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THE

POST Forest Park, Illinois

Our stories, Our people, Our Village

MEMORIAL DAY HONORING ALL WHO SERVED

Volume 14 Issue 3

May & June 2018


7-10 PM 7824 Madison Street Village of Forest Park Picnic Grove

n ’ v oo r G he Grove in t

‘18

Tuesdays Concerts Are Free Concessions for sale including: Beer - Wine - Nachos - Hot Dogs Pretzels - SnowCones - Popcorn and Drink Special of the Month will be Sold.

June 19 Dick Diamond and the Dusters July 17 Out of Control

Grab a Blanket, Pack a Picnic and Head Over to the Grove for a Summer Concert under the Stars.

August 21 The Redmonds

For more information call 708.771.7737 The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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THE

POST Forest Park, Illinois

The Forest Park Post is published by 34 Publishing, Inc.© and distributed free of charge in the Village of Forest Park. All materials, articles, photographs and illustrations are property of 34 Publishing, Inc.© and cannot be duplicated or used in any fashion without express written consent. 34 Publishing Inc. is not responsible for the content, opinions, advertisements or any other materials expressed within.

Amy Rita, Publisher Staff Writers: Mary Win Connor Andrew Cox Bob Cox Kate Cronin Peter Gianakopoulos Arlene Jarzab Terry Keshner Billy Lombardo Woody Mosgers Nello Rubio Jessica Sclafini Kathy Sullivan

www.forestparkpost.com Mailing Address: The Forest Park Post 7442 W. Madison St. • Forest Park, IL 60130 Phone: 708.366.8947 Fax: 708.776.4413 Email: forestparkpost@comcast.net Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

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Proviso Township Handyman Program Available to Age 60+ Homeowners and Disabled at a Nominal Fee The Proviso Township Handyman will be available to provide advice and referral on a variety of home maintenance issues. In addition, the Handyman will be able to do minor repairs for a fuel surcharge of $5.00 per visit plus the cost of parts, if needed.

The Proviso Handyman is here to help you do all of those things you used to do for yourself but just can’t manage anymore, all those simple things that can make life just a little brighter. So next time you find yourself frustrated by some annoying problem around the house, call the Proviso Handyman! They will also make referrals for approved tradespersons for larger jobs. For more information on what services they offer and do not offer, call the Proviso Township Handyman office at 708-547-4001 or through their contact page at: www.provisotownship.com

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Dog Days by Terry Keshner

The noise and exhaust drift up from the Eisenhower Expressway then dissipate once they hit the trees so they don’t seem to bother the dogs or the people who have made the dog park at Circle Avenue practically a second home, especially now that nice weather has settled in.

Amy and her Lab Mix, Miso, have been coming to the park for about six months and she tells The Post, “I just like that she gets her energy out here and has fun with other dogs.”

And Amy says one-year-old Miso has, indeed, plenty of energy to expend, saying the park “is our savior, to be honest!”

Owen Cassidy and his furry pal Renley, a stocky and lovable yellow Labrador, are dedicated park visitors. Mr. Cassidy says the park is better than the offerings in Oak Park where he used to live, telling The Post on a sunny Saturday morning as about a half-dozen dogs darted back and forth, barking and wagging their tails that, “They (the village) seem to take pretty good care of it, they have bags, other people keep their dogs under control. For the most part I’ve had a very good experience here.” And Renley gets a good workout, with Mr. Cassidy noting that Renley usually sleeps in the car the whole, (short) way home.

Allison and her dog, Tiggy, are regulars at the park, saying it’s a convenient spot, practically in her own back yard, and she notes that it’s likely a “safer environment” than walking a dog where cars and those who aren’t fond of our four-legged friends can sometimes get in the way.

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Pat drives from Riverside with her German Shorthaired Pointer, Lilly, nearly every day to visit the park and, being a nonresident, pays $50 annually to use the park at Circle and Lehmer, on the north side of the bridge, as opposed to the $10 fee for Forest Park residents. Pat and Lilly love the park but, like some others we spoke to, Pat also has suggestions for improvements, telling The Post, “The village does not do a good enough job in keeping up the park, replacing the mulch, filling the holes and replenishing the bags (for dog droppings.)

Pat is among several dog owners who believe that Forest Park should begin putting a lock on the fence, which is what is done in Oak Park and at Cook County off-leash parks, to ensure that only those who have paid for a license, and thus have gotten their dogs the proper shots, etc., can enter the park.

Amy, however, thinks things are OK as they are. “I’ve always felt really safe here and I think the dogs are really friendly so I don’t think that (a lock) is a necessity.”

Bernadette’s two and-ahalf year-old Border Collie, Seamus, is spending a sunny morning chasing other dogs and even tries to “herd” the passing cars, but with little success as she tells a reporter and his dog that she also thinks the park, while maybe not perfect, is still pretty good. “I don’t think there’s much that needs to be changed. For the most part the owners are respectful. They’re great dogs.”

Seamus seems to agree, wagging his tail and chasing other dogs as the sun shines over the Eisenhower, the trees, the mulch and the happy dogs who soak up the sunlight, sniff everything they can and, with every bark, seem to be saying, “Life is good. Life is good.”

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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Got a story idea? Call us at 708-366-8947 or e-mail forestparkpost@comcast.net Read The Post online at www.forestparkpost.com 6

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Pick up your copy of The Forest Park Post at these convenient locations:

The Last... by Arlene R. Jarzab

With a nod to Etta James’ At Last, how do we know ‘when our love has come along’? It’s easy to know when something was the first: first words, first steps, first day of school, first car, first home and on and on. But, how do we know when something is the last? While cutting through Forest Park last month (I had to make a run to Famous Liquors), I found myself passing my last apartment. Of course, when I moved out, I didn’t know it was going to be my last; that is the problem with lasts, you don’t know they are the last until it’s too late. So, I pulled over to look at the building and reminisce. It was a great apartment. I was still working on my Masters’ Degree at the University of Illinois/Circle while teaching in Westchester, so it was incredibly convenient. I could be at work or at school in less that a half hour; I had public transportation within walking distance. It was an older three-story building with 18-plus apartments. I was on the second floor with a view of the courtyard and free parking on the street. FREE Parking! That is one of the reasons I left Oak Park for Forest Park! It was close to

shopping, bars (Lots of bars!) restaurants (Olde Town West and Richards were still there on Madison), The Pines and The Golden Steer were close enough for a special dinner, and there was great transportation. These older apartments had plaster walls, radiators, no central air, and a small bathroom. A hallway led to the dining room which had a leaded-glass French door to close it off from the living room. It also had a swinging door to the kitchen. Off of the kitchen was a stairway leading down to the alley. The single bedroom was in the back with a tiny closet. To today’s apartment hunters, it would be positively primitive. One jack for a phone, no cable, no granite or stainless steel. It did have a huge walkin pantry. Yes, it was hot in the summer; the radiators clanged in the winter and the coin-operated laundry was in the basement. I did purchase a window air conditioner that never really cooled the place off adequately. And, yet, I loved that apartment! I hosted lots of dinners, lunches, brunches, showers and game nights. As I sat there looking at the building, it occurred to me that that was my last apartment. (Maybe?) From there, I moved into a series of houses and townhomes. I guess, one day, one of those will be my last, but who knows when that could happen? That’s the problem with lasts; you don’t know they are last until it is too late. When my dad retired in 1970, he bought his ‘retirement car’. It was supposed to be his last car. It was a metallic brown Buick Electra 225 (sometimes called a ‘deuce and a quarter’). Dad drove that car to Florida

