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FULLER ISSUE 01

THE CHANGING FACE OF THE CITY

1.1 2014

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TEAM FULLER The Fuller issue is put together by volunteers and is published with things we begged and borrowed and wrapped up with No 8 wire. 1ST ISSUE EDITOR Matt Walters editor@thefullerissue.co.nz MARKETING MANAGER Hannah Wright advertising@thefullerissue.co.nz GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tamsin Eldridge studio@thefullerissue.co.nz PHOTOGRAPHIC CONTRIBUTERS Josh Duncan, Caitlin Metzel, Mike Moravec, Matt Walters EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTERS Shawn Gough, Anita Kerr, Caitlin Metzel, Mike Moravec, Melissa C. Reimer, Thomas Tolchard, Bradley Traynor, Matt Walters ADVERTISE IN THE FULLER ISSUE advertising@thefullerissue.co.nz SEND US YOUR STUFF Send your articles, ideas, artwork and photographs to the editor at editor@thefullerissue.co.nz. If you don't hear from us don't take it personally, if we love it we'll be in touch!

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THE FULLER ISSUE 1 City Scape............................................................................... 07 Let The City Play..................................................................... 10 Fuller Bar Review: Civil and Naval......................................... 13 A New Kind of Doctor: No Appointment Necessary.............. 15 Photo Essay: We Built This City on Rock and Roll................. 19 Fuller Restaurant Review: St. Germain................................. 25 Hope Less. Do More................................................................ 26 Artist Profile: Sharnae Beardsley........................................... 32 Pants That Stand Up on Their Own....................................... 35 Bailey Peryman at the Agropolis........................................... 38 A Life Worth Living.................................................................. 44 Integrity: It's in Their Jeans................................................... 48 Counting People First............................................................. 51 Fuller Roastery Review: Upshot Roastery............................. 55 Who is Evan Smith?................................................................ 56 A Community in Action.......................................................... 60 Pallet Inspiration.................................................................... 64 How Awesome Are These Things........................................... 67

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FROM THE EDITOR

BAD TRAFFIC ONE PERSON CAR, PUBLIC TRANSPORT IT SHOULD BE. BUILDING WORK COMPOUNDING MISERY, WORRY AND RUSH DIVIDED REALITIES. THIS IS THE LIFE OF A MODERN CITY REALLY?

Elmwood Normal Primary school sits nestled in the leafy suburb of Merivale. Its motto is "striving to be the best we can". A remnant of a bygone age, Normal schools developed as a place to provide a model or "normal" school environment for trainee teachers; away from the inquisitive questions, loose projectiles and barking behaviour of other more sinister learning environments.

At times like these I'm reminded of Forest Gump: [The principal holds up a I.Q chart and points to the centre of the graph, labelled "Normal"] Principal: I want to show you something, Mrs. Gump. Now, this is normal. Forrest is right here. The state requires a minimum I.Q. of eighty to attend public school, Mrs. Gump. He's going to have to go to a special school. Now, he'll be just fine.

THE NORMAL SCHOOL EMBODIED GOOD TEACHING PRACTICE AND SHOWED EXPERIENCED TEACHERS PERFORMING THEIR ART.

Mrs. Gump: What does normal mean anyway? He might be a bit on the slow side, but my boy Forrest is gonna get the same opportunities as everyone else. He's not going to some special school to learn how to re-tread tyres. We're talking about five little points here. There must be somethin' can be done.

Somewhere between 1800 and 1954, Normal became well and truly normal and trainee teachers were let out into all the other schools.

Does a child at a Normal school ever ask, "Daddy if we are a normal school what are all the other schools?"

Teaching practice has undoubtedly changed since the late 1800s (for the better) and whilst the centre of teaching training has moved, Elmwood has kept its title as being Normal.

There is undoubtedly a paradox here — that normal is as normal does. So by description, normal, well, is simply unsurprising. However more and more, whether it is in a positive or a negative way, our experience of living in Christchurch is anything but

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unsurprising. Our normal is the surprising. Urban life across the globe looks set to be full of our normal for many years to come. Not earthquakes, or natural disasters however these may play a part, but change. By 2050, seventy percent of people across the globe will live in cities. Half of these will live in small to medium cities of 100,000 – 500,000 people. Fewer than ten percent of these people will live in mega cities. This means a lot of things. It is the changing face of urbanism; if we want to have excellent lifestyles and enjoy living in these cities, we are all going to have to participate, take part in the life of our city a lot more. It is going to be increasingly difficult to be a casual observer. This issue of The Fuller focuses on people and groups who are anything but casual observers; in fact, it argues that the casual observer might be the death of our city were it not for the attitude of these folk. Sitting around with a group of friends a few months ago we realised that we were in a unique position a paradox similar to those students of Elmwood Normal. Normality for us was a shared memory, an underlying expression that our friends and family across the globe couldn't quite understand.

Normal became destruction, change, and creation. People over things. Trust and new connections. Opportunity, distress. Beauty and adventure. Winners and losers. Normal was the reality of the 'now'. Delving a little deeper into this realisation made this group of 'normalities' existing in the new now want to express this new urbanism in a way that shared it a little further — and so The Fuller Issue was born. If the new normal was not what it was before, the challenge is: how could this new normal be better than what it was before?

MANY OF US WANT NORMAL, SOME OF US DON'T. We want our normal to be encapsulated by people adapting and excelling in changing environments, producing and doing amazing things, raising expectations and succeeding, and ultimately; "striving to be the best we can". History shows that the best things about our human condition have always been part of our new normal, we just need to not forget that. That in essence is what The Fuller is about.

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Good Mexican food is fresh, colourful and most importantly, damn tasty. Check out The Headless Mexican in Sumner for a most genuine experience, but leave the luchador masks at home. For a weekend lunch snack head to New Brighton and grab a burrito or enchilada from Mama Citas food caravan in the mall as part of the New Brighton Market.

HAVE A GO AT WAKA AMA ON THE AVON. CONTACT CATHY SWEET AT CSWEET@XTRA.CO.NZ FOR MORE INFO.

VISIT SOUTH OF INDIA IN NEW BRIGHTON & PURCHASE A CHICKEN TENALI... TRUST US!

CITY SCAPE MAKE YOUR OWN JERKY Buy some schnitzel, rub it with salt, garlic, black pepper, and maybe some BBQ sauce. Marinate it over night, then run the oven at its lowest fan-assisted setting, prop the door open and let it go for 4-6 hours. VoilĂ ! Jerky! Substitute the Beef for carrot and or parsnip, and half the time. Perfect with a Poolside Pale Ale from Hop Baron.

Zinefest

CHRISTCHURCH 2014 A festival for people that like to make self published 'zines or other publications. Just search for Zinefest-christchurch on Facebook.

NATIONAL BASKETBALL LEAGUE RETURNS TO CHRISTCHURCH AT COWLES STADIUM FROM THE 4TH APRIL. SEASON TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM WWW.RAMS.ORG.NZ

Beat Street Cafe Healthy, with great portions sizes. A great place to sit and debate the reasons why Dads were the original hipsters.

Housing Check out new ways of constructing places to live and be in at www.spacecraft.co.nz. They're trying to make things better.

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IMAGE NEEDED

WRITING IS BACK, SINCE NONE OF US CAN DO IT ANYMORE

Oi You!

It's not news that art has spewed out onto the broken walls & infiltrated the spaces you least expect. Rise to the occasion and take more than one Saturday to walk around the CBD. Watch or document yourself being part of the changing physical face of our city.

After some quality paper? Fine Art Papers presents almost the best selection known to anyone who uses paper regularly. Download their catalogue at www.fineartpapers.co.nz or visit them at 51 Opawa Road. Since we're On the paper train, Papergraphica sits quietly on Bealey Ave and they have new work by Marian Maguire and Ralph Hotere. The book, James+_pictures, Tourettes+_words' by James Robinson is $20 and worth every dollar.

TAKE A TRIP DOWN CHCH MEMORY LANE. VISIT: CHRISTCHURCHCITYLIBRARIES.COM/HERITAGE/PHOTOS/ OR VISIT A REAL LIBRARY IN A MALL AT EASTGATE, LINWOOD.

WHAT DO THE AUSTRALASIAN SHOVELER THE GREY TEAL, THE METALLIC BLUE HOVER FLY & THE TOTARA HAVE IN COMMON? Head out to Travis Wetlands for a Autumn afternoon walk, and you're likely to see all of them and more, maybe even a Black-Headed jumping spider. Pack a hip flask or thermos, or both.

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Locally made Surprise yourself by taking the 10km challenge. Only buy things from a 10km radius. It will be quality, tasty, fresh, fly, and unique. Flour is tricky. Find the Fuller on Facebook and tell us how it went.

Groom your beard For you budding beardies out there or you ladies that like a beard, but like it kept, attend your local barber for some words of wisdom on facial care. Craig from the Brighton Barber Shop, Craig from the Brighton Barber Shop off Hawke Street in New Brighton, New City Barbers near the CBD, or NG on Madras will sort you.

Real vinyl, locally recorded Lyttelton Records available online lytteltonrecords.co.nz or God Save the Queen, 33 London Street, Lyttelton, Christchurch.

Wanderer

It's a funky little shop that nurtures and rewards creativity and our local aesthetic. Roam to it at the Tannery.


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LET THE

CITY PLAY

[ ARTICLE BY SHAWN GOUGH ] [ PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSH DUNCAN ]

CHRISTCHURCH HAS A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. A REBUILD BRINGS THE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A MODERN URBAN DESIGN THAT HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BE A MUST-SEE TOURIST DESTINATION. From the tragedy and the destruction that has occurred, the city council and its citizens have the potential to create something architecturally stunning and cutting edge. The rebuild allows the potential for the city and its citizens to reinvent itself. The benefits are immense for new small businesses and long-established business entities. It will encourage the people to return, spend their cash, and take pride in the sleek design of the buildings and complexes that have been agreed upon by those in control of the purse strings. However, is this all that makes a city grand? Buildings, streets, precincts or exquisite designs? No, a city requires people. Not employees, not tourists, but its citizens to venture away from the self-contained malls back to the heart of the city. But if all we focus on is the architecture and modern design, the city planners and the government officials have missed something incredible that has happened in the remains of the city.

WHAT HAVE THEY MISSED? AN OPPORTUNITY TO CREATE A CITY WITH AN EMBEDDED PLAYGROUND. WHERE DOES THIS IDEA COME FROM? THE GAP FILLER.

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This concept was born from the destruction created by the September and February earthquakes, and according to Gap Filler's website, these were spaces due for redevelopment but have been turned into temporary interactive places. What other city in the world can boast a nine hole mini-golf course, a sound garden, and a pavilion made from pallets? I don't think there are any. The aim of the Gap Filler Charitable Trust is simple: create activities that benefit the community. The problem is that these spaces are temporary. While walking around the remnants of my city on a beautifully clean Sunday afternoon, I marvelled at the billboards advertising the future space that would be available for lease at the completion of the building stage. Billboard after billboard all revealing low-level glass facades reflecting the direction that the reinvent for Christchurch will boast in 5 plus years. Yes, it will be a sight to behold, but it will miss what these gap fillers have managed to do in such a short existence: create something for the community. What I mean by this is best illustrated through an example. My colleague visited the Sound Garden one weekend and relayed what I think the city planners and government affiliates should take in to consideration when redesigning the city around these new precincts. This incredible cultural event took place at the Sound Garden. She was playing with the jandal drums, beating out a funky rhythm when a group of Korean tourists arrived, ready to take holiday snaps of this creative and interesting tourist attraction. They proceeded to position themselves around the other instruments; the fire extinguisher chimes, the street names twanger [not its official name] and rattle pipe. Together, without a word being uttered, they began to make music. It is as my colleague suggested an experience that would not have occurred if this gap filler had not been created. It brought two cultures together; it created an experience imprinted in the memories of both parties.

THIS EVENT EXEMPLIFIES WHAT THE DESIGNERS OF THE PROJECT INTENDED TO HAPPEN IN THIS SPACE. IT IS THIS SOCIAL EXPERIENCE THAT NEEDS TO BE REPEATED AND THIS CAN ONLY BE ACHIEVED IF THE GAP FILLERS BECOME A PERMANENT PART OF THE CITY PLANNING.

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On this same adventure of mine, I happened upon the Pallet Pavilion while a free jam session was in progress. Traffic meandered by, hindered by the orange cones, as the sweet sound of Rachel Hamilton filled the air. The audience repaid their appreciation with attentiveness and a joy that swept across their faces. It was at this moment that I wondered whether the people of the city knew of this incredible venue. Forget the fact that it is an interesting design concept, but it offers the citizens of the city a free entertainment venue where all that is required is attendance. The variety of events included for that week were games night, live music, Friday night at the flicks, a free music recital from the CPIT School of Music and the already mentioned jam session. Its positioning is poignant but what it offers as an attraction and source of entertainment is inconceivable. It is a must for the central city redesign.

