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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

WWW.THEGEORGEANNE.COM

VOLUME 92, ISSUE 34

PROTECT THIS

HOUSE Eagles look to get back on track by beating instate rival JAY MCCLENDON

Page 11

MICK MILLER

MICK MILLER

A CLOSER LOOK Interdisciplinary Building expected to be completed by mid-July

Page 4 BLAKE KESSLER

WELCOME HOME Former Eagle Star returns to join Lunsford’s staff

Page 6 PHOTO COURTESY OF GS EAGLES


Campus Life 2

Thursday

Friday

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High: 79� Low: 59�

Campus Spotlight & Events

Saturday

Sunday

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2-15-18

High: 74� Low: 55�

Spanish Club Film Festival: Film - Neruda Pablo Larraín / Argentina, Chile, France, Spain / 107 min / 2016 / Spanish with English subtitles

The Club Dodgeball Team What we do: We are a club sport which plays dodgeball both recreationally and competitively on a collegiate level. On campus, we host pickup dodgeball weekly and practice for our competitive league competition. We also travel for collegiate matches and competitions within the National Collegiate Dodgeball Association. What that means to you: We provide the chance to play and fun and easy-to-learn sport, stay active, meet new people and play competitively. We love the sport of dodgeball, which helps relieve the stress of school and gives you a chance to be a part of a social team and family. Interested? You can contact us through myInvolvement or at our email, gsudodgeballclub@gmail.com or check us on: Facebook: Georgia Southern Dodgeball Club Twitter: @GSUdodgeball Instagram: @gsudodgeball

It’s 1948 and the Cold War has reached Chile. In Congress, Sen. Pablo Neruda accuses the government of betraying the Communist Party and is swiftly impeached by President Gonzalez Videla. Police Prefect Oscar Peluchonneau is assigned to arrest the poet. Neruda tries to flee the country with his wife, Delia del Carril, but they are forced into hiding. Neruda, however, sees this struggle with his nemesis Peluchonneau as an opportunity to reinvent himself. He plays with the inspector, leaving clues designed to make their game of cat-andmouse more dangerous, more intimate. In this story of a persecuted poet and his implacable adversary, Neruda recognizes his own heroic possibilities: a chance to become both a symbol for liberty and a literary legend. Attendance Verification Provided The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, The Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports of Spain and SPAIN arts & culture. Sponsored by the Spanish Club, the Department of Foreign Languages, the University Honors Program, the Office of First Year Experience, the Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Office of International Programs and Services. Monday, Feb. 19 at 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 1115 Education Building

Environmental Community Cinema: The Age of Consequences Georgia Southern’s Center for Sustainability invites you to a film screening of The Age of Consequences. Join us as we investigate the impacts of climate change on increased resource scarcity, migration and conflict through the lens of US national security and global stability. This film is part of the Center for Sustainability’s Environmental Community Cinema program. Attendance verfication will be provided for students who need it and the public is invited to attend this FREE film. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at 7:00 p.m. Natural Sciences Building, 1119

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CAMPUS LIFE

2-15-18

3

RESTAURANT F

GUIDE

CFS to hold sixth annual

Arbor Day celebration

AMERICAN Bites

DELI Panera Bread

PIZZA Little Italy

1212 Brampton Ave

810 Buckhead Dr

450 S Main St

Cracker Barrel

McAlister’s Deli

Mellow Mushroom

216 Henry Blvd

1100 Brampton Ave

1098 Bermuda Run

Dingus Magee’s

FAST FOOD Jimmy John’s

Primos

BY SHIANN SIVELL The George-Anne staff

The Georgia Southern University Arbor Day celebration will be held on Friday at 10 a.m. at the Herty Preserve kiosk on Sweetheart Circle. The celebration will include a tree planting ceremony where up to 500 native long leaf pine seedlings and other assorted vegetation will be planted in the Herty Preserve to replace the vegetation that has been lost this past year, Center for Sustainability Director Lissa Leege said.

3 Georgia Ave

Fordhams Farmhouse

10706 GA-67

781 Brannen St

McDonald’s

Your Pie Steak n Shake

810 Archway Dr

Subway

The event is free is open to the public, so bring your seedlings to plant some seedlings this Arbor Day.

