAN

HI & LOIS

DILBERT PEOPLE KEEP TELLING IAE YOU REFUSE TO ADtAIT WHEN YOU ARE WRONG.

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

C2

Saturday, January 27, 2018

IT ONLY LOOKS THAT WAY BECAUSE ITA RIGHT IAOST OF THE TINE AND PEOPLE ARE TOO DUfAB TO KNOW IT.

WOW! THEY'RE RIGHT ABOUT YOU BEING A NARCISSIST. TOO. I REFUSE TO ADhMT ITA WRONG ABOUT >THIS.

BEETLE BAILEY

BABY BLUES

BLONDIE

PICKLES

GARFIELD HERE'S THE PLAN, OPIE. I'LL HIT JON WITH THIS SNOWBALL, ANP VOD CLOSE THE WINPOW BEFORE HE CAN THROW ONE BACK. REAPV?

TAKE THAT, JON!

A LITTLE QUICK ON THE PRAW THERE, ACE

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Solution in next edition Sudoku is a number-placement puzzle. The objective is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku will increase from Monday to Saturday.

1-27

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MARKETPLACE

C3

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

SATURDAY, January 27, 2018

OPEN HOUSES See More Real Estate Listings C1

OPEN HOUSE SUN, JANUARY 28, 2018 OPEN HOUSES

THE REAL ESTATE SHOPPE, INC.

3113 HOPPER CT - GARDEN CITY 1:30 - 3:00pm - Sun. Jan. 28th

     

Peggy Glunt 272-6494 256881

     

1809 E. MARY ST   , KS

gccoldwellbanker.com

envisionrealestate.co

Each office is independently owned and operated.

620-805-5001

se habla espanol

www.UCrxl.com

United Vending Now accepting applications for all positions.

System Operator Trainee 1536 N 13th 2:15 to 3:15 Carmen Guzman 620-290-8669

256595

USD 457 Garden City Kansas Public Schools is accepting applications for the following positions:

1306 W 9th, Scott City, 2:00 to 4:00 Alex Messenger 620-640-3240

% Deputy Board Clerk % Paraprofessionals % Substitute Teachers % Computer System Support % Substitute Bus Drivers

HOME TOWN REAL ESTATE, P.A.

Applications will be accepted on-line at www.gckschools.com

Employment Opportunities Convoy Systems is hiring Class A drivers to run from Kansas City to the west coast. Home Weekly! Great BeneďŹ ts! www.convoysystems.com Call Tina ext. 301 or Lori ext. 303 1-800-9266869.

Feed/Hay & Grain SMALL SQUARE bales of alfala hay. $10 / bale. (620) 384-4776

G R O E N DY K E TRANSPORT, the award winning industry leader is currently offering a SIGN ON BONUS UP TO $2,500 to qualiďŹ ed applicants at our Hutchinson Terminal for local and regional driving positions. We have been E-Log compliant for years, with the knowhow to operate efďŹ ciently using ELD. REQUIREMENTS : Value safety and service, qualify with DOT regulations, good driving record, 23 years or older, minimum of 6 mos. tractor trailer experience. BENEFITS: Excellent pay, health, dental, disability and life insurance, 401K with company match, vacation, holiday and safety pay, friendly working environment and home frequently. Apply in person at 2701 E. 4th, Hutchinson, KS; online at w w w.g r o e n d y ke. com or call: 620662-7281. HELP WANTED on a large hog operation in southern Scott County, Kansas. Good pay and beneďŹ ts. Call 620874-1017.

5HFHLYHRXWVWDQGLQJSD\DQGEHQHÂżWVLQFOXGLQJDFRPSDQ\IXQGHG SHQVLRQDQGORZKHDOWKLQVXUDQFHSUHPLXPV 256844

Apply for Mosaic today!

