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February 5, 2014 •

• Anthem

Vol. 12, No.12

• Black Canyon City

Cave Creek opts to fight lawsuit Tara Alatorre

After nearly 3 hours of discussion during the Feb. 3 Cave Creek Town Council meeting, the council unanimously agreed to not settle a pending lawsuit over easement property rights and also unanimously voted against an ordinance that would have banned the council from using electronic devices during meetings. The ongoing lawsuit Freeman vs. the Town of Cave Creek was brought on by the town’s plan to build a non-motorized trail on Morning Star Road that would connect the east and west side of Cave Creek. Jerry Freeman has filed suit against the town claiming the non-motorized road would impede with the use of his property. Citizens spoke out against the proposed settlement terms brought to the council during the meeting, which would not allow the construction of a trail as long as the Freemans reside on the property at least half-time. “I don’t understand why we are being held hostage by one person,” said resident Terry Smith. Attorney Gary Birnbaum said that there are a lot of “what ifs” because of a series of annexation agreements the town has entered, plus the complication of open space laws. “It depends on how you read

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First lady invites Anthem teen to join her for State of the Union Mauro Whiteman Cronkite News Service

Joe Hudy is not your average 16-year-old. The self-described “maker” from Anthem has been to the White House to demonstrate one of his inventions, has traveled the world to show off other creations and has landed an internship at Intel. All before graduating high school. But Joe said he was still excited to be back in Washington this week, one of a handful of people invited to join first lady Michelle Obama at the Capitol to watch the 2014 State of the Union address. “Who gets invited to the White House once, let alone twice?” asked Joe’s mother, Julie Hudy, from a Washington hotel room. “Me,” Joe chimed in, jokingly. Joe first came to the attention of the White House 2 years ago when he was one of 100 students from around the country invited by the administration to a science fair. It was there that his Extreme Marshmallow Cannon stole the show—and wowed President Barack Obama. Obama asked Joe to show him how the cannon worked. Next thing he knew, Joe, then 14, was trying to make sure he didn’t hit anyone. “At the time, I didn’t see his (Obama’s) expression,” Joe said of the encounter, which was captured on video as the president gasped in

TEEN

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Gregory Hayes photo

Impressive teen years — Anthem resident Joe Hudy, then age 14, in a file photo taken at the headquarters of Make magazine in California. Hudy, now 16, was invited to watch the State of the Union address in Washington last week with first lady Michelle Obama.

Twins share same birthday card since 1979 Eric Quade Editor

continued on page 2

Inside: Shooting................4 Bluhm........................... 5 Burros Killed......6 Events..................... 11 Editorial.............. 20 Services................. 21 Crossword......... 24 Classifieds.......... 25

ECRWSS Carrier Route PreSorted Standard U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit No. 371 Cave Creek, AZ

Eric Quade photo

The gift that keeps on giving — Jim Walkington of New River and his brother, John, have relayed the same birthday card between them for 35 years.

It all started innocently enough in 1979, said New River resident Jim Walkington. His former wife had been trying to convince him to send his twin brother, John, something for their shared birthday. Although the men, 34 years old at the time, had never been big on exchanging gifts, Jim relented, went to the store and picked up a whimsical card to mail off to John. The whole affair seemed to be forgettable until a year later when Jim checked his mail and found that his brother had mailed him a card—not just any card, though. It was the same birthday card Jim had sent the year before, just with his original signature scribbled out and John’s sign-off featured instead. They probably didn’t realize it at the time, but the simple act of re-gifting a birthday card would

start a tradition between the two brothers that still endures today. Sometimes they would just sign a name to the card. Other times, Jim said that they included a note with their name regarding a significant milestone from that year, such “Medicare.” “We were eligible for Medicare 3-4 years ago, and I kept calling saying, ‘Did you get your Medicare card?’” Jim said. When Jim’s card arrived first, he was sure to call John again and gloat in the manner siblings are accustomed to. Jim recalled that his brother’s wife characterized them as “a couple fifth grade boys,” which they took as a compliment. The physical distance between Jim and John surely didn’t stop their annual card-swapping custom, either. John retired

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council from page 1 the purpose of the agreement,” Birnbaum said. “Two people can have easements of a roadway, and as long as their use of the roadway does not unreasonably interfere with the other persons use, then they both can continue to use the property.” After listening to attorneys, developers, private land owners and residents, the council agreed it was in the town’s best interest to go to court to settle the matter with a judge to avoid future lawsuits. “There are a great many assumptions,” Councilman Thomas McGuire said. “I believe those assumptions lead to vulnerability.”

teen from page 1 excitement. After the fact, Joe thought the photographs were “really funny.” Since his first visit to the White House, Joe has been building inventions as part of the do-it-yourself “maker” movement and traveling the world to show off his creations. During a trip to Rome in October, Joe was approached by an Intel representative. That led to an internship for Joe, a junior at the Herberger Young Scholars Academy, with the American chip maker in Chandler. “I think as a kid, we all hate being bored,” Joe said. “Instead of being bored, you can make something.” Joe wears his slogan—“Don’t be BORED … MAKE something”—on a plastic orange bracelet. The same phrase was featured on a business card that he gave to Obama 2 years ago. Julie Hudy said she was excited for her son and his accomplishments.

  February 5, 2014

Vice Mayor Adam Trenk voiced his desires for the town to try and settle out of court one last time by getting together with all involved stakeholders. “There is no reason for this mess, and that is exactly what this is, a mess,” Trenk said. “I would like to see the litigation and the hard feelings and the contentiousness of this community end.” Then, a recommendation by councilman McGuire to approve a resolution that would ban council members from using electronic devices during meetings failed in a 7-0 vote. McGuire, who brought the matter to council, explained that he voted against his own measure because he realized the issue needed more thought. “You just want your kids to be happy,” she said, adding that her son is made happy by making things and inspiring others to join him. “That’s what it’s all about.” Joe’s grandfather, Mike Williams, said he can still remember that when Joe was younger he would build things out of cardboard and, later, wood. “He was always building things,” said Williams, who is retired and lives down the street from the Hudys in Anthem. Williams said he was sworn to secrecy when he found out that Joe had been invited to the State of the Union, but “as soon as we got the all-clear this morning … we all got on our Facebook pages. It’s what proud grandparents do.” But even someone with as many accomplishments as Joe still has at least one more to achieve after the State of the Union concludes. “His next accomplishment is graduating high school,” said Julie Hudy. Joe agreed.

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card from page 1 to Vista, Calif., near San Diego, and previously worked at Edwards Air Force Base testing airplanes. Jim said that he personally was living in Saudi Arabia in the early 1990s, working as a registered nurse for the Saudi national oil company. But neither oceans, nor living in an overseas “police state,” nor the Persian Gulf War itself would hinder their birthday card exchange, Jim said. It was his stint in Saudi Arabia that led Jim to write his first book, “What the Lord Said About Labs.” He said that the type of humor in his book is an accurate reflection of not only his personality— which gets a kick out of the quirky birthday card thing—but also of the

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community he has called home for the past 12 years. “You have to be strange to live in New River,” he said with a laugh. Looking over the makeshift 35-yearold heirloom, the twins’ birthday card is in fairly good shape. All the print is still legible, and the card’s main message reads, “We may be getting a little older, but we still have what it takes.” A tear down the seam threatens to one day split the card in two, but Jim isn’t worried. Slap some tape on there, and it’ll be fine, he said. With the twins’ birthday less than a week away, it was Jim’s turn to mail off the tattered keepsake this go-around. Time will tell if it makes another return trip. If history is a decent indicator, though, then Jim can count on it.

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Highland Lakes dominates DVUSD spelling bee

Submitted photo

Great spellers — Local students participated at the annual Deer Valley Unified School District spelling bee Jan. 24, and Highland Lakes School students Mathews Sajan and Grace Xu ranked first and second, respectively, when it was all done. Pictured from left to right in the front row: Kyle Endres of Gavilan Peak School (seventh runner-up), Mathews Sajan, Adryan Escarsega of Mountain Shadows Elementary (fifth runner-up) and Grace Xu. In the back row, left to right: Keshav Nandakumar of Sierra Verde School (fourth runner-up), Brenden Castellanos of Anthem School (third runner-up), Emma Edmund of Gavilan Peak School (sixth runnerup) and Kelsey Keto of West Wing School (second runner-up) All of these students can now move on to the regional competition.

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Publisher: John Alexander Editor: Eric Quade Office Manager: Karen Alexander Graphics: Ross Buchanan Account Executives: Stan Bontkowski Jack Van Wechel Contributing Writers: Gerald Williams Judy Bluhm Tara Alatorre Web: Eric Rodriguez

Jan. 27 shooting injures woman; few leads

A woman was injured in an apparent drive-by shooting incident last week near Tramonto, and authorities reported that they had few leads to track down any possible suspects. Sgt. Trent Cr ump of the Phoenix Police Department said that the 58-year-old woman had departed from her church and was traveling north on I-17 when an older model, dark blue twodoor pickup sped up along side her vehicle and opened fire. A f te r b e i n g c h a sed of f of the freeway, the victim r e p o r t e d l a s t s e e i n g t he shooter’s vehicle heading east on Carefree Highway near 27th Drive. The victim was alone in her vehicle at the time of the shooting and suffered minor injuries from broken glass. Local law enforcement has asked for the public’s help in providing information about possible suspects.

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The Foothills Focus is a free and weekly publication. It is delivered to Anthem, Black Canyon City, Carefree, Cave Creek, Desert Hills, New River, North Phoenix and Tramonto. We reserve the right to refuse any proposed advertising. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any measure without the expressed written permission of the publisher. The Foothills Focus cannot and will not be held responsible for any content of the contained advertisements in this issue. This consists of any inserts, display advertising, Service Directory or classified advertisements. The content of the contained advertisments are the sole responsibility of the advertiser. For any questions regarding information contained in such endorsements, please contact the specified advertiser. Thank you. -The Foothills Focus

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Bluhm: Paying attention more difficult than it seems Apparently, we don’t pay enough attention to our surroundings, or the people in our lives. Some might say that humans are becoming so immersed in technology that the constant quest to communicate has led to a colossal breakdown in personal relationships. We also seem to be easily distracted, self-absorbed and not “tuned in” to the world around us. How can we stop and smell the roses if we don’t even see t hem? Dear readers, “pay i n g attention” is a whole lot harder than we care to BLUHM admit. Several years ago in Washington, D.C., a man stood at the metro station and started playing a violin. It was a January morning, and approximately 1,100 people passed him by during the 45 minutes that he performed. The man played beautifully six different Bach pieces to a largely indifferent crowd. A few commuters slowed their pace long enough to brief ly listen, some paused and then threw a dollar or two into the violin case, but most seemed oblivious to the music being made. It was children who seemed most captivated by the violinist and many wanted to stop walking completely and stare at the man. All of their parents pulled them

away. In the 45 minute “concert,” only six people actually stopped, sat down and listened for a while, and 20 kind folks tossed money in the violin case. After the man was done playing, he had made $32. No one applauded, made a comment or gave him any recognition. After all, he was just another street performer. No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell—a world-renowned musician who had just played to a sold-out theater in Boston where tickets went for at least $100. He was playing one of the most intricate pieces ever written on a violin worth $3.5 million. Does time and place matter? Can we appreciate the extraordinary in the midst of our ordinar y routines? Organized by the Washington Post, this was a social experiment, seeking to discover if people can perceive beauty in a commonplace environment at an unexpected time. This begs the question: What “beauty” are we missing each day? The drumbeat of our own hectic schedules may drown out the voices of our children, the chit-chat of our neighbors, the stories that our loved ones want to share. Birds singing, wind whispering, owls hooting, coyotes yelping, all sorts of “music” surrounds us each day. The commuters at the metro station weren’t expecting a classical genius to be playing Bach. And our perceptions usually dictate our thought.