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Forest Park Bank on Madison St. The Beacon Pub Famous Liquors Village Hall Lobby and hated every minute of the drive. In a parking lot in Sarasota, someone admired the car; dad sold it to him and flew back to Chicago. He ended up buying a Chevy Malibu and drove that back to Florida. He loved that car; it was going to be his last car. It wasn’t. Dad ended up buying another Chevy which eventually did become his ‘last car’. Of course, dad didn’t know which car would be ‘the last’, and neither do we. Darius Rucker, a former member of Hootie and the Blowfish has been on his own as a country singer for several years and albums. His latest album asks the question, “When Was the Last Time You Did Something for the First Time”? Good question; and very philosophical for a country-and-western song. It doesn’t mention cheatin’, drinkin’, pick-up trucks or fishin’. It just asks that question: When will we experience the last time? Part of the message of the song is to try new things, meet new people, go out on a limb because we don’t know if it will be the last. That is the point; we don’t. Doesn’t that mean we should be a little nicer, you never know what could be the last.

Healy’s Westside Forest Park Library Howard Mohr Community Center Doc Ryans Ed’s Way McGaffer’s Saloon Forest Park Bank on Roosevelt Rd. Old School Records Old School Tavern MPK Kitchen Scratch Kitchen Exit Strategy R'Place Pioneer Tap Kangi's Mini Mart Starship Subs

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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Crossword Puzzle 1

2

3

4

5

12

6

7

16

22

23

24

27

33

34

37

38

41

ACROSS

46

29

35

30

32

54

55

36

39

40

42

43

44

48

49

50

56

57

58

59

60

61

51

36. Arresting figure?

1. Joined the party

37. Baby-book first

5. China problem

39. Series opener?

9. Hula hoops, in 1958

40. Violinist's ailment

12. Customer attracter

41. Color of some glasses?

13. Itty-bitty bit

43. Untrained

14. Biblical matriarch

45. Gas additive

15. Least allowing

48. Dixie hero

17. Brick load, perhaps

49. Article

18. Born, in bios

50. Works together

19. Tough to swallow?

56. Ending with spy or sky

21. Bring into harmony

57. Altar exchange

24. Masseuse's target

58. Pound, notably

26. Family girl

59. Turning point?

27. Kind of palm

60. Mythical matchmaker

29. Bundles of bills

61. Dance movement

34. Chicago suburb

31

20

25

28

47

33. Harm

11

17

19

26

10

14

18

45

9

13

15

21

8

52

53

DOWN 1. Music media 2. Curator's concern 3. Scratch 4. "Dallas" family name 5. Commend a G.I. 6. Break new ground 7. Neutral possessive 8. Quilt part 9. Honor, in a way 10. Declare bluntly 11. Forswear 16. Perfume by burning 20. Do a hatchet job? 21. Buyer's caveat 22. Bounce 23. Man, for one 24. Texas A & M student

25. Change component 28. Charity 30. Realtor's unit 31. Teaspoonful, maybe 32. Doctor's rotation? 35. Chad toucher 38. Do some levering 42. Branch of the U.N.? 44. Enjoys, as benefits 45. Make an impression 46. Asian cuisine choice 47. Rope fiber 48. Comparison word 51. Negative joiner 52. Brace number 53. Lower? 54. Leaves for a drink? 55. View from Charlotte's web

Crossword answers on page 23. 8

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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Forget Tweeting... I'd Rather Be Cheap by Arlene R. Jarzab

the circular racks? If you haven’t, then you obviously don’t know that that is the day they put out the newly reduced items. You can always shop those circular racks, but Wednesday is the best day to get a terrific deal. I have found slacks, blouses and sweaters for a fraction of the original price. Then, if someone compliments it, I am very quick (and proud) to point out I got it on sale. I will happily tell them the When was the last time original price and my final you bragged about paying purchase price. full price for anything? For example, did you ever say: Why are we so proud to say how much we saved “Sure, see that new car out and loathe to admit we there? I walked into the paid full price? Does it have dealer and paid full sticker anything to do with being descended from ‘hunter/ price for it!” gatherers’? It’s said that “Yep, I went to that garage men are the hunters; their sale and bought a box of early predecessors went out singly or in small crap… paid full price!” groups to hunt. During “I went into Bed, Bath the hunt they kept quiet and Beyond and bought to not scare off the prey or $200.00 worth of stuff. give away their location. Coupons? Who needs Especially if they found a particularly rich source of coupons?” fresh meat. By remaining I have NEVER uttered those quiet, they wouldn’t have to words. Instead, I’m proud of share their kill. There may getting a deal on anything. also have been a degree of We are proud to brag about competition; if they went out how much we saved, what alone, they could provide a good deal we got or, yes, more for their families. The how cheap we are. In fact, women, or the ‘gatherers’, when you compliment a instead would often go female friend on her outfit, out in groups. They could shoes, etc., she is most likely divvy up duties, care for to respond, “I got this on the children and share the sale; over 50% off!” When location of the nuts, berries my sister told me she liked and edible roots. If they a new dress I was wearing, chatted and made noise, it I proudly told her I paid would help keep them safe $11.00 for it! Do you go to by warning predators and Von Maur on Wednesday keeping them at bay. Today, just to browse through those genetic patterns seem

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

to hold; men rarely go out in packs to shop. If they need a shirt or shoes, they drop into the store, zero in on their prey and get out. Shopping is rarely a social outing for men. Women, on the other hand often go out in pairs or packs to shop. They find clothes for each other, make suggestions, and plan where they will have lunch. Shopping is definitely all about being social and gathering. When women do shop singly, they are often on a mission to find something specific. And, they love to brag about what they did (or didn’t) pay. That is what we do; we never brag about how much we paid for something. Seriously, can you imagine how pompous you would sound if you said, “These shoes; $159.00 at Macys; no coupons; full price. Instead, we brag about what a great deal we got. We downplay the cost in favor of the price paid. Once we get started, women are happy to throw in a story about a great deal and the thrill of the hunt. Filene’s Basement was famous for ‘the running of the brides’. Other departments stores also put their wedding dresses on sale and prospective brides would camp out to get in as early as possible. When the doors opened, the stampede began. The fitting rooms would be jammed and time was of the essence; brides would wear leotards under their clothes so they could try on a dress in the aisle. Later, the re-telling of the hunt became legend.