Wild Wing Cafe

701 Piedmont Loop

244 Henry Blvd 1550 Chandler Rd

52 Aspen Heights Dr

BARBEQUE Bourbon Grill & More

Wendy’s

SEAFOOD The Boiling Shrimp

500 Fair Rd

12218 US-301

GRILL & PUB SOUL FOOD Locos Grill & Pub Sisters of the 91 Briarwood Ln New South 721 S Main St

718 Northside Dr E #10

ITALIAN Olive Garden

Vandy’s BBQ

201 Henry Blvd

725 Northside Dr. East Suite

CHINESE Chinese Kitchen

Social Media Spotlight

Stoner’s Pizza Joint Krystal

23657 U.S. 80

The event will also include a few speakers that will briefly explain the value of trees and environmental preservation.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTER OF SUSTAINABILITY

609-9 Brannen St

100 Brampton Ave

SUB SHOPS Jersey Mikes 721 S Main St

JAPANESE Tokyo 100 Brampton Ave

456 S Main St

SWEETS & TREATS Bruster’s 995 Lovett Rd

Panda Express

MEXICAN Barberitos

Daylight Donuts

101 Brampton Ave

1100 Brampton Ave

455 S Main St

COFFEE Cool Beanz

El Jalapeno

PITA Son’s Donor Kebab

711 S Main St

58 East Main St

17 College Plz

El Riconcito Ellianos

2 College Plaza

598 Brannen St

Pita Pit 609 Brannen St

Moe’s Three Tree Coffee

608 Brannen St

441 South Main St

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If you want to add your free listing, contact ads1@georgiasouthern.edu.

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News

@GeorgeAnneNews

4

2-15-18

A look inside the new Interdisciplinary Building BY MATTHEW ENFINGER

The George-Anne staff

The School of Human Ecology toured the construction site of the new Interdisciplinary Building on Feb 9. Along with the School of Human Ecology, the three floor building will house History, Foreign Languages and International Studies. All courses are currently held in temporary buildings constructed in 1994 according to the Facilities Planning, Design and Construction website. The tour was led by Super Intendant Clarence Satchell, Project Manager Warren Holland and Project Manager Sandra Wilkinson. Visitors were able to get close look at first and third floors of the new building.

First floor Upon entering the main lobby, visitors saw a large monumental stairwell that went up to the building’s second floor. “What you’re seeing in here is a lot of what it’s going to look like,” Warren said. “It’s going to be a lot of exposed structure.” The first floor will house the building’s only lecture hall with projector screens and acoustic panels. In addition to the lecture halls, the first floor will house classrooms and faculty offices. At the entrance facing the pedestrium is an open area where students and faculty will be able to sit and relax. Painting will begin on the first floor within the next two weeks, Satchell

said. The standard color of the building will be creamy with accents of green.

Second floor Although the tour group did not visit the second floor, Wilkinson said that the history and forgien language departments will be housed primarily on the second floor. “Their office space will be over here and they’ll be able to utilize any of the classrooms,” Wilkinson said. The building will also house a Makerspace workshop area for the history department and oral history interview areas. A critique space will aslo be on the second floor to display student work

Third floor The third floor will be home to the interior design, fashion merchandising, and culinary arts The floor will include: • Two sowing labs • Two food labs • One computer lab • One print and drafting lab Addie Martindale, Ph.D., fashion

merchandising and apparel design professor, said she looks forward to the benefits students will have in the new building. “We’ll have more space to work,” Martingale said. “Right now we’re in a temporary building over on Forest Drive. So, we’ve been kind of in a space that wasn’t really designed to be an apparel lab. “

Unisex restrooms Unisex bathrooms in GS buildings are becoming campus standard, Wilkinson said. Each of the three floors will have a unisex restroom in addition to men’s and women’s restrooms. “I do know that [unisex restrooms] are one of those things that is continuously growing” Satchell said.

Building Completion The tour concluded with the school of ecology in high hope for the new building. “This is going to be a great change for the school of ecology,” Sharon Wilson, school of ecology admin assistant, said. The building is scheduled to be complete in mid-July.

The Interdisciplinary building will be located between the IT building and Carroll building. The building is expected to be completed in July.