World-famous violin virtuoso Joshua Bell

And those “thoughts” might filter out the “noise” around us. A woman in Anthem emailed me to say that she has had “salt and pepper” hair for many years. One brave day at the beauty shop, her hairdresser talked her into a “new look,” and in 2 hours she was transformed into a brunette. Feeling wonderful, she went home, and when she walked through the door, her husband said nothing. In fact, he “never noticed,” or, if he did, “never uttered a word” about her hair for three long days. Finally, when she demanded that he “say something” about her new golden brown locks, he smiled and said, “I guess I didn’t notice because you always look beautiful to me.” Hmmm … that’s a pretty good comeback. Brilliant, actually. Yikes, how is it possible

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that we sometimes do not notice the obvious? The Washington Post posed the question, “Can we ever recognize talent in an unexpected place?” And if we cannot appreciate one of the best musicians in the world playing some of the most thrilling music ever written, then what else might we be missing? Hey, but aren’t we multi-tasking, busy people? We are running to those trains, planes and automobiles that have to get us to our next destination. There is not a lot of time to stand around “loitering” in a subway station listening to a poor fellow strum a fiddle! So we hurry along, perhaps missing out on “greatness” every now and then. At least we made it to our dentist appointment! My vet says that one reason that

our dogs are so happy is because they “live in the moment.” And because of that, they are very acutely aware of their surroundings … sights, smells and sounds. People generally do not live in the moment, although I must admit I have tried, but all it does is lead to major malfunctions. Just a few hours ago, I was making coffee and getting ready to write this column, noticed a paper on the counter that needed to be filed, went into my office, then could see that the plant needed watering, so took it to the sink where I saw a towel that had to go into the laundry, went to the washing machine and grabbed an empty detergent bottle and then put it in the trash out in the garage and realized my boots needed polishing. Help! When I do “pay attention” I seem to exhibit symptoms of attention-deficit. Busy minds and lives are the reason we get sidetracked, lose sight of our priorities, missing all those special moments that comprise each day. Like the focused commuters at the subway station with a train to catch, how can we possibly notice a guy, a violin and Bach? OK, this week, let’s all strive to seize the moment, seek out greatness in unexpected places and stop to hear the music … or smell the coffee. So until next time, Carpe Diem! Judy Bluhm is a writer and a local realtor who lives in the Anthem area. Have a story or a comment? Email Judy at judy@judybluhm.com.

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  February 5, 2014

Anthem artist among nominees

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A nt hem a r t ist, pai nt i ng instructor and award-winning monument designer Renee Palmer-Jones has been nominated for a 2014 Governor’s Arts Award in the individual artist category. The award recognizes an Arizona artist of significant merit, leadership or whose creations or contributions enrich the state and the field of the arts. The category is open to artists of all disciplines, demonstrating strong artistic impact through previous honors and awards. The artist’s personal contribution to the field of artistic practice is strongly considered, as well. Palmer-Jones has focused her passion for more than 12 years promoting art education

and youth artist scholarship programming. Her design of the Anthem Veterans Memorial led the monument to be declared a State Historical Site. Currently, she is working on the design of a veteran’s monument at the state capitol’s Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza,” and she said she was pleased to receive a nomination for the 2014 Governor’s Arts Award. “I am incredibly honored to have been nominated for this prestigious award,” she said. “It is a blessing to share my passion for art with adults and children throughout Arizona.” The nomination of Renee Palmer-Jones is a distinction shared by 20 artists across the

state, and the winner among these finalists will be named at 7 p.m. March 25 at the Mesa Art Center Theater. Palmer-Jones was recently awarded a national arts award by the National Heritage Council of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was presented with the 2014 American Women in the Arts Recognition Award. Since 1981, The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens for the Arts in partnership with The Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.Further information is available online at GovernorsArtsAwards.org. To learn more about Renee Palmer-Jones, visit rpjfineart.com.

Wild burros killed; suspects sought Federal law enforcement officers announced last week that they are seeking the public’s help in identifying the culprits behind wild burro shootings northwest of Phoenix. Officers received a complaint on Jan. 26 regarding two mature burros that were found dead from an apparent shooting west of Castle Hot Springs Road. Investigating authorities believe that the crime had been committed at around 2 p.m. that day. The incident occurred within the Bureau of Land Manage-

ment’s Lake Pleasant Herd Management Area, located northwest of Phoenix in Maricopa County and southern Yavapai County. The area is actively managed for wild burros, said Rem Hawes, BLM’s Hassayampa field manager. “The BLM seeks information from anyone who saw shooting activity off of Castle Hot Springs Road Sunday or who may have heard about this crime,” Hawes said. “We are gathering evidence and are committed to the protection and management of wild

burros and horses. We take this criminal violation seriously. This is why we are asking for the public’s assistance.” Wild burros and horses are protected by law under the Wild Free - Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, as amended. Authorities are encouraging those who have relevant information to call 1-800-637-9152. They said that all calls are confidential and any perpetrators convicted of the crime will face a fine of up to $2,000 and/or imprisonment for up to a year for each violation.


February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

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Running with the Bulls in Cave Creek

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Stampede! — If this photo from a previous year’s event is any indication, then runners keeping a watchful eye for bulls is no bull.

All this weekend, Cave Creek will be rumbling as Running with the Bulls takes place Feb. 7-9 at the Hogs and Horses arena. Promoter Phil Immordino said that there are a total of 12 runs scheduled between Saturday and Sunday for “adrenaline junkies” who want to hoof it along side the event’s rowdy bulls. While the activity is modeled after the iconic Spanish tradition, Immordino said that the Cave Creek event is tailored to an American audience. “Spain has Mexican fighting bulls with very sharp horns, and these bulls are very aggressive. And our bulls are rodeo bulls that aren’t as aggressive— their hor ns aren’t shar p,” Immordino said. That doesn’t mean there isn’t a sense of danger, though, he said. “Same bulls as last year,” Immordino said. “Last year … we put three people in the hospital. Two other people were wiped out.

But, you know, we’ve got to keep it a little bit dangerous, a little bit exciting, but not too dangerous, not too exciting.” For those less inclined to tangle with the beasts, Running with the Bulls will also feature more tame entertainment, such as a “Battle of the Bands,” food, drink and festival exhibitors. Musical groups including Inept Hero (11:15 a.m.), Saving Pointe (12:15 p.m.), Tricus (1:15 p.m.), Havens End (2:15 p.m.) and Tridon (3:15 p.m.) will be competing Feb. 8 for a $2,000 prize as part of the Battle of the Bands. Voting will take place via a texting system, and the winner will be announced before Saturday’s final bull run. In addition to bull runs, Sunday’s schedule includes bull riding, a buffalo act, a matador show and Indian dancers. A charity run, followed by a “Runner’s Party” at Hogs and Horses Bar and Grill, will take

place Friday evening. Entry to the weekend event costs $30 for runners, $10 for spectators. Due to a partnership with The Foothills Food Bank, however, guests who turn in 25 cans of nonperishable food can spectate for free. A portion of proceeds from Cave Creek’s Running with the Bulls will benefit a number of organizations. Pa r t of e ve r y r u n ne r ’s registration fee will benefit Operation Hawkeye, a group whose mission is to pay special tribute to fallen special operations forces. A “Charity and Media Run” scheduled for Friday night will benefit the charity of each runner’s choice. Vendor and concession stand sales, in part, will also support The Valley Hispanic Bomberos, an organization of firefighters a nd ot he r s who p r ov id e scholarships, mentoring and outreach programs.

Business Spotlight

Deer Valley Credit Union marks 10 years Eric Quade Editor

Ten years ago, one North Valley financial institution opened the doors of its first branch office, and that business still stands today in Anthem. Establishing Deer Valley Credit Union, situated near the intersection of Anthem Way and Gavilan Peak Parkway, paved the way for other branches to spring up a couple of years later in Glendale and Surprise. Mark Trumpp, vice president of marketing at Deer Valley Credit Union, said that the parent company has been around since 1971, and deciding to take the

leap and start opening affiliate offices was no small feat. “So Anthem was our first venture into branching, which was a big step for the credit union,” he said. “Anthem is our oldest outlying branch, and it’s been a huge success.” To c e l e b r a t e i t s 10 t h anniversary, the Anthem branch will have cake and refreshments on hand all day Feb. 14. Trumpp said that the Anthem branch largely employs from within that community and also strives to be as involved as possible in community events. One such example is the annual Anthem Days celebration where

local businesses and vendors set up booths and spread the word about what they offer. So what does a financial institution like Deer Valley Credit Union offer? While they offer many services similar to a bank—such as loans, checking and savings accounts—Trumpp said that there are differences. For-profit banks are owned by stockholders, whereas nonprofit credit unions are held by members with an account. Instead of racking up profits, any extra money is rolled back into the credit union to offer better rates to its members, Trumpp said.

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ARIZONA STATE LAND DEPARTMENT 1616 WEST ADAMS STREET PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85007 PUBLIC AUCTION SALE NO. 16-16-116982 PERPETUAL RIGHT OF WAY EASEMENT Pursuant to A.R.S. Title 37, notice is hereby given that the state of Arizona through its Arizona State Land Department (herein called ASLD), will sell at Public Auction to the highest and best bidder at 9:30 a.m. on, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, at the Arizona State Land Department, 1616 W. Adams, Room 434B, Phoenix, Arizona, a perpetual right of way easement for the purpose of a Public Road and Underground Utilities including a Buffer Area situated in Maricopa County to wit: TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 3 EAST, G&SRB&M, MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA PARCEL: OR LESS.