THE GAP FILLERS REINVENT THE IDEA OF PLAY. People have become reliant on technology for this aspect of life. Game and app designers plan and give everything to the user, and while swiping allows the player to engage, it doesn't require any people interaction eventually destroying the ability for people to create relationships. My generation's play-stations were trees, back-yard cricket, homemade jumps which often required neighbourly assistance but this type of play has diminished. The gap fillers capture this old world spirit of play. The nine-hole mini-golf course around the fringes of the old city reignites this spirit. I

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have seen families venturing out from the centre of the city with a putter, golf balls, score-cards, smiles widened in anticipation of the great experience about to be had while completing the challenge offered by the carefully crafted roll of the greens. Laughter, conversation and memories are created as they move from mini-green to mini-green. This is the gift that these temporary projects have given the city, but most importantly, all of this family fun is free. So what am I suggesting? I am not suggesting anything. I am clearly stating that these spaces that have risen from the ashes of a destroyed city should be a permanent part of the central city design. These places, these social spots, should be a part of the city's plan as it moves the city into the future. The idea of using recycled materials should be retained but the finished product should be polished, permanent and free. This opportunity offers Christchurch and its citizens the chance to create a unique element to a city's design, making Christchurch stand out in a country full of attractions. It will create a playground within the CBD, facilitating ground-breaking city planning. Its benefits are limitless. If it is free, people from all parts of the city will journey inwards to play. They will play and because it is free, will have extra cash to spend on other goods and services offered by the rebuild: the pop-up food stalls and coffee carts that now decorate the city's blank canvas. Tourists will come to visit these new icons of the city bringing with them an increase in spending for our inner city, bringing with them businesses. Not only will we reshape the design of a city, but the mind-set of a city. What is it that makes a city? People. So with that in mind, we should reinvent a city for the people by thinking about the people.


FULLER BAR REVIEW

"OF ALL THE GIN JOINTS IN ALL THE TOWNS IN THE WORLD, SHE HAD TO WALK INTO THIS ONE. AND SHE DID WITH ME". CIVIL AND NAVAL IS OVER THE HILL BUT NOT FAR AWAY. NESTLED IN LONDON STREET, IT'S RIGHT AT HOME IN LYTTELTON. The different brands of bottled spirit, Juniper and Botanicals crammed the shelves, along with a fine selection of other spirits to make the drink of your choice.

Wine glasses come with musical notes marked – how very Mozart. Spend some time transposing your favourite popular tune.

This menu described a small selection of snacks to satisfy. In this instant they were Tapas, someone had either spent some serious time researching or a large amount of kilometres of travel experience putting together a menu that stretched the imagination and, thank goodness, challenged a bit. The warmed marinated olives had vanilla and lemon notes, Chilli Crab (to find whole crab, just cracked up was a pleasant surprise for us), the perfect mix of sweet and chilli, The Ox tongue was a comforting melt and the salt cod stuffed peppers, would have pleased (as they did us) my old Portuguese waitress friend. Other things left for next time included slow cooked beef cheek, Miso roasted eggplant and lavender risotto.

This is a place to grab a quick cocktail and move on, or settle in for an evening, talking politics and planning protest with a loved one. Rick Blaine would be proud.

Civil and Naval don't do reservations. Get there early or get there late and have a drink until a table or a space at the bar becomes free "that is the way they roll" and I like it.

As time goes by, you start to feel the need for something salty / sweet to aid discussion and soak up some of the fervent excitement and loud opinion. Places like Civil and Navel deliver. Laying on the bar, almost understated, was the menu – clipboard style to change with what has been recently found out there. The small kitchen packs a punch.

If done properly your bill will be ¾ liquid ¼ solid. We changed the world on this evening.

People were resting at the bar, crammed outside and chatting on the intimate tables that filled the long space. Locals jostled in the warm night, and we made our way through a selection of long and short drink, all well-served. A fine wine list and more than a "select" craft beer selection keep Jack and Jill happy.

Rick Blaine never said "Play it again Sam", but if he did, I could have used it here about Civil and Naval. He did say "Play it". Do Civil and Naval.

Civil and Naval are open for breakfast, lunch and Dinner on Sunday – Wednesday and Breakfast and Lunch on Thursday – Saturday. 16 London Street, Lyttelton open 10am-late. Call 03 328 7206 or e-mail Louis: louis@civilandnaval.co.nz

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[ ARTICLE BY MATT WALTERS ] [ PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSH DUNCAN ]

A New Kind of Doctor No Appointment Necessary

UNFORTUNATELY WHEN I VISIT A HEALTH PROFESSIONAL, MY CONFIDENCE IN THEIR ABILITY TO TREAT ME IS NOT JUDGED ON THEIR GRADES IN MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY OR THEIR ABILITY AT ANATOMY. I'M NOT IMPRESSED BY THE TROPHY WALL OR WHICH DRUG COMPANY SPONSORED THE CALENDAR ON THE TABLE.

A good doctor for me is judged by one simple degree – namely their ability to spark up a conversation with me about something completely unconnected to my sore eyes, ears or itchy feet. This bedside manner means I trust and recommend them to others. It also means I have confidence that whilst I have no idea about the epidermis or the clavicle, I have complete faith in the advice and drugs I soon will be given. This judgement on medical skill comes down to the simple fact that at least this person who I see only in dire circumstances and trust with my life with has instilled confidence in me due to their ability just to relate. At $50 a pop, I think it's probably the least to expect from a health professional. It wasn't long ago, before concept stores and multi-national bicycle brands, that some bicycle shops and the people that ran them held almost apothecary status. As they tinkered and clamped, oiled and built machines of transport that were seen to be as efficient as they were utilitarian, a wisdom and authority was not an uncommon trait. Bike shop proprietors were the enabler of freedom and adventure, and the best took time to invest in their customers and their products.

It seems fitting then that Peter Page decided to name his bike shop Doctor Bike. Pete from Doctor Bike charges nothing for a consultation. For Pete, the ability to relate is how he does business and how he has maintained and grown Doctor Bike from a garage activity to a successful bike shop in

8 years. This bike shop isn't on some busy main road or super centre, but tucked away quietly in the rejuvenated suburb of Woolston. Like most good things, you have to discover it.

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For Pete, the best bike ride is one that enables you to clip in at your front door, ride some mountains, and un-clip back at your front door. Christchurch, like many New Zealand urban environments, has the enviable quality of being so close (max. 30 mins away) from world-class mountain bike tracks. This means it is the perfect place for Pete to set up shop. Pete's shop is a simple thing. He is the sole employee and owner of Doctor Bike. When he needs to contact the shareholders and directors and manager, he calls on "Me, Myself and I". This autonomy and individual approach to the business gives Pete and the Doctor Bike brand an ability to focus and control the things that he believes are important: quality control and personal customer focus. A decidedly contemporary business acumen with an old-school ethos.

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Like most craftsmen and artists, this space is his space, and something he feels quite precious about – and rightly so.

"THE AREA WHERE I DO THE REPAIRS IS MY SPACE; IF ANYONE TREADS ON THE BLACK MAT, I STOP WORK! IT PROBABLY IS OPPOSITE TO MOST MODERN BUSINESS PLANS OR MODELS, BUT I WORRY ABOUT THE DAY I EMPLOY SOMEONE ELSE AS IT MAY BE THE DAY I HAVE TO SHUT UP SHOP". Pete's been in the bike industry since 1988, and has been riding bikes competitively since 1981. BMX road racing, mountain bike, multi-sport, and lately cyclocross.


In the early days of the sport, Pete says, "We saw mountains, we went riding, we didn't worry about what we rode or what we wore". Things have changed though, and in Pete's view, some of the changes have been a natural positive progression, while others have been at the detriment of cycling and its culture. "Some people are in it just to make money, I just enjoy and focus on the mechanics of the push bike". Pete is anything but naive though, and he is ever-conscious he needs to make a living. That's why he encourages his customers to ride the Heaphy Track! But being driven by the dollar is not at the core of Doctor Bike. Pete doesn't see commercially-driven as growing exponentially.

"I WILL ONLY BUY SOMETHING TO SELL TO YOU IF IT IS GOOD ENOUGH FOR YOU AND THE MONEY YOU'RE GOING TO SPEND ON IT, BECAUSE BIKING IN MY VIEW HAS ALWAYS BEEN AND IS STILL ABOUT THE PEOPLE". So for Doctor Bike, it is not the dollar value that warrants product selection, but rather the quality and longevity of the products he installs and builds for the bike-discerning public. He has regularly advised customers that the product they would like on their bike is not as good as a cheaper one, but

often aesthetics and brand recognition take priority, and in the end he has to do what he is told, even after he has recommended against it. It is not uncommon for Pete to see $15,000 bikes leave his shop, and a single wheel built for customers in excess of $2,000. In fact, Pete acknowledges that repairs and high-end new bikes are Doctor Bike's core business. This is a personalised approach where you will regularly see customers watching their repairs or bike build, sharing a beer. Back in the day, Pete bought his first mountain bike new from the suppliers. For 1986, this was a huge thing, costing in relative terms equivalent to the newest, shiniest 2014 carbon-fibre, full-suspension frame. The frame was bent. He took it back and got a refund. This revelation that something could be sold to a customer anything less than perfect has remained with him and was a founding experience for the key ethos of the Doctor Bike brand. It is a fact that Pete regularly has to take apart and reassemble newly purchased bikes from other stores, as the mechanical and technical understanding that is needed in the new world of high-tech components and bicycle design requires a level of skill, craftsmanship and time that isn't necessarily supported at every retail outlet. "New customers come to see me usually at a point of frustration with previous experiences elsewhere. They've heard about Doctor Bike through word of mouth and they are willing to give me a try on the condition that I can sort their problems out". It is a fact that in the 8 years of Doctor Bike's trading, Pete has spent a grand total of $1000 on advertising. Through this time he has moved from a garage into a fully

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functional bike shop, and his success is purely down to word of mouth. Pete also has a reputation for being a wheel builder. By his own admission he may not be the best locally, but he understands how a wheel works. As is usual with a highlyskilled technique, the details of how these things are done or achieved are often glazed over and replaced with a glint in the eye and waft of the hand. The reason for this is that it takes time and practice to perfect such skills of high dexterity as wheel building, and no amount of instruction or explaining can replace the act of doing, and doing again.

"ITS SOMETHING YOU DO OVER AND OVER AGAIN AND YOU JUST GET GOOD AT IT". If a good Doctor is indeed one that has a keen ability to relate and make the patient

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or customer feel at ease, there is no doubt that Pete has earned the right to qualify as Doctor Bike. But maybe there is something more. Even in the face of industry pressures and an ever-changing world, Doctor Bike is deciding to move with the technology and the designs and to embrace new wheel sizes and smart new materials. He is unwilling to compromise his business approach that has taken time to grow, which is such a refreshing point of difference but really a return to what used to be common place, even old-school. "I was taught old-school, and I've stuck to old-school. In 25 years I've had 2 wheels fail. Both of those times, I knew what I had done wrong. Both times, I listened to someone else, and should have said no and continued on with the way I usually do it, trusting that". Find Doctor Bike at 10 Thackers Quay, Woolston, or on peter@doctorbike.co.nz


WE BUILT THIS CITY ON

PHOTO ESSAY BY JOSH DUNCAN

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[ ARTICLE BY ANITA KERR ]

CHRISTCHURCH

ROCK SCENE If Starship (the band formerly known as Jefferson Airplane) can write an extremely passionate song about building a city on Rock n Roll1 after they were not allowed to play a free gig in San Fransisco's Golden Gate park, then we must aspire to take even a portion of their outrageously ridiculous passion to rebuild a city that has truly rocked and rolled. Horrible pun slash cliche aside, about Rock and Roll: Rock n Roll is here to stay Danny and the Juniors, 1958 Rock and Roll is King ELO, 1983 Rock 'n Roll stops the Traffic Bono, graffiti on a wall in San Fransisco circa Rattle and Hum 19872 Some even say Rock and Roll had a significant impact on changes in segregation in the USA from the 1950s. And Starship? "Someone always playing corporation games/Who cares they're

always changing corporation names/We just want to dance here, someone stole the stage/They call us irresponsible, write us off the page/Marconi plays the mamba...". Ah classic eighties. Pop pretending it is Rock n Roll. Heartfelt impassioned pleas against corporate dominance3, intermingled with random allusions to building a city with the power of a rock guitar, while someone plays the mamba4. Jefferson Airplane, I mean Jefferson Starship – sorry, scratch that – Starship, do have a point, though. Can't we bring some of this eighties vibe back to the city? Can we balance out the tiresome effect on our hearts from earthquake struggles with electric guitar solos and some good old Rock N Roll? Why not. "We built this city... Yeah, we built this city on Rock and Roll!!!" Check out some of our legendary Christchurch bands, starting with these...