BLAKE KESSLER

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To contact the news editor, email ganewsed@georgiasouthern.edu


NEWS

2-15-18

5 The stairs in the main hall of the building. The building will consist of three floors.

PHOTO TOUR A faculty member of the School of Ecology looks through a wall.

Large stairs connects the three floors of the new Interdisciplinary Building.

Members of the School of Ecology tour the Interdisciplinary Building.

The new building is scheduled to be completed in mid-July. A hallway of the new Interdiscplinary Building.

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BLAKE KESSLER

To contact the news editor, email ganewsed@georgiasouthern.edu


NEWS

6

2-15-18

Adrian Peterson joins Lunsford’s staff BY ASHTON CHRSTIANSON AND MATTHEW ENFINGER

The George-Anne staff

Former Eagles star running back Adrian Peterson was named the new director of student-athlete development for the Georgia Southern University football program. “It’s an honor to be back at Georgia Southern, a university that helped me grow as a young man,” Peterson said in a gseagles.com article. “Now I get the opportunity help our student-athletes grow on and off the field.” He will be serving as a mentor to many GS football players, helping oversee their academic progress and having a hand in recruitment for the GS football team. Peterson led the Eagles football team to two national titles and three championship games and was the first sophomore to win the Walter Payton Award for being the top player in the nation at the Football Championship Subdivision level.

He played in the NFL for the Chicago Bears in 2002 and was a Super Bowl XLI participant. In 2017, Peterson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. “Adding Adrian Peterson to our staff is something that means a lot to Georgia Southern and to our community,” Coach Chad Lunsford said in a gseagles.com article. “He will serve a daily role in the lives of our student-athletes. His life experiences will definitely be of great benefit to our players and he will be able to serve them as a role model for them. We keep talking about the right fit and blue collar and no exemplifies that more than AP. He will be a huge asset to this program and I’m fired up to be able to get him back to Statesboro.”

His life experiences will definitely be of great benefit to our players and he will be able to serve them as a role model for them.”

- Chad Lunsford Head Coach for GS Football

PHOTO COURTESY OF GS EAGLES

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NEWS

2-15-18

7

What you need to know about Georgia’s 2018 Legislative Session BY TANDRA SMITH The George-Anne staff

Georgia is currently well into a mostly quiet 2018 Legislative Session with just a few weeks to go until Sine Die in late March, when bills must be signed by midnight or they are dead for the year. While Georgia isn’t currently seeing bills of large magnitude such as campus carry or religious freedom like last year’s session, this year’s legislative session is still full of bills pertinent to staff, students and the Georgia Southern University community as a whole.

Free speech policies

Senate Bill 339 (SB 339), brought forward by Sen. William Ligon, R-Georgia, Sen. David Shafer, R-Georgia and Sen. Joshua McKoon, R-Georgia and three other senators, would call upon the Board of Regents to adopt a policy on free speech that would stand for every college and university in Georgia. A few of the provisions under SB 339 are as follows, according the bill’s draft: 1. The Institution must strive to ensure the fullest degree of intellectual freedom and expression. 2. It is not the proper role of the institustion to shield individuals from speech protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. 3. Students and faculty have the freedom to discuss any problem that presents itself. 4. That any person lawfully present on campus may protest or demonstrate there. 5. That the campuses of the institution are open to any speaker whom students, student groups or members of the faculty have invited. 6. That the public areas of campuses of the institution are traditional public forums open on the same terms to any speaker. 7. A range of disciplinary sanctions shall be established for anyone under the jurisdiction of the institution who interferes with the free expression of others. Jacek Lubecki, associate professor of political science and international studies, said that states have to be careful in regards to free speech. “There’s only so much that individual states and state level regulations can do to limit free speech,” Lubecki said. “The general notion is that free speech is protected by the First Amendment and the most protected category of speech is political speech.” Lubecki warns that the senators have to be careful that they don’t infringe on

the constitutional right of free speech. “I applaud the general effort to put more specific rules and regulations,” Lubecki said, “They might clarify issues of free speech, it’s just any such regulations have to tread a very careful line between legitimate and illegitimate restrictions of free speech.”

the seventh month after the student has been employed by the defense institution in the state.