M&B THRU E2SENW; NESW, SECTION 13. CONTAINING 2.11 ACRES, MORE

BENEFICIARY: PERMANENT COMMON SCHOOLS (INDEMNITY SELECTIONS) For a complete legal description of the land, prospective bidders are advised to examine the right of way application file as well as all pertinent files of ASLD. Said right of way easement has been valued at $470,003.00 and consists of 2.11 acres, more or less. Additional requirements and conditions of this right of way are available and may be viewed at the Arizona State Land Department, 1616 West Adams Street, Phoenix, Arizona. The complete file associated with the described land is open to public inspection at the ASLD, 1616 West Adams Street, Phoenix, Arizona, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., exclusive of holidays and weekends. Please direct any questions regarding this Public Auction to the Rights of Way Section of the Real Estate Division of ASLD at (602) 542-4098. This auction notice is available on the ASLD’s web site at www.azland.gov. Each potential bidder must show ASLD’s representative a cashier’s check made payable to the Arizona State Land Department in the amount specified under Terms of Sale Paragraph (A) below. TERMS OF SALE: (A) At the time of sale the successful bidder must pay the following by a cashier’s check: (1) The value of the right of way, which is $470,003.00; (2) A Selling and Administrative Fee of 3% of the value of the right of way, which is $14,100.00; (3) Reimbursable Estimated Advertising Fee, which is $2,500.00; (4) Reimbursable Appraisal Fee, which is $3,250.00. The total amount due at the time of sale is $489,853.00 (less $5,750.00 if the successful bidder is the applicant for a total amount due of $484,103.00). (B) Within 30 days after the auction date the successful bidder must pay the full balance of the amount bid for the right of way and pay a Selling and Administrative Fee of 3% of the purchase price for the right of way less the amount paid under (A) (2) above. (C) No Selling and Administrative Fee shall be collected by ASLD if the successful bidder at auction is the beneficiary of the land trust. (D) Within 30 days after the auction date the successful bidder shall be required to pay the actual legal advertising cost, less the amount paid under (A)(3) above. BIDDING INFORMATION: (A) The time of sale shall be deemed to be the time of declaration of the highest and best bidder. The bidding will begin at the total value of the right of way. A bid for less than the value of the right of way easement or by a party who has not inspected the right of way and/or the associated files and records of ASLD will not be considered. (B) All bidders must sign an affidavit stating that they have undertaken due diligence in preparation for the auction and that their representative is authorized to bid and bind the bidder. It is the bidder’s responsibility to research the records of local jurisdictions and public agencies regarding this property. (C) Pursuant to A.R.S. §37-240.B, the successful bidder must be authorized to transact business in the state of Arizona no later than three (3) business days after the auction. The successful bidder must sign an affidavit stating it is the successful bidder and sign a Certification Statement pursuant to A.R.S. Title 37 and the Rules of ASLD. (D) If the successful bidder fails to complete the payment as stated in the auction notice together with the additional required fees within 30 days from the auction date, all amounts paid at the time of auction by the successful bidder will be forfeited. (E) In the event of forfeiture, the ASLD Commissioner may declare that the bid placed before the final bid accepted is the highest bid, and that the bidder has five (5) days after notification by ASLD to pay by cashier’s check all amounts due. GENERAL INFORMATION: The ASLD may cancel this auction in whole or in part at any time prior to the acceptance of a final bid. A protest to this sale must be filed within 30 days after the first day of publication of this announcement and in accordance with A.R.S. §37-301. Persons with a disability may request a reasonable accommodation such as a sign language interpreter, by contacting the ADA Coordinator, at (602) 364-0875. Requests should be made as early as possible to allow time to arrange the accommodation. Ruben Ojeda (for) Vanessa Hickman State Land Commissioner December 5, 2013

 The

Foothills Focus.com

Eric Quade photo

A labor of love — Elizabeth Turner and Joe Norkus discuss Norkus’ military history during a recent interview, which Turner then preserves for posterity. Eric Quade Editor

As part of the Anthem Veterans Memorial Support Team, Elizabeth Turner routinely has members of the armed forces on her mind. While all the steps that went into creating the memorial itself amounted to no small task, part of the project also involves documenting veterans’ stories for the benefit of future generations. And Turner enjoys every minute of it. “I think the greatest part of working on the planning, build and fundraising for the Anthem Veterans Memorial is meeting veterans,” she said. “I cannot think of anything I have done in my life that is more rewarding than meeting veterans and learning about their lives.” A recent example of this was

when Turner sat down at the Ironwood clubhouse to interview Joe Norkus, who at 91 just might be the oldest living World War II veteran in Anthem. Norkus was drafted into military service in 1943. With the Army Air Corps, he served as a flight engineer and radio operator on dozens of missions across Southeast Asia, including several trips skirting the Himalaya mountain range, which stood too tall for airplanes to soar directly over at the time, he said. Among Norkus’ most memorable overseas journeys was having tea with the wife of a Chinese general, who had invited soldiers into their palace. The 91-year-old veteran also prized the “Air Metal” he was awarded in 1945 for completing 56 missions and 101 hours in the

air, which would ultimately lead to him logging more than 1,200 hours of total f light time. He proudly wore the Air Metal on his baseball cap the day Turner interviewed him. “The hat tells the story about me,” he said. To get the full story, though, Turner also spent more than an hour interviewing Norkus, reviewing his military records and asking him questions to fill in any uncertainties. “Meeting Joe, at 91, and hearing about his part in World War II, his family and life after the war truly made my day,” she said. “These are moments I will treasure always.” More information about the Anthem Veterans Memorial and related projects are available by visiting onlineatanthem.com.

School district considers November bond vote Eric Quade Editor

Over the coming months, Cave Creek Unified School District officials will be considering whether or not to pursue a bond election in November. Superintendent Debbi Burdick said that she is forming a committee made up of students’ parents, staff and community members to research the district’s options and come up with a recommendation in May. That recommendation—whether to pursue a new bond or otherwise—would then be brought before the governing board in June for further consideration. School officials said that bond monies could be put toward a number of maintenance and renovation projects, including the replacement of district school busses. Projects particular to Cactus Shadows High School, such as upgrades to the stadium and cafeteria, which have generated lots

of debate at the governing board level, could also lie within the scope of acceptable uses for bond funding. One caveat that Burdick said her special committee will look into regards approximately $10 million in unused bond dollars from a successful 2000 vote. The district must decide whether to try tapping into those funds exclusively, leave them alone entirely or put them to use in tandem with a new bond. Kent Frison, associate superintendent of operations and finance at CCUSD, said that the sticking point with the bond monies from 2000 lies with restrictions placed on them following a Goldwater Institute lawsuit. The original bond put before voters said that the district would use the money to buy busses and build four schools. Two of the schools were built, but an economic downturn put a damper on many of the other planned improvements. As a result, some of the approved bond

money was left on the table, but school officials hoped to still access them. “About 3 or 4 years ago, the legislature passed a law, modified a law giving districts … the right to use outstanding bond funds for another purpose if the governing board would vote to do that,” Frison said. Although the CCUSD governing board did just that, Frison said that the Goldwater Institute challenged the practice in court and won. A subsequent legislative initiative, however, might make the old bond dollars accessible again, Frison said. “If a school district has outstanding bond dollars that it can’t use—that have already been sold—one option available to them is that they can go back out to the voters and ask them to approve a new purpose for those funds,” he said. The superintendent’s committee will be considering that possibility.


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History authors speaking at museum Eric Quade Editor

February is authors’ month at Cave Creek Museum. As such, a lineup of authors relevant to local history have been booked to give presentations on their areas of expertise. Here’s a glimpse at what a couple of these authors have to offer: Michael Sandford The author of the “Rock Springs Arizona” history series, Michael Sandford, will speak and sign books at Cave Creek Museum Feb. 8 starting at 2 p.m. A small community in southern Yavapai County, Sandford said that Rock Springs often goes unnoticed, and his book is meant to bring the public’s attention to the area. “A lot of people really don’t know about it,” he said about Rock Springs. “It’s been there since 1921, but before that it was always a place where the stage coaches would come by and water their horses or the military would camp overnight. About 1,000 years before that, Native Americans lived there.” Sandford’s interest in local histor y dates back to his childhood, he said. “Growing up, I was always saddened by older buildings being torn down for progress,” he said. “But, in some places, they were saved and preserved and turned into museums at that time.” Aside from his books, readers might also recognize Sandford’s name from when he regularly

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Museum featured author — Carolina Butler will be at Cave Creek Museum to talk about Yavapai history.

contributed to the Foothills Focus in 2004-07. Sandford said that the first volume of his Rock Springs history book was recently released and a second volume is planned

for publication later this year. Carolina Butler On Feb. 15 at 2 p.m., author Carolina Butler will give a presentation at Cave Creek Museum regarding her book, “Oral History of the Yavapai.” Butler said that although the Yavapai are one of Arizona’s oldest tribes, few people have a working knowledge about them. “They have such a tortured history, and Arizonans, for the most part, are not aware of it,” she said. “Let’s pretend that the black people in this country had no history book written about them, yet they walk among us. They carry their pain, their suffering, their past, their memories that their past generations told them about the slave days and … they just hold it within them, within their hearts, within their souls. How terrible that would be.” Producing the book “Oral History of the Yavapai” wasn’t something that Butler had eagerly sought out at first. She had first met members of the tribe in 1971 regarding the Orme dam and its potential impact on the Fort McDowell reservation. An ASU anthropologist ultimately left all of her research material regarding the Yavapai’s oral history to Butler in her will. Although hesitant at first, Butler eventually agreed to take on the project so that the compiled Yavapai history wouldn’t be lost. Cave Creek Museum is located at 6140 Skyline Drive in Cave Creek.

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  February 5, 2014

Ironwood Eagles soar over Jaguars

ARIZONA STATE LAND DEPARTMENT 1616 WEST ADAMS STREET PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85007 PUBLIC AUCTION SALE NO. 16-116983 PERPETUAL RIGHT OF WAY EASEMENT Pursuant to A.R.S. Title 37, notice is hereby given that the state of Arizona through its Arizona State Land Department (herein called ASLD), will sell at Public Auction to the highest and best bidder at 9:30 a.m. on, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, at the Arizona State Land Department, 1616 W. Adams, Room 434B, Phoenix, Arizona, a perpetual right of way easement for the purpose of a Public Road and Underground Utilities including a Buffer Area situated in Maricopa County to wit: TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 3 EAST, G&SRB&M, MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA PARCEL: M&B THRU TRACT 7, BLOCK 12 IN STATE PLAT 44, SECTION 24. CONTAINING 1.30 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. BENEFICIARY: PERMANENT COMMON SCHOOLS (INDEMNITY SELECTIONS) For a complete legal description of the land, prospective bidders are advised to examine the right of way application file as well as all pertinent files of ASLD. Said right of way easement has been valued at $289,575.00 and consists of 1.30 acres, more or less.

Eric Quade photo

Fast break — Myles Judon of the Boulder Creek Jaguars grabs possession of the basketball and leads his team on a fast break during their Jan. 31 home game against Ironwood. By the end of the game, though, the visitors had wrapped up their victory with a 66-52 score.