ACCOUNTING INTERN Direct Support Associate

Kearny County Hospital

Must be detail oriented, self motivated, willing to learn & possess strong communication skills. Experience with QuickBooks & Microsoft Excel preferred

RN-LPN We are looking for mission-minded RNs or LPNs to work FULL-TIME in our LONG TERM CARE UNIT. :HRIIHUFRPSHWLWLYHSD\H[FHOOHQWEHQHÂżWVJURXS KHDOWKLQVXUDQFHĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOH372DQGPRUH

Applications may be picked up at the .HDUQ\&RXQW\+RVSLWDO%XVLQHVV2IÂżFH 500 Thorpe St, Lakin, KS, 67860 or downloaded at www.kearnycountyhospital.com or call 620-355-7112 x 1238 256835

7R$SSO\(PDLOUÂŤVXPÂŤWRKU#NFČľOFFRm or mail to:

Kearny County Feeders P.O. Bo6  8!*)-



Pre-employment physical and drug screen required. E.O.E.

Big Brothers Big Sisters Program Coordinator

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL ed individuals to . This position will provide services for assigned consumers in Garden City. High School Diploma or GED and a valid Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s License are required. If interested, apply online at www.rescare.com then select careers. External Applicants, enter 67846 and then choose Garden City Summitt ResCare. Summitt ResCare Kansas is an EOE M/F/D/V employer. 256598 250122

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Finney & Kearny Counties, PO Box 1544, Garden CIty, KS 67846. Or e-mail to bbbs@gcnet.com

SERVICE TECHNICIAN Murphy Tractor & Equipment Co., Inc., in Dodge City is seeking a full-time experienced heavy construction equipment technician. Requires HS diploma/GED & technical school training &/or equivalent experience. ([FHOOHQWEHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV SD\

E.O.E.

(620) 272-7905

Apply Online At:

mosaicinfo.org/work-us

RNs, LPNs & CNAs Stevens County Healthcare is seeking Full-time RNs to work night shifts on the Med/Surg floor of the Stevens County Hospital. Qualified candidates must have Kansas RN licensure to be eligible. We offer competitive wages, shift differentials of $2.50/$3.50, and mileage reimbursement to RNs living 15 miles or more outside of Stevens County. A generous sign-on bonus is available to full-time new hires. Stevens County Healthcare is seeking PRN RNs and LPNs for all shifts at the Stevens County Hospital and Pioneer Manor. Qualified candidates must have Kansas RN/ LPN licensure to be eligible. We offer competitive wages, shift differentials of $2.50/$3.50 for RNs; $1.50/$2.25 for LPNs; and mileage reimbursement to RNs and LPNs living 15 miles or more outside of Stevens County. Stevens County Healthcare is searching for Full-Time CNAs to work at Pioneer Manor, both day and night shifts are available. Candidates must have current Kansas CNA licensure, a love of the elderly, and the willingness to work as a valued part of our team. We offer an exceptional benefits package, shift differentials, and a set rotation with every other weekend off. Stevens County Healthcare is also hiring a Full-Time CNA to work night shift at Stevens County Hospial. Applications may be obtained at the Information Desk, located next to the Medical Clinic, inside Stevens County Hospital. Resumes may be emailed to dmangels@stevenscountyhospital.com or you may call Human Resources at (620)544-6141 for more information regarding any current openings.

Sal Sa ale les es CONSUL LT LTA TANT

Apply at: http://murphytractor.com/careers/. 256817

Taco Bell is Hiring Responsible & Hardworking

Cooks & Cashiers for ALL SHIFTS

Opening, Lunch/Afternoon, Evening & Late Night. We Offer Excellent Pay! MUST be able to work weekends.

Apply in Person: 2408 East Kansas Avenue Garden City, KS

         

%HQHĂ&#x20AC;WVSDFNDJHÂ&#x2021;ZHHNVSDLGWUDLQLQJ 2+ years yea ye ears in-home or outside sales experience recommended nde ed A strong focus on exceeding customer expectations. ns.

256850

Full Time position on 150 cow dairy. Housing provided. Call 785299-0153.

evenings & some weekends. Must have at least 3 years experience.

Non-profit looking for a Full-Time Program Coordinator, looking for energetic person to recruit, train, and supervise volunteers and children in youth mentoring programs in Finney & Kearny Counties. Candidate must have a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in a social service field, be self-motivated, able to work independently and effectively in the community and in local schools, very organized, computer literate, excellent communication skills, team player. Fund raising skills, excellent time management. Must pass a criminal background check. Benefits, flexible work schedule, generous time off. 35-40 hour work week.