Resolution for football staff diversity

While not exactly a bill, Sen. Lester Jackson, D-Georgia, has put forward Senate Resolution

716, also known as the Rooney Rule, which is already implemented in the NFL. Jackson is pushing for the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia to require universities to interview minority candidates for head coaching and other senior operational positions, according to the bill’s draft.

Jackson wants more diversity in the football staffs at universities on campus and adds in the draft that athletic programs benefit by diversity in the ranks of head coaches and other athletic positions. For more information about Georgia’s current legislative session, visit the Georgia General Assembly website.

New grants

There are quite a few grants in this current session that deal with providing monetary assistance for various types of individuals or other groups. Senate Bill 405, if passed, would provide a grant of $1,500 to eligible students who have a household income of $48,000 or less. This bill is aimed at first-year and current students who have qualified for, or are currently receiving a Pell Grant. The requirements are a bit specific, according to the online draft of the bill. A high school recipient, in addition to being able to get the Pell Grant, must not be able to earn the HOPE Scholarship, have a GPA of 2.3 to 3.0 and meet other criteria. College students, on the other hand, must either be making satisfactory progress in their degree program, or be currently ineligible for the HOPE Scholarship, but can meet at least one of the criteria that a high school student must meet. In addition to the criteria above, a student wishing to earn this grant must be working 15 hours a week during the semester they are enrolled. Brought forward by Rep. Heath Clark, R-Warner Robins and four other representatives, House Bill 702, also known as the STEM Defense Support Fund bill, would provide loan forgiveness for students who go on to have STEM related careers in federal civil service positions at a defense installation in the state of Georgia. Whether the student goes to work at a facility, base or any other institution owned by the U.S. Department of Defense, they are eligible to have up to the following amounts forgiven per year:

4

bedroom 3 bathroom townhouse

295

starting at

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First year: $10,000 Second year: $7,000 Third year: $5,000 Fourth year: $2,000 Fifth year: $1,000 In order to get their loans forgiven a student must continue to work for the institution one year after their last loan forgiveness installment, according to a draft of the bill. Loan forgiveness can begin

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To contact the news editor, email ganewsed@georgiasouthern.edu


Opinions 8

2-15-18

LETTER

TO THE

EDITOR I performed JESSICA VUE Jessica is a junior multimedia journalism in the Vagina major from Lawrenceville, Ga. Monologues last year in 2017 and I haven’t been the same since. When I went to audition, I pretty much went on a whim, unaware of the world I was about to enter into. Don’t think that I was completely comfortable talking about vaginas for five straight minutes, because I wasn’t. Yes, I was a feminist, but I wasn’t a finished piece of work. Talk to any woman, really, and you’ll find that a good amount of them actually don’t really like or think about their vagina. Or even consider their vagina enough to even say the word. They’re too embarrassed. They’ll say “down

YES, I WAS A FEMINIST, BUT I WASN’T A FINISHED PIECE OF WORK. JESSICA VUE

Junior multimedia journalism major and actress there” or just awkwardly make an eye-motion towards their crotch that the listener then has to awkwardly follow their eyes to. Here’s the thing, too: women don’t really have to think about their vagina, because they don’t have to see it every day. If you wanna see your vagina, you gotta make an appointment at

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least two hours before and reserve at least ten to thirty minutes, or more, of your time to look at it. So, if you wanted to, you could just straightup ghost your vagina. I also found in the women I’ve talked to that they see their vagina as a punishment. Periods, cramps, babies, uncomfortable vaginal sex sans orgasm, impending menopause, all of it. If you look at it that way, having a vagina is basically a timeline of disappointment. No breaks. You basically wasted your childhood wishing to become a woman and here you are. Women have whole entire discussions about how much they would like to have a penis and the societal benefits of being a man. Don’t believe me? Ask. But when I read the monologues, when I heard my cast members read the monologues, when we performed in front of people, I discovered a whole new world, where the vagina was able to show off and bask in its own glory. Vaginas don’t have to be penises. They can be themselves. The vagina was not always a place of pain, but it was a place that meant a lot of different things to different women. A place of joy, of pleasure, of pain, of birth, of healing. And the most amazing part is being a part of something bigger than you. Sharing the pains and joys of other women and supporting them. Listening and learning to understand other women. So please, come and support your fellow women and go see the Vagina Monologues. I hope it’ll change you, like it changed me.