Additional requirements and conditions of this right of way are available and may be viewed at the Arizona State Land Department, 1616 West Adams Street, Phoenix, Arizona. The complete file associated with the described land is open to public inspection at the ASLD, 1616 West Adams Street, Phoenix, Arizona, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., exclusive of holidays and weekends. Please direct any questions regarding this Public Auction to the Rights of Way Section of the Real Estate Division of ASLD at (602) 542-4098. This auction notice is available on the ASLD’s web site at www.azland.gov. Each potential bidder must show ASLD’s representative a cashier’s check made payable to the Arizona State Land Department in the amount specified under Terms of Sale Paragraph (A) below. TERMS OF SALE: (A) At the time of sale the successful bidder must pay the following by a cashier’s check: (1) The value of the right of way, which is $289,575.00; (2) A Selling and Administrative Fee of 3% of the value of the right of way, which is $8,687.00; (3) Reimbursable Estimated Advertising Fee, which is $2,500.00; (4) Reimbursable Appraisal Fee, which is $3,250.00. The total amount due at the time of sale is $304,012.00 (less $5,750.00 if the successful bidder is the applicant for a total amount due of $298,262.00). (B) Within 30 days after the auction date the successful bidder must pay the full balance of the amount bid for the right of way and pay a Selling and Administrative Fee of 3% of the purchase price for the right of way less the amount paid under (A) (2) above. (C) No Selling and Administrative Fee shall be collected by ASLD if the successful bidder at auction is the beneficiary of the land trust. (D) Within 30 days after the auction date the successful bidder shall be required to pay the actual legal advertising cost, less the amount paid under (A)(3) above. BIDDING INFORMATION: (A) The time of sale shall be deemed to be the time of declaration of the highest and best bidder. The bidding will begin at the total value of the right of way. A bid for less than the value of the right of way easement or by a party who has not inspected the right of way and/or the associated files and records of ASLD will not be considered. (B) All bidders must sign an affidavit stating that they have undertaken due diligence in preparation for the auction and that their representative is authorized to bid and bind the bidder. It is the bidder’s responsibility to research the records of local jurisdictions and public agencies regarding this property. (C) Pursuant to A.R.S. §37-240.B, the successful bidder must be authorized to transact business in the state of Arizona no later than three (3) business days after the auction. The successful bidder must sign an affidavit stating it is the successful bidder and sign a Certification Statement pursuant to A.R.S. Title 37 and the Rules of ASLD. (D) If the successful bidder fails to complete the payment as stated in the auction notice together with the additional required fees within 30 days from the auction date, all amounts paid at the time of auction by the successful bidder will be forfeited. (E) In the event of forfeiture, the ASLD Commissioner may declare that the bid placed before the final bid accepted is the highest bid, and that the bidder has five (5) days after notification by ASLD to pay by cashier’s check all amounts due. GENERAL INFORMATION: The ASLD may cancel this auction in whole or in part at any time prior to the acceptance of a final bid. A protest to this sale must be filed within 30 days after the first day of publication of this announcement and in accordance with A.R.S. §37-301. Persons with a disability may request a reasonable accommodation such as a sign language interpreter, by contacting the ADA Coordinator, at (602) 364-0875. Requests should be made as early as possible to allow time to arrange the accommodation. Ruben Ojeda (for) Vanessa Hickman State Land Commissioner December 5, 2013

Eric Quade photo

Tough defense — After falling behind against Ironwood 9-0 at the start of the game, Boulder Creek Jaguars defenders like No. 32 Justin Braun and No. 24 A.J. Villegas helped bring their team in the lead by halftime, but the Eagles managed to come out on top by the final buzzer.


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Community Events SATURDAY MTA benefit Musical Theatre of Anthem will hold its annual fundraiser benefit, “Have a Heart for the Arts,” at 7 p.m. Feb. 8 at MTA in Anthem. The benefit will include singing, food and a live auction. MTA is located at 42323 N. Vision Way, and the dinner portion of the event will take place next door in the new Little Kay’s suite. Tickets may be purchased at musicaltheatreofanthem.org. Adult tickets are $75. Tickets for students and children are $40. Prices include catered cuisine, beverages, dessert and entertainment. DAR school story At the Feb. 8 meeting of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Ocotillo Chapter, in Anthem, guests will hear the story of Linda Rehwalt and her experience with a DAR school in the foothills of South Carolina that provides educational opportunities for the disadvantaged. The meeting starts at 9:35 a.m. in suite No. 435 at the Outlets at Anthem. Rabies vaccinations A rabies vaccination clinic will be held Feb. 8, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Sanders Ranch Supply in Black Canyon City. The vaccination fee is $15. More information can be obtained by calling 623374-5570. Sanders Ranch Supply is located at 20305 E. Squaw Valley Rd. Landscaping seminar On Feb. 8 at 9:30 a.m., Carefree’s town council chambers will play host to a seminar on landscaping. Presenting the program will be Tom Gatz, a retired wildlife biologist, horticultural aide in the education department at the Desert Botanical Garden and certified desert landscaper. Gatz will bring his 20 years of experience to bear on the topic of landscaping smaller areas, emphasizing year-round color. Friends of the Poor 5K run/walk The inaugural St. Vincent de Paul Friends of the Poor 5K run/ walk will be held starting at 9 a.m. Feb. 8 at St. Rose Catholic Church in Anthem. The event aims to raise money to build a food pantry to serve the area. Race day registration costs $35 for adults, $15 for children 12 and under; a $5 discount is available for those who sign up prior to 6 p.m. Feb. 7. The entry fee includes not only race participation, but also a cotton shirt, goody bag, free pancake breakfast and raffle entry. Online registration is available at 4peaksracing.com. Shamanic workshop A shamanic workshop will be held at The Boulders Resort’s Waldorf Astoria Spa Feb. 8 starting at 8 a.m. The 90-minute workshop will cover topics spanning the mineral, plant, human and

spirit world and how they relate to physical, emotional, mental, spiritual and life force aspects of everyday life. Guests can then partake in a ceremonial nature walk. Cost is $30 per person, not including tax and gratuity. TUESDAY Young Rembrandts Young Rembrandts drawing classes for children will be held Feb. 11 in the Anthem Community Center. A “Mommy and Me” class for 3-4-year-olds will be held from 12:30 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. and “Rising Artists” for kids ages 4-5 will be held from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Admission to either class is $35. To register, stop by the front desk. Parkinson’s support The public is invited to attend a Feb. 11 meeting of the Parkinson’s Support Group starting at 2 p.m. at 3340 W. Sousa Dr. in Anthem. Those who plan on attending are asked to call Alice at 623-5519726 to confirm. Yoga for preschoolers Visit North Valley Regional Library Feb. 11 at 1 p.m. for a yoga story time program for preschoolers ages 3-5. Children can stretch their imaginations with stories, music and finger plays and then stretch their bodies with kid-friendly yoga activities. Wear comfortable clothing suitable for exercise. Yoga student teacher Amanda Sinha will lead the class, along with a librarian. Registration is not needed, but space is limited. Contact the library at 602-652-3000 or visit mcldaz.org online. WEDNESDAY Neighborhood safety The Black Mountain Community Alliance, a volunteer network of neighbors with a common goal of preventing crime and improving their neighborhood’s quality of life, will meet at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 12 at the Deer Valley Senior Center for a guest speaker presentation by Sgt. Darren Burch of Silent Witness. The program is open to the public. The senior center is located at 2001 W. Wahala Lane in Phoenix. LATER IN FEBRUARY Hearing/vision screenings BASICS will provide free hearing and vision screenings for children ages 6 weeks to 5 years old Feb. 13 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at New River Elementary. Free games, prizes and books will be provided. WEEKLY Scottsdale North Rotary Local residents, visitors and “snowbirds” are invited to the Scottsdale North Rotary Club’s weekly dinner meetings, held Wednesdays at 5:45 p.m. at the Hacienda Mexican Grill, 32527 N. Scottsdale Rd. Rotary is a global humanitarian organization made up of men and

women who are business, professional and community leaders. The club’s top priority is the eradication of polio. Read to Sioux Pooh Children, along with a favorite adult, are invited to Desert Broom Library every Tuesday at 3 p.m. to read to Sioux Pooh the therapy dog. A 2010 study found that children in reading programs that used therapy dogs developed reading skills up to 20 percent faster than without. Stories in Cave Creek From 9:45 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. every Thursday, Desert Foothills Library in Cave Creek hosts “Little Ones Story Time.” The program is geared toward newborns and children up to 36 months in age. The library also has a story time program for toddlers, which is held every Tuesday from 9:45 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Toddler Time Toddlers, accompanied by a favorite adult are invited to enjoy interactive stories, songs and games that encourage emerging language skills every Wednesday at Desert Broom Library. The program starts at 11:30 a.m. and is aimed at children aged 24 to 36 months. Networking group AmSpirit Business Connections is national organization consisting of sales representatives, entrepreneurs, and professionals which provides a forum for its members to exchange qualified referrals with others in the group. The Greater Scottsdale Chapter of AmSpirit meets every Wednesday 8 a.m.-9:15 a.m. at the offices of Homeowners Financial Group located at 16427 N. Scottsdale Road, No. 280 in Scottsdale. Prospective new members and visitors are welcome to attend. Family Storytime Children of all ages, with an adult in tow, are welcome Thursdays at Desert Broom Library to share books, stories, songs and rhymes in a fun, interactive program that builds early literacy skills. The library is located at Cave Creek Road and Tatum Boulevard. Babytime Fridays Babies up to 24 months in age, accompanied by an adult, can explore pre-literacy skills through songs and stories at Desert Broom Library. Programs start at 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Each 20-minute program is followed by an unstructured 30-minute playtime. Crafting Adults wishing to knit, crochet, tat, macramé or do just about anything that has to do with fiber are invited to North Valley Regional Library’s “Made by Hand” program every Thursday at 1 p.m. Bring projects, books and patterns, accomplishments and knowledge to share with others. Learn something new about

your own craft, or pick up another craft (or stitch) that has piqued your interest. Or come and spend a couple of leisurely hours doing something you love to do or would like to learn and, in the process, make new friendships. Friday night meals The Ladies Auxiliary VFW Post 1796 in Black Canyon City is serving up meals every Friday night. The public is welcome to attend. Homework help Teen volunteers are available Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Desert Broom Library to help elementary school-aged children with homework assignments and study skills. Age-appropriate story times Every Tuesday at 9:15 a.m. or 11 a.m., North Valley Regional Library in Anthem invites preschoolers ages 3-6 to the Story Time Room to enjoy stories, rhymes, music, movement and more as they build their early literacy skills and develop a love of reading. For toddlers ages 18-36 months, Story Time Room hosts Wednesday programming at 9:15 a.m. that includes stories, songs and finger plays for children and their parent or caregiver. Also on Wednesdays, Story Time Room is the place to be for the 0-18-month-old crowd. This

“Baby Time” starts promptly at 11 a.m. Programming includes books, lap-sit songs and rhymes, puppets, music and shakers and the parachute. Learn tips to build a foundation for reading. Playtime follows the regular program. MONTHLY Volunteer orientation The Foothills Caring Corps, a volunteer-based nonprofit with the primary mission of assisting the elderly so they may live independently at their homes, holds a volunteer orientation session the second Thursday of each month starting at 9 a.m. at 7275 E. Easy St., Ste. B103 in Carefree. To RSVP or find out more, call 480-488-1105. Writing workshops Desert Foothills Library has two monthly workshops catering to writers. The first Friday of each month, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., author and publisher Patricia Brooks, founder of the Scottsdale Society of Women Writers, leads a workshop on how to write nonfiction books that position the author—you—as an expert on a particular topic. Then on the first Monday of each month, from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., a memoir writing group meets to establish goals, set personal writing schedules, share stories and receive constructive

EVENTS

continued on page 19

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  February 5, 2014

Movie Review

Labor Day Director: Jason Reitman Starring: Kate Winslet, Josh Brolin, and Gattlin Griffith Monte’s Rating: 3.00 out of 5.00

Monte Yazzie

Jason Reitman, director of “Juno” and “Up In The Air,” wrote and directed “Labor Day” based off a novel by Joyce Maynard. The story surrounds a mother and son who unwillingly give refuge to a fugitive man. With an excellent cast that headlines the noteworthy performances of Josh Brolin and Kate Winslet, Reitman’s film seemed prime for excellence. Unfortunately an unconvincing script offered a love story that wallows with emotional misfires. Henry (Gattlin Griffith) is 13-year-old boy maturely charged with taking care of his depressed mother Adele (Kate Winslet).

