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"Here." $217,328.35. "Dad!" she did cry now, his baby, his little girl, as fragile and thin of artery, if not more so, than his wife. "What are you doing?" "Send your kids to that academy. Give them a chance." He went to the truck. "Where are you going, Dad?" she managed, through the tears, to call after him. He paused. "I don't know exactly." She was framed at the top of the landing and from her, and from her brother, he felt cessation. Their thinning was over. If it started again, it was on them. He groped, testing, but still encountered layers of mud. "I'll call you," and he drove away. He didn't go that far, only four hundred or so miles. He looked over as he crossed the Ohio River from Williamstown, changed his mind about continuing up 77, and turned off into Marietta. He got some directions and settled the Airstream in the dark next to the Muskingum River, about 15 miles north on 60. He slept well. The next morning he drove back to Marietta and walked around. Nice, a row of Victorian mansions on the street overlooking the Ohio, an Indian mound at the top of the hill with a Revolutionary War cemetery around it. The headstones named soldiers who had come here for land and homes. Their wives' stones often showed a death a few years after the husbands'. That was unusual for the time. It spoke of good men, who did not thin arteries. The Ohio decided it. He walked to the banks, the bluffs of West Virginia towering on the opposite side. The water was brown and a Coast Guard tug floated slowly by, a thin sheen of oil trailing behind. But the water was fast and carried all of its

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The Fine Line Issue 3  

The Fine Line presents its third compilation of art, fiction and poetry by contributors Francis Raven, Michael Young, Dorothee Lang, Raj Sha...

The Fine Line Issue 3  

The Fine Line presents its third compilation of art, fiction and poetry by contributors Francis Raven, Michael Young, Dorothee Lang, Raj Sha...

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