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Ross breathed deeply. “Have you seen the home security system ad on TV, the one with all ones and zeros flowing over the outside of a house?” “Years ago, I saw one with them on the inside of a home. Why?” Ross leaned forward in his chair. “It represents binary digitalization. We think it’s everything today. Like we used to believe in radio waves.” He pursed his lips. “I had an old issue of a Superman comic in which he perceives everything all at once and almost goes mad, until he finds a way to stop it. It taught me that our senses aren’t consciousnessexpanders, but consciousness limiters. Otherwise, we couldn’t function. Imagine if we could see all different waves of radio frequencies simultaneously. We wouldn’t see; everything would gray out.” I didn’t get his point immediately. Ross shut his eyes a moment and sighed. Sometimes he lost patience with my intellect. Warmed to his subject, he kept talking. “The same applies to sound. Take music. I used to believe in infinity and that there’d be no end to new songs. Wrong. Have you noticed how more and more melodies are copies of earlier tunes?” He paused, eased back into the seat, nodded to himself and said, “We’re nearing the end.” “Ross,” I said, “I think I get the idea. If we heard all music at the same time, we’d just hear some high-pitched hum.” “Perhaps.” He sighed again. “Maybe nothing.” Struggling to keep up with him, I frowned. “What do you mean by, ‘nearing the end’?” Ross appeared frightened. “Are you familiar with entropy?” I shook my head. He said, “Google it.” He stared ahead, licked his lips and went on. - 93 -

The Fine Line Issue 3  

The Fine Line presents its third compilation of art, fiction and poetry by contributors Francis Raven, Michael Young, Dorothee Lang, Raj Sha...

The Fine Line Issue 3  

The Fine Line presents its third compilation of art, fiction and poetry by contributors Francis Raven, Michael Young, Dorothee Lang, Raj Sha...

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