The Vagina Monologues will be held Thursday, Feb.15 at 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Russell Union Ballroom.

STAFF LIST Editor-in-Chief Jozsef Papp Coverage Managing Editor Tandra Smith Enterprise Managing Editor Ian Leonard Daily Managing Editor Brendan Ward Engagement Managing Editor Annie Mohr Assistant Engagement Editors Brett Daniel and Emma Smith News Editor Matthew Enfinger Features Editor Blakeley Bartee Sports Editor McClain Baxley Opinions Writer Ashley Jones Creative Editor-in-Chief Lauren Grizzell Creative Managing Editor Rebecca Hooper Photo Editor Jaren Stephens Features Designer John St. Lewis News Designer Xavier Hodges Sports Designer Aminatta Mbow Marketing Manager Haley Clark Business Manager Kenyatta Brown The George-Anne welcomes letters to the editor and appropriate guest columns. All copy submitted should be 350 words or fewer, typed, and sent via email in Microsoft Word (.doc/.docx) format to letters@georgiasouthern.edu. All submissions must be signed and include phone number for verification. GSU students should include their academic major, year and hometown. The editors reserve the right to reject any submission and edit submissions for length. Opinions expressed herein are those of the Board of Opinions, or columnists themselves and DO NOT necessarily reflect those of the faculty, staff, or administration of GSU, the Student Media Advisory, Student Media or the University System of Georgia.

To contact the opinions editor, email letters@georgiasouthern.edu


Features

@GeorgeAnneFeats

2-15-18

9

From Nicaragua to Georgia Southern:

Maria Olivas's Journey to America

BY CHRISTA FEAZELL The George-Anne staff

Maria Olivas was born in Nicaragua. Her town suffered following an earthquake in the 1970s, after which very little was rebuilt. By the time Olivas was twelve, the nation was engulfed in a civil war. Her mother left the country in 1987 with her brothers. They were scared, as boys as young as twelve were being press-ganged into the military. They ended up staying in Guatemala. A year later, Olivas’s father put her and her sister on a bus to reunite with the rest of the family. Her father chose to stay behind. Olivas never saw him again.

The journey to America

The situation in their home country wasn’t improving. So, the decision was made for the family to continue from Guatemala to America. They crossed the border into Mexico and began to head northwards. They traveled for about a month. They slept in bus stations and train stations. Once, Olivas and her family even slept in a park. More than once they had encounters with Mexico’s immigration forces. Olivas recalled one incident where she and her brother were pulled off a train. Her mother and siblings had already been cleared to go. “We were against a train…watching my mom walk away,” Olivas said. “I’m a kid, I don’t understand what’s happening, my mom is leaving.” At that point, she said, her brother grabbed her hand and told her to get ready to run. Olivas protested, worrying that they would be killed. Her brother reassured her. Olivas said he told her, “‘As soon as I say ‘go’, you have to run’…and he said go.”

WE DIDN’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IMMIGRATION OR BEING DEPORTED… WE COULD COME OUT OF THE SHADOWS.” MARIA OLIVAS

second-year doctoral student at GS They ran, and managed to meet up with their mother and siblings in a park. It wasn’t the only scare the family would endure. Olivas recounted an incident where her mother was in a house as it was raided by Mexican immigration authorities - but somehow, they