Add some wine, and the stories could fill the evening with everyone trying to top the last best price! I thought this was strictly a female thing, but recently I overheard two men talking about a tent. The owner wanted to make it clear that he got a great deal; he didn’t want to brag about the price or, heaven forbid, admit to paying full price. But, he let his companion know that he got a great deal and was happy to admit it.

Getting back to paying sticker price for a car, now that we can go to CarMax for an estimate or CarVana for a used car, the thrill of the hunt is being lost. You can see the sticker price and know that that is the price; there will be no haggling. A new service, DealerInspire. com will also help find a car for you. That is the only way that paying ‘full sticker price’ is at all acceptable. But it sure takes the fun out of the hunt; no more ‘tirekicking’, no more sitting in the salesman’s office while he/she takes your offer to the General Manager. (We all know they are just having a cup of coffee to make you wait and think about getting a great deal.) Heck, those services will even deliver the car to you and take away your old car. So, the ‘thrill of the hunt’ is being taken out of huntingand-gathering. Which leaves us with going to Bed, Bath and Beyond, but you better remember to take your coupons with you!

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The FP Appeal by Andrew Cox

like a record dig at the Old School Record shop, or an heirloom to add to your living space at one of the many antique emporiums. Take a ride down Circle and over the big bridge.

Catch the flip side of town, our park district, snug to the main artery of the big metropolis, an expansive field connecting from bridge to bridge. A brush of modernity with the Roos rec-center, a sign of yesteryear with the old I was sitting with writer’s block this time around for the Post when it struck me to get inspired and take a ride around the town. I made an effort to stop and embrace what makes Forest Park a unique urban landscape nestled parkdistrict building, and just outside of the big city. a monument to our longI feel that we are right in running annual sport, the between both the urban no-gloves softball tourney, and suburban spheres, landmarks across from like in the sci-fi realm, a end-to-end. Just a little connecting portal between further down Des Plaines two-worlds. I began to now. meditate on the ‘big city access small town charm Up to Roosevelt - an array slogan’ and it hit home. of worlds coinciding, the Here is that meditation: strip mall, a stalwart of the big-box shopping era, A town of two-bridges nestled with the hot dog stand turned Chicago food Cruise down the main icon, Portillo’s. The other strip, a sense of the oldside of the street, the longworld, a dive at a nearly standing small businesses, an arms lengths from each the old music store, other, as many watering Kagan and Gaines Musical holes to quench the thirst Instrument Co, with the of a ship of sailors. The Golden Steer Restaurant, eats are a plenty, from both driving in people the beloved Louie’s diner, after all these years. Then our greasy spoon, to the there’s Nadeau’s ice-palace many Italian restaurants, for the party centerpiece the upscale, and eclectic, or a sculpture that will to satisfy many a taste. coolly soothe, like an iceStop to shop, you’ll find a cream scoop for the sweet relic every here and there,

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tooth from the Brown Cow on a hot summer day. Now driving back up Des Plaines, the lower bridge, to come back around to the other side.

Crossing the highway bridge of Des Plaines, where you’ll find a smallepicenter of transit. To the east – take the blue-line, where you can venture to the loop or beyond to O’Hare and out of this part of the world to another. Or, to the west,

Pick up your copy of The Forest Park Post at these convenient locations: Forest Park Bank on Madison St. The Beacon Pub Famous Liquors Village Hall Lobby Healy’s Westside Forest Park Library Howard Mohr Community Center Doc Ryans Ed’s Way

you can drive out to suburbia and the sprawl of our civilization to the farmlands. Underneath the pass, a couple community markers, the old post office, and we are right back to where we started on the main strip. Our bridges connect us to this vast scenery of places. They can take us as far-reaching or near abiding that we are willing to travel. The adventure begins right at our own doorstep, and all these landmarks to guide us to another stopping or starting point. It’s spring, so take a ride, a walk, and get out there to FP and beyond! As always feedback to Andy Cox – coxandrew89@yahoo.com

McGaffer’s Saloon Forest Park Bank on Roosevelt Rd. Old School Records Old School Tavern MPK Kitchen Scratch Kitchen Exit Strategy R'Place Pioneer Tap Kangi's Mini Mart Starship Subs

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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Ask The Plant Expert by Scott McAdam Jr.

Scott McAdam Jr. Commercial Account Manager, V.P. of Snow Operations, Horticulturist

French Drains Make Rain, Rain Go Away! Drainage, or storm water management, has been on our clients’ minds plenty the past couple of seasons. One of the best solutions: the French drain pit, which can be as large as 10' long x 10' wide x 7' deep in more extreme cases of flooding.

James M. O’Rourke Attorney at Law Since 1981

Forest Park & Chicago

350 W. Circle Ave. Forest Park, Illinois 60130

53 W. Jackson Blvd. Suite 240 Chicago, Illinois 60604

• Zoning Law • Business Law • Probate Administration & Litigation • Municipal Collection • Municipal Liaison-Zoning Development • Representation of Business to County and Municipal Governments; Defense of Violations & Business Development

It is typically a hole dug into the ground down to the sand layer. Then it is filled with coarse gravel or river rock with a center drain tile to allow the pit to "breathe,” followed by installation of a weed barrier over the gravel, and wrapped up by covering the upper 12 inches of the hole with soil and turf. With established turf, they are invisible (except for the drain cap at the surface). A French drain collects rain water and allows it to percolate to the sand layer and disperse into lower soil profiles. If soils are fully saturated through all layers, some flooding problems may still occur, but they are minor and disperse significantly faster. The bottom (or subterranean) line: French drains are a fantastic way to collect and disperse storm water in relatively large volumes. McAdam Landscaping was founded in 1979 by brothers Scott and Rob McAdam and has a passion for providing outstanding service. Located at 2001 Des Plaines Ave. in Forest Park, the company is online at www. mcadamlandscape.com.

www.forestparkpost.com

James.JMOLaw@gmail.com Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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The Village of Hillside Presents

Summer Nights

In The Commons

Free Tuesday Night Concerts Begin At 7:30 P.M.

