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THE

POST Forest Park, Illinois

Our stories, Our people, Our Village

Volume 13 Issue 4

July & August 2017


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The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


THE

POST Forest Park, Illinois

The Forest Park Post is published by 34 Publishing, Inc.© and distributed free of charge in the Village of Forest Park. All materials, articles, photographs and illustrations are property of 34 Publishing, Inc.© and cannot be duplicated or used in any fashion without express written consent. 34 Publishing Inc. is not responsible for the content, opinions, advertisements or any other materials expressed within.

Amy Rita, Publisher Staff Writers: Mary Win Connor Andrew Cox Bob Cox Peter Gianakopoulos Arlene Jarzab Terry Keshner Billy Lombardo Woody Mosgers Nello Rubio Jessica Sclafini Kathy Sullivan Amy Turilli

www.forestparkpost.com Mailing Address: The Forest Park Post 7442 W. Madison St. • Forest Park, IL 60130 Phone: 708.366.8947 Fax: 708.776.4413 Email: forestparkpost@comcast.net Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

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Happy Hour at McGaffer's Beer Garden

BBQ & Brews

Every Thursday & Friday in July & August 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. July 20th & 21st Pork Chop Sandwich $5.50 BBQ, Maxwell Street Style of Chubb Seasoned w/ chips and slaw July 27th & 28th Polish Sausage $4.50 Maxwell Street Style, Melted Cheese and Bacon w/ chips and slaw

Come Join Us!

Great Summer Stop for Office Groups, Car Dealers or Tradesmen! 4

The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


Wounded Warrior Project's Soldier Ride 2017 Wounded Warrior Project is a non-profit organization that works to honor and empower wounded service members returning home with a multitude of medical issues, and helps them readjust to civilian life. While participating in Soldier Ride, these Wounded Warriors ride specially designed bicycles that meet each of their specific needs on a 65 mile route over a three day period. This year marked the 10th Annual Chicago area Soldier Ride. The Cook County Sheriff’s Department Chicago Fire Department along with Brookfield Zoo and Rosemont Public Safety Department's and a multitude of Police and Fire agencies, including Forest Park, from the Cook County area have supported Soldier Ride from the beginning and did again this year. The ride took place from Thursday, June 22nd to Saturday, June 24th. A successful dinner, funded by Reed Construction, was hosted by Jimmy’s Place on June 22nd in honor of Jack Hughes. Jack had been an avid supporter over the last five years working along with The Wounded Warriors Project. Jack was never one to except any platitudes; like all of the men and women who came every year, he was a warrior who served proudly during the war, and afterwards, for those whom still fought through their own personal wars. Jack was always one of “The Men in the Arena”.

“It is not the critic who counts, not the one who points out how the strong man stumbled or how the doer of deeds might have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred with sweat and dust and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who, if he wins, knows the triumph of high achievement; and who if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat. —Theodore Roosevelt April 23 1910 Paris France Sorbonne

Jack Hughes During The Korean War Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

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Neighborhood Planners Guide by Bob Cox

Planners forecast more than they predict. Change happens in built form in all neighborhoods and both rural and urban areas. In past issues of NPG I have mentioned commentary on housing, a subject that urban planning practitioners are aware of and contemplate on. What it means for Forest Parkers is an aspiration to sustain a vibrant and sustainable community… one that might also be culturally diverse. It’s a big country, why live in Forest Park anyway?

Density is still a dirty word for some folks (photo google Images)

Most urban / suburban neighborhood like FP saw a housing shortage after WWII. The conditions set the stage for the suburban expansion that we know of now, although I believe that it was more Ad Hoc planning based in the private sector and on the mobility produced by the American Car in every pot and freedom of the road, rather than conventional town planning and neighborhood growth. There were winners and losers. Sprawl was inevitable and the short term needs of the consumers were met to those who could afford it. Generally, people freak out on and feel threatened by racial integration plans, renters, social housing concepts, urban renewal projects, density and imminent domain seizures by government. Forest Park still has challenges with affordable housing. A remarkable hunk of our homes(housing stock) are now or will be over 100 years old. It is documented in the last Comprehensive plan upgrade a few years back and the US Census. The very term of affordable housing strikes fear in many people feeling that “there goes the neighborhood” or a tipping point is lurking might be time to move. If you asked me, how are we doing regarding housing? I would reply, “cautiously, reluctantly and a little behind investment.” Because the process varies for different communities, ones that seem more comfortable with taking risks seem to enjoy gradual growth. The idea of common good in public policy are supported by the private sector and amenities like jobs, healthy living, walkability and good schools for the future are nurtured by most of the community’s stakeholders. There are surveys that determine the Happiness factors of residents being used. Being active only on social media is passive democracy. In Forest Park since 2000 we have transitioned a bit but only have scratched the surface in growth. A bona fide opportunity 6

Looks like my Carneyville neighborhood (photo Google Images)

exists for improving PTHS including Proviso East. The last few years FP grade school’s student population has shrunk dramatically. Is that an outcome that we really want? There are also external constraints like The State of Illinois property tax formula and its method of funding schools that seems eternally ongoing. Before I go to the happy hunting grounds I would like to see, hear, and listen to what you think living in Forest Park will be like in 2040. First you have to find a place… Your feedback is appreciated and welcome, the good, bad or imaginative, we want to hear your neighborhood planning ideas. Please send them to robertcox20@comcast.net or forestparkpost@comcast.net or follow us on Facebook at Forest Park Urban Portraits and Forest Park Posts FB pages. *Bob Cox is a lifetime resident of Forest Park and has a 2010 minted B.A. in Urban Planning and Public Affairs from UIC CUPPA.