Send resume and cover letter to:

EOE

Local company seeking CDL Class A Driver for

This internship could lead to a full time position that would include competitive compensation, health & dental insurance, paid vacation, paid sick leave, and retirement plan (Simple IRA).

Mosaic is a faith-based nonprofit organization providing a life of possibilities for people with intellectual disabilities. We offer competitive pay and benefits, development opportunities, and a positive work environment. Requirements for employment are: High School Diploma/GED, 18 or older, can pass a background check, valid drivers license and drug screen. 256500

Kearny County Feeders, LLC is seeking an Accounting Intern to assist with daily transactions of feedyard inventories & accounts to keep cattle feeding operations running smoothly.

Any questions please call the Personnel Office at 620-805-7022 USD #457 is an Equal Opportunity Employer

256653

Employment Opportunities

620-277-4076

(WWSPJH[PVUZHYLHJJLW[LKVUSPULH[^^^Z\UĂ&#x2026;V^LYUL[

256842

256852

Ready to further your career in the utility industry? 6XQĂ&#x20AC;RZHUKDVDQRSHQLQJIRUD6\VWHP2SHUDWRU7UDLQHH DWRXU*DUGHQ&LW\ORFDWLRQ7UDLQHHVZLOOOHDUQKRZWR VDIHO\RSHUDWHDQGPRQLWRUWKHWUDQVPLVVLRQV\VWHPVDQG SURYLGHGLUHFWLRQLQOLQHVZLWFKLQJYROWDJHUHJXODWLRQDQG JHQHUDWLRQORDGLQJ4XDOLÂżFDWLRQVDUHDQDVVRFLDWHGHJUHH LQDSSOLHGVFLHQFHZLWKDQHPSKDVLVLQHOHFWURQLFVHOHFWULFDO RUUHODWHGWHFKQRORJ\DQGWKUHH\HDUVXWLOLW\H[SHULHQFHRU DQHTXLYDOHQWFRPELQDWLRQRUHGXFDWLRQDQGH[SHULHQFH

Cooks, Cashiers & Dishwashers (WWS`H[:LJ\YP[`6MĂ&#x201E;JLZPU;`ZVU8\LZ[PVUZ&*HSS9PJOHYK

256834

271-9500

www.hometownrealestategc.com Se Habla EspaĂąol

256853

ENVISION REAL ESTATE

256860

620-276-3525

4BR/3BA home in Holcomb. Fresh interior paint. Hardwd Floor, Fireplace in Mstr, Main Fl Laundry. Clemencia Zermeno, 620-521-7198

256846

$139,900 - Robin Hawkins is offering for sale a great, well-maintained ranch-style home located at 308 Barber Ave. in Holcomb, Kansas. This 3-bedroom, 1-bath home has 864 SqFt of living space with an attached garage that is fully insulated and has an exhaust fan. On the main level, you will find (2) bedrooms, (1) bathroom, the kitchen / dining room, and the livingroom. The full, finished basement is home to an additional bedroom, a large family room, bonus room, and an unfinished storage / mechanical room. Hosted by: Jody Thompson (620) 277-5895

3617 Cole Cir 2:00 to 3:00 Missy Baier 620-287-5000

Sunday, January 28, 2018

603 E. Johnson St.

7285 Lindsay Dr  

308 BARBER AVE - HOLCOMB 1:30 - 2:30pm - Sun. Jan. 28th

312 W Fair 1:00 to 2:00 Carmen Guzman 620-290-8669

OPEN HOUSES

256837

SUNDAY, January 28, 2018

$216,500 - Welcome to 3113 Hopper Ct. in Garden City, Kansas! Robin Hawkins is offering for sale some brand new construction with concrete board siding. This home has 2-bedrooms, master bedroom with a bathroom and walk-in closet, 2-bathrooms, a full unfinished basement ready to be finished to your liking. Large fenced backyard, a kitchen complete with stainless steel appliances, large walk-in pantry. If you are looking for a brand new home look no further! Hosted by: Robin Hawkins (620) 271-3809

&D &DOO5DLI7HUU\DWRU RU No Phone Calls


C4 SATURDAY, January 27, 2018

The Garden City Telegram

Employment Opportunities

Health & Fitness

Health & Fitness

Health & Fitness

Health & Fitness

Now hiring! Cook, Kitchen Help and Waitstaff. All shifts available. Help must be 18 years or older. No phone calls please. Apply at Timeout.