American English July 24th 7th heaven July 31st 16 Candles August 7th New Colony Six August 14th Chicago 6 Band August 21st The Buckinghams August 28th Summer Nights In The Commons

Welcome to Hillside

Summer Nights

Cruise Night and The Market Place start at 5:00 P.M. Food and beer will be available for purchase.

www.summernightsinhillside.com All events subject to change without notice, sorry for any inconvenience.

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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Howard Mohr Community Center New Kitchen Fundraiser

Friday June 1st American Legion/ VFW Post at the corner of Circle & Adams

5:30 - 9 PM

Cost is $10 at the door Cash bar.

Let’s join together in raising funds to give our Community Center a new state-of-the-art kitchen. As with any home, the Community Center kitchen has been the heart and soul of Forest Park serving seniors, children, charities, and so much more. After 40 years, this heart and soul needs an upgrade and it’s time for us to give back for all that they do for Forest Park and for all of us. Everyone is welcome, please join us in giving back and having fun.

music by the redmonds

Free food, Soft rinks Lots of &dM usic raffles and silent auction

Questions? Call 708-771-7737 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

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Welcoming Studio 8 To Madison Street by Jessica Sclafini I had to opportunity to sit down with owners, Melody Kratz and Brian Shamhart, of the newest addition to Madison Street, Studio 8. One of the first things Melody said was “we’re not an antique store we’re a vintage boutique”. So, what sets them apart and what does that mean? While every item is curated, hand-picked and designed to be unique, what makes them even cooler is the modern spin they put on each item enabling that piece to fit into any home décor. And trust me; there is something that fits every style and personality.

Studio 8 started as a working studio. A place where Melody could mix her love of vintage and art and she really created this amazing space filled with beautiful things. She would take furniture and other pieces that she picked up from estates sales; clean them up, fix any damages and ultimately redo each piece making it her own. Recycle, Repurpose, Upcycle are the mantra and you get that feel the second you walk into the store. Each piece is so different and unique, making it the perfect place to shop when looking for a special gift for all occasions. She decided to move her business of 3 years, after outgrowing her Oak Park location and losing the ability to be able to create her pieces of art right there in the shop.

Most all of Studio 8's items come from local estates, local sales or customers that come in and sell to them privately. They are priced competitively to sell quickly, as their goal is to have different inventory each month, which makes going there even more exciting. It’s like walking into a new store every month! Love that.

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

Melody partnered with Brian, an experienced Vintage/ Antique Dealer, to enable Studio 8 to venture into other related avenues such as conducting Estate Sales. Not only are they seasoned in buying and selling items, but they have partnered on conducting these sales in the past and feel that there will be a growing demand for such services as more and more baby-boomers downsize. If anyone is looking for an estate sale consultation, Brian is definitely the guy to talk to! ...continued

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Recycle, Repurpose, Upcycle

The Partners look at their new location as just another step in the evolution of their business which they hope to one day include a much bigger space and/ or multiple locations, the potential to conduct flea markets and auctions, and the ability to take consignments of items and artists’ works. As another step towards this goal, they are currently working with the Village and Chamber of Commerce to hold a monthly flea market on Madison. The flea market will encompass vintage merchandise vendors from the area along with the possibility of other select Madison Street merchants, food offerings and musical entertainment. The flea market will take place from June-October on the 3rd Sunday of every month.

Melody Kratz Both Melody and Brian are very excited to be part of the Forest Park community and are thrilled with the way we embrace small businesses. It’s been an amazing feeling for them to be here. So, stop by, say hi and join me in welcoming them to our community! You will not be disappointed. I think you’ll fall in love with one of Melody’s incredible pieces of art the second you walk in the door.

Studio 8 is located at 7316 Madison Street and is open Tuesday - Saturday from 11 AM - 6 PM and Sunday from 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM.

Brian Shamhart Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

Studio8vintage.com

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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Stormy Weather News In anticipation of power outages from spring storms and thunderstorms, Forest Park officials are encouraging all residents with internet access to enter the following ComEd website links into their web browsers in order to more easily access information regarding power outages and emergencies. Mobile device applications are also available for tech proficient smart phone users as they travel home.

ComEd Emergency If you have an electric emergency it is important to call ComEd immediately. Never email your emergency request. If you need to report an emergency situation such as a fire, vehicle accident, electric contact/shock, or other potential danger please call 911 to notify local authorities. https://www.comed.com/customer-service/ service-request/Pages/emergency.aspx

Storm Center When the storms roll in, ComEd is ready to keep you up-to-date on our outage restorations. Visit the Storm Center at ComEd.com/Storm to get the latest information on outages in the service territory, view our Outage Map, and report an outage. https:// www.comed.com/customer-service/ outageinformation/Pages/storm-center.aspx

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

Outage Map With ComEd’s outage map, customers can view all outages in the ComEd service area at once and zoom in and get details on specific areas, such as the estimated restoration time & status of crews working to resolve problems. Icons are color-coded to indicate the number of customers affected by each incident. Check out the interactive map at ComEd.com/Map or at https://www.comed.com /_layouts/comedsp/outagemap.aspx

Outage Alerts Need to report an outage? Text the word OUT to 26633 (ComEd) and get updates until your power is restored. Visit ComEd.com/Text for more info and to sign up or visit www.comed.com customer-service/ outage-information/pages/outage-alerts.aspx Mobile App Gain the flexibility and convenience of managing your ComEd Residential account on the go with ComEd’s FREE mobile app for iPhone and Android devices. Report an outage, make a one-time payment, and manage account features with the swipe of a finger. Learn more at ComEd.com/App or at www.comed.com/customer-service/mobile/ pages/mobile-application.aspx

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Random Thoughts On A Spring Day by Mary Win Connor

Life is not always easy but if you approach the bad in the right way, it can be a learning opportunity. Many years ago I was out with my best friend griping about a difficulty I was experiencing in my life at that point. After listening to me for about half an hour she looked at me and said, “Maybe God’s trying to teach you something.” That comment has stuck in my head for years and is trotted out As I write this Mother (whether I want it or not) by Nature has finally taken my psyche whenever “why the wheel and we seem to is this happening to me?” be leaving snow and cold plays on an endless loop in behind. When the sun my head. While figuring out comes out and the breeze what I need to learn from takes on a mildness that is a situation is not always so very different from the immediately forthcoming, hawk that Chicago is known it at least takes my brain for in winter, my little in a different direction and pea brain tends to go on out of the whiney cycle. It walkabout. So here are the also makes life easier on random thoughts that have everyone around me. been keeping me amused today. Admitting that my Irish heritage bars me from ever The older I get the less I sporting the golden summer care how I look. I used tan look was one of the to have to dress up and greatest things I have ever apply makeup every day done for myself. Not only do for work. Since my office I not have to get all slimey is now in the basement if I and sweaty whilst baking make it out of my bathrobe in the hot sun, but I save a I consider myself dressed. fortune on Solarcaine. While On the rare occasion where it is a well-known fact that I have to put on actual “be tan fat is better looking than seen in public” clothing and lily white fat, red fat just do something with my face, looks painful. Orange fat, on what was once routine is the other hand, looks good now a total chore. I much on no one. Tan-in-a-bottle prefer the Jessica Fletcher stuff should be outlawed for of Cabot Cove look and as the esthetic good of all. It’s long I don’t frighten animals a look only Ray Charles can or small children, I call it love. good. My dream is to live my life in such a simple way Keeping a secret is really not that the next time I have that hard. Just ask yourself, to be dressed up I’ll be in a “Does this person really coffin. need to know about this?” Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

and generally you’ll find the answer is no. However, should the information get out at some point, it’s just snotty to say “I’ve known that for a while but was asked not to say anything.” A simple, “yeah, I heard something about that,” is more than sufficient.