The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


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Crossword Puzzle 1

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ACROSS

32. Bygone auto ornament

DOWN

1. Proscribe

33. Flower holder?

1. Topical treatment

4. Bills, e.g.

34. Kind of grass

2. On the road

8. Catch some flies

35. Blubber

3. Discuss terms

12. Leave dumbstruck

36. "So ___!"

4. Like a boxer

13. Fit for the job

37. Concise summary

5. One way to be taken

14. Miner's quest

39. Shoot up

6. Cagey

15. Delay

40. Court decision?

16. Some floor votes

41. Battle group

7. Revolutionary War mercenary

17. Adviser, say

44. Story starter

18. Like Mr. Magoo

47. Arabian bigwig

20. Gull

49. Brazil, for one

22. Fail completely

50. Come down hard

23. Gave out

51. High-top's low part

27. Avon or Cornwall

52. Big cheese

29. Cry to Cratchit

53. Boer's migration

30. Bottom of a deck?

54. Turn's partner

31. Canned-soup instruction

55. Shade maker

27. Do more than browse 28. Act as a judge 29. Took the bait 32. Sprint winner 33. Bogus thing 35. Giant syllable 36. Television's Liz 38. Record keeper 39. Seascape sights

8. Sharp rebukes

42. Face-off

9. ___ polloi

43. Energy source

10. Make sense, with "up"

44. Pick or choose

11. "Shucks!"

45. Hide-hair link

19. Actor's goal

46. It can be behind the eightball

21. Volcanic spew

48. Bossy remark?

24. It's been said 25. Antique item 26. Capitol feature

Crossword answers on page 25. 8

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Top 10 Summer Safety Tips For Dogs While there is certainly nothing wrong with taking your pet out for picnics, hikes, swimming, or running, keep in mind that warm weather can be dangerous. It’s hard for pets to keep cool when the sun is beating down, and animals don’t sweat like people do. Dogs do sweat, but not very much, and it does little to cool them off. As you probably know, dogs more commonly cool themselves down through panting. When there is only hot air for a dog to breathe, it’s a lot harder for that dog to keep cool. Here are some important summer safety tips for dogs.: 1. Never, ever, EVER leave your dog in a hot car Okay, you’ve probably heard this one before, but it’s so important that we still decided to list it first. It can take minutes – yes, MINUTES – for a pet to develop heat stroke and suffocate in a car. Most people don’t realize how hot it gets in parked cars. On a 78 degree day, for instance, temperatures in a car can reach 90 degrees in the shade and top 160 degrees if parked directly in the sun! Your best bet is to leave your dog home on warm days. If you’re driving around with your dog in the car, bring water and a water dish and take your dog with you when you leave the car. 2. Make sure your dog is protected from parasites like fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes If not protected, your dog is at risk for heartworm, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and a host of other nasty and dangerous conditions. And don’t forget, many of these diseases can be caught by people too! 3. Keep your dog's paws cool When the sun is cooking, surfaces like asphalt or metal can get really hot! Try to keep your pet off of hot asphalt; not only can it burn paws, but it can also increase body temperature and lead to overheating. It’s also not a good idea to drive around with your dog in the bed of a to your veterinarian about sunscreens for your dog (don’t assume a truck – the hot metal can burn paws quickly (and they can fall out to sunscreen for people is appropriate for your dog). be injured or killed in an accident). 8. If there’s no fence, keep your dog on a leash 4. Your dog should always have access to fresh drinking water Summertime means all sorts of exciting sights, scents, critters running and shade around, and new and exciting places to explore. You never want to lose Our dogs get much thirstier than we do when they get hot, and other your dog because he became distracted in an unfamiliar environment. than panting and drinking, they really have no way to cool themselves And remember, not every dog is meant to be off-leash; some dogs down. Keep your pet in the shade as often as possible. While dogs and just can never be fully trusted to come when called. Make sure you cats like to sunbathe, direct sunlight can overheat them (especially understand your dog’s tendencies and err on the side of being overlydogs) and cause heat stroke. cautious. 5. Give your dog his very own "kiddy pool” Dogs who love the water, naturally love it even more during the hot months, and getting wet keeps them cool. Providing a small, kid-sized pool will go over big.