1 incidentally "We Built This City" received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group in 1986 2 graffiti is not all bad – check out the street art in the CBD and images of the recent Style Walls event here in Christchurch

whilst ironically some huge corporation was no doubt raking in the success of this song

3

a mamba is a deadly snake, we are assuming 'mambo' was meant, but it is never sung that way. Who is Marconi and why is he playing a deadly snake? 4

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THE BLACK VELVET BAND @ THE BREWERY

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PODOCARP @ DUX LIVE

THE RIVER JONES @ THE BREWERY

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PODOCARP @ DUX LIVE


THE FAMOUS UNKNOWNS @ PEGASUS ARMS

T54 @ THE DARKROOM

THE RIVER JONES @ THE BREWERY

THE RIVER JONES @ THE DARKROOM

PODOCARP @ DUX LIVE

PHAZE III @ BECKS SOUTHERN ALE HOUSE

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IPSWITCH @ THE DARKROOM

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FULLER RESTAURANT REVIEW

RESTAURANT & BISTRO ST GERMAIN RESTAURANT & BISTRO IS A CLASSY LITTLE ANNEX SITUATED ON PAPANUI ROAD WITHIN THE HEARTLAND HOTEL COTSWOLD.

ST GERMAIN, HEARTLAND HOTEL COTSWOLD 88/96 PAPANUI RD MERIVALE 8014 03 355 3096 SAINT-GERMAIN.CO.NZ

Run by French brothers Frederic, Vincent and Benjamin, the experience of St Germain is a welcome touch of a French experience in Christchurch. From the warm French greeting on arrival, to the heart-warming menu and elegant atmosphere, this is a welcoming venue. Whether you are after a romantic evening or just something a little classier for a group of friends, St Germain would be a great choice. With an all French menu there is certainly something for all tastes, from the ever-evocative escargots to the classic tuna à la niçoise entrees, to the rack of lamb or duck à l'orange mains. Follow that with Crêpes Suzette or the all-time favourite vanilla crème brulée for dessert. There is also a choice of a surprise 5- or 8- course menu with matching wine. Entrees range between $15 and $27, mains $27 and $41, and desserts are $15 each. Accompany your meal with a stunning wine helpfully selected by Vincent, who has won many awards, and was voted best sommelier in Madrid and Spain in 2007. Overall a quality experience and joie de vivre to be had at St Germain; be sure to call ahead and book a table before you try it out.

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[ ARTICLE BY MIKE MORAVEC ] [ PHOTOGRAPHS BY CAITLIN METZEL ]

Hope Less. Do More. CHRISTCHURCH PROJECTS ITSELF AS A CITY RIPE WITH ENERGY, VITALITY, AND INNOVATION. A CITY FILLED WITH FASCINATION AND INTRIGUE. The internet's and the earth's portrayals of the city are vastly misaligned. Crumbled buildings, empty lots, boarded windows, traffic cones, graffiti, overcast skies, biting winds ...broken. Inadequacy and insecurity are laid bare. Other cities protect themselves with a façade – a semblance of order and control to protect their public image. The earthquakes stripped away that veneer here in Christchurch. It is seen in the faces, in the fences, in the rubble. Citizens have relocated, restarted, survived. Migrant workers flock in to join the Rebuild. Rarely assimilating, they often live disjointed, isolated lives. Go to work, get paid, drink, sleep. Families who move here often struggle finding lodging due to exorbitant housing costs. Travelers hurry through, changing their itineraries to see more of the country, less of the city. The Rebuild is happening. This city could really be special – if you can wait for it. Until then it's road works, construction sites,

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and leaning buildings propped by iron crates. And then, whose city will it be?

THE POPULATION IS CHANGING. NO LONGER IS CHRISTCHURCH THE TRADITIONAL, PROVINCIAL ENGLISH PLACE IT ONCE WAS. Pacific Islanders, Irish, Afghans, Filipinos, Americans and Turks are only a small sample of the varied peoples who comprise the Rebuild. People groups who won't simply return to their homelands when (if) the city finally finds its footing. After spending three months in the grips of scaffolding, concrete dust, and PPE (Personal Protective Equipment), I'd yet to see signs of life – of hope. On the contrary, Christchurch's vulnerability and despair dealt significant emotional blows. Then I felt it.


Walking to the library on a cool gray Saturday morning, breathing in the damp – yet clear – air, when something stirred me; the place, time, and energy strum a chord of harmony with my mood, my life, my present. I felt the moment gently embracing me, releasing some loneliness, at once quietly supportive and encouraging. The spirit of the Rebuild in the heart of New Brighton has life – intangible, elusive, less than rational hope.

bodies. The individual politician or businessperson or community chair becomes the hero or the villain, the hope or the scapegoat. This process leaves one bitter, helpless and hopeless. Something different is in the air out in the East. They aren't exempt from the blame game, but a quick breeze through the weekly market on the pedestrian mall might leave one with an unusual impression.

Where is this hope coming from? Who's sowing it in Brighton? Will it even affect the development of this community? When answering questions like these, the tendency is to look outward at faceless, general entities: businesses, governments, organizations, sectors, and systems – the Machine, the Man. Putting responsibility (and the accompanying blame) on the group feels safer. If it's their fault it isn't yours, right? In Christchurch, the typical fall guys are EQC, CERA, City Council, the government (local and national), and the construction industry.

BUREAUCRACY, POSTURING, POLITICKING AND INEPTITUDE HAVE LED THE CITY BUMBLING ALONG THE SLOW ROAD TO RECOVERY. WHILE NOT FULLY TRUE OR APPROPRIATE, THAT IS HOW WE OFTEN PERCEIVE THE 'POWERS THAT BE.' It sure is a lot easier than thinking about how I'm responsible, how I impact the world around me, what I'm contributing to the Rebuild. The unfortunate corollary of this naturally-occurring mindset is that we assign that responsibility – that blame – to the individuals within those governing

What's so funky in New Brighton (aside from the pumpkins)? Speaking to people from other parts of Christchurch about New Brighton elicits many amusing responses. "Weirdos". "Artsy hippies who gather round on the beach, juggling fire and singing Kumbaya". "Run-down and dangerous". While off-base and exaggerated, these opinions are generated from small seeds of truth. People here are eclectic. There is an active community of artists. The area has been badly hit and sectioned off from Christchurch by the earthquakes.

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Paul Zaanen – Manager of New Brighton Business and Landowners Association "Just come around the business district. I'll be there. Find me in one of the shops". What an invitation. There are community developers and city planners who work behind desks, under stacks and binders of paperwork. Then there's Paul. Many of the shops and storefronts resemble a small town that's been resting on its laurels since the 1980s, when Saturday shopping spread to Christchurch's other commercial centers. Yet there is a certain energy that exists between the faces, stalls, interactions, and various activities of the Saturday morning market. Stroll through the business district and sense the subtly stoic optimism that pervades the community.

THIS PATIENCE AND ENDURANCE IN THE FACE OF HARD TIMES IS EVIDENT. IT IS REAL. People work together, build community, pick themselves up by the bootstraps, carry on and any other clichés you can muster to stand up against 'the way things are,' determined to 'make a difference'. Generic, trending, and cringe-worthy? Maybe. But it seems to be working. So I asked around. Some light digging uncovered a few individuals who appear to be shaping their world, rather than simply surviving in it. Two community leaders on the East side – Paul Zaanen and Evan Smith – are embodying the changes they desire, while many (myself included) idly and cynically hope things get better from the safety of our automated, reactive lives.

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I met up with Paul on Seaview Road and we headed toward a local café. En route he had a brief, personal exchange with the majority of passersby. Either he has a photographic memory or he spends a lot of time with the people of New Brighton. Inside the café Paul addresses the young barista with the same familiarity he reserves for, well, seemingly everyone around here. "When are you going to get some speakers up outside and fill this street with some music, man?" he offers the guy behind the counter during the course of our drink order. "You've got to talk to the boss and get it going. This place used to be hopping". It had the feeling of an exchange they replay over and over – friendly, business-minded, and positive. And relentless. So who is this guy? Cult figure, politician, businessman, community community leader ...worse? What does he actually do? Around town I've heard, "Paul's the man", "He's important", and "Paul makes stuff happen", but what exactly does he 'make happen'? Initial searches ran vague and unhelpful. He's some sort of manager for a local business and land owners association? Who appointed him? I've heard whispers that he was offered positions with both CERA and City Council, only to turn them down. Why and why? He shared a microphone and minced words with John Key? More questions than answers led to curiosity, amusement and skepticism.


Let's start with appearances. Smart casual dress, middle-aged white male with dark, graying hair and slate blue eyes. Confident, engaging, passionate. He's got the smooth talk of a salesman, polished delivery of a politician, and feistiness of an upstart. Should I buy into this? Is Paul who he says he is, or some carefully calculated figure, working endless angles to ensure his paid role in the community? According to Paul, he's a "Benevolent dictator". He moved to New Brighton after the earthquakes and ran a "hippy and eclectic wee café", which he said was a reflection of the past decade of his life. He'd been travelling, "hippy-ing" around the planet, doing what he wanted. "But I moved here and met up with a whole bunch of good people. And I started touching base with community groups around here".

"THE BIGGEST ISSUE IN BRIGHTON IS THIS COMMERCIAL DISTRICT IN THE MIDDLE". "It's like a rot in the core of it, and there was nobody really actively starting to punch through that. The only thing that was happening was complaints. There was nothing solution-based", Paul saw the same thing we all see when we look at this business district and had the gumption to try to do something about it. He started the role voluntarily, going around and meeting with local businesses, saying someone's got to pay attention to this. Paul moved on from his role at the café into a new job, but started to notice how much of his time got soaked up by this community work. From there, Peter Beck – former Christchurch city councilor – gave Paul the necessary nudging. Paul says of Peter's influence "He's a smart, smart cookie. He gets people to do things for him without

them actually realizing they're doing it. He did that with me. Beck said, "Look, you're on the right path here. You need to punch through it. Keep going with it, because you're right". He gave me that little piece of political backing and that knowledge base to keep moving forward". Paul seems to be on the colossal campaign to renovate a community that's been slowly decaying for decades. He started shaving, stopped walking around barefoot, stopped hippying. He collaborates with local business owners, holds meetings, partners with other organizations, and lobbies with elected officials, among other things.

"THE ONLY THING THAT KEEPS ME AWAKE EVERY SINGLE NIGHT IS THAT THERE ARE 18,000 RESIDENTS THAT LIVE HERE. AND THAT EVERY ACTION ME AND MY GROUP TAKES IS GOING TO HAVE A DIRECT IMPLICATION ON AT LEAST 18,000, IF NOT 400,000 PEOPLE IN A CITY". "It's an ethical checklist: are you doing it for the right reasons? Are you doing it for personal gain? Are you doing it for community gain? What is your reason for doing things? And if you can – as an ethical person – comfortably sit there and say you're doing it for the right reasons, then that progress will happen".

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While we were sitting there, two teenage boys sidled up to our table and asked us for a smoke. I went with my old reliable 'smile politely and ignore them until they walk away' method. Paul clowned around for a bit. "I don't know if I should be insulted," laughing, as he puts on the grimy cowboy hat they'd been carrying around town. One of the boys starts recording him on his smart phone, "I'm putting this on Facebook, homie". Paul chuckles quietly as they walk away, "I used to be like that. It was awesome". I, on the other hand, veil my annoyance and try to refocus. "You can't turn your back on that, eh? Young people having fun (gasp!) It must be dangerous". Lesson learned.

So what needs to happen? How is New Brighton going to become what it wants to be? Paul's solution is a holistic one.

"THIS IS FROM MY OWN PERSONAL BACKGROUND OF PERMICULTURE IS THAT IF YOU MAKE ONE ACTION THAT YOU HAVE MANY REACTIONS", SAYS PAUL. "YOU PLANT ONE THING AND NOT ONLY DOES IT PROVIDE YOU WITH FOOD, BUT IT HELPS THE OTHER PLANTS, IT HELPS THE SOIL, AND SO ON. YOU TAKE THAT APPROACH INTO PLANNING... THINGS BECOME FASCINATING ALL OF A SUDDEN". There is no quick fix. Waiting around for others' money, manpower, and expertise is a losing game. "We can engage with the community at a level that Council can't. Consultation is not something you do once a year. It should be in a daily engagement process with the community as well. You just get really opinionated. You get caught in your own little bubble. And bureaucracy does do that. But there are very good things to come out of the bureaucratic system and how they can assist. You need both parts working together. Bureaucracy has the capital, it has the resource, it has the expertise, and so does private industry to partner with the community".