Things don’t always work out as planned, but if you give up because something didn’t work out you may miss out on a great opportunity. Think of the possibilities. Not just the obvious positive ones but the could-go-either-way ones too. You never know what you might find if you just look beyond what you can see from where you’re sitting.

At what point in life did we become so complacent that we freak out when presented with something new in our world? As adults we fear change because it upsets our norms and makes us alter our world to deal with the new stuff when

we’re comfortable with our current stuff. Kids, on the other hand, are much more adaptable. Their whole world is change. Every day they learn something new and incorporate into their lives. We need to be more like kids and open ourselves up to change so we can keep learning.

Social media is a fun distraction and can sometimes be a great learning tool. What it is not is reality. That perfect mom is not perfect she’s just putting out the good stuff and hiding the bad. And that cyberbully is really just insecure and trying to feel better about themselves by degrading someone else. Just laugh at the cat videos and ignore the nonsense.

Well so much for letting my mind meander its way around life’s intricacies, time to actually get outside and enjoy Spring before summer hits tomorrow.

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

19


Woody’s Whine

Of Cheese, Bubbles and Foothills by Woody Mosgers woodywine@aol.com Writing from the edge of the cheeses and a bit to my surprise, goat cheese will work with Russian River in Sonoma County tawny and aged ports. I’m in a huge hall at the Sonoma fair grounds filled with specialty cheeses as part of the California Artisan Cheese Festival and I whom do I find, well it’s Janet Fletcher, the author of several cheese matching and cheese cookbooks, and the winner of three James Beard Awards … and she still agrees to talk with me.

Janet’s has a mantra for matching cheese and wine, “You must match the intensity of the cheese with the wine” she states several times during our conversation. For example Sauvignon Blanc is high in acid therefore matches well against the acidity of fresh goat cheese, Cabernet on the other hand with its age and high tannins need a mature tart cheese such as an aged sheep’s milk or aged cheddar. The simplest way to demonstrate is to try these items as suggested and then exchange the wines – a little light will go on that says, “Oh that’s why this works.” Speaking of acid, Champagne and sparkling wine are famous for it and need a cheese that partners well. Janet suggests triple cream brie or the Mount Tam cheese from Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes on the Sonoma coast (Whole Foods). (Been there, seen it, eaten it) Ms. Fletcher notes, “Most Chardonnays are round and have a soft texture so they would work well with Camembert’s and Brie”. Both are cow's milk cheeses, though Brie has a higher fat content and creamier texture from the addition of cream. The Brie I mentioned recently from Costco is a good match with Chardonnay. Earthy components and umami flavors and the lighter tannins and delicate flavors of Pinot Noir match well with mushroomed or truffled Brie. Janet says that the medium intensity and tannins of Merlot really opens up the cheese pallet to Spanish Manchego, California dry Jack, Fontina and Toma, a cow’s milk cheese. And in a different vein, get it vein, the direction for big blues, aged Spanish 20

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

Look for more pairing help from Janet in her book, Cheese & Wine: A Guide to Selecting, Pairing, and Enjoying and at her blog site Planet Cheese at www.janetfletcher.com Chef Emily Sarlatte of La Marcha Bakery & Restaurant in Berkley responses a bit more emotionally regards cheese and wine matching. “Pairing is personal, I usually choose my cheese first, as it’s easy to find the right wine” she stated without pause. Chef Sarlatte who was offering cheese samples at the festival, suggested looking for cheese and wine from the same region and offered a rule of thumb that, “richer cheeses need richer wines”, makes sense to me.

And staying with cheese course, I offer a tad of food info on processed cheese that came my way. First it’s is not a 100% cheese. Most of the time it hovers around 50% cheese, then it’s cut with other, non-cheese ingredients added to melted, pasteurized cheese, which is then converted to a sliced solid, a jarred sauce, a spread, a spray. Processing produces cheese that melts like a dream and can be amazing and there are times when nothing else will do. If we’re talking about a cheeseburger or a breakfast sandwich, we’re hoping to see a perfectly melty piece of American cheese on top of that patty or egg and we love it for that. We now resume our normal programing…. Greg Graziano got off of his tractor in Potter Valley to return my call as a follow-up to our meeting at a sparkling event in Mendocino County. He is the proprietor of Graziano Family of Wines in Redwood Valley about 50 miles north of Santa Rosa. Greg is a hands-on farmer, winemaker, traveling salesman, wine blender, and deliveryman. He works with his daughter and an assistant winemaker but claims he’s in charge and his word goes, I bet. He is quite proud of his wines and metaphorically thumbs his nose just a tad at the folks from Anderson Valley who are situated on the Mendocino coast and is most rightly well-known for the Roederer sparkling wines; they were pouring in Magnum at the tasting, very nice.

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“People think it’s colder on the coast when in fact our vineyards are at the headwaters of the Russian River and at 1,000 - 1,200 feet. That means we pick our grapes later than Anderson Valley and Potter Valley has lots of rain and so along with the cold that makes everything late blooming - we don’t end up picking until mid-September,” he states factually. (Most Chardonnays and Pinots from Sonoma are long in tanks by late August or early September) “It’s important to have consistency” Greg pointed out, “so that you get good acid, low pH, good tannins and to be well structured for 2 to 3 years of aging. We use a lot of different clones because more diversity makes for better blends”.

He is rightfully proud of his Saint Gregory Brut Rose “Cuvee Trudi” – from the 2011 vintage is 75% Pinot Noir and 25% Chardonnay. Great food wine pairing and works well with soft creamy cheeses, roasted chicken and a number of seafood dishes. $50. www.Grazianofamilyofwines.com

ask a bit at your local wine shop you may find some terrific Zinfandel and blended wines at great value from Amador Cellars, Easton Wines, Renwood Winery, Turley and Lava Cap Winery.