9. Watch your dog’s weight After a long winter, many dogs put on a few extra pounds. Summer is the perfect time to increase his level of exercise and get in tip-top shape. A pet that maintains a healthy weight throughout his lifetime will live, on average, 2-3 years longer than an overweight pet! Just 6. Don’t assume your dog can swim well make sure not to over-exert your dog. Talk to your veterinarian, give Just because dogs instinctively know how to swim, doesn’t mean him adequate rest and if your dog is especially overweight, make sure they’re good swimmers. And if your dog jumps in your swimming you ease him into physical activity. pool, he might not be able to get out without help and could easily drown. Make sure your dog can’t get into your swimming pool without 10. Keep your windows screened! you around. You may want your house to be ventilated, but you definitely do not want your dog jumping out! 7. Dogs get sunburns too! Believe it or not, dogs can sunburn, especially those with short or Perhaps the most important tip is to pay attention to your dog – you’ll light-colored coats. And just like with people, sunburns can be painful know when he seems uncomfortable. Summer can be a great time to for a dog and overexposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer. Talk spend with your dog, but it’s important to keep these tips in mind! Source: Pet Health Network

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Somewhat Of A Legacy by Mary Win Connor

when she was in her late 20s. The fact that they died before she married and had children was not lost on Mary Win; in fact, she was quick to say that it was most likely due to a burning desire to avoid having to continue to take care of children after having raised five of their own.

I have gotten to the point in life where what I have to look forward to is shorter than what I have to look back on. I’m not saying that I have been told my days are numbered or anything like that, it’s just that the numbers have hit that tipping point. Since this mathematical occurrence has already afforded me the dubious honor of writing an obituary, it has also given me pause to consider what would be written about me when the time comes. After much contemplation I have decided that if I want my story told accurately in a few paragraphs I should be the one to tell it. To that end, I have taken it upon myself to write my own obituary. Here ya go:

Mary Win made very little impact at St. Luke’s Elementary or Trinity High Schools, creating a void of colleges that were receptive to lending her money to continue her march of mediocrity. So off into the working world she wandered. For 12 years she served mankind by typing, filing, making copies and answering phones, with several side forays into food serving, drink making and server schedule creation. In 1985 she married Tim Baldwin (aforementioned failure of judgment), and in 1988 their daughter, Kerry Baldwin was born. Something about the rigors of giving birth slapped her sound judgment back into place and when Kerry was three months old, Mary Win packed Kerry and the dog into the better of the two household vehicles and left Tim in the rear view mirror.

2007 Rory Connor was born. The new Millennium found our heroine living a life of static annoyance. Since this had never been Mary Win’s preferred form of existence, in 2004 she once again threw all 52 cards in the air and began rearranging them by quitting her full-time job and starting a freelance bookkeeping business with occasional forays into writing. This gave her the flexibility to join the Forest Park District 91 School Board and volunteer at various School District and Park District events. This also widened the circle of people who groaned when they saw her number come up on their phones and facepalmed at some of her less thought out comments. In 2015, Mary Win’s brother Bill was diagnosed with lung cancer. Since she was the sanest and most centered of the siblings (and what does that tell you about that family?) she drew the runninginterference-with-the-world card for the months of treatment and subsequent surgery that followed the diagnosis. Having been blessed with stubborn children she was more than up to the task of dealing with a sick male. However Bill, never one to let anyone else run the show, survived the chemo and surgery only to die of a heart attack within a month of leaving the hospital. That left to Mary Win the job of herding the remaining three siblings, Maureen, Beth and Bunky (she has a real name but no one ever uses it) through life. This is one of the first subjects she plans to bring up with Bill upon entering the Pearly Gates.

After seven years of looking at the world through the exhausted eyes of a single parent, Eric Connor appeared on the scene. Mary Win was happy to have someone to share her life, household and Kerry-raising responsibilities with, but was not very receptive whenever Eric would bring up marriage. So Eric did what any guy desperate to get married would Mary Win’s parents Bill and do. He got her pregnant. Off Liz Hosty passed on to a wellto the courthouse they went in earned quieter, gentler world November, 1996 and in May, Having Mary Win Connor was born Mary Win Hosty and due to a breach of sound judgment in the 1980’s spent a brief period as Mary Win Baldwin. Fortunately, in the 1990’s she found a man much more worthy of her presence in his life and was able to adjust her monogram. More on this later.