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Adele is emotionally wounded and heartbroken, and Henry is the only reason for the minimal stability she demonstrates. Adele also has social anxiety, leaving the house for grocery shopping once a month. While out, Adele and Henry are confronted by a wounded man named Frank (Josh Brolin) who asks, by threatening Henry, for a ride back to their home. Frank is an escaped convict who is not only haunted by the events of his past, but also fills a void in Adele and Henry’s life. The film takes place over the course of a Labor Day weekend. In roughly 3 days, Frank invades the lives of the mother and son and, in this short time, Adele transitions from terrified victim to madly in love accomplice. Winslet was great as usual, making Adele an affected character with a deeply personal past that has changed her entire life. For a time, her portrayal made the character’s change plausible. However, the script, specifically the details of her devastating past, undermined the decisions she made as a mother and the choices associated with her newfound love, Frank. Amidst the romance was also a coming of age story for young Henry, who was already maturely confident in his own right, but also confused about the new feelings that were invading his life. Henry’s interaction within the relationships of both of his disjointed families—his father Gerald (Clark Gregg) abandoned Adele for a new family—were insightful into

the transgressions of adults. Brolin was good as Frank. His character unusually composed as a menacing good guy offered Brolin opportunity to display his subtle emotional conflictions. Still, there were moments that even the two talented actors couldn’t help. One being a cooking scene, reminiscent of “Ghost”, that was drenched with forced metaphors and awkward sexuality. Reitman, even with stumbles in the script, managed to make a film that looks good. It was photographed well with an amber tint accompanied by focused visuals and the design of

the late 1980s was ingeniously detailed throughout. While the film emphasized the romantic sentiments of Adele and Frank, the interesting aspects reside in young Henry and his journey—forced or otherwise— into the intricacies of adulthood. While Reitman maintained some of the headier emotional substance cultivated through the three main characters at times, in the end it felt as if that content merely made subtle touches in the narrative. “Labor Day” was a mix of interesting and trivial themes that, depending on what you’re looking for, will determine your appreciation of the film.


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The Foothills Focus

Artist’s new series celebrates sweethearts Shea Stanfield

Earthy, subtly complex, elegantly rugged are a few of the many descriptors for jewelry artist Kathi Turner’s creations. Kathi, a life-long rancher’s wife from Ellensburg, Wash., loves the great outdoors, the rhythms of the high desert’s changing seasons and the inspiration she receives from the natural world. Kathi is strongly influenced by the Yakima Indian Nation in Washington state and the cowgirl artistry of the great Doreman Burns. She credits much of her fine and uniquely detailed beadwork to time spent with elder women in the Yakima Indian Tribe when she was a young rancher. Kathi is a bead weaver and mixed metal jewelry designer. She creates wearable art and accessories. Largely self-taught, her beading techniques include peyote, embroidery, loom, and many other contemporary knotting and braiding techniques. Kathi combines mixed metals, semi-precious stones, beads and an inspired spirit in each of her pieces. The results are eye catching original designs that draw constant admiration and compliments for their wearers. Today, Kathi and her husband, Tom, live near Cave Creek. She has a working studio in their home that she said is her solitary place, somewhere she “can bring together all pieces of me: the rancher, the artist, the wife, mother, sister, daughter.”

Kathi said that “art reflects life, and life reflects art,” and in that place all is one. “I’ve always felt my work represented our lifestyle: earthy, simple and rugged,” she said “The high desert ref lects the simpler things in life: the sights and sounds of the remote life we have lived as cattle ranchers in southeastern Oregon.” “Living and loving the Western way of life” is Kathi’s motto, and it’s reflected as a connecting theme throughout her work. Kathi has exhibited the last 2 years in the Hidden In The Hills Studio Tour in the Cave Creek, Carefree area. She said she loves the opportunity to meet new people, share her designs and to receive inspiration for new work. In celebration of love, Kathi has developed a collection of new, beautifully designed pieces just in time for Valentine’s Day. The local artist also welcomes ideas for personally designed commissioned pieces, as well. Those interested in seeing a larger selection of her work, purchase designs and obtain her contact information are invited to visit Kathi’s website at www.HighDesertCreations.com. In addition to photographic examples of her metal, bead and stonework artistry, visitors at her website can obtain pricing information on pieces already completed and can also contact her for custom-made jewelry pricing.

theFoothillsfocus.com

  February 5, 2014

Eric Quade photo

Divine design — Jewelry artist Kathi Turner has created a line of jewelry to appeal to Valentine’s Day shoppers.


February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

The Foothills Focus

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page 15

Fine chocolate, art converge

The San Francisco Chocolate Factory photo

Just a sample — It will be a fine time to have a sweet tooth next week during the Carefree Festival of Fine Chocolates and Fine Art.

Carefree will celebrate Valentine’s Day weekend with the third annual Carefree Festival of Fine Chocolates and Fine Art. Presented by Magic Bird Festivals, the 4-day festival begins Feb. 13 from noon to 5 p.m. and continues each day through Feb. 16 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Carefree Festival of Fine Chocolates and Fine Art, which takes place at 101 Easy St. at the Carefree Desert Gardens and Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion, is a free,

family-friendly event featuring up to 100 exhibitors of fine art, chocolate and other confections—plus live entertainment is scheduled throughout the weekend. Organizers anticipate more than 10,000 visitors to attend. This year’s featured chocolatier is the San Francisco Chocolate Factory. Other confectioners include W-Xocolati Fine Chocolates and It’s a Devine Bakery.

Love is in the air

Romantic Valentines Day Dinner For Two Join us in the Lariat Restaurant on Friday, February 14th from 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm for a Five Course Dinner to celebrate this special day with a culinary event sure to please! First Course Soft Butter Lettuce Salad, Point Reyes Blue Cheese, Candied Walnuts, Strawberries, Diced Apples, with Light Champagne Vinaigrette ~OR ~

Gem Caesar Salad, Hearts of Romaine, Baby Grape Tomatoes, Shaved Reggiano Parmesan, Garlic Crostini

LARIAT RESTAURANT IN THE

Second Course Velvety Lobster Bisque Soup With Crab Meat and Green Onion ~OR ~

Creamy Tomato Soup Topped with Diced Tomatoes, Parmesan Cheese

Third Course Refreshing Chilled Agave Honey Mint Soup layered with Fruit Fourth Course Pan Seared Alaskan Halibut, Garlic Spinach, Grilled Asparagus, Mashed Potatoes, Tomato Hollandaise Sauce ~OR ~

Black Pepper Seared Filet Mignon Manchengo Potato Gratin, Broccolini, Yellow Baby Squash, with Madeira Sauce Fifth Course

(Choose a dessert to share)

Red Velvet Cake with Strawberry Sauce ~OR ~

Chocolate Covered Strawberries Enjoy a champagne toast with dessert!

$55.00* per person Reservations required

For reservations call 480.595.3829

* Prices exclude beverage, tax & gratuity. A 5.00 split plate charge will be added for sharing an entrée.

37220 Mule Train Rd. Carefree, AZ 85377 480.488.5300 www.carefree-resort.com CF-Ad-Foothills-VD-Day-1-2014-03ab.indd 1

1/20/14 12:11 PM


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The Foothills Focus

theFoothillsfocus.com

  February 5, 2014

Local teens awarded

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale photo

Alexa Jenouri Kelly Potts

Cactus Shadows High School junior Alexa Jenouri, Cactus Shadows High School senior Dani Haboush and Deser t Mountain High School junior Ashley Thompson have been named as 2014 Youths of the Year by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale. In addition to representing their North Scottsdale-area branches as Youth of the Year for the next 12 months and earning $1,000 scholarships from General Dynamics C4 Systems, the teens will be honored March 22 at the Celebrate Youth program at the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess Resort. Presented by Tiffany & Bosco and Great American Title, more than 600 civic and com-

munity leaders are expected at the gala to recognize Jenouri, Haboush, Thompson and seven other greater-Scottsdale branch Youths of the Year. The gala also includes a silent and live auction, dinner and live entertainment and performances from the club youth. “The Youth of the Year program is a premier character and leadership initiative which has been in existence for more than 60 years,” said Janet Caldarelli, co-chair of the Celebrate Youth program. “Recipients of the award are chosen based on each finalist’s demonstration of moral character, life goals, leadership, poise, public speaking ability and service to the Club, community and family.” Jenouri is an 8-year member of the Thunderbirds branch in north Scottsdale and has been active in the Keystone Club, which focuses on community service including volunteering monthly at a local food bank and assisting with homeless shelters. She has also been active in Leaders in Training, learning basic work habits during the summer months as an unpaid staff assistant, and she participated in Money Matters, which promotes financial responsibility among middle and high school club members by building

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February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com basic money management skills. Haboush is a 9-year member of the Vestar branch in Desert Ridge and has also been active in Keystone and Leaders in Training, as well as What’s Hip, an 8-week program for high school girls covering issues such as relationships, drug and alcohol use, self-esteem and fashion. Thompson is a 7-year member the Virginia G. Piper branch in North Scottsdale and has also been active in the Leader in Training Program, What’s Hip, Money Matters and the Keystone Club at her branch. During Celebrate Youth in March, one of the 10 branch Youths of the Year will be named

The Foothills Focus

as the overall Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale Youth of the Year, taking home a $5,000 scholarship. The winning 2014 Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale Youth of the Year will continue on to the state-level competition with other organizations from across Arizona. The winner of the state competition advances to the Pacific Region Youth of the Year competition held later this year, with the opportunity to continue to the national event. Tickets for Celebrate Youth start at $175 per person. Tables and event sponsorships are available at www.celebrateyouthgala. org or by calling 480-344-5682.