Wow, I’m tired after all of that but happy to do it all again. I even have a great new recipe for you from Ian Garten and matched with a Scotto Lodi Chardonnay, one of the best matches I’ve ever made - love it when a plan comes together. That’s my whine…and I could be wrong

Woody Mosgers, cooks, caters, writes, drinks and matches wine and food in Santa Rosa Sonoma at www.woodythewineguy.com

Chicken Breasts with Lemon and Parmesan and Arugula Salad Dressing

Total: 35 min Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients • 1 cup all-purpose flour • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper • 2 extra-large eggs • 1 1/2 cups seasoned dry bread crumbs • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese • 1 teaspoon lemon zest • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped • 6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts I loved the deviled eggs and they were tasty with the wines. • Unsalted butter “Deviled eggs are one of my favorite things to make” explained Ramekins Catering Executive Chef Kyle Kuklewski. “We mixed a • Good olive oil little nettle (tastes like spinach, but with a stronger flavor) pesto • 5 ounces arugula with the traditional (egg) mix, topped it with pickled mustard • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (2 lemons) seeds and a crispy bacon chip”, who at the church social would • 1/4 pound chunk Parmesan cheese have thought. Combine the flour, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper in a medium bowl The Sierra Foothills are a good hour east of Sacramento and or high-sided pan. In a second bowl, beat the eggs with 1 tablespoon of water and includes eight counties that stretch 120 miles roughly north in a third bowl or pan, combine the bread crumbs, the 1/2 cup grated Parmesan to south and are set 80 miles inland from San Francisco. The cheese, the lemon zest and thyme and set aside. preponderance of top wines are from Amador, Calaveras and El Dorado counties. Split the chicken breasts in half lengthwise so they are about the same thickness and then place in a sealable plastic gallon storage bag. Pound the chicken breasts Amador County seems to be the best known of the group, their until they are 1/4 inch thick using either a meat mallet or a rolling pin. grape-growing and winemaking history goes back to the mid1800s, Gold Rush days. There are 46 wineries in Amador and Coat the chicken breasts on both sides with the prepared flour mixture, then dip another 157 located throughout region. both sides into the egg mixture and dredge both sides in the bread-crumb mixture, pressing lightly. We’ve been there - about ten years ago but this trip was easier Heat 1 tablespoon of butter and 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large sauté pan and as the folks from ZAP (Zinfandel cook 2 or 3 chicken breasts on medium-low heat for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, Advocates & Producers) www. until cooked through. You will need to add more butter and oil for each batch zinfandel.org were good enough chicken breasts. to bring a nice representation of 22 wineries into town that made Place the arugula in a large bowl. In a 1-cup glass measure, whisk together the 1/4 sampling a lot easier. cup lemon juice, 1/2 cup olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Pour A complex jumble of exposures ¬allows producers to choose enough dressing on the arugula to moisten. Toss well. between warmer, ¬western-facing locations for heat-loving Zinfandel and cooler angles for Chardonnay or Merlot. As the Pile some arugula on top of each hot chicken breast. With a very sharp knife or a climate runs mostly warm to hot, there’s little or no Pinot Noir, vegetable peeler, shave the chunk of Parmesan into large shards and arrange them Pinot Gris or Riesling. on top of the arugula. While on our way to Sacramento for the Zinfandel tasting - the things I do for you loyal readers – we just had to stop in Sonoma for a brunch and bubbles tasting - part of an upscale Signature Sonoma Valley wine and food event - the brunch was the only part we could afford. We really loved the Blanc de Noir and vintage sparkler from Gloria Ferrer Caves & Vineyards as well as the sparkler from Schug Carneros Estate Winery.

Most of these wineries are small producers and most of their sales are out the front door but if you look hard enough and Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

Pair with: 2015 Scotto Lodi Chardonnay or any Chardonnay with little or no oak with citrus and minerally flavors The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

21


Proviso Pie 2018

A new door opening at Proviso East High School by Bob Cox

This year the Proviso East experience feels different. Some may call it school climate or culture change. Others may call it a Proviso renaissance but I see it as a more organic realization that what goes on in every Proviso classroom matters. Finally, the focus or dominance of sour politics, negative perception of a punitive nature, called the “Proviso way” have been diminished. The new focus at PTHS is on the students and in the now. The new focus is on sustaining a high performing school system. The new focus is on nurturing learning communities. Complacency has been replaced by planned action and the collaborative actions of more than one change agent, who are empowering those on the frontline, namely students, their families’ and teachers. Self prophesized failure is replaced by deliberate and anticipated transformational change. At times the general public is oblivious to the hard work needed to produce a school turnaround and at the same time the hard work needed to have organizational safeties in place that prevent a relapse. Here are a few Proviso stories worth noting: Students matter

When I substitute teach at Fenwick High School I can observe the unique learning communities that in turn compose the larger Parochial Catholic School system. These smaller learning communities compliment each other and contribute to building the character of it’s students and their future success.

At Proviso East the same effect is being done through programs like JROTC, The Proviso East Band, and athletic programs like boys and girls track. They reflect student self worth, self discipline, positive group and team play. They are a means to an end and that end is preparation for life after High School, whether that is technology career programs like STEM or college bound programs like AP (Advanced Placement) or IB (International Baccalaureate).

All three of these successful Proviso programs need financial support for things like leadership camps, summer band, and college trips and experiences like Boys Track and Field athletes who ran in the Penn Relays this past late April 2018. 22

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

Most students spend their 4 years at Proviso East in this program Whether an appearance to a 9/1 ceremony, these Proviso Student/JNROTC cadets work hard all year long. (Photo PEJROTC 2018)

Governance matters BOE members are well to keep in mind that they have only one employee and that is the Superintendent. One analogy is that he or she is the District’s CEO. There are literally thousands of indicators and hundreds of school strategies for school “systems” to navigate. School Superintendents live in this world. BOE and Superintendents relations always will come into play. Boards have only one employee and that is the Superintendent and he or she’s recommendations matter. “Curious Proviso”

When a Superintendent makes a recommendation to the BOE for a vote, the vetting and rationale that support it have been completed. BOEs have the legal right to discuss the recommendation in closed and open session. My training as a former BOE member and a current supporting education consultant alerts me that voting against a Superintendent’s recommendation should at least raise a flag to miscued pressures self-attached to the governance integrity and roles that each body takes. In reality there was either not enough information or the appearance of conflicting misinformation rendered. High functioning school boards navigate through this and it’s my expectation that D209 BOE and Dr. Rodriguez will too! I just finished a book called Curious Proviso. That only means that I have read it a few hundred times. It started as a brainchild in 2010. I hope you read it. When it gets finalized at the publisher I’ll keep everyone posted. Congratulations to all PTHS and Fenwick Seniors on your graduations. To the The Class of 2018!