Diagnosed with Mesothelioma or Asbestos Lung Cancer? If so, you and your family may be entitled to a substantial ďŹ nancial award. We can help you get cash quick! Call 24/7: 855510-4274

OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to reďŹ ll. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844-359-3973

SAVE ON YOUR MEDICARE SUPPLEMENT! FREE QUOTES from top providers. Excellent coverage. Call for a no obligation quote to see how much you can save! 855-5871299

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cheaper alternative than high drugstore prices! 50 Pills SPECIAL $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW! 855-850-3904

Follow us Twitter! Go to twitter.com/GCTelegram for the latest southwest Kansas news & sports updates. The Garden City Telegram, (620) 275-8500.

Get house ready with a great ad with amazing results. Buyers want to know â&#x20AC;&#x201D; What Is It?, When was it made?, How Much Is It? Your buyers want it! Call 620-275-8500

Help Us Cover Your Town. Call Your News Tips

Check Us Out www.gctelegram.com

Lunch Break? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re There. Fill up on the latest business reports, current events, sport statistics and advertising. E-Edition online at gctelegram.com. Free to print subscribers. $7.95 a month for non-subscribers. The Garden City Telegram, (620) 275-8500.

The City of Anthony is accepting applications for a full-time Electric Department Lineman. High school diploma or equivalent and valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license required. Excellent beneďŹ ts. Call 620-842-5434 or go to www.anthonykansas. org for job description and more information. Open until ďŹ lled. Anthony is an EOE.

Drivers Wanted

NOW HIRING!

Class A & B CDL Truck Drivers Clean MVR Preferred 2 Years Experience Required. Bonuses! Call (620) 275-5499

2 bedroom duplexes w/ garages. Very quiet living. References req. 620-275-6841.

Houses 2 bdrm exec home 2.5 bath, basement, fplace, garage, yard $1400, 661 644 1843

For Rent: Studio. 107 1/2 Grant Ave. Call 271-2604.

Autos 1951 Dodge Club Coupe $6000; 1950 Chrysler Jet 6 4 door $6000; 1924 Silverstreak Tractor, very rare, $12000. Negotiable. Call 620-290-7753. 2002 Dodge Durango 4x4 Good interior-exterior. $2500.00 Call 620-521-2351 2003 Toyota Avalon XLS. 159k miles. $5,500. 2000 Dodge Durango 130k miles. $4,300. 620-855-3824. Leave message. 2006 Jeep Commander. White. 155k miles. Very Clean. $6800. (620)640-1258. 2008 Dodge Charger SXT, V6, Black, 120k, Rear Wheel Drive, Very Nice Condition! $6,400. (785)365-1938. DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 844-268-9386

Check us out at

www.stappsautosales.com 252289

Auto Parts & Accessories 920 Stone Creek Dr. Suite C, Garden City

275-0284 www.HeritageRealty.biz Yo Si Hablo EspaĂąol 228416

Bursting at the Seams?!

In At: (620)275-8500 1-800-475-8600

John Deere 2004 936D header, belts excellent, bat reel, transport, shedded, $20,000. (620)271-8048. mustylin@yahoo.com.

PRIVATE LAND AUCTION -&', &+ $)#(+ Kansas

Business Buildings for Rent

STAPPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AUTO SALES Real Estate

Medium sized female black dog with white chest. No collar. Found near Pizza Hut on Kansas Ave. To identify call (620)276-6722.

Equipment - Machinery

Wheels & Tires: 22â&#x20AC;?, tires have less than 100 miles, all 4 tires @ $550. (785) 365-1938.

PRIVATE LAND AUCTION 24/().)"## &+%*y, Kansas

MULTIMEDIA SALES EXECUTIVE

Miscellaneous For Sale 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Grade A Steel Cargo Containers $1650.00 in KC. $1950.00 in Solomon Ks. 20sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 45sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 48s & 53sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; also available Call 785 655 9430 or go online to Chuckhenry.com for pricing, availability & Freight estimates.