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"I mean, who in this community has ever moved 150 million dollars worth of capital? No one has. I haven't. But we do employ people who have. You've got to have this partnership in place. It doesn't mean that they dictate it. But they certainly take the will and ambition from the community and implement it into something that's feasible". In order for any of that to happen, it seems like you need people to let go of their pride and start cooperating. "That's happening more and more. A lot of it is dropping egos". It doesn't happen overnight, though, does it. "So many people get caught up and they see this vision of a rainbow and the sunrise and rah, rah, rah in fifteen years' time and they're ignoring those simple steps that actually help the community to get some form of positivity back into it". They see it how it is and how they want it to be and think, 'That's never going to happen', right? "But you're never gonna flip that switch. It takes steps. There's twenty thousand steps for New Brighton for actual rejuvenation. Something that is a holistic approach to rejuvenation, not just a big one-off. Because a one-off ain't gonna do it. It's that simple. It's those twenty thousand steps, and the community groups – the ones working on the ground – they're the ones who are doing these steps. And the lobbying to government and council, etcetera, are all enabling those steps to happen."

"THEY'RE ALL VERY COMPLEX. IT IS A VERY COMPLEX SITUATION THAT CHRISTCHURCH IS IN. BUT IT DOESN'T MEAN THAT YOU DON'T DO IT". With Brighton, there is this perception level. Expectations are high, which has lead to

disappointment. People are angry with what could be happening here, but isn't. This doesn't have to be the case. According to Paul, "It's not as bad as everyone perceives it to be. I voluntarily moved to this community after the earthquakes and fell in love with the place. Why? Because the kids are here, we've got a park next door, we've got a school next door, and we live two minutes from the beach. Pret-ty sweet. It's not that bad. And the crime and perception..." He rolls his eyes like it's the same arguments he's been having over and over with everyone he encounters. Misconceptions are made by people who don't want to actually look at the situation. "It's like those kids who walked by. You could see that as a negative. Why would you look at that as a negative? They're having fun. Play with it. Work with it. They look at you as a role model to some extent, even though they may not appreciate it, and you can guide them through these things". So is perceived Paul the real Paul? His impassioned pursuit of holistic regional development, sound reasoning, and cheery persona certainly seem convincing. Ultimately, Paul's actions in New Brighton's progress over the coming years will be a truer judge of his character and aptitude as a community leader. Granted he cannot bear the burden of an entire community's well-being – no one can – but leaders are held to higher standards. For now, though, perhaps we should consider him through the lens of his own personal litmus test. "The day that I can't sit in a café or bar in Brighton drinking beers, drinking coffees, I know that I've completely shanked it. The day that someone comes up to me and goes, 'We don't want you here' is the day that I've screwed it up". Continue reading Hope less. Do more on page 61 in Who is Evan Smith?. THE FULLER ISSUE // 01 [31]


ARTIST PROFILE:

Sharnaeé Beardsley [ ARTICLE BY MELISSA C. REIMER ]

CHRISTCHURCH-BASED ARTIST SHARNAÉ BEARDSLEY CELEBRATES THE BEAUTY OF NATURAL FORMS WITHIN HER PAINTERLY PRACTICE. Beardsley graduated from the Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design, Auckland in 2012 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She has exhibited in Christchurch, Wellington, Nelson and Southland and, in 2013, was a Finalist in the Waikato Society of Arts (WSA) National Youth Art Awards. She also won the Viewers' Choice at the 2013 Otago Arts Gold Award. She works from her studio in Brighton and manages Chambers 241 on Moorhouse Avenue, a gallery established post-quake to represent the work and interests of Christchurch artists, in the absence of a more permanent arts infrastructure in the inner city.

Her work is fresh and contemporary and yet her subject matter has ancient origins with the earliest surviving botanical illustration dated 512 A.D. Original specimen drawings were, of course, intended to assist identification of a species, usually for medicinal purposes. Fast-forward a millennium and then some; more recent historical precedents include Carl Linnaeus (1707-78) and Sydney Parkinson (c. 1745-1771), the latter of whom was appointed by Joseph Banks and painted aboard Cook's first voyage into the Pacific in 1768. Like Parkinson before her, Beardsley's 'painted drawings' are based on close observation of botanical specimens. Beardsley's work also includes found small animal remains. However, unlike the scientifically-correct images produced by the famed botanical illustrators whose work grace the pages of historical tomes, Beardsley's painstakingly-rendered, ink and watercolour works bear testament to a rich and unbridled imagination. Plants, insects and animals exist in a new light. Roses and foxgloves hang suspended, chandelier-like, from the skull of a small bird (Untitled 151012, 2012). A spindly length of spine is bound to a flower specimen; the root system, drawn in minute detail, revealing a striking similarity to the skeletal form of the animal (Untitled 310712, 2012). These works subtly point to the interconnectedness – and interdependence – of all living things. They are, then, primarily a commentary on the fragility of human existence. Beardsley's images of bees in particular, are a reminder of a current global issue – the dramatic decline of honeybee populations. Beardsley's works are also suggestive of humankind's desire to control and cultivate nature and remind me of Monet's taming of Spring growth when it jeopardised a work in progress: "I'm overjoyed, having unexpectedly been granted

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permission to remove the leaves from my fine oak tree! It was quite a business bringing sufficiently long ladders into the ravine. Anyway, it's done now, two men having worked on it since yesterday. Isn't it the final straw to be finishing a winter landscape at this time of the year..."1.

WHILE PREDOMINANTLY NATURALISTIC, SURREALISM ALSO INFLUENCES THIS ARTIST'S BRUSH, AS EVIDENCED IN HER UNUSUAL JUXTAPOSITIONS AND TENDENCY TO REVEAL THE HONEST AND SOMETIMES AWKWARD PROPORTIONS OF HER ORGANIC SPECIMENS. At first glance, one of Beardsley's paintings might pass for a well-preserved nineteenthcentury print. But they're more difficult to dismiss. And odd detail will draw you in and unusual features demand closer inspection. These works hold you, force you to squint, reassess and then step back. This is what art is supposed to do – make us stop, look, question, wonder; and, in this case, marvel at the artist's sure and steady hand. Beardsley's works reveal a little about the artist and a little about the viewer, and thus society. They reflect the increasing interest in changes occurring in the natural world and the integral role of organic specimen in the maintenance of healthy ecosystems. They also play into long-standing discourse around women and nature (addressed in works by writers as diverse as Jung, Freud and Shakespeare), and invite contemplation on an academic level, notably in works where the bones of small birds are depicted rapped in the bulbous forms of a Venus fly trap Dionaea muscipula. There is also that

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subtle nod to the Garden of Eden and the notion of original sin. Artists have always sought to be innovative and modern within their practice, even when tasked with biblical and historical narratives. Neo-classicist Jacques-Louis David (1748-1925) realised new heights in history painting in works such as The Oath of Horatti (1784), ennobling his works with a grandeur and intensity his predecessors had failed to achieve (Poussin, for example, privileged sentimentality in his own rendition of the subject). In the 1870s and 80s the Impressionists opted for unconventional vantage points, fractured compositions and impasto over the sublime idealisation of Neoclassicism. They also turned their back on accepted subject matter and well-established genres, instead favouring everyday experiences, painting scenes from the street and café. In all cases, these artists strove to be of their time. Beardsley, it appears, is also attempting to address modern concerns but via a more traditional and conventional technique. She is neither aiming for the grandeur of David nor the extreme innovation demonstrated by Manet, Monet, Cassatt and Morisot. Her medium – watercolour and ink – is humble, as is the scale of her work. Thematically, her work reveals itself to be current and yet references ideas which have inspired literature and painting since time immemorial. Her paintings are simultaneously old and new. And above all, they're quite simply exquisite. To see more form the artist, visit her website at www.sharnaebeardsley.com, or visit the Chambers 241 gallery at chambers241.wordpress.com. 1

Monet to Alice Hoschedé, 9 May 1889 in Richard Kendall (ed.) Monet by Himself: Paintings, Drawings, Pastels, Letters. London: Macdonald Orbis, 1989, p.96


[ ARTICLE & PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANITA KERR ]

Pants That Stand Up on Their Own IF YOU ARE AN OUTDOORS PERSON OR A TRADIE, THEN GRAB A BREW FROM YOUR FLASK, TAKE A SEAT, AND READ. THIS IS FOR YOU. AND IF THAT IS NOT YOU, READ IT ANYWAY. IT PAYS TO KNOW ABOUT THE BONES THAT MAKE UP THIS GRAND OLD CITY OF CHRISTCHURCH. Cactus Equipment is like a small but crucial bone in your body – you might not often hear about it unless you are a specialist in your field, but if you have heard of it you will be a fan of its purpose and in awe of its ability to be small but work so hard for good. For 22 years Cactus has existed as a small but proud New Zealand company, dedicated to producing high quality outdoors equipment, clothing and work wear. Their ethos is about local jobs, local economy, and the efficiency of a product that works as it should, and lasts even longer than it ought to. Things are happening that give you a hope for the future. We are regularly reminded of global warming, of the depletion of oil, of

the scarcity of some key natural resources. What gets me excited is when I hear of little projects, even the tiniest of entrepreneurial forays – those heart-filled projects that have a bigger picture in mind. That picture could be as simple as making products with integrity, with care for the environment, and with the good of people in mind. It is as simple as that. Think back to the good old 1950s or 60s culture, picture it now; the advertisements we have all seen at some point in a quaint old Woman's Weekly magazine at our grandparents' house. The perfect house in suburbia, a freshfaced housewife happily vacuuming her well-made up house with her new Hoover that was built to last, as the photographer

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shoots the scene for the advertisement on his Minolta Hi-Matic, the one that you might still find in existence down at the Eco Shop on Blenheim Road.

THOSE WERE THE DAYS, AND OF COURSE MANY WERE THE DAYS BEFORE THAT, WHEN THINGS WERE DESIGNED TO LAST. Products were designed for people to trust and therefore buy. At some point during the last 30-40 years, time became of the essence (among other things), and products were manufactured faster, with less care, efficiently, cheaply, and in the end, not made to last. Outsourcing made the production cheaper, and with a change to the way countries trade, the proliferation of easier freighting, we saw the waning of local production and local jobs. Also, with the availability of everything you want on hand, you know you can replace almost anything anytime you want. Enter a revolution, from people who believe that their products should and will last.

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Quality, integrity, and duration. Those who believe in making things local, employing local people, and giving back to this earth and her people. Some such people are the team at Cactus. Within five minutes of meeting some of the crew, I had been introduced to the worldwide phenomena of pants that stand up on their own. You have to see this for yourself. The type of canvas that makes up these trousers is so durable, that when you first buy your pants in the 12 ounce thickness, you can actually stand them up. It takes a few days to break them in, but once you have done so they are extremely comfortable.