Your feedback of either Proviso Pie 2018 or Neighborhood Planners Guide is important to me. Please make them to robertcox20@comcast.net or Online visit www. forestparkpost.com Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


Business Sluggish? It's Time To Advertise In The Post! Call us at 708-366-8947 or e-mail forestparkpost@comcast.net Got a story idea? Call us at 708-366-8947 or contact us at www.forestparkpost.com C

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The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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by Bob Cox

Neighborhood Planners Guide

I remember my Dad telling me that he liked living in Forest Park because his home was his castle and as long as nobody (i.e. fascist governments or city hall) breeched his family’s privacy or freedoms, this was a good place. My parents, my 5 siblings, my wife and two children all navigated local political, social, and challenging economic times here since 1959. I ask myself pondering retirement sooner than later, “why am I still here”. Public education issues, historic preservation issues, environmental protections, sustainable neighborhood issues, suburban sprawl, and popular culture influences have always come up for me to contemplate. They are also connected and complicated quality of life components for me. There are many pleasing things about Forest Park. There are also some unsettling things too. Life can always get better.

We are essentially products of our time, parents, place and living environments. Forest Park was just one of several communities feeding into the PTHS system. Forest Park was basically a blue-collar group of small mostly white urban neighborhoods divided in half by the Eisenhower Expressway. The dream of grassy green Suburbia was still in its infancy.” Curious Proviso”

If one wants to understand the root causes of white flight, block busting and Forest Park’s slow appreciation of diversity in at least the planning side, you can ask this question. How can we cast ourselves out of a time warp or pitfall of community ideological biases including the waning nostalgia of “make America great again” sentiment? From a historical perspective its only been great for certain people. Separate but equal never worked. Neighborhood killing left between the have’s vs have not’s. Fancy gated communities vs blighted slums. How does every neighborhood stakeholder get a voice and a seat to the table? I also make this point because Forest Parkers are both victims and winners in sustaining a short home ownership cycle. One major casualty has been a declining school K-8 population. One topic that rarely gets discussed beyond a superficial Families resist moving in and prematurely leave when level is housing. Another is zoning. Another is race it comes to the public high school question. Politically a relations including institutional discrimination and circumvented course was taken that favored exchange segregation. The process of “redlining” redefined who value over usage value. I’m not on a witch hunt for lives here. unscrupulous red- lining practicing real estate actors (It is in fact illegal) but the fact exists that since the 1960’s “Redlining is the practice of arbitrarily denying or many people in Proviso Township have been affected by limiting financial services to specific neighborhoods, the veiled private warnings about PTHS. generally because its residents are people of color or are poor. — Encyclopedia Chicago “ Economic development of any community depends on a strong bond between residents and their all Over 80% of Forest Park’s housing stock will be over inclusive public schools. This relationship is more a a 100 years old by this next decade. There is a fear foundation of the American dream that I have come to of renters and of entry level home buying vs keeping know. Living in Forest Park in spite of PTHS is an old property values up. There is a fear of density and habitual issue and position. Changing the intentions of there goes the neighborhood. Multi- usage zoning in Forest Park residents with K-12 students is the current recent zoning evolution and improvements have caught issue at hand. How this plays out is a very important on to making use of density. I already can hear my factor of why people choose to live in Forest Park. It is contemporary neighbors say,” Bob how can you say this a reasonable observation that PTHS is changing for the about our Mayberryeske Small Town Charm Big City better in spite of students that they will never see. The Access town? Well I never saw a Mayberry TV show prize will go to those students that they will see …the with people of color, diverse LGBT groups of individuals, benefits outweigh the risks in making PTHS school a or urban savvy global citizens as characters, but was school of choice in FP. The door is open at Proviso East. glad that Sherriff Andy Griffith -Taylor didn’t carry a Please leave all excuses at the door or with Aunt Bea. gun, a smart phone, arrest or shoot a kid with a BB gun or openly make a racial slur. 24

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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10 Reasons Spring Is the Most Delightful Season 1. Temperatures Are Moderate Spring marks the end of blistering winter and the transitional period to scorching summer. In many places, the season brings mild temperatures in the 60s and 70s. People tend to be most comfortable at temperatures of about 72°F, research shows, so the arrival of spring means you can finally ditch the heavy winter layers and still be comfortable. 2. The Birds Return Many animals migrate south during the winter, then head north as temperatures rise. For relatively northern regions, there is no better indicator of spring than birds chirping outside your window. Their northward migration can start as early as midFebruary and last into June, meaning that throughout the spring, you can expect to see a major avian influx. In addition to the satisfaction of marking species off your bird-watching checklist, seeing more of our feathered friends can make you happy. In 2017, a UK study found that the more birds people could see in their neighborhoods, the better their mental health.

3. There Are Baby Animals Everywhere Many animals reproduce in the spring, when temperatures are warmer and food is plentiful. Baby bunnies, ducklings, chipmunks, and other adorable animals abound come spring. Studies have found that seeing cute animals can have positive effects on humans. For instance, one small study in 2012 found that when college students looked at cute images of baby animals, they were better at focusing on a task in the lab. Being able to watch fluffy baby squirrels frolic outside your office window might make spring your most productive season of the year.

7. Flowers Are In Bloom After months spent conserving energy, flowers bloom in the spring, once they sense that the days have grown longer and the weather has turned warmer. That's good for humans, because several studies have shown that looking at flowers can make you happy. A 2008 study of hospital patients found that having flowers in the room made people feel more positive and reduced their pain and anxiety [PDF]. Another study from Rutgers University found that when participants were presented with a bouquet of flowers, it resulted in what scientists call a "true smile" a full 100 percent of the time. Seeing flowers had both "immediate and long-term effects" that resulted in elevated moods for days afterward, according to the researchers [PDF].

8. You Don't Have To Worry About Dry Air Flu season in the U.S. typically lasts through the fall and winter, usually peaking between December and February and tapering off during the spring. The seasonal change is in part because of dry air. Cold temperatures mean a drop in humidity, and indoor heating only makes the air drier. This lack of moisture in the air can dry out your skin and the nasal cavities, leading to nose bleeds, irritated sinuses, and a greater risk of getting sick. Since the mucus in your nose is designed to trap viruses, when it dries up, you're more likely to catch something nasty, like the flu. As the weather warms up and becomes more humid throughout the spring, that mucus comes back. As the season wears on, not only can you lay off the body lotion, but you can probably put away the tissues—if you don't have spring allergies, that is.