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page 17

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The Foothills Focus

theFoothillsfocus.com

  February 5, 2014

Book sale to boost outreach ministry Desert Foothills Lutheran Church will be holding its seventh annual book sale from Feb. 14 through Feb. 23 at 29305 N. Scottsdale Rd. in the Fellowship Hall. This year’s sale has been expanded to cover two weekends and will feature tens of thousands of books to choose from including paper backs, hard backs, cook books, children’s books, audio books, videos and DV Ds.

Proceeds from the sale will benefit the church’s outreach ministries. Visitors can take advantage of special pricing such as a bag full of books for $10 Feb. 16-21 or a bag full of books for $5 on Feb. 22-23. Sale dates and times are: Feb. 14, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 15, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 16, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 17-21, 5 p.m.–8 p.m.

ARIZONA STATE LAND DEPARTMENT 1616 WEST ADAMS STREET PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85007 PUBLIC AUCTION SALE NO. 16-106041-00-002 PERPETUAL RIGHT OF WAY EASEMENT Pursuant to A.R.S. Title 37, notice is hereby given that the state of Arizona through its Arizona State Land Department (herein called ASLD), will sell at Public Auction to the highest and best bidder at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 4, 2014, at the Arizona State Land Department, 1616 W. Adams, Room 434B, Phoenix, Arizona, a perpetual right of way easement for the purpose of a Service Road and Underground Utilities situated in Maricopa County to wit: TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST, G&SRB&M, MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA PARCEL: M&B THRU TRACT MF3 IN STATE PLAT 55, 2ND AMD., SECTION 34. CONTAINING 0.04 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. BENEFICIARY: PERMANENT COMMON SCHOOLS (INDEMNITY SELECTIONS) For a complete legal description of the land, prospective bidders are advised to examine the right of way application file as well as all pertinent files of ASLD. Said right of way easement has been valued at $22,857.00 and consists of 0.04 acres, more or less. Additional requirements and conditions of this right of way are available and may be viewed at the Arizona State Land Department, 1616 West Adams Street, Phoenix, Arizona. The complete file associated with the described land is open to public inspection at the ASLD, 1616 West Adams Street, Phoenix, Arizona, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., exclusive of holidays and weekends. Please direct any questions regarding this Public Auction to the Rights of Way Section of the Real Estate Division of ASLD at (602) 542-4098. This auction notice is available on the ASLD’s web site at www.azland.gov. Each potential bidder must show ASLD’s representative a cashier’s check made payable to the Arizona State Land Department in the amount specified under Terms of Sale Paragraph (A) below. TERMS OF SALE: (A) At the time of sale the successful bidder must pay the following by a cashier’s check: (1) The value of the right of way, which is $22,857.00; (2) A Selling and Administrative Fee of 3% of the value of the right of way, which is $686.00; (3) Reimbursable Estimated Advertising Fee, which is $2,500.00; (4) Reimbursable Appraisal Fee, which is $2,000.00. The total amount due at the time of sale is $28,043.00 (less $4,500.00 if the successful bidder is the applicant for a total amount due of $23,543.00). (B) Within 30 days after the auction date the successful bidder must pay the full balance of the amount bid for the right of way and pay a Selling and Administrative Fee of 3% of the purchase price for the right of way less the amount paid under (A) (2) above. (C) No Selling and Administrative Fee shall be collected by ASLD if the successful bidder at auction is the beneficiary of the land trust. (D) Within 30 days after the auction date the successful bidder shall be required to pay the actual legal advertising cost, less the amount paid under (A)(3) above. BIDDING INFORMATION: (A) The time of sale shall be deemed to be the time of declaration of the highest and best bidder. The bidding will begin at the total value of the right of way. A bid for less than the value of the right of way easement or by a party who has not inspected the right of way and/or the associated files and records of ASLD will not be considered. (B) All bidders must sign an affidavit stating that they have undertaken due diligence in preparation for the auction and that their representative is authorized to bid and bind the bidder. It is the bidder’s responsibility to research the records of local jurisdictions and public agencies regarding this property. (C) Pursuant to A.R.S. §37-240.B, the successful bidder must be authorized to transact business in the state of Arizona no later than three (3) business days after the auction. The successful bidder must sign an affidavit stating it is the successful bidder and sign a Certification Statement pursuant to A.R.S. Title 37 and the Rules of ASLD. (D) If the successful bidder fails to complete the payment as stated in the auction notice together with the additional required fees within 30 days from the auction date, all amounts paid at the time of auction by the successful bidder will be forfeited. (E) In the event of forfeiture, the ASLD Commissioner may declare that the bid placed before the final bid accepted is the highest bid, and that the bidder has five (5) days after notification by ASLD to pay by cashier’s check all amounts due. GENERAL INFORMATION: The ASLD may cancel this auction in whole or in part at any time prior to the acceptance of a final bid. A protest to this sale must be filed within 30 days after the first day of publication of this announcement and in accordance with A.R.S. §37-301. Persons with a disability may request a reasonable accommodation such as a sign language interpreter, by contacting the ADA Coordinator, at (602) 364-0875. Requests should be made as early as possible to allow time to arrange the accommodation. Ruben Ojeda (for) Vanessa Hickman State Land Commissioner December 5, 2013

Feb. 22, 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Feb 23, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. I n p r e pa r a t io n fo r t he book sale, Desert Foothills is accepting donations of gently used paperbacks, hardbacks and audio books. Donations can be dropped off at the church between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays. Contact Dwayne Richard at 480710-2403 for more information or for assistance in picking up any large donations.

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Eric Quade photo

Funds for fellowship — The upcoming book sale at Desert Foothills Lutheran Church supports its outreach ministry efforts.

Luau fundraiser Feb. 13 at Grayhawk

623.551.4135

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF A TAX-EXEMPT CORPORATION Pursuant to A.R.S. §10-3202 (Arizona Non-Profit Corporation)

I The Name of the Corporation is The Kiwanis Club of Tempe-Sunrise, Inc. II The address of the corporation is: 2311 S. Rural Rd. Tempe, AZ 85282 III The Statutory Agent of the Corporation is: J.M. Selleh 2311 S. Rural Rd. Tempe, AZ 85282 IV The purpose for which the corporation is

organized is:To give primacy to the huiman and spiritual rather than to the material values of life.To encourage the daily living of the Golden Rule in all human relationships. To promote the adoption and application of higher social, business, and professional standards.To develop, by precept and example, a more intelligent, aggressive, and serviceable citizenship.To provide through this club, a practical means to form enduring friendships, to render altruistic service, and to build better communities. To cooperate in creating and maintaining that around public opinion and high idealism which make possible the increase of rightousness, justice, partiotism, and good will. Published in The Foothils Focus Jan.29, Feb.5 and 12,.2014

ADVERTISING WORKS! CALL 623-465-5808

Submitted photo

Prepare to party — Nedra Williams, Kitty Duke, Sharon Gregory, Jane Heidel and Renee Hodkinson warm up for the Aloha Luau under neon palm trees.

The Desert Foothills Woman’s Club annual “Aloha Luau” fundraiser takes place Feb. 13 at Grayhawk Golf Club’s Fairway House, 8620 E. Thompson Peak Pkwy. in Scottsdale. Proceeds from the fundraiser support student scholarships and local nonprofits, such as Cave Creek Museum, Desert Foothills Library, Desert Foothills Land Trust, Foothills Caring Corps, Foothills Food Bank and Horses

Help. Tickets are $55. Attendees are invited to don Hawaiian duds and come enjoy a range of entertainment from hula dancers and other performances by Kilali’s Polynesian Revue to a silent auction and raffle prizes. Lunch will be catered by Grayhawk chefs. For event info, or to learn more about the Desert Foothills Woman’s Club, contact Nedra Williams at 480-773-3753.


February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

the

Fishing Report This is a North Valley-focused version of the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s fishing report. To view the full report, visit azgfd.gov. Lake Pleasant—A handful of days in the past few weeks have been 20-30 fish days, but it has also been a crap-shoot as far as morning or afternoon trips. You never know which one is going to be the best for fishing, so pick a time and go for it. Canyon Lake—Lake is 1,657 feet in elevation, 95 percent full. Next stocking is Feb. 10. Canyon Lake is one of the prettiest lakes in Arizona and the fish that have been coming out of there are just as pretty, according to The Arizona Fishing Guides’ report. Throw those big swim baits for the biggest bass in the lake. Also, the dropshot should still entice

some nice large mouth. Saguaro Lake—Lake is 1,526 feet in elevation, 96 percent full. After being stocked the week of Jan. 13, Gary Senft of Mesa Bass Pro Shops said that he fished the lake on Jan. 24, and fishing was slow using dropshots. Spoons jigged in deep water produced a decent bite. Senft said crankbaits, swimbaits and spinners produced nothing. The best bet was a Roboworm dropshot in morning dawn and various brown colors. Overall, fishing is slow, and anglers must use a slow, winter presentation. Horseshoe Lake—Lake is 1,985 feet in elevation, 24 percent full. Salt River Project tends to use Horseshoe as a flood retention reservoir, but steadily releases the water downstream into Bartlett Lake.

events from page 11

coming events go to dlfa.org. Desert Foothills Library is located at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road in Cave Creek. New River Kiwanis The first and third Wednesday of every month, New River Kiwanis hold their regular meetings at the New River Kiwanis Community Park, 48606 N. 17th Ave. The civic organization is geared toward helping children and is always looking for new members to get involved. Music at Desert Broom Library The second Saturday of every month, Desert Broom Library invites musicians to come and perform live acoustic numbers between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Music should be family friendly. Bring fliers or other means to advertise your group. If interested in performing, email Kimberly at hickinbotham@phoenix. gov or talk to a librarian for more info. Cards, board games social The third Tuesday each month at Desert Foothills Library in Cave Creek is designated for a cards and board games social for adults from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. The library has lots of games to choose from including cards, Scrabble, chess, checkers, backgammon, Tr ivial P ursuit, Cr ibbage, Yahtzee and more. Games and refreshments brought from home a re welcome, too. Cof fee available for purchase. No registration needed.

feedback. For memoir group guidelines, email Elena Pavlova at elepavlova@mac.com. Both writing workshops have limited seating. Call 480-488-2286 to register. NR/DHCA meeting The New River/Desert Hills Community Association hosts two meetings each month. A community meeting is held every second Tuesday of the month, 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m., at the Daisy Mountain Fire Station. Then on the second Friday each month, the group convenes its town hall meeting from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Tramonto Fire Station. Meetings feature local guest speakers on an array of topics. Peaceful spirit women’s group The last Friday of every month, Peaceful Spirit Enrichment Center in New River hosts its monthly women’s gathering. Members of the group share their journey with each other, gaining insight and inspiration. A $10-$15 donation is suggested, though no one is turned away for lack of funds. For more info, contact Melanie Dunlap at 623-465-5875, melanie@ peacefulspiritcenter.com or visit the online calendar at PeacefulSpriritCenter.com. Library hosts foreign film Desert Foothills Library will host a different foreign film from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., one Monday each month. For information on the