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did not notice or MATTHEW ENFINGER question her. They were also robbed by the man who helped them cross the Rio Grande. “He starts going ‘Oh, immigration is coming, run, run!” Olivas said. “We started running through here, started running through there…then the guy says ,‘Stop…give me all your money.’” The family was Maria Olivas spoke at the 2018 Statesboro Women’s March. While there, alone, in the middle she shared her own personal story about her struggle with getting to America. of nowhere, with a and then a master’s and now she is a secondman who claimed to have a gun. At one point he demanded year doctoral student at the Georgia Southern Olivas lift her shirt to prove she did not have University College of Public Health. Her experiences have colored her view of the money on her. “Can you imagine that? In front of my world and her doctoral research. “Right now, I focus on health disparities… siblings, in front of my brothers…I thought I diff erent people don’t have access to different was going to be raped,” Olivas said. services…not all of them have the same After showing him she didn’t have any access, or same care or same opportunities,” money, her mother gave the man all they Olivas said. had. He ran off. Olivas was relieved it wasn’t Olivas encouraged GS students to connect worse. “During that time…people were being with the community and get involved. killed. A lot of people died.” “The university stays here, and the Life in America wasn’t easy. While community stays here. They can help each undocumented, they could not get driver’s other,” Olivas said. licenses, or take advantage of public aid Recently, Olivas spoke at the Statesboro programs. They were homeless for a year, and her mother was often taken advantage of by Women’s March. She shared her story to employers who knew she was undocumented. shine a light on Learning English was a struggle, as the different women’s interpreter only visited Olivas’ school once a struggles. Olivas said, week. “Everyone has a Eventually Nicaraguans and Cubans were story. Everyone has granted amnesty and allowed to apply for a reason for doing residency. It was a relief for Olivas’ family. “We didn’t have to worry about immigration what they do…no or being deported…we could come out of the one wants to leave their country. No shadows,” Olivas said. Amnesty did not come soon enough, one wants to leave unfortunately. Olivas’ father passed their home.” away while the rest of the family was still undocumented. Risking such a grueling journey again was out of the question. Olivas can still vividly remember the day he put he and her sister on a bus bound for Guatemala: “I just thought I was going away for a little bit…[I] didn’t understand…I waved goodbye to him through the window,” Olivas said.

American life

By the time she was 29, Olivas was a divorced mother of two. She made the decision to go back to school and enrolled in a community college. “I would go and work full-time in the morning, and my younger brother would babysit for me…it was a group effort, a family effort,” Olivas said. She later pursued her bachelor’s degree,

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIA OLIVAS

Maria Olivas is a second-year doctoral student at GS. At the age of 29, Olivas decided to go back to school and enrolled in community college.

To contact the features editor, email gaartsandent@georgiasouthern.edu


X

XXAVIER ROBERTSON

#SOUTHERN SOUTHERN notSTATE

X


Sports

@GeorgeAnneSports

2-15-18

11

Redemption on the rise Eagles look to get payback on Panthers after loss in Atlanta BY MCCLAIN BAXLEY The George-Anne staff

Since the two teams met in Atlanta a month ago, Georgia Southern and Georgia State have gone in different directions. GS has gone 2-4 since Jan. 20 and GSU has gone 5-1 with their one loss coming this past Saturday in overtime against ULM. The Eagles have fallen into a 3-game losing streak with two dejecting home losses to Louisiana schools. When the two teams played in front of a sold out GSU Sports Arena, the two huge differences were the field goal percentages from the floor and the home court advantage.

The home team shot an impressive 50 percent while the Eagles shot a disappointing 34 percent from the field. Fans have to remember though, that scoring leader junior point guard Tookie Brown didn’t play in that game. The junior averages more than 20 PPG in Sun Belt play and last season he averaged 20 points against the Panthers in two meetings. He is also coming off a phenomenal 29-point effort against Louisiana where all 29 points were in the second half. Brown is no stranger to these big moment performances, whether it be nearly 30 points against the conference leader or hitting the game-winning three against Little Rock. Tookie will need to have

another strong outing if the Eagles hope to win. Another aspect that the home team will need to capitalize on is on the boards. In the first matchup, Montae Glenn led both team in rebounds with 11 total rebounds. Games this season have seemed to go with how the junior forward goes. The Eagles have more success when he does well on the boards. Glenn will be in a battle Friday though against former Sun Belt freshman of the year D’Marcus Simonds. When the Panthers really started to break away last month, they were led by Simonds who had 24 points and 10 rebounds. Though he’s best in his dunking and driving, the true sophomore went 0-2 from three point range. If

Junior guard Ike Smith and sophomore guard David-Lee Jones Jr. huddle on the court. The Eagles are currently on a three game losing streak.

the defense can keep Simonds out of the paint, their chances go up greatly. Finally, the deciding factor Friday night comes down to the atmosphere. It will be Friday night, a white out and probably end up being sold out. “Hopefully, [the crowd] gives us another chance,” Coach Mark Byington said. “Hopefully, everyone comes out.” There is such a difference in environment when the crowd is involved. The first five minutes of the game against UL were incredible because of the resounding roar the fans gave. It fed into the playing of the team and the 6-0 start. Tip-off is set for Friday, Feb. 16 at 9 p.m. in Hanner Fieldhouse.