4. You Are Safer In 2015, a pair of public policy researchers discovered a hidden upside to "springing forward" for Daylight Saving Time. It reduced crime. When the sun set later in the evening, the study published in the Review of Economics and Statistics found, robbery rates fell. After Daylight Saving Time started in the spring, there was a 27 percent drop in robberies during that extra 9. You Can Open Your Windows hour of evening sunlight, and a 7 percent drop over the course of Temperate weather makes it easier to get the fresh air you need. the whole day. Opening your windows and allowing the breeze in serves as an important way to ventilate indoor spaces, according to the EPA. 5. The Leaves Come Back A lack of ventilation can lead to an unhealthy concentration of Spring brings green growth back to plants and trees. indoor pollutants from sources like cleaning product fumes, Depending on whereyou live, trees may begin sporting new certain furniture and building materials, and stoves (especially leaves as early as mid-March. That successful spring leaf growth gas ones), posing a threat to your health and comfort. Winter ensures a cool canopy to relax under during the hot summer—a brings the highest rates of indoor pollutants like nitrogen oxide, hugely important factor in keeping cities comfortable. According a 2016 study of unventilated stove use in homes found. Spring to researchers, vegetation plays a big role in mitigating the urban brings the perfect opportunity to throw open those windows and heat island effect. When trees release water back into the air doors and get the air moving again. through evapotranspiration, it can cool down the areas around them by up to 9°F, according to the EPA. 10. You Can Get Your Vitamins Naturally Sunlight triggers your body to produce vitamin D, which keeps 6. Growing Plants Absorb Carbon Dioxide your bones strong. At northern latitudes, it's extremely difficult It's amazing what a little sun can do for plants and grass. to get enough sun exposure naturally to maintain healthy vitamin Through photosynthesis, plants convert sunlight, carbon D levels during the winter—even if you did want to expose your dioxide, and water into food, releasing oxygen in the process. skin to the elements—but that starts to change during the spring. That means as plants start to grow in the spring, they pull One Spanish study found that in Valencia (which shares a latitude carbon out of the atmosphere, providing an important with Philadelphia, Denver, Baltimore, Kansas City, and several environmental service. Plants take in roughly 25 percent of the other major U.S. cities), people only need 10 minutes outside with a quarter of their bodies exposed to the spring sunshine to get an carbon emissions humans produce, absorbing more than 100 adequate daily dose of vitamin D. gigatons of carbon through photosynthesis each growing season. Because of this, the amount of carbon dioxide in the Source: Mentalfloss.com atmosphere drops each spring and summer. Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018 25


Animal Care League 1011 Garfield, Oak Park, IL 60304 708-848-8155

Dusty Breed Domestic Shorthair/Mix Age 9 years 8 months 3 days Gender Male

Abel Breed Age Gender Size Color

Cane Corso/Mix 12 years 5 months 26 days Male Large Chocolate

Sweet, snoozy, and swoonworthy - that's Abel! He's a 12 year old Cane Corso mix who is a delicious chocolate color. Abel came to ACL as a stray, and the poor guy wasn't able to find his family. Abel is a senior guy, but he still has tons of pep in his step! He loves to go for walks, and he still knows how to use his big muscular body! At home, he's content to snooze and snuggle the day away. Abel has lots of life left, and he deserves to spend it in the lap of luxury! He's a gentle dog who will do well with kids of any age. He's tolerant of other dogs his size, and he would likely do fine with dogsavvy cats, too. He's healthy and happy - just looking for the perfect place to retire! Email Gabrielle at caninemanager@ animalcareleague.org to meet him!

Dusty loved his caregiver and lived happily in his "forever" home for seven years. Then sadly, and unexpectedly, his caretaker passed away and Dusty was brought to the Animal Care League. Dusty is a moderately active feline who liked to explore his house when his people are sleeping and is an inquisitive and affectionate cat. Dusty enjoys people and gets along with other felines as long as they are respectful. He would also be content to be your one and only kitty to adore! Dusty is a great cat and good fit for most any feline, friendly household, and plenty of people are interested in Dusty until they hear that "D" word. Dusty doesn't understand why "diabetes" makes folks feel sorry for him but not want to take him home and so he continues to watch his friends leave while he stays behind. Sure, Dusty needs medication each morning and evening, but he really doesn't mind his insulin shots and our staff has assured him that they would be more than happy to teach his new adopter how to take care of him. We think Dusty would do great in just about any home environment with older, respectful children! He enjoys basking in the sunlight and enjoys his pets/ scratches on his head! He is a sweet, docile boy ready to swoon and charm you with his handsome and loving demeanor! If you would like more information on meeting Dusty and hearing more about his medical care, please email Alan at felinemanager@animalcareleague.org.

Find more adoptable pets waiting for their forever home at www.animalcareleague.org 26

The Forest Park Post • May & June 2018

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708.366.1001

290

^Please add tax, title, license & doc fee to all advertised offers. New vehicle sale prices include all applicable manufacturer rebates that are available to everyone. All finance offers with aproved credit. #Available on similarly equipped vehicles only. Must take delivery from dealer stock. Dealer reserves the right to verify competitive offer from Chicagoland area only. See dealer for details. Valid on in stock vehicles only. All prior sales excluded. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Dealer will not honor errors or omissions in this advertisement.


LOW PAYMENTS!

LOW PRICES!

1000 VEHICLES OVER

NEW 2018 CHEVY

SILVERADO $

STK#B7807

18,998

NEW 2018 CHEVY

STK#B7749

STK#B7793

$

12,995

TRAX

$

14,495

OIL CHANGE & TIRE ROTATION INCLUDES: OIL & FILTER

$

49.

95

Cannot be combined with any other offer. Plus tax

Se habla Espanol

EQUINOX

AVAILABLE!

NEW 2018 CHEVY

CRUZE

NEW 2018 CHEVY

$

STK#B8416

18,998

NEW 2018 CHEVY

NEW 2018 CHEVY

MALIBU

CAMARO

$

$

STK#B7587

14,890 $

STK#B7028

21,798

100 BONUS DISCOUNT

You spend this:

$50- $99.99 $100-$199.99 $200-$299.99 $300-$399.99

You save this:

Save $5.00 Save $10.00 Save $20.00 Save $30.00

You spend this:

$400-$499.99 $500-$699.99 $700-$899.99 $900-or more!

You save this:

Save $40.00 Save $50.00 Save $75.00 Save $100.00

Cannot be combined with any other offer. Plus tax

CurrieChevy.com

888-577-0343

8401 West Roosevelt Road Forest Park, Il 60130 Roosevelt just East of 1st Ave.

Cannot be combined with any other offer. See dealer for details. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures for illustration purpose only. All rebates in lieu of other offers. All offers expire two days after publication. Plus tax and tag.

Profile for The Forest Park Post

Forest Park Post May June 2018  

Forest Park Post May June 2018  

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