CACTUS RECENTLY HAD A CUSTOMER SAY THEY HAVE HAD A PAIR OF SHORTS FOR 5 YEARS AND THEY ARE STILL GOING. It is worth the investment – and not a bad investment for an NZ manufactured product which helps keep local jobs, will last a long time, and is from a company whose founding principles include ethical construction. That is their "pattern language for making things strong, simple and appropriate to the task". They are built to the task. At Cactus, new products are not created unless necessary. When created the product is run it through rigorous testing with their testing clients (keen outdoors folk, including rugged pig farmers), to ensure the product does the job it is supposed to. Scientific testing even includes holding up a smaller staff member inside a canvas bag, and hanging another from a doorway to test buckle strength. Cactus was started by outdoor enthusiasts, mountaineers and climbers. They wanted a chalk bag for climbing and found there was nothing suitable on market. So they made their own. Though a specialist company in the climbing market, they are known here for their brand and their products will suit almost anyone who is into the outdoors. The word goes out and they get a constant stream of tradespeople come into the store including construction workers. Crews who

go to Antarctica will make pit-stops via the store to stock up before heading south. Cactus continue to achieve high quality design at very good prices by being efficient. The fuel costs aren't high as everything is local. There is no middle man. Aside from clothing they make packs of different sizes and purposes for all terrain through to everyday use. For example the "Do-Gooder" bag is $39 and you can use it to cart beer to a BBQ, or shopping from the store. The online clothing and equipment price range is between about $30 for a Classic Chalkbag, to $199 for Supertrousers, to $649 for a Foray pack. If you are in a business or trade, you can sign up and become a pro user at Cactus resulting in certain bulk deals and discount levels. Speaking with the team I could hear the passion for the company's products. "We make products that are dependable and versatile." And with it they bring local jobs to local people. The company employs about 16 local people, some of whom have worked at the company for years. The fans of Cactus know all this. That's why they are fans. And they are loyal. But why wouldn't they be, with a company that is loyal to them. If you have any problems with your product from Cactus, just take it back in and they will repair it for you. But you shouldn't have too many problems because true to form, Cactus works with integrity and great workmanship. Cactus have a story to tell. It's a really good story, and they have incredible support to prove it. Become a fan yourself; pop down and visit Cactus at 90 Fitzgerald Avenue, or visit them online at www.cactusequipment.co.nz

THE FULLER ISSUE // 01 [37]


[ ARTICLE BY ANITA KERR ] [ PHOTOGRAPHS BY TANYA MARIEL INIGUEZ ]

Bailey Peryman

at the Agropolis I RECENTLY HAD THE PLEASURE TO CHAT TO BAILEY PERYMAN, THE MAN BEHIND GARDEN CITY 2.0 AND ITS FOODBAG DELIVERY SERVICE. WITH A BACKGROUND IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, AND MORE RECENTLY, ORGANIC HORTICULTURE, THIS GUY KNOWS HIS GARDENING, COMPOSTING, AND SOIL AND PLANT HEALTH – AND HE IS PASSIONATE ABOUT IT. After just a few minutes of standing by him as he shovelled coffee, orange and lemon remnants (provided by the local CBD bar, C4 Cafe, and Shop 8) into a healthy compost heap, I was already inspired to do my own composting and better manage the meagre pots of herbs and dying lettuces at my door. Bailey is also passionate about his community. He is one of the founders of the Agropolis project on High Street. The Agropolis is a unique project designed to

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create food resilience and sustainability in the new era of Christchurch City. You may have seen the happenings down there during the FESTA event at Labour Weekend in 2013. There were seed growing, shed building, and composting workshops. He has been involved in this field for a few years now; it is becoming his livelihood. His father taught him to make choices in life that would make him happy; do what you enjoy doing – what comes easy – and it will happen. And he has followed that.


That is where Garden City 2.0 comes in. Bailey became serious about the concept of food security, and of knowing where our food comes from. I clarified if he was referring to food security if all our systems failed or we had something more catastrophic than an earthquake?

"YEAH IT WORKS AT THAT LEVEL AS WELL, BUT IT IS REALLY JUST THAT BASIC CONCEPT OF 'WHERE DOES YOUR FOOD COME FROM?'" Bailey has been awarded a grant this year to coordinate the set up of the 'Hand Over a Hundy' project in the East of Christchurch. He explained this is a programme initiated by Jade Temepara in Ashburton. She fundraised for a small grant – $100 for seedlings and tools for people. She then set them up with a local mentor with gardening experience and gave them a year with the challenge to create a garden,

generate a hundred dollars, and pass that on to another family to repeat. Two days a week Bailey has coordinated the set up of that, and the other three days to develop Garden City 2.0 as a social enterprise. It is going well, but involves a lot of voluntary work. It is gradually creating jobs for people which is even better than just creating food. It is starting a cycle

"DEPENDING ON WHO I AM TALKING TO – SOME PEOPLE TALK ABOUT IT BEING A LOCAL FOOD MOVEMENT, SOME PEOPLE TALK ABOUT BUILDING AN INDUSTRY, AND THAT'S WHAT IS WAITING TO HAPPEN". There is a demand for organic produce, so the idea is to produce a revenue stream from sourcing locally grown organic produce and distributing it. The FoodBag Delivery project is this idea in action. It is

Continue reading Bailey Peryman at the Agropolis on page 40.

THE FULLER ISSUE // 01 [39]


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ILAM

SPREYDON HILLSBOROUGH

WOOLSTON

RICHMOND

CHRISTCHURCH CENTRAL

ST ALBANS EDGEWARE

MAIREHAU

HEATHCOTE VALLEY

REDCLIFFS

NEW BRIGHTON

SUMNER

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COMMUNITY GARDENS

COMPOSTABLE FOODS: ANYTHING UNCOOKED, EXCEPT MEAT AND DAIRY.

PAPANUI BRYNDWR

HAREWOOD

CANTERBURY


LEGUMES

Bush Beans Dry Beans Snap Peas Peas Pole Beans

BRASSICAS

Broccoli Cabbage Cauliflower Radish Turnips

Capsicum Eggplant Potato Tomato

SOLANACEAE Chive Garlic Leek Onions Shallots

ALLIUMS Carrot Cucumber Melon Pumpkin Squash

UMBELLIFERAE

Beetroot Silverbeet Spinach

CHENOPODIACEAE

Use our crop family key (below) to make sure you don't rotate plants from the same crop family one after another in your rotation plan. This ensures that the crops that follow each other don't use up the same nutrients from the soil, and you can avoid attracting the same pests.

The sample vegetable patch rotation (right) shows how you could divide the space you have into different crop rotations in a way that helps the soil to maintain a fantastic growing environmnet for your varying plants.

SUCCESSION PLANTING CAN BE USED TO MAXIMISE THE SPACE YOU HAVE AVAILABLE FOR GROWING YOUR OWN PRODUCE BY DIGGING UP YOUR PLANTS WHEN THEIR MAIN PRODUCTION IS OVER AND REPLACING THEM WITH THE NEXT ROTATION OF PLANTS.

A GUIDE TO SUCCESSION PLANTING IN YOUR COMMUNITY...

Plant green manure seeds. These feed the soil with nutrients, preventing weed growth and attracting bees. You could plant mustrad seeds that can then be used in salads or field beans that can be eaten as broad beans.

ROTATION 4

Plant carrots, radishes, root & bulb vegetables. These plants enjoy well aged fertiliser as well as compost.

ROTATION 3

Plant your peas and beans. These plants are great to follow the previous heavy feeders as they will give the soil some rest and return some nutrients.

ROTATION 2

Make sure your soil is well fertilized using compost or manure. Then plant cabbage, spinach and beetroot.

ROTATION 1

Best compost ingredients: food scraps, coffee grinds, grass, animal manures, seaweed (rinsed), leaves and twigs (no thicker than your thumb).

THE FULLER ISSUE // 01 [41]


a business model that is working and the team are now focusing on scaling that up. Through the service you can order seasonal, organic and locally grown fruit and veges in different ranges and sizes and have them delivered or collect them from several pickup points in Christchurch.

big business". We discuss profit and the aggregation of power, large scale agriculture, genetic modification, chemicals leaching into soil, and the gradual destruction of our ecosystems and human health. And the answer to it all comes back to us, and what we can do about it.

It is not lost on Bailey and others that the Agropolis sits at the heart of the planned 'Innovation Precinct' in Christchurch. They are demonstrating what is possible by being those who take a punt and innovate. Bailey wants to build a resilient local food system which he sees as a reflection of our times, with 'resilience' being a buzzword we are used to hearing.

Bailey says the necessary elements for a more resilient food system exist, but they are not working together, so that's what Garden City 2.0 see their role as doing with their food distribution service; getting more of our food produced locally and distributed locally. By using the service people will be buying more than just a bag of food, they will be supporting this system.

I ask if he thinks we can change culture and make an impact in this city. He says we have to. If not in this lifetime then we have to sow the seeds (pun completely intended) for our future generations.

Another topic we discuss is that a lot of children do not know where their food comes from. But this is not just a local issue, Jamie Oliver has already delved into this in his Food Revolution series in the United States. Milk comes from a bottle. A kid standing next to an apricot tree told Bailey that apricots come from the supermarket. He is already on to this issue, helping to initiate a community garden and food forest at the Van Asch Deaf Education Centre in Sumner and another at Aranui High school, but there is a lot to do – too much for one person.

"I THINK WE HAVE WOKEN UP A LOT THROUGH THE EARTHQUAKES, WE HAVE REALISED THE POWER OF COMMUNITY, THROUGH THE FORCE OF NATURE. WE HAVE LEARNT WHAT COMMUNITY IS. I DON'T WANT TO EXPERIENCE A FOOD CRISIS. I DON'T WANT TO EXPERIENCE THAT SHOCK AND I DON'T WANT THE SUFFERING THAT GOES WITH IT FOR MANY PEOPLE". It is human nature to move on, and often forget what we knew, what we felt. We discuss how our ancestors used to live, without fridges, without immediacy of produce and the abundance of supermarkets. "There's been quite a systematic shift to take control of our food supply which has been orchestrated by

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Bailey has built a life around making the world that wee bit better by living a life of integrity, toward himself and his passion of cultivating land and providing for people in his communities. But he has a plan to take that cultivation and provision much wider. He talks of being able to feed a whole city through gardening – not just in case we might have to one day – but because it is simply a better way of living and has a load of benefits; interactions with your community, fitness, growing your own food, saving money, providing for others (including the homeless) – all reciprocal processes. All resilient processes.


"I OFTEN THINK OF IDEAS AS SEEDS. THE IDEA OF COMMUNITY GARDENING WAS SOMETHING MY MIND WAS READY FOR. I THINK THE TIME IS NOW FOR GETTING ON WITH THIS AND MAKING A BIG COMMITMENT TO IT, BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE READY FOR IT. THE WORLD IS READY FOR IT; NOT LEAST THIS CITY. THIS RUPTURE CREATES NEW POSSIBILITIES."

So if you want to get involved there are plenty of places to start. To begin, head down to the Agropolis project (on the corner of High Street and Tuam) and check out what Bailey and the good folk are doing down there. Start a conversation about where our food comes from and what it takes to grow it, and be a part of the Garden City version 2.0.

He has a vision for Christchurch. "I see, what we will hopefully put in place sooner rather than later, bikes coming in and out with waste from different projects and it will be like a hive, like working bees, part of everyday life." He sees people providing simple services, and that just being part of their life, contributing to the system which works for the betterment of their community and their lives and families. It might sound trivial, but it is extremely logical. We became quite philosophical by the end of our discussion, but he is not a dreamer; he is a doer. His philosophy is pure and the action is real. The future looks bright for Christchurch if people of Bailey's ilk have anything to do with it. It is going to be an amazing city in which to live. Community gardening is not new; it has been around for years in Christchurch. Soil & Health Canterbury (Bailey's biggest supporter) have been around for over 70 years. There is even a Canterbury Community Gardens Association, and over 30 community gardens are located across the city.

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[ ARTICLE & PHOTOGRAPHS BY TOM TOLCHARD ]

A LIFE WORTH LIVING GENERATING SOCIAL VALUE I CONSIDER MYSELF TO BE PRETTY LUCKY AND RIGHT UPFRONT WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THAT ALMOST ALL THE FORTUNATE THINGS THAT HAVE HAPPENED IN MY LIFE HAVE BEEN THE RESULT OF RANDOM CHANCE RATHER THAN THE FRUITS OF SOME CAREFULLY CONSIDERED PLAN. In this same vein, I never set out to get into social enterprise, rather the sector found me, and the past 6 years have so far been the most rewarding of my career.

realise that I couldn't get good at something unless I liked doing it. Frankly I just couldn't be arsed to apply myself if I didn't connect with it.

I stumbled into the world of social enterprise (businesses which trade in order to support social missions) after a long, uncomfortable period post-graduation working in the white-collar bliss of the corporate sector. I held a number of jobs working in retail head offices, recruiting people, training and development roles, etc. I enjoyed most of them, but never really had any sense of purpose or satisfaction. My early working life was typically a means to pay my rent, get drunk at the weekend and maybe just about break-even at the end of the month.

In 2004 I quit my job in London and decided that I was going to live in Australia. My basic rationale was along the lines of "…Well, if you're going to be miserable making money for other people then you might as well do it in the sunshine". It turned out to be the best decision that I have ever made. After a brief spell of working for retailers, recruiters and consulting firms I was awarded my permanent residency and was free to reinvent myself.

After a few years of repeating this cycle all I was left with was a grim, grey and unsatisfying existence where my working measure of success was how much money I made for someone else. I also came to

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My introduction to social enterprise came via an email from a friend who said that they had seen a job advertised and thought that I'd be perfect. The role was for a General Manager to help build a start-up street food concept (street hawker style street food and coffee carts), but the difference in this model


was that the employees would exclusively be made up of 16-25 year old young people who were at risk of or suffering homelessness. One thing leading to another and I become the General Manager of STREAT Ltd. STREAT was a wild and fantastic ride which provided me with some really confronting insights into how many of the 'traditional' approaches to helping our most disadvantaged people through the not-for-profit sector were often very well intentioned. However, in practice, these approaches were out-dated, clunky, often prescriptive and in some instances enabling of negative lifestyle choices. STREAT taught me that the people who have fallen through the cracks were incredibly resourceful, creative and streetwise (of course), but the magic happened when they were included in the heart of the business.