DAVID OLATUNDE

Beyond the arc with Jake Allsmiller BY MCCLAIN BAXLEY The George-Anne staff

In preparation for the huge game Friday against Georgia State, I was able to sit down with senior guard Jake Allsmiller. Q: How would you describe the season thus far? “It’s going good so far. We’re going through a little rough patch right now. Once we really define ourselves as a team...we’ll get back to where we are.” Q: How do you see yourself as a leader of this team? “Just kind of be a voice on the

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court and a leader by example for the younger guys. That and just give a lot of effort.” The team has had stretches of wins and stretches of losses. How have you and the rest of the guys been able to put all of that behind you and just keep looking forward? “We know that’s the whole season, you’re gonna have ups and downs. Once we move on and start getting hot were gonna start looking forward to the tournament.” Q: What’s been one of your favorite moments throughout your 4 years?

“There’s so many games. The ones that stand out are all the Georgia State games at home. They’re so much fun.” Q: This is the ninth time you will have played the Panthers. What makes this game different for you and the team? “Really how it’s coming down to a close. It’s the last time playing them in Hanner. The fact that it’s in primetime and that fact that it’s the last time playing them on our home court is really special for me.” Q: How much of an impact does the crowd at Hanner have on the

play of the team? “It’s huge. It lights a spark for everyone when we’re playing. It also scares them. When they’re getting excited, we get excited. We feed off of the energy that they provide.” Q: What’s your message or call to the students and fans for Friday night? “Come out. It’s gonna be fun. It’s gonna be chippy. We’re just excited for everyone to come out and see it.”

To contact the sports editor, email gasports@georgiasouthern.edu


SPORTS

12

Georgia

Why

Georgia SOUTHERN Will Win

2-15-18

SOUTHERN IKE SMITH 12 AVG POINTS PER GAME

RYAN KOSTENSKY Kostensky is a contributor for The George Anne

The second installment of the battle for state supremacy rolls through Statesboro on Friday as the Eagles of Georgia Southern face the Panthers of Georgia State. Georgia State took the first matchup rather handily in Atlanta just a few weeks ago. Georgia Southern is coming off of a three game losing streak, and with five games remaining, are in need of a moral boost. So what makes us think that the Eagles can be victorious? I believe that homecourt advantage will play a huge role in this matchup, even with GS dropping their last two home games. The Eagles had played extremely well at home before this recent home stand, amassing a 7-1 record in Hanner Fieldhouse. The student section, affectionately known as the “Hanner Hooligans,” needs to show up in force, and with the game being nationally televised, with a 9 p.m. tip-off, expect for the environment to be rowdy. As if a game on ESPN2 wasn’t enough, it was announced that the game will be a whiteout. As for the game itself, I believe that the ball is going to have to go through the backcourt, and the Eagle guards, Tookie Brown, Ike Smith and Mike Hughes, are going to have to facilitate and control the tempo of the game. It’s hard to say how GS responds after three straight heartbreaking losses, but with our instate rivals from the north making the long haul down, the Eagles need to get an early lead, and never look back. If that’s the case, with the backing of the crazy fans we have, look for the good guys to finally upend that team from Atlanta. Page designed by AMINATTA MBOW