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achieved

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matriarch

status, Mary Win soon realized it was time to grow up and become a serious adult. Her venture into adulthood lasted twelve months. While at a wedding reception in St. Augustine, Florida she was offered the opportunity to go ziplining at an alligator farm the next morning and off she went. Zipping through the air over alligators led to diving into Lake Michigan in March and steering a wheeled cart down a ski slope in Michigan in July. While she’d given it her best shot at being an adult, Mary Win’s true talent lies in being unpredictably absurd and annoyingly fun. As she grew older, her circle of friends grew younger. Perhaps that’s what kept her behaving so much younger than her chronological age. Or maybe it was just because she never really grew up, just did a reasonably good job of faking it for a while. Now that she has left us to join those who departed her life earlier, we are faced with what to do with what’s left of her. Fortunately, she left behind specific instructions in regard to her mortal remains. On the advice of John Prine she would like us to “give my feet to the footloose, careless and fancy free, give my knees to the needy, send my mouth way down south and kiss my ass goodbye”. When the times comes, if my kids are too distraught to remember I have taken care of my obituary I am counting on someone who has read this to make sure it gets into the newspaper. Thanks! MW


Proviso Pie 2017 by Bob Cox

A chapter in my book called Curious Proviso starts out with these lyrics by Mr. Simon. When I think back on all the crap I learned in high school, it's a wonder I can think at all. And though my lack of education hasn't hurt me none, I can read the writing on the wall — Kodachrome Paul Simon For me and my class of 1972 classmates, June 1972 was the historical time we were released and granted our personal freedom from Proviso East. That summer was a milestone for most of us and still is today for students all over the country. I honestly remember pledging to myself that I was never going back. My sentiment was not from hatred or fear but more of wanting to do what “I wanted to do “and an internal promise that we were going to change the world. How did we do? is an entirely different question. I’m still asking Proviso questions and for those of you that do not know me, I did go back. I believe

asking questions about public education should be frequently asked. In the 45 years after I graduated, there were decades that went by when public attention to Proviso High Schools vanished and the need to ask questions would cease. The deafening sounds of silence dovetailed with the negative perception (the irrational hatred of anything Proviso) that would permeate the Proviso Community’s opinions and taint PTHS’s reputation. The collective actions and NON actions of Proviso stakeholders created the backdrop for the political malcontent, suspicious attitudes, and lack of trust that are mainstream today. We are at a turning point. And it took over 45 years to get there. All schools change and whether you believe and actually take part in that marvelous chaos you can become by default… a passive outsider. More and more more progressive public school stakeholders are learning the benefits of asking questions, better questions, and relevant questions for 21st Century public in order to define education programs, strategies and partnerships. You then become an ardent insider...you have a voice. At an earlier springtime meeting with Dr. Hardy, Principle at Proviso East, I was keen to learn the current and future direction of Proviso East parents. He referred me an ASCD book called Partnering with Parents, to Ask the Right Questions, by Luz Santana, Dan Rothstein and Ages Bain, which I read and enjoyed. The opportunity to train with

them came up. I completed the workshop at Maine South High School in Park Ridge 6/26/17 and earned 6.5 hours of Professional Development Hours from ISBE (Illinois State Board of Education) I left with a new tool and greater insight about asking questions. RQI, The Right Question Institute, A Catalyst for Microdemocracy, invites the public to join their network for free, this is a group activity and process that gets people talking and listening to each other. (see rightquestion.org) I am borrowing a few questions from education

consultant Jeff Cohn at a recent Flint Michigan planning project he was facilitating. You can apply these to our District 91, District 209 and private school k-12 landscapes: • What are the characteristics of 2022 Flint students? • What are the characteristics of 2022 Flint Graduates? Much dialogue with stakeholder groups set the content and roadmap for goals, objectives and strategies. Flint has found Flint Grit. This seems simple but in reality and in both Flint Schools and PTHS Schools

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negative outcomes were often produced when this process broke down and died through community neglect, economic downturns, neighborhood poverty, government policy failures, or when organizational code of silence is practiced. Here are a few of my own: • What does a 21st Century classroom look like? • How do we bring arts and music to k-12 students? • How do we support all Proviso East students in the “now”?

This summer and beyond try to come up with some questions on your own. A forgone natural family activity replaced by the personal love affair with smart phones? You won’t find the answers on Google. Proviso Pie 2017 Updates: The Proviso East NJROTC sent 31 cadets to summer camps this past June. I intend on bringing their story back to you this Fall in Back to School Forest Park Post Issues. Send your questions or comments to forestparkpost.com or robertcox20@comcast.net.

The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017

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Pick up your copy of The Forest Park Post at these convenient locations: Beacon Pub Doc Ryan's Ed’s Way Exit Strategy Famous Liquors Forest Park Library Forest Park Bank on Madison St. Forest Park Bank on Roosevelt Rd. Healy’s Westside/Cocina Lobos Howard Mohr Community Center McGaffer’s Saloon Old School Records Old School Tavern MPK Kitchen Pioneer Tap R'Place Scratch Kitchen Village Hall Lobby

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The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


Ask The Plant Expert by Scott McAdam Jr.

James M. O’Rourke Attorney at Law Since 1981

Scott McAdam Jr. Commercial Account Manager, V.P. of Snow Operations, Horticulturist

Forest Park & Chicago

4 Steps To A Flourishing Garden — Even When You're Away Summer is here for a while—but if you’re like many others, you are hitting the road for some vacation. How do you keep your garden flourishing in your absence? Follow these four tips: 1. Watering – For weeks, water deeply to establish a deep and healthy root system that is more tolerant of drought.  2. Weeding and cultivation  – Both are crucial for water and nutrient uptake.  Remember that weeds typically grow much faster than your perennial plantings, and cultivation of the surrounding soil will improve gas exchange between the soil and air and also improve the soil’s ability to absorb water.  