NOT HANDED OUT WELFARE, BUT RATHER CONTRIBUTING TO A COMMUNITY OF WORKMATES AND PEERS. This built confidence and self esteem by holding down a meaningful job and

benefiting from all the social and emotional perks that go with it. The work was hard, really hard but the rewards were greater and for the first time in my career I started to describe what I did with enthusiasm and real conviction. With STREAT we offered employment, social support and qualifications. These three pillars were enough to help kids with long term issues to start to change and more importantly make positive choices, which would exit them from the cycle of homelessness.

I WAS ASKED ONE DAY TO CONSIDER THE COST OF KEEPING SOMEONE HOMELESS IN MELBOURNE. I found it to be an odd but very important question. My initial response was that it costs us (the community) nothing to keep someone homeless. I was very wrong. After a subsequent journey into social return on investment (SROI) methodology, I was blown away to hear that it was estimated that for every 'trainee', STREAT was saving the taxpayer on average $70,000 per year! The results were enlightening but made

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perfect sense, considering that many of the staff were regulars at crisis accommodation, accessing drug and alcohol services, spending nights incarcerated, accessing crisis mental health services, accruing public transport fines, etc., etc.It was at that point I understood that it is often far more cost effective to help people intensively than it is to keep them living the lifestyle of a vulnerable, homeless youth. Post STREAT I've been involved in a number of great social enterprise projects which include the development of Western Australia's first coworking and socialinnovation centre, Spacecubed.org, built an NFP law firm which invests 100% of its profits into the provision of free humanitarian legal services enabling refugees and asylum seekers to have legal representation when arriving in Australia. I also built a model for the Association for the Blind to employ people living with visual disabilities to conduct accessibility audits, (online and document audits), and my current project is working with a large affordable housing provider to help design and run new, high impact social housing.

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THERE ARE A FEW THINGS I'VE LEARNED ALONG THE WAY AND SURPRISINGLY THEY ARE ALL UTTERLY OBVIOUS BUT TYPICALLY OVERLOOKED. Co-Design: Designing services for people and not with people is madness, but commonplace. People inherently know what they need and how they wish to access it. By engaging the user of your services (homeless person, aged care resident, youth at risk, etc.), you will create 'authentic' high impact and resilient social services. Get Real: Many of my clients are large NFP organisations who have frankly 'lost the plot'. They run business models that are developed to attract short term government funding and offer very limited opportunities for participants to break the cycle or disadvantage. A homelessness provider who is tackling the issue of homelessness by providing more beds is simply missing the point. To prevent people becoming homeless, we need to examine the upstream


issues, which lead them into being homeless. Only then can we reduce the numbers by introducing preventative care and support. Focus on the Enterprise (not the Social): A business which is failing to deliver a quality product or service or which is over priced or simple out-gunned is a lousy place to be. In my opinion social enterprises must work incredibly hard to provide a model that primarily offers a great product and then delivers great support, not the other way around. Measure What Matters: Get away from thinking in terms of input and throughputs, i.e how many people come through our programs, but focus on understanding what happens to them. This 'theory of change' allows organisations to gain a deeper understanding of what changes take place and places a social and economic measure to that change. By gaining a deeper understanding of the social equity that is generated by social enterprises, organisations can become very attractive to impact investors or philanthropists who do expect to see

measurable social outcomes in return for their investments. Stop-Start-Keep: Three simple questions, but when reviewing the effectiveness of social sector services it is often helpful to consider stopping doing the things that the organisation isn't crash hot at or that doesn't generate sufficient social outcomes to justify the input. The NFP sector is a busy place, is it typically highly effective? No way. A mission for me has been to separate busy from effective.

MY CURRENT MEASURE OF SUCCESS IS AROUND HOW MUCH SOCIAL VALUE I CAN GENERATE. I'm not saying that social enterprise is the answer to our modern social problems but there is plenty of room at the table for it, especially when compared to the traditional NFP's. It's not been an easy journey but it has been a real and rewarding one.

Check out: www.streat.com.au . www.Siiwa.org . www.spacecubed.com www.future-proof.com.au . au.linkedin.com/in/tomtolchard

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[ ARTICLE & PHOTOGRAPHS BY CAITLINÂ METZEL ]

INTEGRITY It's In Their Jeans IF YOU'RE ANYTHING LIKE ME, YOU ABSOLUTELY DESPISE SHOPPING FOR JEANS. FROM FIGHTING THE TRAFFIC AT THE MALL, TO TRYING ON DOZENS OF PAIRS OF ILL-FITTING JEANS, THERE IS NEVER AN ENJOYABLE MOMENT. After hours of disappointment and selfdoubt, I may come home with one pair that I will most likely be displeased with. My short stature almost guarantees an awkward fit, and the fabrics used in most mass-produced clothing leaves a lot to be desired. Thankfully, it doesn't have to be that way. Dual makes jeans and other lovely garments, and offers a pleasant and personal alternative to the mall-shopping

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experience. I met with owner/designer Caro Allison to find out more about this classic Christchurch label, its humble roots, and what's been happening with Dual at their new Tannery shop in Woolston. Originally called Demo Jeans and based out of her home in Lyttelton, Caro (with her background in fashion design) began to sew urban skater shorts for teenaged boys in 1998, featuring legs that were much wider


than their mums would make. Wide-leg trousers were not yet being imported from the US, and word of mouth quickly spread to the skaters' girlfriends, and then their mums and beyond. Before she knew it, Caro found her niche producing custom jeans for many people – ranging from teenage boys to adult women alike. At this point, she was required to change her business moniker, as Demo was already registered to another business. She began to ponder what else to title her company. "I just went through the dictionary and I looked for a four letter word that started with D, and I was bringing in female pants at the same time, so Dual worked quite well". Retailers quickly caught on, and the demand for her designs rapidly rose. Eventually she had to move into a larger workshop on Norwich Quay in Lyttelton – one that could accommodate her rapidly-growing business. When the devastating February 2011 earthquake struck, the Lyttelton shop was rendered unusable. She temporary set up shop in a tiny studio in Ferrymead, until construction of The Tannery was complete. While small and out of the way, she did learn a lot from her time in Ferrymead.

"BEING IN A TINY WEE UNIT, I REALISED HOW THE PUBLIC ACTUALLY LIKE BEING A PART THINGS, AND FOR US WE'RE NEVER BORED HAVING THE WORKSHOP RIGHT THERE. THERE'S NEVER A QUIET MOMENT". Having their workshop close at hand offers many benefits to both Dual and their customers.

For example, it cuts down on transport costs and carbon output. It also offers the unique customer experience of having new purchases tailored to the exact fit right there on site, so they can be sure their new jeans or dress flatters them perfectly.

IT'S EXCITING TO SEE WHERE YOUR CLOTHING ACTUALLY ORIGINATES FROM, TOO, AND TO KNOW THAT IT IS BEING MADE WITH INTEGRITY BY SKILLED SEAMSTRESSES WHO ARE COMPENSATED FAIRLY FOR THEIR WORK. Dual's staff is comprised of about eight employees altogether. You can imagine what a relief it must have been for Caro to move into her new storefront and workshop at The Tannery. "It's exciting – we've found our home, really. We've never been so close to so many other retailers, and it's full of support. I do love being in a recently-built building, and the whole place has been built with a lot of integrity. Everyone is looking for the one-stop shop in Christchurch now".

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Dual's designs differ from other Kiwi designs in that Caro uses specialty designer fabrics that she has imported from Europe (mainly Italy) that are unseen in other New Zealand designs. "What I love about the Italian fabrics is the premium quality. There's nothing like it, really".

TRUE TO THE KIWI DIY CULTURE, CARO DESIGNS THE CLOTHING HERSELF WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY DIRECTING HER BUSINESS. "WE'RE REALLY JUST STICKING WITH WHAT WE'RE DOING AND WHERE WE'RE GOING, AND WE REALLY LISTEN TO OUR CUSTOMERS". Dual clothing items are an investment. They are high quality, carefully hand-made, and they are built to last beyond seasons and fads. It's this business model that keeps Dual's loyal customers returning time and time again, from teenagers to pensioners. "Dual is practical. We're having a lot of fun. We're colourful and we're creative with our European influence, but we're a homegrown New Zealand company".

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Caro's favourite items in the shop are the ones she hasn't yet created. When asked what item of clothing she couldn't do without, she laughs, "My gumboots! ...No, I think my Dual linen dress. I couldn't do without that this summer. It's just such an easy throw-on and it looks so good. A simple dress you can just throw on, you don't need anything else and it's done. Bang!".

THE NEW SHOP AT THE TANNERY IS EXCITING, ORGANIC, AND FILLED WITH THE PROMISE OF WHAT IS TO COME. "PROSPERITY! AND LOTS OF IT!" CARO LAUGHS. In all seriousness though, she says that she plans to continue her high standard of design with her gorgeous and exclusive fabrics, small runs, and intimate designs. Dual Jeans are tough and loyal, and hold longevity – much like the good people of Christchurch. The times are exciting, and it certainly will be interesting to see what the future holds for both. To see Dual's collection, visit their shop at The Tannery, 3 Garlands Rd., Woolston, or visit them online at www.dual.co.nz


[ ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT WALTERS ]

Counting people first A SPECIAL BOOK STORE AND A VERY SOCIAL ENTERPRISE. Ok. Lets get botanical. The Karo is a small costal shrub found on the north island of New Zealand. For the Tui and the Bellbird (those very New Zealand of birds), this small shrub provides sustenance in the hardest of months, late winter and early spring. When things are hard and food is scarce, the Karo tree has got it where it counts. In New Brighton I meet a different kind of Karo. Not a shrub, but a person with similar sustaining and hopeful qualities. In New Brighton, the Barn Bookshop dominates that small enclosed mall (the one that looks like a barn) at the beginning of the slow road on the right, heading towards the beach. Specialising in quality second hand books, love of literature is only the beginning. All the books are donated and the profits are dispersed to various projects and initiatives of the St. Christopher's Bookshop Trust. Originally, St. Christopher's had a book shop in the old Dalley Seed and Grain store on Riccarton Road. "Post-quake, it was time to be where we were needed," says Karo. A local herself, Karo mentions that the shop was set up 3 years ago by the Trust at her suggestion. When I first come into the shop, Karo is preoccupied with sorting a large quantity of freshly donated books. "It's important to sort the wheat from the chaff, and get them printed and shelved." She places the books aside and we sit down to begin the interview. However, before we get stuck into, it she comments on my pants, a pair of well worn Cactus supertrousers. "My daughter, an entomologist who does a lot of field work, just lives in those! I like the ethics of the company; they're locally made, have a low carbon foot print, go the distance

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and encourage people to tread lightly on the earth", says Karo. Although the book shop is an Anglican initiative, Karo points out she is however, a 'convinced Quaker'. By Karo's own statement, Quakers are a rare breed in our 21st century society.

Quaker principles that Karo believes have helped shape the shop and make it, as she says, "dovetail into the local community".

For those that don't know, Quakers follow the acronyms S.P.I.C.E.S. or S.T.E.P., depending on which side of the Atlantic you decide on. S.P.I.C.E.S. equates to simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality and stewardship. S.T.E.P. is simplicity, truth, equality and peace. If you didn't already know, some famous Quakers included brothers Cyrus and James Clark, Joseph Rowntree, and John Cadbury — all renowned for their business acumen and also their dedication to philanthropic and social justice. The Clark brothers and John Cadbury of shoe and chocolate fame both had commitment to the highest quality, but also to social justice and equitable provision for their workers. The villages of Street and Bournville had high levels of education, housing and leisure activities due to the provision and services put in place by Cadbury and the Clark brothers. These villages were renowned for their comparative quality of life and the comparative void of alcohol-related problems that dominate other areas where workers lived in the mid-to-late 1800's. Joseph Rowntree, on the other hand, was ahead of his time developing a village trust to look after the village of New Earswick, and two trusts to promote and affect social reform. The difference here was that one was a simple charitable trust, and the other a limited company so that it could walk in places that a simple trust could not. These were people that understood business but who also cared. It is these

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"THERE ARE TWO THINGS THAT WE DO HERE: PRESENT THE BEST BARGAIN AND GOOD QUALITY BOOKS, AND TALK TO PEOPLE AND EACH OTHER. PEOPLE ARE GENUINELY EXCITED AND DELIGHTED ABOUT BOOKS IN THIS SPACE", SAYS KARO. "I have regular people coming in and giving me books. One gentlemen is an ex-police dog handler and he brings me books about animals and dog handling. I also have two ex-nuns which keep me up to date with spiritual books and things". "I say to my suppliers, 'so and so needs this book', and they say, 'oh, I will have a look and get back to you'. I just ask the right person if they can help me with things and they do". "This city has become a city with pockets of hope that are owned and created by fantastic people, not by what is being built


here or there. These are the things that are quietly happening". The outside table is particularly popular in this shop. "Where else can you buy 3 books for two dollars? It's such a popular browsing and chatting place, you find absolute strangers discussing their favourite authors. Most days, we sell 60 books from the outside tables". The bookshop has a list of regulars; some that consume books as an extra meal, and others that want to talk or come in to get a book for their neighbour, some for connection, some for solitude, and others for friendship. "People come to talk, to share. If I don't have the book they want, I tell them I will put it in the database – that's my head! – and when I come across that book, or the people that give me books find it, I store it so that when that person comes back in I can get it for them".