The Foothills Focus

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page 19

Learn about Grand Canyon history, river running Stop by The Good Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m. and be introduced to the history of the Grand Canyon and river running. Todd Weber, a “Living History” presenter and educational guide, will be making his presentation on the topic as a guest speaker for the Desert Foothills Chapter of the Arizona Archaeology Society. His specialties are patriots, explorers and great adventures that occurred in American history. Weber honed his skill sets with Elderhostel Inc. (Road Scholar) for 20 years and more recently American Cruise Lines, a specialty line for rivers and waterways in America. Weber’s presentation, “The History of River Runners of the Grand Canyon,” will follow a historical time line and include a Hopi creation story, the John Wesley Powell expedition, the ambitions of industrialists and the disappearance of the Hydes newlyweds. Local meetings of the Arizona Archaeology Society are open to the public at no charge on the sec-

SPEAKER

continued on page 26

NRA gun safety Now that Constit utional Carry is permitted in Arizona, why not learn gun safety and what state and federal laws dictate? A National Rifle Association-affiliated class is being of fered ever y mont h, and CCW certification is available at no additional cost. Check

Rick Burress photo

Guest speaker — Todd Weber will cover Grand Canyon history.

azpistol.com for class dates. Desert Broom Knitters Knitters of all ages and skill levels are invited to gather in the small conference room at Desert Broom Library the fourth Saturday each month from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. to work on existing projects, start new ones and share tips and techniques. Gen-

eral instruction given includes how to cast on, making the knit stitch, purling and binding off at the end of a finished piece. Specific projects are also taught. The group’s leader is an experienced instructor, knitting guild member and established knitwear designer with published original patterns for hand knitters.


page 20   FACEBOOK.COM/THEFOOTHILLS.FOCUS

The Foothills Focus

theFoothillsfocus.com

  February 5, 2014

Opinions

Politics versus immigration reform

Sex and the Super Bowl The Super Bowl was coming and with it ... 40,000 hookers? That’s what the media said, and they sure seemed to love saying it. But it was just an urban myth. “The idea t hat some L os t Tr i b e of Gypsy SKENAZY Harlots, tens of thousands strong, wanders around the world from megaevent to mega-event, unimpeded by the usual logistics of transport and lodging” — well, it defies logic, writes Maggie McNeill on Reason.com. McNeill is a former stripper, call girl and madam turned blogger (a fate that seems to await us all). She’s also a former reference librarian, a quadruple threat making her the perfect person to explain the hooker hype. First off, she notes, even with cops on the lookout for lots of illegal sex, the facts don’t match the fears. The number of arrests of prostitutes doesn’t increase around these events — e.g., the Olympics, Pro Bowl and World Cup. London, for instance, spent a reported $800,000 on sex policing

during the 2012 Olympics but found “no significant increase in prostitution (coerced or otherwise).” That’s because, unlike trade shows, big sporting events are actually not good for the prostitution business. “With trade shows, you definitely have an increase,” says McNeill, speaking by phone from the rural home where now she lives, happily married and writing full time. “We liked to see trade shows because this meant men traveling alone, and they’re kind of partying a little bit. But with sporting events, you usually have a decrease in business because 1) a lot of guys take their families and 2) a lot of the guys who don’t take their families are very young and (have) used up all their cash getting a hotel room.” Having been a madam in New Orleans during the 2002 Super Bowl, McNeill can attest: “We didn’t see any increase in business.” (The strip clubs, she says, did.) So why would a hooker waste time and money hoofing it to a one-weekend event where the prospects are dim, the rooms are overpriced and the police are on the prowl? They don’t.

The only time a large-ish group of women pulls up stakes to follow a large-ish group of men is when those men are moving someplace more or less permanently — for example, to California during the gold rush and, more recently, out west to join the gas and pipeline industry. But even then, says McNeill, we’re not tal k i ng tens of thousands of women. We’re talking hundreds. So where did the Super Bowl sex myth begin? She traces it to some remarks made right before the 2004 Olympics in Athens that got misinterpreted and repeated by the press. Though prostitution is legal there, the local government nonetheless wanted to clean things up before the visitors arrived. Cops began raiding brothels, causing the legal sex workers to complain that if it became difficult for them to ply their trade, illegal prostitutes would take their place. Put together “illegal prostitutes” and “Olympics” and suddenly you’ve got a juicy story about sex and tourism and hookers and sin. Name a news outlet that

SKENAZY

continued on page 26

Republicans are again at war with themselves over immigration reform. Ideally, they would agree on the need to legalize millions of illegal immigrants now here and to better control the number of future unskilled foreigners competing with our struggling working class. Unfortunately, neither the Republican Party’s leadership nor its conservative opposition is entirely with the program. The conservative base doesn’t want HARROP to legalize, and the leadership wants a generous supply of cheap labor. Seeing this rift, some Republican strategists advise simply avoiding the conversation altogether. One of them, Bill Kristol, holds that with midterm elections coming, the smart politics for Republicans is to bang on Obamacare rather than get into an intraparty fight over immigration. One could counter-argue that letting immigration reform fester would not be politically wise, given the growing clout of Latino voters. Meanwhile, the percentage of Americans wanting to repeal the Affordable Care Act has fallen to 34, according to a recent CBS poll. This number will probably go far lower by Election Day as the dust settles and the public becomes familiar with Obamacare’s benefits. As for immigration reform, the conservative base is justified in casting a wary eye at the GOP leadership’s intentions. The leaders’ business allies, notably the Chamber of Commerce, want low wages. If they can get them through illegal immigration, fine. But if they can suppress pay through big guest-worker programs, also fine. Numbers matter, and the more low-skilled workers, legal or otherwise, the lower the wages. So the conservative base should keep a watchful eye. When Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., warns against “a larger f low of immigration that threatens the financial future of middle-class Americans,” he has a point — though mass immigration by lowskilled workers threatens mainly poorer Americans. These conservatives also worry

that granting any kind of legal status would encourage more illegal immigration. But the status quo is what most fosters illegal immigration. Jobs are the magnet for the vast majority of undocumented workers. The bipartisan Senate proposal for reform would go far in closing down the U.S. labor market to those without papers. For example, it would (finally) require fraud-proof biometric ID for all job applicants. And it would seriously punish employers who break the law. Amnesty for otherwise lawabiding illegal entrants is the political price of restoring order in the immigration program. Conservatives should accept it and drop the charge that “they” broke U.S. law. It’s true — they did — but this was a law that the American government held in contempt. And there are moral considerations. Many illegal immigrants have become virtual Americans, settled in their neighborhoods and key employees for local businesses. Their children are more often than not culturally American. With logic on reform’s side, Kristol must turn to an emotional standard from the right’s political playlist: “President Obama obviously can’t be trusted.” That’s an odd accusation, in that Obama has been the only president in recent memory to enforce the weak law we now have. Obama’s administration has deported 2 million illegal immigrants, a record for any president. Immigration activists urged him to announce an end to deportations in the State of the Union address. He did not. The conservative base already knows that it’s at odds with some of the party’s business interests. Perhaps it should take a giant leap and admit to some shared concerns with labor unions — and many Hispanics, who want the same job and wage security that they do. Anyhow, there are things besides politics. Like governing. After the midterms, the politicos will be gearing up for the 2016 presidentials, and then after that, another midterm. So how about solving a problem now and then? To find out more about Froma Harrop and read features by other Creators writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators website at creators.com.

The Foothills Focus encourages submissions from the public for the editorial page. Respond to the columnists, fellow letter writers, or let us know about something all together different making an impact in your community. Submissions should be kept to less than 400 words. Send letters to ffeditorial@hotmail.com. If e-mail is unavailable, fax to 623-465-1363 or send them by mail to 46641 N Black Canyon Hwy, New River, AZ 85087. Include your name, your city and a phone number where you can be reached.


February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

SERVICE SERVICE SERVICE SERVICE

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page 21

The

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page 22   FACEBOOK.COM/THEFOOTHILLS.FOCUS

ELECTRICAL

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  February 5, 2014

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February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

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page 23

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Services continued on next page


page 24   FACEBOOK.COM/THEFOOTHILLS.FOCUS

SYNTHETIC LAWNS

The Foothills Focus

theFoothillsfocus.com

  February 5, 2014

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RO Filter Change, Water Softener, Water Heater Replacement and More!

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PUBLIC NOTICE

ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION HAVE BEEN FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE ARIZONA CORPORATION COMMISSION FOR

Strategic IT Services LLC L-1885488-8 The address of the known place of business is: 3123 W. Feather Sound CT Anthem, AZ 85086 The name and street address of the Statutory Agent is:

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Business Filings Inc. 2390 E. Camelback Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85016 Management of the limited liability company is reserved to the members. The names and addresses of each person who is a member are: Debra Wolf 3123 W. Feather Sound CT Anthem, AZ 85086 William McDermott 3123 W. Feather Sound CT Anthem, AZ 85086 Published in The Foothils Focus Jan.22,29 and Feb.5, 2014

We’re YOUR Community Newspaper . . . We’d love to hear from you! Contact Eric Quade at 623.465.5808 to get your events, notices and letters in The North Valley’s only Weekly Newspaper.


February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

The Foothills Focus

FACEBOOK.COM/THEFOOTHILLS.FOCUS    

page 25

classifieds

Please visit our website at www.thefoothillsfocus.com to place your classified. Rate for classifieds are $20 for the first 20 words then $.50 per word after and must be prepaid.