350 W. Circle Ave. Forest Park, Illinois 60130

53 W. Jackson Blvd. Suite 240 Chicago, Illinois 60604

• Zoning Law • Business Law • Probate Administration & Litigation • Municipal Collection • Municipal Liaison-Zoning Development • Representation of Business to County and Municipal Governments; Defense of Violations & Business Development

James.JMOLaw@gmail.com

3. Mulching – Yet another way of maintaining moisture in the soil for longer periods of time.  Apply a thick layer (3”) of mulch around your plants and in the planting beds.   4. Composting – Incorporating compost into plantings, with its concentrated organic matter, helps maintain nutrients and moisture better than clay and loam soils.  Follow these tips and you can rest assured that your garden is having an equally good time while you are away. Should you have any concerns or if you notice any changes in your landscape, please contact the professionals at McAdam Landscaping to assist you with your needs. McAdam Landscaping is located at 2001 Des Plaines Ave. in Forest Park. Phone: 708-771-2299. For more tips and information about the company’s range of services, visit www.mcadamlandscaping.com. For information, and hours, of the McAdam Nursery & Garden Center, call 708771-4903. On social media: http://www.houzz.com/pro/mcadamlandscape/ www.facebook.com/McAdamLandscaping www.twitter.com/McAdamLandscape

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The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


A long time ago in a galaxy far far away... With a big bang!

A tiny sub shop selling 5 great subs, homemade fries & fountain pop opened its doors. Then we started cookin’- homemade soup (125 types) 11 cold subs, beef, sausage & chicken and fresh salads and we became…

followed by the word ‘Restaurant’ In 1985 when the Bears won the Super Bowl we added catering of hot & cold hors d’oeuvre’s, many entrees & sides and the slogan… “We Deliver, anytime anywhere”

In 2015, we added BYOB, a Lunching Pad, a full catering liquor license and morphed into

And now we’re 40! Please join us from August 19th thru 26th as we celebrate each day with specials, celebratory toasts and fun freebies! We thank you, Forest Park and all our customers for supporting us and making our journey a success Live Long & Prosper Paul McKenna & Henry Laskowski 7618 W. Madison 708-771-3016 www.starshiprestaurant.com

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The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


In An Instant by Arlene R. Jarzab

We all know that life can change in an instant: a birth, a death, a diagnosis, a chance meeting, zigging when you should have zagged. Each of those can have life-altering effects. That stranger on the train could be ‘the one’; or you may have missed that train and the opportunity. Life is like that; we don’t know when we choose a certain college or career how our lives are going to be changed. And, we will never know what we missed when we turned right instead of left. On May 3 ,2017, a perfect Florida morning, I headed to Robinson Preserve for my usual 5-or 6-mile run to enjoy the birds and tranquility. Two and a half miles in, I caught my left toe on a rock and went down. I actually saw my hand hit the gravel; hard. I knew right away I had broken my left wrist. I was bleeding and had to get back to my car at the main entrance. Astonishingly, people passed me by even though I was holding my arm and had blood on my leg. I guess their Instagram post were too fascinating to notice anything around them. Forget me; did they see the

Bald Eagle? I was particularly impressed by the bikers who could pedal and check their screens. As I started the 2 ½ mile walk, I knew I was going to need help. I found three women whom I had passed earlier; I called out to them and they immediately swung into action. They stayed with me, walked me back, called 911 and made sure I wasn’t in shock; I wasn’t. I was angry at myself. The paramedics met us at the parking lot, wrapped my wrist and checked my vitals. Those three women brought my rental car to the hospital for me.

When I returned to Illinois two weeks later, I was put into a hard cast from my knuckles to above my elbow. That further complicated everything: nothing would fit over my cast. Sleeping became a challenge: I felt like it was an anchor that kept me from moving during the night. On the plus side, I was only in that cast for a few weeks, but since my arm had been immobilized for over 5 weeks, I needed therapy to straighten out my elbow. I am also trying to get my wrist to twist the way it used to and touch my thumb to all of my fingers.

At Blake Memorial, I was fasttracked into the ER. I became a reluctant celebrity as the “67-year-old woman who runs a 10K every day” (a slight exaggeration) and walked two and a half miles back to her car with a compound fracture. I knew I would need surgery and I quickly calculated the 6-8 weeks I would be in a cast, and hoped I would be better by the fourth of July.