THEY ARE OFTEN SURPRISED THAT SHE HAS REMEMBERED, BUT THAT IS THE SERVICE SHE PROVIDES THERE. Karo is helped by six volunteers, and they are all devoted to books and the kind of social interaction this shop produces. Karo's youngest volunteer is 17 years old and her oldest is 85. Her team includes a published poet, and two of the shop volunteers also volunteer at the local community gardens. Dylan, a 22 year-old organics student from Lincoln University, presents as either a tattooed millennial or as a character from one of his favourite Tolkien tales.

"People come in and we just give them advice" Some people just come in because it's a happy place with a good vibe, and others come in because we have such a good selection of books". Dylan talks further about his love of books, and passion for the smell of both new and old books. "We get a lot of donations from older people, so some of the stock is just something that you can't find anymore or wouldn't come across when you do a Google search or something similar. The other day, I came across some early editions of Soil and Health Association publications, which is now the Organics Magazine. There were some original compost guides, which you just wouldn't find now". Karo says it's not easy to get volunteers, but when they do, they add so much to the shop. These volunteers bring with them different interests and qualities that she doesn't have, and also experiences for the customers that they otherwise probably wouldn't get. When I ask Dylan why he volunteers, he replies,

"CHEAP BOOKS! AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO LOOK THROUGH THE NEW ARRIVALS, BUT I ALSO JUST LOVE SPEAKING TO PEOPLE".

Dylan has volunteered for about 5 months. He loves books. His areas of responsibility are the mythology, fantasy, esoteric, and gardening books.

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Another side to the business is the amount of travelers they get in from the local Backpackers, one of the few that is still operational in Christchurch. "We had this guy come in a few weeks ago and he just looked white and weary. I asked him if he was ok and he told me his story. He had decided to come from the U.S. to Christchurch to see if it would be potentially viable to come and work here. He was an engineer and he wanted to see the building situation. He had no idea. He had spent the day before walking around the city and he told me he just cried. He came and sat in the shop and said to me, 'thank you for taking the time to notice I was walking wounded'". As we were coming to the end of our time, a customer comes in and hands over some home-made fudge. "Thanks for everything Karo, hope you like it". Karo explains that she finds large print Mills and Boon books for the customer's next door neighbour.

"THAT'S QUITE A SPECIFIC REQUEST, BUT I FIND THEM!"

"YOU SEE, THIS IS THE WAY IT WORKS HERE," SAYS KARO. "WE JUST TREAT PEOPLE WELL, AND THEY TREAT US WELL. PEOPLE ARE OFTEN SO PLEASED WITH THE BOOKS THEY FIND THAT THEY BUY THE BOOKS, READ THEM AND GIVE THEM BACK TO US! ISN'T THAT THE BEST BUSINESS MODEL?" Part of living in a city is taking the time to discover it yourself, devoid of guide books. Wandering, you discover the unexpected and begin to form links across unfamiliar territory. Being a fl창neur means you discover treasures or Taonga like the Barn Book Shop, and the people that work there. It leads me to think what else is out there. This small book store and the staff in it are a place of knowledge and wisdom, refuge and strength. Like the Karo bush for the Tui or the Bellbird, they really are Taonga. They provide a place of sustenance and refuge for the people that come in. Money is part of the story, but making people count is the real enterprise in this store. First and foremost, over and above, however, this is a bloody good second hand book store.

To visit the Barn Book Shop, stop by 121 Seaview Rd., New Brighton. Open 10-4.30pm every day, except for Saturdays until 2pm.

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FULLER ROASTERY REVIEW

UPSHOT

ROASTERY MONDAY – FRIDAY 7-2 SAT 8-2 03-384 0629 131 BRIDLE PATH RD, HEATHCOTE VALLEY, 8022

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE

UPSHOTCOFFEE.CO.NZ OR FIND THEM ON FACEBOOK

MEGAN AND JUSTIN RUN UPSHOT ROASTERY, A WHOLESALE COFFEE BEAN PROVIDER AS WELL AS A ROASTERY THAT NESTLES ITSELF NICELY, THANK YOU, UP AGAINST THE HEATHCOTE RIDING SCHOOL. Like all good symbiotic relationships, the Riding school helps with the patronage and the Roastery shows off its exquisite food and superior coffee to get the word spreading. It's not just equestrians that make the most of the berry and cream cheese muffins or the freshly made toasties. Riders of the two wheeled kind also know that it is a great place to end, start or grab a mid ride snack. Eclectic furniture, freshly-made food, and friendly service stand out. Oh – don't forget their coffee blends; Loco, named after Loco the Dog, is one of my favourites. Chocolate and Spice, their singleblend Ethiopian Mocha Harrar, is pretty special, as well. Upshot Roastery is a regular haunt for the Heathcote masses as well and one feels it is the place where "business" is taken care of. It's a changing place and Justin is keenly working on a covered area for the winter. When asked if I could include this review in the Fuller, Megan replied, "Ha! You call this a roastery?" Yes, I do.

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[ ARTICLE BY MIKE MORAVEC ] [ PHOTOGRAPHS BY CAITLIN METZEL ]

Who is Evan Smith? EVAN SMITH IS UNEXPECTED. EX-PROFESSOR, EX-RED-ZONER, CONSULTANT, AND CO-CHAIR OF EASTERN VISION AND AvON ARE SEVERAL OF THE LOADED LABELS THAT EVAN CARRIES AROUND WITH HIM. ALTHOUGH HE DOESN'T SEEM TO NOTICE. He is focused. Walking into the coffee shop wearing casual clothing, relaxed hair and carrying a bundle of visual aids, Evan looks like a regular guy. His eyes, focus, and conversation are all locked onto his map of the Avon River area. Barely talking about or regarding himself, Evan only wanted to discuss the future and prospects of the city. He is humble, gracious, average. Except he isn't. Most people look out for themselves when tragedy strikes. Most people hold on to what's left, hunker down and wait. They don't walk away from stable careers to spearhead audacious, big-picture, wholesale change on behalf of the people and place that surrounds them. Evan is different. When the earthquakes hit and his home was deemed uninhabitable, Evan got involved. His process wasn't manufactured or contrived; he listened to advice and did what he felt he was supposed to do. He started talking to others in the community, lending a hand where work was being done and help was needed. This led to an increased role in several efforts – chiefly AvON and later Eastern Vision.

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"The Avon-Otokaro Network [AvON]", according to their website, "is a network of individuals and organizations promoting the future use of the residential red zone lands as an ecological and recreational reserve". They wish to "establish a community-driven science-informed living memorial to rejuvenate and nurture the long-term environmental, economic, community and spiritual wellbeing of the eastern suburbs and of those living throughout greater Christchurch. Our aim is to turn a tragedy into an opportunity, a polluted drain into a vibrant river system, and exhaustion and despair into hope and inspiration".

EVAN STARTED UP A COMMUNITY GROUP WHICH BECAME SUCCESSFUL, AND IT QUICKLY CONNECTED TO OTHER CRITICALLY-AFFECTED SUBURBS. These groups all grew very organically, from the streets to neighborhoods to the greater city, out of necessity rather than enterprise. After the February quake, those groups (represented by people like Smith) reached out to John Hamilton, the National Coordinator of Civil Defense, providing honest feedback that otherwise was lacking in the information from the Civil Defense hierarchy.

THAT INVOLVEMENT LAID THE FOUNDATION FOR EVAN'S CURRENT PATH, WHETTING HIS APPETITE FOR CREATING REAL AND LASTING CHANGE. Instead of reacting to the immediate needs of the community, he – along with several colleagues – shifted their focus to the future. Taking tools they developed from prior careers and the experiences resulting from the national emergency, they organized their efforts toward the bigger picture. "What we want to do is help the communities recover from the earthquakes, reinvent the East in a new way that retains the social capital and the communities that existed and are very vibrant, and to extend on that to help with the urban infrastructure". While that all seems straightforward and naturally-progressing, it certainly hasn't happened without a cost. Evan's whole life seems devoted these projects. He quit his fulltime job to give all his time to one effort (AvON) that pays nothing, and another (Eastern Vision) that pays eight hours of wages per week. Smith dedicates far more time now than was ever demanded from his prior job, and he doesn't even consider it a sacrifice.

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Committing himself to improving the city's well-being is simply the sensible way forward as he sees it. "It helps me to move through the process of giving up on the home where I brought up my family. Moving on is much easier for me when I know that land could become a park one day", says Smith. How can your project have the greatest positive impact. "It's all about collaboration. Forging networks of communities of place, of identity, of issue. It's about being able to connect the dots. Where there are gaps, it's about facilitating people and groups to fill those gaps. It has to be community driven. Look at the big picture of what you want to happen, what assets your place has, and seeing what the areas of concern are. Bring people together and be willing to learn from one another". We all want the world to be a better place, but often we're not ready to pursue that change. Even if we were, we can't agree on how to do it or what 'better' means. Inconvenience, sacrifice, and hard work require more energy and time than we have to spare. Life's hard enough without taking on challenges we aren't required to face. That is the general script that plays out in many lives in many places. It is the reality

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that saps hope, that breeds discontent, that shrinks our lives into smaller, more isolated existences. Not for everyone, not to the same extent, and not in the same way, but to some degree apathy has the ability to eat away at us. Paul Zaanen (see pages 26-29) and Evan Smith are two people trying to write a different story. They take on obstacles that impede progress. Their uncommon, proactive approaches may turn heads, but Paul and Evan wouldn't have it another way.

THE TIME, ENERGY, AND SACRIFICE REQUIRED ARE SIMPLY THE STANDARD COSTS OF LIVING IN THE WORLD THEY WISH TO BE A PART OF. Their smiles and outlooks on the future make it seem like the costs aren't very painful. They are a good kind of exhausted – the type felt after an invigorating workout. Not everyone will read this, quit their jobs and die for a cause. I won't. But maybe we make a few choices that feel like personal loss. Maybe we lend a small hand on occasion and maybe things will start feeling a bit different.


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[ ARTICLE BY SHAWN GOUGH ] [ PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSH DUNCAN ]

A COMMUNITY IN ACTION WE HAVE ALL FACED THE DECISIONS MADE BY THE FEW FOR THE MANY. WE HAVE SOMETIMES APPLAUDED THESE DECISIONS, SOMETIMES THESE DECISIONS HAVE CREATED HOSTILITY BECAUSE RESIDENTS INVOLVED DON'T FULLY UNDERSTAND HOW THEIR OPINIONS HAVE INFLUENCED A DECISION, AND SO FEEL THEIR PARTICIPATION HAS BEEN WASTED. [60] THE FULLER ISSUE // 01


They have felt left out of the communication process, and feel as though they are not considered as valuable members of the decision-making process. However, there are a number of individuals who believe that public participation is a necessary component of any decision made for the benefit of a community, suburb or city. Chris Mene is one of these individuals and his role in the Aranui Community Campus consultation document is testament to how a city moving forward should use this model for the rebuilding of Christchurch. For many, the name Chris Mene will be a familiar one. He hails from Christchurch and has a sporting history that culminated in him representing New Zealand in Athletics and for Samoa at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996. He is currently a member of the Canterbury District Health Board, has served on the Spreydon-Heathcote and Shirley-Papanui Community Board, is a director of Mene Solutions Ltd, and has worked as a facilitator for the Aranui Community Campus consultation process. These are just some of the many roles he has had but his résumé is quite full, which reinforces his obvious commitment to involvement in community action. It is in these roles that he has used the core values of the International Association for Public Participation [IAP2], an organisation has been a member of for several years. On the day of the interview, it is hot. 33 degrees hot, but this does not affect his demeanour. I sense in his voice an excitement about the opportunity to discuss public participation when I mention the reason for the interview, the rebuilding process and his involvement in facilitating consultation processes. He insists I lead the discussion. I am keen to find out why he has had such a long and substantial association with IAP2. "It just made sense", he states, "people should be engaged". Here, he is referring to the core values of IAP2. There

are 7 of them but the gist is that people affected by planning should be engaged in the decision making process and how this process should be organised. Reading through the documentation on their website it makes perfect sense.