& Highly productive irrigated land & Producing minerals &N½NEŸ and NWŸ 2-27-32 & Located on the Finney/Haskell County Line .0")$$)-'!-$/0./%025$%2!)+1/+%!1%#.-2!#2:

! Irrigated cropland ! SEÂź 10-24-29 ! Located 12 miles northwest of Ingalls

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Bathe safely and stay in the home you love with the #1 selling Walk-in Tub in North America. For an inhome appointment, call: 844-873-7650

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Amusements, Events Accelacare Physical Therapy The solution for removing pain and getting back to your active life! No referral needed! (620) 271-0700

www.FarmersNational.com

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ANTIQUE, HOUSEHOLD, GUN & ATV

AUCTION Saturday - February 3, 2018 Time - 10:00 am Location: Wm Carpenter 4-H building, at the

Firewood

FIREWOOD

ProCut Tree Service Call (620)640-1605

fairgrounds, north edge of Scott City, Ks 255257

Call the ClassiďŹ ed Department to Advertise. 620-276-6862 ext. 501 MJT CONSTRUCTION Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a contractor to call you back? Call Tim for your roofing, siding, remodeling & concrete needs. Free Estimates! (620)521-2181 We Now Accept Major Credit Cards! Visit us online at: mjt-construction.com

PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PAINTING Interior & Exterior Residential & Commercial Fence Repair & More (620) 521-9762

Professional Painting Interiors & Exteriors (620) 276-3134

Mr. Carpet

Carpet & Vinyl Installation *Carpet Repairs *Floor Covering *LVP Floor Plank SPECIAL 15X12 INSTALLED $399 FREE ESTIMATES Call Ulises (620)290-3792

Check Us Out www.gctelegram.com A PLACE FOR MOM. The nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE. No obligation. CALL 855-973-9062

Quirky? Retro? Vintage? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sell it Now â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Call 620-275-8500

&RORU<RXU:RUOG Liability and workmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comp Insured

6DXO0DJDQD Cell: 620.805.2983 SaulMagana@live.com Garden City, KS 67846

256735

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Total Property Management Commercial - Residential Property Management

"$  $T   $T   $ "#$  $   $  $! "  $ W

One Phone Call Will take care of your problems.

WARDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDEN CENTER 2703 N. Taylor/ N Hwy 83&620-275-1902 (Garden City â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holcomb Area) www.wardsgardencenter.com

252500

Garden City, Kansas

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www.FarmersNational.com

R%!+12!2%!+%163#2).-16!0,!-$!-#(!-!'%,%-2 //0!)1!+16-130!-#%6.-13+2!2).-16)+!-$!1!-!'%,%-2 Lak%!-!'%,%-26.0%12%1.30#%!-!'%,%-2 !2).-!+3-2)-'%!1%16'2.#*

Berning Be i Auction, Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Trust Your Auction To Just Anyone!â&#x20AC;?

Troy Hawker, Owner Operator 252287

    

SUPER SINGLETONS!

OWNERS: ELNOR H. KREHBIEL LIVING TRUST

Auctioneer/Listing Agent:

Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Workers Compensation

A-16792

Check us out of Facebook & www.berningauction.com

www.berningauction.com

255414

256809

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*STORAGE CONTAINERS* (2) 20 ft. Cargo storage containers, (will need picked up at the fairgrounds right away after the auction) *FURNITURE* Brass bed, Bedroom suite, queen size bed, night stand, large dresser, chest of drawers, Dining room table w/6 chairs & matching china hutch (nice), Grandfather clock, Lift chair, Roll top desk, Several bookcases, Bernina sewing machine in cabinet, Dining table w/4 roller chairs *ANTIQUE AND COLLECTABLES** Nativity collection, Collector Christmas items, Angel collection, Collectors plates, 1/16 scale toy Case tractors, Model car collection, Breyer horses, Childs rocking chairs & chairs, Collectors plates, Porcelain doll collection: Hamilton Mint, Gorham, Precious Moments (approx. 24 dolls, very nice collection), Other dolls including Barbie, Indian, etc., Doll furniture, (3) Shaving mugs, Razor & razor strap, Brass school bell, (2) Cow bells, (2) Cast iron skillets, Seth Thomas mantle clock, Large cast iron kettle, Pink depression cake plate, CloisonnĂŠ bowl & ginger jar, Carnival glass, Purple glass items, Red glass items, Rose stemware & sherbets, Tea pots, Cups & saucers, (2) Cookie jars, Wooden trains, Lots of other nice glassware **GUNS** Springfield Model 87A semi-auto rifle, open site, Ted Williams Model 200, 12 ga. pump shot gun, vent rib, used little, Bushmaster AR 15 233cal. rifle w/ Nicon rangefinder scope, Remington 721 rifle 30.06 w/Blackhawk stock, Pentax scope, extra clips, Ruger 10- 22 semi-auto rifle w/Bushnell scope, Remington 22 cal. pump rifle, vent rib, (500) rounds 223 ammo, (300) rounds 30.06 ammo **ATV, SHOP, LAWN & GARDEN** 2001 Polaris Sportsman 400 ATV, 4x4, 550 hrs., dozer blade (good shape), Snapper riding mower, Ford riding mower, Rototiller, Snow blower, 8000-watt generator, electric start, Drill press, Welder, Power cement trowel, Small hand & electric tool *HOUSEHOLD ITEMS** Christmas decorations, Tupperware, Mixing bowls, Pots & pans, Kitchen utensils, 4-drawer file cabinet, Blankets & bedding, Many nic nacs, Precious Moments, Willow Tree angels, music boxes, etc., Lamps, Rose pattern china, Set of pottery (cream & brown)

Lunch served TERMS: Must show valid ID to register. Cash or approved check day of sale. No credit cards. Everything sold as is. No warranties expressed or implied. Not responsible for theft or accident. Announcements day of auction take precedence.

Cole Owens, AFM/Agent / (620) 276-4 .0 

1-1 

A-16365

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Interested applicants may send their resume to:

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Do you enjoy working with people? Are you interested in an H[FLWLQJFDUHHUÂżHOGWKDWZLOOUHZDUG\RXUKDUGZRUN"$QG do you want a career that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take away your nights DQG ZHHNHQGV" ,I VR 7KH *DUGHQ &LW\ 7HOHJUDP KDV DQ opportunity for you!

87 9C%6;./0.)C.*(&+/-&,)+( â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Trust Your Auction To Just Anyone!â&#x20AC;?

Russell Berning Ed Simon Leoti, KS Marienthal, KS

Sage Davis Scott City, KS

256781

Speer Construction Inc is an underground utility contractor hiring a Laborer. Must be 18 or older & have valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. 620-805-6989.

Pets Lost and Found

256808

Progressive southeast Nebraska hospital seeking a full-time acute care RN charge nurse. Requires Nebraska RN License. New grads welcome! Competitive salary, based on experience. Excellent beneďŹ ts. Apply online at j c h e a l t h a n d l i f e .o r g . For information call HR Director Sandy Bauer at 402-729-6850.

Apartments

GREAT RATES FOR SINGLE ITEM â&#x20AC;&#x153;MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALEâ&#x20AC;? WORD ADVERTISEMENTS! The Telegram classiďŹ eds are the place to be!

$10 OPTION $15 OPTION $30 OPTION SELL YOUR ITEM VALUED

SELL YOUR ITEM VALUED

SELL YOUR ITEM VALUED

for $10 / 30 days / 15 words. Each addition word is $1.00.

for $15 / 30 days / 15 words. Each addition word is $1.00.

for $30 / 30 days / 15 words. Each addition word is $1.00.

UNDER $1000

OVER $1000

These special rates are available on private party "miscellaneous for sale" word advertisements only. Quick results?! Great! Call to cancel after item sells. Prepayment is required. No refunds. All Super Singletons will be seen in The Garden City Telegram, Bargains Plus Weekly Shopper and GCTelegram.com

CCall 275-8500 or come in to 310 N. Seventh St. in Garden City from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday The deadline for word ads is one day prior to publication.

246379

UNDER $250

Jan. 27, 2018  
Jan. 27, 2018  
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