Deadline for classifieds is Wed. at 5pm for the following Wed. issue. Classifieds may also be faxed to 623-465-1363. Please note that no classifieds WILL BE accepted over the phone. NOTICES Looking for ladies and gentlemen to play Mah Jongg Wednesdays in library at Boulder Creek HS, noon to 3 or later. Call Nancy after 6pm. 623-465-9317 Al-anon Meetings in Anthem. Mondays 10:45am. St Rose Parish. 2825 W Rose Canyon Circle. S/W corner of Daisy Mtn & Meridian. ADOPTION ADOPTION: Unplanned pregnancy? Caring licensed adoption agency provides financial and emotional support. Choose from loving pre-approved families. Call Joy toll-free 1-866-922-3678 or confidential email: Adopt@ ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption. org. (AzCAN) LOVING COUPLE LOOKING to adopt a baby. We look forward to making our family grow. All information confidential. All medical expenses paid. Please call us anytime. Gloria and Joseph 888-2299383. (AzCAN) Adopt: Our hearts reach out to you. Loving couple seeks to adopt a newborn to complete our family. Please call John and Maria 1-888-988-5028 or johnandmariaadopt.com ATV/Cycle/Etc 1960 to 1976 Enduro or dirt bike wanted by private party. Must be complete 50cc to 500cc. Will look at all, running or not. 480-518-4023 2005 Bombadier Outlander 400. Mileage 1800. $3600. Cell 623-980-0516 Autos 1964 to 1972 classic sports car, muscle car wanted by private party running or not. 480-518-4023 Business Opportunities ATTN: 29 SERIOUS PEOPLE to work from anywhere using a computer. Up to $1500-$5000 PT/FT. www.pticoncepts.com. (AzCAN) EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY!! Help needed! Turn your next cup of coffee into a life-changing income! Samples/full details: 1-888-2555909. Mention System ID Code 4037GO. (AzCAN) FULL AUTOMATED 24 HOUR coin-operated standpipe water company located in rural Mohave County, Northwest, AZ. Call Jim 928-753-9328 or 928-897-5944. (AzCAN) Cable/Satellite TV DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/ month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-318-1693. (AzCAN) DirecTV:Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie &2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800644-2857. ADVERTISING WORKS! CALL

623-465-5808

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IT SPECIALIST: Paid training in the U.S. Navy. $ for school. Medical/ dental, 30 days vacation/yr. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-354-9627. (AzCAN)

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GORDON TRUCKING: CDL-A Truck Drivers. Up to $5,000 Sign-on bonus & .54 CPM. Solos & Teams. Full-time & Parttime. Consistent miles, benefits, 401k, EOE. Call 7 days/wk! 866-837-5997 GordonTrucking .com. (AzCAN) HOME FURNISHINGS CREDENZA ENTIRELY HAND MADE IN TUSCANY,<<< imported by us from Italy,solid chestnut wood,15th century Florence hand carved model, Artisan fire branded signature on each piece,no fillers,glues or resins, wrought iron keys and hinges. W 95” H 39” D 16” - details of this Costanza Credenza at www.tarpac.it - Tel. 9282523862 - cell. 480-745-6574 - email: dm.flick@yahoo.com INSTRUCTION MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES needed! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. No experience needed! Online training at SC Train gets you Job Ready! HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888926-6058. (AzCAN)

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Livestock & Supplies Free delivery of shavings, cow & horse mixture great for arenas or fertilizer 480-595-0211 TRIPLE R HORSE RESCUE is a 501(c)3 non profit organization. We rehabilitate and adopt out local horses that have been abused, neglected or rescued from slaughter We are in need of donations and sponsors to help with feed and vet care. Volunteer opportunities are also available. For further info, please call 602-396-8726.

Pets & Supplies

Rattlesnake proof your dog now. Snake proofing for all breeds of dogs. New River location. 480-215-1776 www.vipervoidance.com Sheltie & Collie rescue have beautiful dogs for adoption. 480-488-5711 SundustSDA @aol.com Services Offered D & G Scrapping. Old washers, dryers, hot water heaters, etc. We will recycle your left over yard sale items. Moving? We will take your trash to NR refuse for cash. Call 602-920-4989 I would love to clean your home. Prefer to work for seniors. Have references. 928-304-1062 Anthem area. HOME WATCH & CONCIERGE FOR PARTTIME RESIDENTSLeave this summer knowing that Your property is being cared for. Local, Reliable, Bonded & Insured www. northvalleyhomeservices. com 480-567-6029 Two Girls With A Paintbrush ready to help with your interior painting dreams and needs. Qualified Safe Friendly and Reliable! Call Jessica today for a fair quote 602-903-0304

Replace your decaying wood vigas with Fiberspan Concrete Vigas. “The only permanent viga solution.” 928-274-6805 ConcreteVigas.com Real Estate Mobile for Sale in New River, AZ. 8ftx40ft with two slide outs and carport. Good Condition, fully furnished, $3500. Must be moved. 360-731-5234 ADVERTISE YOUR HOME, property or business for sale in 85 AZ newspapers. Reach over 1 million readers for ONLY $330! Call this newspaper or visit: www. classifiedarizona.com. (AzCAN) Rentals True Desert Living: One Bedroom one bath newly renovated apartment in Cave Creek.Small fenced in yard. Beautiful views. $700 mo. references. 602-448-1054

4 ACRES with views of majestic Bradshaw Mountains. Situated at the end of road. Area of custom site built homes. Area of 30 gallon a minute wells. Property does have its own well and electric. Close proximity to Agua Fria river bed. Easy commute to Prescott, Flagstaff or Phoenix. Rural living yet close to shopping, hospital, schools, colleges and other amenities. Priced to sell quickly at $160,000. Call Kay 928-710-4193 New River Land Sale. 360 degree views, 2200ft elevation, underground electric and water. 1 to 23 acres available. Located at the base of Gavilan Peak. Call 623-680-1017 57 ACRES, $57,900. Prescott area, Ruger Ranch. Rugged mountain property bordering State Land. 1st come basis. Financing & ADWR report available. Call AZLR (866)632-0877. (AzCAN)

Tired of searching for a Rental? Call Jo at Arizona Premier Real Estate 480-326-8825 at absolutely no cost to you!! 3 bed/2 bath home for rent. 2 car garage, plus storage room. $950 mo. In BCC. 602-717-3641 Land For Sale LENDER REPO SALE. 5 acres, $12,900. Show Low, Windsor Valley Ranch. Quiet county maintained road with electric. Excellent climate, nearby trout fishing. 1st come basis. Financing & ADWR report available. Call AZLR (866)561-5687. (AzCAN)

U FINISH CABIN SHELL on 38 wilderness acres, $439 month. Well-built new cabin shell in quiet, scenic highlands of northern AZ. Evergreen woodlands & meadow mix at cool, clear 6,200’ elevation. Sweeping wilderness views, abundant groundwater, loam garden soil. Top hunting / fishing in nearby National Forest. $59,900 with low down seller financing. Free brochure photos, cabin specs, area info: 1st United Realty 800-966-6690. (AzCAN)

VOLUNTEER-SPONSORADOPT! Dreamchaser Horse Rescue offers a myriad of volunteer opportunities. Please consider joining our Dreamchaser family! We need animal lovers who are willing to help with everything from ranch chores to fundraising! We have sanctuary horses who need sponsors, and horses available for adoption. Come see us: www. dreamchaserhorserescue.org or Susan at 623-910-6530 Saddle & Tack Repairs. Western & English plus Racing saddle too. 30 years exp. Buy-SellTrade. 23yrs same location. Circle Mtn Rd & 18th St. 623-465-7286 MISC Free delivery of shavings, cow & horse mixture-great for arenas or fertilizer 480-595-0211 Excellent condition Wells Cargo 10ft enclosed trailer. Electric brakes,2 DR. 623-569-9022 Christmas Village Display, C-56, 100 pieces. Business district, houses, railroad, landscaping, lights. $250. 602-796-4709 Misc Wanted Wanted: CASH PAID for guns, wagon wheels, wagons, anvils, wooden barrels, western antiques. 623-742-0369 / 602-214-5692

Crossword on Page 24


page 26   FACEBOOK.COM/THEFOOTHILLS.FOCUS

L

The Foothills Focus

theFoothillsfocus.com

skenazy from page 20

skincare Ease away the pressure and stress...

30min express facial $35 Anti Aging Facial $60 Brow Wax $10

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All facials include hair removal, steam, extractions, massage of the hands, feet and neck.

480.427.8559

7100 E Cavecreek Rd Suite 141 Cavecreek , AZ , 85331

  February 5, 2014

in PHOENIX 2525 W. Carefree Hwy. Bldg. 6, Ste. 144

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wouldn’t run with that. Since then, the story has been ricocheting through the media, always sounding plausible — till you talk to an actual hooker, such as McNeill, or an actual sports fanatic, such as my son, age 15. When I told him that rumor had it there are 40,000 hookers flocking to the Super Bowl, he said: “Wow. That’s one for every two people attending the game!” As a football nut, he knows there are 82,566 seats at MetLife Stadium. One shady lady for every two ticketholders (and not all of them even men)? Put that way, it sounds preposterous. But it sure is a great story. To find out more about Lenore Skenazy and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at creators.com.

Voted “Best of the Best in 2013 for Customer Service”

speaker from page 19

Receive a free Home Warranty when I represent you!

ond Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are available a half-hour prior to the beginning of meetings. The meetings are held in the community room at The Good Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 6502 Cave Creek Rd. in Cave Creek. Find out more online at azarchsoc.org/ desertfoothills.

New Home Sales • Residential Sales & Rentals • Short Sales • Luxury Market • Commercial Sales & Rentals

You’re invited to an Open House It’s our way of saying thank you The opportunity to show our commitment to our customers means a lot to us. Stop by our Customer Appreciation Open House and join us for fun and refreshments. It’s our way of saying thanks for your business. We look forward to seeing you. Join us at the Wells Fargo Anthem location 41830 N. Galvin Peak Pkwy. Anthem, AZ 85086 Friday, February 7, 2014 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 623-465-2244 © 2014 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC.


February 5, 2014   theFoothillsfocus.com

Wigwam Festival coming to Litchfield Park

The Foothills Focus

FACEBOOK.COM/THEFOOTHILLS.FOCUS    

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Cultural entertainment — In addition to visual art, musical performances by groups such as Estun-bah, pictured above, will be part of the Wigwam Festival of Fine Art.

Good only with Taylor. (Exp.2/28/14)

page 27

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STORE HOURS Monday-Friday: 8am-6pm Saturday: 9am-3pm

(623) 551-1305 az115@postnet.com www.postnet.com/az115

Submitted photo

Featured artist — Craig Bergsgaard will exhibit his work

Wigwam Resort, located in Litchfield Park’s historic district, will host the fourth annual Wigwam Festival of Fine Art Feb. 14-16. T he e ve nt w i l l fe at u re craftsmen and creators of fine art exhibiting in an outdoor gallery on the front lawn of the resort portraying Western, Native American and Southwestern subject matter. Participating members of organizations such as The Western Artists of America, Cowboy Artists of America and Southwest Premier Artists will

be represented at the festival, too. Visitors will have a rare opportunity to meet and visit with nationally acclaimed artists, while enjoying fine wines and listening to Native American musicians Tony Duncan and Estun-bah, Arvel Bird with “Many Tribes One Fire” and spectacular dance performances by the Yellow Bird Dancers. Also sharing the stage will be Arizona harpist VeeRonna. Fo r i n f o r m a t i o n , v i s i t ve r m i l l ionpromot ion s.com online or call 623-734-6526.

Our best asset is our customers – thousands of satisfied customers (from CA-AZ) have made the change to fresh, clean great tasting water with the WATERBOY™ system. Poor taste, odors, the feeling of “can’t rinse off the soap”, damaging mineral deposits in pipes & appliances are all things of the past. Dr. Lawrence Stern - OD (Doctor of Optometry) with Arizona Eye Care and also an Anthem resident has this to say about his Waterboy system: “My family & I love our Waterboy. The water taste great and I have not purchased any bottled water since. Every shower is a clean feeling not slimy.” Shalimar Roper, Shalimar Salon & Spa - Anthem “In a span of 7 years, we thought we’ve purchased to a better water system 3x’s and still my hair felt brittle & my skin not so….. Until “waterboy,” it did what it said. My husband Ken brought it here to AZ. It’s very important that our guest’s hair is rinsed with the right water after color and we have it at the salon too.


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