I have had several ‘breakthroughs’: getting my hair into a ponytail, tying my shoes and putting in my earrings. I still can open those wine bottles, but I’m faster now. Those small containers of butter you get in restaurants are almost impossible, but, it seems that others have the same problem with two good hands. Typing is a problem; I’m tired of using one hand; I’m trying to write this with both hands, but my I was fortunate that it was my left arm is starting to ache. left wrist since I am righthanded. If it had been my right, What I have learned from this I would have needed someone is that people are resilient; to fly down and bring me back. we find a way to conquer As it was, I still had some obstacles and we adapt to our challenges; showering, blow circumstances. I also learned drying my hair, opening a wine that we are surrounded by bottle. That last one I mastered people who will jump in to pretty quickly; twist-off tops help; they will go an extra are easier! But trying to open mile. Maybe if I had zigged a carton of yogurt or those instead of zagged I wouldn’t sealed contact lens packets have been reassured that were a challenge. Everything people are good. I know that I took longer. By the time I have a responsibility to repay finished getting dressed, I was the kindnesses of everyone I exhausted. encountered that day; I will do my best to ‘pay it forward’. Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

Pick up your copy of The Forest Park Post at these convenient locations: Forest Park Bank on Madison St. The Beacon Pub Famous Liquors Village Hall Lobby Healy’s Westside/ Cocina Lobos Forest Park Library Howard Mohr Community Center Ed’s Way McGaffer’s Saloon Forest Park Bank on Roosevelt Rd. Old School Records Old School Tavern MPK Kitchen Scratch Kitchen Exit Strategy

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The Forest Park Post • July & August 2017 Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com


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Woody’s Whine So Many Vines, So Little Time! by Woody Mosgers woodywine@aol.com Rosen is the former CEO of what was at one time America’s #1 wine retailer, Sam’s Wines in Chicago. Read with interest his thoughts on the Amazon and Whole Foods merger published on a wine industry web site.

Writing from the edge of the Russian River in Sonoma It only feels like a couple of weeks but as I write this it’s been six months exactly since Peg and I left Galewood (12/12) and drove across country in two cars with a cat on downers, a memorable and somewhat exciting trip but that’s a story for another day. Much has taken place in our lives - finding an apartment for which we paid more in rent than our new mortgage, then finding a house in a very tight and expensive market and then a contractor to remodel the bathrooms and create a fabulous kitchen that I wish I’d had 20 years ago, all quite time consuming and fraught with delays and stress. I could go on but that’s not why I’m here.

Rosen first shares his thoughts on cross country wine shipping and how troublesome and expensive it is and his premise is that, “ …the acquisition takes all that away…and puts the independent liquor store (Famous Liquors) officially on the endangered species list followed in a close second by the independent grocer.” Point being that there are Whole Foods in 38 states. “It is perfectly legal to ship to an end user within your own state. Costs are cut down by proximity. Time to deliver is cut down by store location. Price is cut down because Whole Foods and Amazon have effectively created the nation’s largest online/offline retailer. Groceries…will be ordered by Prime customers and so will the booze, now more than ever. Whole Foods/Amazon will get a 50% share of consumers that want to round out their virtual shopping cart with adult beverage.

liquor store owner will suffer greatly. No longer will the consumer stop by the wine shop on the way home from work, they will send it in advance to be delivered within an hour. That sale will be booked at AMZN and WFM.” Bordeaux - Over the last few decades there has been a shift in Bordeaux; certainly pricey, highly rated, age-worthy wines are still in evidence although the past few vintages have been tough weather wise ‘13 is better than horrible ‘12 and ‘14 called the “…best of the lessor vintages” is better yet with ‘15 and ‘16 projected to be off the charts. However more and more vintners have recognized the shift of world-wide palates, i.e. many younger wine lovers are looking for wines that can be consumed early alongside their favorite contemporary meals and the ’14 vintage fits into this search almost by accident.

pound of cannabis,” says a small production wine maker in Mendocino County north of Sonoma. “We have 31,000 plants out here for grapes, so I’m pretty sure I can handle 300 to 500 cannabis plants.” So what’s the big deal you say, good for the wine maker, but this is the 5000 lb. gorilla in the room. Magnify that statement by 100 or 1,000 or more folks who are in the grape business and may want to go into the weed business when it becomes legal in California next year. It’s such a concern that I’m going to a “Wine & Weed Symposium” in August here in Santa Rosa to get a feel for what’s going to happen. Consider that medical weed is already legal and going strong and that there is already a real labor shortage of workers who spend all day in the sun or cold and damp - depending on the time of the year, caring for vineyards and who will be offered better jobs tending plants in climate controlled warehouses, for better pay. That labor issue has wine makers already considering more mechanized farming that may in fact mean having to change the style of vines and result in rougher handle of a fragile product resulting in maybe not the same wine you’re used to and at a higher cost. There’s already a growing issue of demand for existing warehousing and zoning that’s already driving up the cost of local, non-weed business.