WHY AREN'T WE INVOLVED, INFORMED AND RECOGNISED AS VALUABLE PARTICIPANTS IN THE DECISIONS THAT AFFECT US DIRECTLY? If it makes perfect sense, how willing are organisations to be a part of this approach? I put this question to Mene. "Some organisations are open and embracing of the principles of IAP2 and others have a narrower lense – that is, they just inform the participants involved of their decisions, which is still legitimate". I guess that while the latter exists for a lot of the planning that has taken place over the past three years, he would like to see more of the former. That is, more organisations involving, informing and recognising the contribution of the affected parties during the decision-making process of the rebuild.

HE INFORMS ME THAT IT IS IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THAT THE REBUILD IS A "TRANSFORMATIVE PROCESS" AND THE WORD 'TRANSFORM' HAS A LOT OF MEANING. Our city cannot go back to the way things were, one meaning of the word transform, but that the process is a human one whose "goal is to use the momentum created by this human interaction to produce an outcome that fosters development of the organizational system and its people". This

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makes sense and Mene sees the impact of this transformation on our city. He states,

"THE REBUILD IS QUITE A LARGE AND COMPLEX PROGRAMME AND BECAUSE OF THIS IT BRINGS A NUMBER OF FACTORS INTO THE EQUATION; TIME, COST AND SCOPE. IF ONE OF THESE ASPECTS OF THE PROCESS CHANGES IT AFFECTS THE OTHERS AND THOSE PARTICIPANTS INVOLVED". MENE IS ADAMANT THAT, TO ENGAGE IN THIS PROCESS, TRANSFORMATION, "YOU HAVE TO ALLOW FOR THIS". It is at this point in the conversation that I ask him to discuss recent successes where his belief in the IAP2 philosophy and the transformative process has worked. He reminds me that his overall approach is "to share values about getting people engage". In order to highlight his success, he briefly summarises the recent Education Renewal Process where over the past 18 months the Ministry of Education [MOE] have conducted an analysis of the quake effects on a number schools, particularly on the East side of Christchurch. The result of this was the closure and merger of a number of schools but the impact of this bureaucratic process was that it affected thousands – families, students, staff and communities. Whenever MOE decide to close a school, they are required by statute to engage other affected schools. With the closure of 4 schools in Aranui, Wainoni and Avondale, the MOE only received one submission in response to this consultation. The reason for this one submission; the narrowness of the process.

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Then by way of contrast, he speaks passionately about the role he played as facilitator and the process for the Aranui Community Campus project and its subsequent Community Engagement Report. It was during this process that he was able to use his knowledge from previous consultation processes which allowed him to organise a community approach to the development of the school. It took 10 weeks at the end of 2013 to achieve what Mene labels as an "excellent outcome". It is a phrase he states he doesn't use that often but because it was a community-led project, he saw it as excellent, the second time he exclaims his joy at the finished product. What did it take to make this a successful project? Community-led engagement – it took nine members of the community who live, work, play and participate in the community to volunteer and lead the process. They led a process that drew on the IAP2 values, attempting and succeeding in getting community involvement.

"THERE WERE THIRTEEN ENGAGEMENT STRANDS WHICH INCLUDED WORKSHOPS, DROP-INS, STALLS AT LOCAL EVENTS, AND MEDIA, ALL IN AN ATTEMPT TO GET FACE-TO-FACE WITH MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC". A fuller account is provided in the summary document on the project's Basecamp account. Reading through this document, is it clear that the core values of IAP2 are a governing factor in obtaining involvement from those affected in the creation of a community campus.


Their approach used other technology to connect to the community by creating a Facebook group, a Twitter account, a LinkedIn account and the already mentioned Basecamp account which Mene called "the spine of the operation". "Through this platform we engaged 230 people", he recalls. While it may not appear to be a large number, when you compare it with the one submission on the closures which the MOE received it is immense. The outcome of this process is the Community Engagement Report. It is a report that offers the MOE information on what the people of the four schools involved in the closures of their schools, the students, the people of the community, the valued stakeholders want when their new community campus is opened in 2017. It is a document that highlights how to obtain public participation which Mene informs me is getting recognition from organisations within the education sector. The process and submission paper has been endorsed by the PPTA on their blog of the 5 best things of 2013. "The Aranui year 1-13 campus has two elements that are welcome; there has been genuine

consultation, and the concept of the school as a hub for the community with social, health and recreational provision is fantastic. Many teachers would like to see this model replicated elsewhere".

MENE'S ROLE IN THIS PROCESS HAS BEEN AS THE FACILITATOR FOR THE GROUP AND IT APPEARS THAT HIS AIM AND BELIEF IN A SYSTEM THAT PROMOTES THE INVOLVEMENT OF PEOPLE IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES OF PLANNING HAS BEEN INFLUENTIAL, ALTHOUGH HE PROBABLY WOULD DENY THIS, GIVEN HIS BELIEFS ABOUT PARTICIPATION. What can Christchurch learn from this? We can learn that if you give the people the opportunity to be active in the process of transforming the city, you get a city for the people. A city that includes not excludes; a city that is in sync with the needs and wants of it residents. No surprises.

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UPCYCLE PROJECT 01 [ ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRADLEY TRAYNOR ]

IMAGE 1

TOOL LIST WHILST WORKING IN AND AROUND CHRISTCHURCH ON THE REBUILD I'VE NOTICED AN ABUNDANCE OF DISCARDED PALLETS. THIS GOT ME THINKING, "WHAT CAN I USE THIS SOURCE OF FREE TIMBER FOR?" THE ANSWER IS 'ANYTHING', YOU'VE JUST GOT TO GET CREATIVE – JUST LOOK AT WHAT THEY'VE ACHIEVED AT THE PALLET PAVILION. Pallets can be used to make almost anything. All you need is a bit of patience, some creative thinking and a little bit of good old elbow grease. Well maybe more than a little, but ultimately that's what makes it so rewarding; that from an old neglected pallet you have created an object that is practical and functional, something from nothing. Here are ten steps to making a versatile shelf which can be used as a wine rack, planter or herb garden. Always choose your pallets carefully and always ask permission. More often than not, people are more than happy for you to take the pallets off their hands. As the old saying goes, "One man's trash is another man's treasure".

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Cordless drill

Pencil

Jigsaw (If using rounded edges)

Nail punch

Hammer Handsaw Tape measure Square

Sandpaper (coarse and fine) or an electric sander Hand full of nails

TIME NEEDED: 90MINS STEP 1. There are many different types of pallets; for this project you will need a pallet with solid side and middle timbers. Start with the pallet as if it was the right way up. As seen on image 1. STEP 2. From one end count up 3 slats. At the top edge of the third slat square down on both ends and middle timbers using your square and pencil. (See image 2.) Cut through all three timbers using the handsaw. You will end up with 2 halves, with three slats on the back and one on the front, as shown in image 3. It might be an idea to mark front and back at this stage.


STEP 3. Using the nail punch and hammer to punch the nails through, remove the single slat on the front and the top slat on the back. Put these to one side.

IMAGE 2

STEP 4. Moving onto the three vertical timbers we then measure up from the bottom of the timber 150mm and then square across (see image 4). From the top slat on the back measure up 80mm and then square across. Find the centre of the timber and mark a vertical line from the top horizontal line to the bottom horizontal line. Repeat on the other two vertical timbers. At this stage you can use a rounded object (I've used a bottle top) to mark a curve on the right angles, as shown in image 4.

IMAGE 3

STEP 5. Using the hand saw cut all three top lines right through. Then cut the bottom line, half way through to the centre line from the front. After this, saw down the centre line from top to bottom, leaving you with something like image 5. Measure the thickness of the slat we took off earlier, it's usually around 20mm. Then on the middle vertical timber measure from the bottom up 20mm, square down and cut away, as shown in image 5. STEP 6. Cut the curves with a jigsaw to give a rounded finish. Repeat on the remaining two vertical timbers, as seen in image 6. STEP 7. This is where the elbow grease comes into play; sand the rounded edges and the whole rack to get rid of any pencil marks or any potential splinters. If you can get en electric sander. It will make it much easier.

IMAGE 4

STEP 8. Measure between the two end vertical timbers and cut one of the spare slats to this

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IMAGE 5

IMAGE 6 length. Fit the slat in between the two end vertical timbers, under the middle vertical timber to form the base of the shelf. Then nail in place, as seen in image 7. STEP 9. Fit the remaining slat to the front using either screws or nails. I've used some large industrial screws but nails would be fine. Then you can either paint or varnish.

IMAGE 7

STEP 10. Fix to the wall using wall plugs and screws through the top slat, either inside or out. If you are going to use it for a herb garden or

planter, just find some planter pots to fit. There you have it – a versatile wine rack / planter / herb garden. Happy upcycling!

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MELAMINE OWL BROOCH $12 God Save the Queen, Lyttelton

WOODEN CIRCLE RING 'Emiti' (Aus.) – $12 God Save the Queen , Lyttelton

MUSE JEWELLERY gear cufflinks $79 Wanderer at the Tannery, Woolston

WOODEN BICYCLE BROOCH 'JHD' (NZ) – $12 God Save the Queen, Lyttelton

How awesome are these things... HONESTLY THEY ARE

FRAMED PICTURE BY AMERICAN ARTIST 'MARK RYDEN'' $48 print, "The Tree Show" exhibition God Save the Queen, Lyttelton

SMALL DEER NOTEBOOK

$8, Teepee – at the Tannery, Woolston

LARGE BIRD NOTEBOOK

$13.50, Teepee at the Tannery, Woolston

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CERAMIC MUG $10 each or 3 for $20, Printed by God Save the Queen, made in Lyttleton, God Save the Queen, Lyttelton

NZ ART CARDS Postcards $3 each or 4 for $10 God Save the Queen, Lyttelton

WOOL RABBIT

$45 by In My Backyard Henry Trading, Lyttleton

YOU'RE ON DISHES: AN ILLUSTRATED STUDENT COOKBOOK $22 printed by University of Canterbury Students' Association, Wanderer at the Tannery, Woolston

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FABRIC BOW CLIPS $2.80 each Toi Toi at the Tannery, Woolston

LITTLE CERAMIC HOUSES

$48 by Jane Armour, Henry Trading, Lyttleton

CUTE BROACHES

TINGLE VISION DESIGNS NOTEBOOKS

Price on Request, Henry Trading, Lyttleton

$28 each Teepee at the Tannery, Woolston

POTTERY $31 (mug), $63.50 (jug) Hand made in Poland. 'Ceramika Artystyczna' ceramics, Teepee at the Tannery, Woolston

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HANNAH CLAIRE JEWELLERY MINERAL EARRINGS $30, Handmade in Christchurch, Wanderer at the Tannery, Woolston

SABONETE GRAPEFRUIT SOAP $14 by 'Claus Porto' Toi Toi at the Tannery, Woolston

HANNAH CLAIRE JEWELLERY NUTS RING $35 Wanderer at the Tannery, Woolston

HANNAH CLAIRE JEWELLERY STONE RING $65 Wanderer at the Tannery, Woolston

'OUT OF MY BOX' DOG COLLAR $28 each Teepee at the Tannery, Woolston

BLUE EARTH SOAP small $6.50

BLUE EARTH PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL $12.50 – $16

BLUE EARTH MASSAGE BAR $18.50 Teepee at the Tannery, Woolston

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CERAMIC MUG $10 each or 3 for $20, Printed by God Save the Queen, made in Lyttleton, God Save the Queen, Lyttelton

'NEXTIME' ONE MOMENT PLEASE TESTPAGE WALL CLOCK Large size $85.20 Toi Toi at the Tannery, Woolston

LEATHER WALLET WITH FOX DESIGN $86, from the UK 'Heritage and Harlequin' range from 'Disaster Designs', Toi Toi at the Tannery, Woolston

'ROSE ADORN' KEY PENDANT NECKLACE $48 Made in Christchurch Toi Toi at the Tannery, Woolston

WOODEN COASTERS BY SHANE HANSEN FROM 'TIKITIBU' $6 each Toi Toi at the Tannery, Woolston

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[72] THE FULLER ISSUE // 01

The fuller issue one may 2014  

The Fuller Issue is about the city and its people. Christchurch is in a unique position to review what it is to exist in an Urban environmen...

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