3 10 4 370 FG PERCENTAGE

268 3-FG PERCENTAGE

MICK MILLER

JAKE ALLSMILLER

8.6 AVG POINTS PER GAME

360 FG PERCENTAGE

762 FT PERCENTAGE

JAY MCCLENDON

TOOKIE BROWN

19 AVG POINTS PER GAME 543 FG PERCENTAGE

MICK MILLER

469 3-FG PERCENTAGE

To contact the sports editor, email gasports@georgiasouthern.edu


SPORTS

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Georgia

Why Georgia STATE Will Win

STATE

BLAKE CORRIGAN Corrigan is a reporter for The Signal, Georgia State’s newspaper

11 15 ISAIAH WILLIAMS

6.9 AVG POINTS PER GAME .412 FG PERCENTAGE

.882 FT PERCENTAGE

The “Modern Day Hate” rivalry returns to the court this Friday-- and don’t expect the outcome to be any different than when the Panthers hammered the Eagles 83 to 66, just 23 short days ago. The Panthers, led by sixth-year Head Coach Ron Hunter were red hot when they faced the Eagles seven games ago and have showed no signs of slowing since. The Georgia State Panthers have only lost one of their last 11 games. This lone blemish came in the form of an overtime thriller versus Louisiana Monroe. While this record is impressive, the real feat is how the team has been winning these games. Over this stretch the Panthers have put up 78 PPG while only allowing 67.7 PPG. The Eagles however, have lost three straight games allowing a generous 86.3 PPG over that span. This defensive effort from the Eagles could prove to be their downfall Friday-- especially since they’ll be tasked with slowing down the 2017 Sun Belt Freshman of the Year, D’Marcus Simonds. When the two teams faced off in January, Simonds recorded a double-double with an impressive 24 points and 10 rebounds for the day. Simonds, who has really begun to shine in his second year at Georgia State, has put up 20 plus points in back-to-back games and is poised to have another big game Friday versus the Eagles. Georgia State, who has only allowed 67.7 PPG will be taking on an Eagle offense that has struggled to put up points in the first half of games. The Eagles have put up less than 30 points in two out of the past four first halves. Another slow start versus the humming defense of Georgia State could have dire consequences for the Eagles. Georgia State is playing their best ball of the year, and should extend Georgia Southern’s longest losing streak of the year to four games -- once again proving who the real GSU is. To contact the sports editor, email gasports@georgiasouthern.edu

D’MARCUS SIMONDS

21.6 AVG POINTS PER GAME .467 FG PERCENTAGE

.726 FT PERCENTAGE

GEORGIA SOUTHERN

VS

35 All-time wins against 76.0 PPG .427 AVG FG percentage 7.1 STEALS PG 7-6 (3rd) CONFERENCE RECORD Page designed by AMINATTA MBOW

GEORGIA STATE 9 74.7 .461 7.5 10-3 (2nd)

PHOTOS COURTESY OF VANESSA JOHNSON


SPORTS

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BY KAITLIN SELLS The George-Anne staff

After a close 10-point loss to the Ragin’ Cajuns, the Eagles prepare themselves to play rivals Georgia State this coming Saturday at Hanner Field House. The rivalry between the two schools is no secret, and Georgia Southern has been less than triumphant when it comes to winning the “rivalry series” between the two schools, GSU leading 2-0 in the series over the past two years. This Saturday, the Eagles look to change that. Although they’ve had a particularly poor season of 5-19, as of recent the Eagles have been heating up. In the past two weeks the Eagles have collected two wins and three losses, but those losses have all been close (except Little Rock), and those wins have been impressiveone close victory over the UTA Mavericks who have a winning season so far, and one blowout triumph of 30 points over ULM. The Eagles have an average of 54.7 points per game, and shoot 32.3 percent from the floor, while the Panthers look slightly better with an average of 63.2 points per game and shoot 38.3 percent from the floor.

GSU also only has a slightly better record of 6-19, one of those wins being over GS by 15 points. Individually, Alexis Brown had 13 points and Trell LurryEnglish had 11 points against the Panthers, but Kierra Henry had 18 points for the Panthers. A place the Eagles will have to focus if they really want to beat the Panthers is defense. GSU outrebounded the Eagles by over 30 rebounds when they last met, half of those being offensive rebounds. Panther Francesca Minali had 18 rebounds alone against the Eagles, almost equaling GS’s total rebound count of 24. Another huge factor that seems to motivate the Eagles: the fan section. It’s no secret that there is less of a crowd for the women’s games as there is for the men’s games, but it’s time to show up for the women and show some support. There’s a noticeable difference when there are people in there cheering them on, showing that they care, and giving the Eagles incentive to win for their school. GS Athletics has issued a whiteout for the game against GSU, which will be taking place Saturday, Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. in Hanner Fieldhouse.

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XXAVIER ROBERTSON

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The 2-15-18George-Anne 2/15/18 Crossword

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