“The 2014 wines come from a quite normal vintage, grapes got ripe, the wines taste great, a bit better for right bank Cabernet that left bank Merlot”, says Paul Wagner who represents the Bordeaux folks from Napa of all places. “These are 10 year aging wines (short time for Bordeaux) but they’re making wines now that are delicious when young On the other hand not all is and only get better with age”, lost just yet, Phil Coturri, a my point exactly. viticulturist who oversees the vineyard at Kamen Estate in Wine and Weed - “I get Sonoma, Calif. Mr. Coturri sees $2,000 a ton for my Pinot Gris marijuana as a complement to grapes, whereas I can make wine rather than a competitor. AMZN and WFM. - Brian “The independent grocer and potentially $2,000 or more per “How you grow it really affects I’m here to tell you about wine and weed and the very changing face of wine tasting in Napa and Sonoma and of course Bordeaux, yes Bordeaux - it’s the first event I went to in San Francisco not long after we got here and just as I’m writing the “Whine” Amazon scoops up Whole Foods sending the grocery and liquor industry scrambling to comprehend the impact that their respective industries will fell from the new combine, trust me – it will change everything.

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the flavor and the high of the pot,” Mr. Coturri said. “If it’s grown in a greenhouse, it’ll be a lot different than if it’s grown in the hills. It thrives in certain soils and with a long growing season.” Just as with wine, the marijuana industry is diverging, Mr. Coturri said, between inexpensive plants grown in quantity indoors or hydroponically, and marijuana that, like good wine, has a sense of place. “There is going to be a highend marijuana industry, with distinctive strains and distinctive effects,” Mr. Coturri said. “And then you’ll have your ‘Walmart pot,’ your ‘Yellow Tail of pot’ that will be insipid.” Hold your breath on this issue, get it, hold your breath, it’s going to affect beer, liquor and wine sales and costs in the very near future. Napa Cabernet - I can’t tell you how frustrated I am to find every winery large or small charging a hefty “tasting fee” $15-20 and more per person. Even everyday Geyser Peak only samples their “premium wines” which they had to develop just for the tasting room. Much of this is driven by the desire to be like Napa (high end) and cater to the dot.comers that drive up from Silicon Valley on Sat/Sun and can spend like drunken sailors.

“Any land that’s in Napa Valley, in the watershed of the Napa River, that can be planted to Cabernet and produce a good crop of Cabernet is being planted today, and they can make a call and sell the fruit for $5,000, $6,000 $7, 000,” (a ton) said Tony Correia, president of a real estate appraisal firm. Nearly every available plot in Napa County is getting planted to Cabernet and

growers and wineries are also pulling out other varieties rather than absorb the opportunity cost of not growing Cabernet. He also mentioned there has been “great” Sauvignon Blanc in Napa County ripped out for Cabernet Sauvignon and expressed a concern that some appellations might be in jeopardy of becoming mono-varietal.

Grilled Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches 4 servings Ingredients

Basil-Chive Aioli • 1 oil-packed anchovy fillet • Kosher salt • 1 cup mayonnaise • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice • 2 garlic cloves, finely grated In Sonoma County, Correia said • ¼ cup chopped basil, plus more for serving Pinot Noir “is driving the bus,” • 2 tablespoons chopped chives, plus more for serving and the average price for an acre • Freshly ground black pepper of Pinot vines could approach $200,000 this year. “The demand Pork and Assembly is very strong, and there’s just a • 2 tablespoons fennel seeds limited supply of high-quality • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes Pinot Noir vineyards,” he said. • 2 tablespoons Diamond Crystal or 3½ teaspoons Morton kosher salt, plus more Might I remind you that these • 2 pork tenderloins (about 1½ pounds each) folks are really high end farmers • Vegetable oil (for grill) and they respond to the same • 1 ciabatta loaf, halved lengthwise human nature as hog and beef • 6 cups mature arugula leaves with tender stems producers and egg producers, • Torn basil leaves, chopped chives, and lemon wedges record number of eggs are now (for serving) depressing the market. It’s the old adage that if it’s selling let’s Special Equipment make/grow more and then the • A spice mill or mortar and pestle market fills up and pork chops are $1.49 at Caputo’s, which by Preparation the way, I miss very much as the price of food out here is high but Basil-Chive Aioli the quality and the selection are weak. Using the flat side of a knife, smash anchovy and ½ tsp. salt on a cutting board until a paste forms. Scrape into a medium bowl. Add And let me finish on a bubbly mayonnaise, lemon juice, garlic, ¼ cup basil, and 2 Tbsp. chives and note. I struck up a conversation whisk to combine. Season with salt and pepper; cover and chill until at the Hilton bar in SR with the ready to serve. brand manager for the Gallo folks in Florida; he was in town Do Ahead: Aioli can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled. hosting business types on a big tour. One of the many things Pork and Assembly he told me is that your favorite Grind fennel seeds and red pepper in spice mill or with mortar and Prosecco, Lamarca is blended using tasting panels of customers pestle until coarsely ground. Transfer to a small bowl. Mix in 2 Tbsp. not wine makers, so it appeals to salt. Rub mixture all over pork and let sit, uncovered, 1 hour, or chill a wider audience. I’ll try to have up to 8. better news next time. Prepare a grill for medium heat; thoroughly clean grates and brush That’s my Whine and I could with oil. Grill pork, turning every 4 minutes, until lightly charred on all sides and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of be wrong… the loin registers 130°, 15–20 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes, then cut Woody Mosgers, cooks, caters, into very thin slices, think deli roast beef thin, use a slicer if you have one! drinks and matches wine and food in Santa Rosa Sonoma at Grill bread halves on both sides until lightly charred and warmed www.woodythewineguy.com through, about 1 minute per side. Spread about ½ cup aioli over cut sides of both bread halves. Layer arugula over, then top with sliced pork, basil, chives, and a squeeze of lemon. Serve any remaining aioli alongside. More Woody's Whine on page 23. Visit us online at www.forestparkpost.com

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The Woody’s Whine Chicken or Turkey Burger with Hot Chile Bell Pepper Shallot and Garlic Makes 6 servings 2 pounds ground chicken or turkey 1 large egg, room temperature 1 serrano green chile, stemmed, seeded and minced Woody’s way – several squirts of Sriracha 1/4 cup minced red bell pepper 2 tablespoons minced shallot 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1 teaspoon ground chile powder (not seasoned chili powder) 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin salt and pepper Olive oil to brush on patties 6 large brioche buns, split and toasted Guacamole (recipe below) Directions Combine the chicken or turkey with the egg, using your hands to blend. Add the chile, bell pepper, shallot, garlic, chile powder and cumin. Use your hands, (plastic gloves are useful) mix well to blend, season with salt and pepper. Fry up a table spoon of the meat in a skillet to check for seasoning and adjust to taste. Preheat and oil the grill, or preheat a nonstick stove-top grill pan over medium-high heat. Form the mixture into 6 equal mounds (so they cook evenly) and shape each into a patty. Using a pastry brush, generously coat the outside of each with oil. Place the burgers on the grill and grill for 6 minutes. Turn and grill for another 5 minutes for well done. Place a burger on each bun, top with guacamole, and serve.

Woody’s Whine List 2014 Chateau Tire Pe Diem Bordeaux - Here is a wine that was full of raspberry, blackberry, coffee, cedar, tobacco and leather. $15 2012 Chateau Mauvesin Barton Moulis en Medoc - This one started with raspberry, coffee and caramel, and led to dark fruits, cherry and nutmeg. $21 2013 La Cuvee Bistrot de Puy Arnaud Castillon Cotes de Bordeaux - Exploding with raspberry-strawberry jam, this lighter-bodied red had a refreshing finish and 12 percent alcohol. $25 Rosenblum Cellars Vintner’s Zin Cuvee XXXVIII Here is the entry wine for Rosenblum a highly respected and terrific producer. This is house wine for use and should be for you too. Suggested retail is $12.50 but I buy it for $6.99, remember not much diesel involved locally, but you should find it in the $8-9 range. Rose’ is huge out here and I’m sure there is a good selection in your market too. Many are great with food, darker the color of the wine richer flavor that will stand up to food better. Most of the other wines that we’ve had a chance to taste are from small producers and I’m not even going to offer a list, I’ll try harder next time and oh if you’re still reading this, In & Out Burger is not that big of a deal, I’m a Carl’s Jr./Hardees guy.

Drink with a Rose’ or chilled Beaujolais Guacamole Makes about 2 cups 2 large avocados, pitted, peeled and mashed Juice of 1 lime 1/3 cup chopped, seeded and peeled tomato 2 tablespoons minced red onion 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro 1 teaspoon minced and seeded serrano chile (optional) Salt Combine the avocado with the lime juice, tomato, onion, cilantro and chile. Season with salt and serve.

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Grady Breed Domestic Shorthair/Mix Age 5 years 3 months 4 days Gender Male

There's a reason we can't get a good picture of Grady - he's too busy rolling and purring for attention to sit still! Grady is hunk of burnin' love - a big 5 year old grey tabby just brimming with affection. Grady came to ACL when his owners moved and couldn't take him. He took a few days to relax here at the shelter, so he went to foster care - and what a perfect foster cat he proved to be! After a minute to adjust to new situations, Grady is a perfect gentleman - great with kids and adults alike! He loves to be in the middle of things getting lots of attention. Grady is good with other chill cats after a slow introduction. He isn't comfortable with dogs. Come meet this handsome love muffin today!

Catherine Breed Chihuahua, Short Coat/Mix Age 5 years 1 month 24 days Gender Female Princess Catherine is our resident member of the royal family - she's feminine, delicate, and oh so sophisticated. This 5 year old slender chihuahua mix is just a joy - quiet, sweet, and affectionate. Catherine came to ACL from a local animal control facility. She was very frightened all alone, and we knew that she would bloom with a little bit of TLC. TLC is all she's getting at her foster home, and her foster mom reports she's a wonderful houseguest! Catherine gets along with the resident dogs and cats, and she'd be a wonderful addition to a home with kids 12 and up looking for a snuggly lap dog. Princess Catherine was born to be queen - let her rule your heart and home! Email Gabrielle at caninemanager@animalcareleague.org to meet Catherine in person!

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