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ISSUE 10 | 2017

DISC

+ ANIMAL PERFORMERS

Unpacking New Laws and Regulations

+ UNIT MANAGERS

Do You Have What It Takes?

OP


CONTENTS / 01

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02. Cape Town

10 12 22 24

International Film Market: Developing the Film Industry

04. Homegrown

DISCOP 2017

Africa’s biggest content market is ready to welcome the world.

Films Shine at Toronto International Film Festival

06. Autodesk University Explores the Future of Making Things

07. NFVF and SWIFT Partnership Announced

08. Jameson Music Video Grant 2017 Winner

09. Locals Enter LSF

UNIT MANAGERS

When the apocalypse looms, you’ll want a Unit Manager on speed dial.

Script Surgery

10. DISCOP

Johannesburg Celebrates Africa

12. Managing the Unit Supply Chain

18. Health of the TV,

Film and Commercials Sectors

22. Animal Performers:

ANIMAL PERFORMERS

New regulations pose potential challenges for handlers. We talk to the experts.

All You Need to Know About PAPA

24. SA’s Film Heroes 28. An Industry

Compromised By In-House Production

29. Film Industry

Strategy Discussion: An Overview

32. Tanzania: Melting

SOUTH AFRICA’S FILM HEROES

Nominated by their peers; these special people are growing and shaping our industry.

Pot of Cultures and Growing Film Service Destination

36. Events to Diarise 38. Associations News 40. Directory of Advertisers


02 / SPOTLIGHT

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CAPE TOWN FILM MARKET:

DEVELOPING THE FILM INDUSTRY The Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will take place from October 12th – 21st 2017 at the V & A Waterfront, with a four-day business to business event focused on increasing collaboration and supporting the efficiency and development of the film industry across Africa.

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unique business focused event, The Cape Town Film Market will see dozens of companies from the film industry participating in four days of discussions, networking and workshops all designed to support the growth of the industry, including its affiliate and support services. The event will include an exhibition space, panel discussions, targeted workshops and networking opportunities that will enable film production companies to interact with the range of affiliate and support industries required for the growth of the sector. Government and associated City support agencies will also be part of this event with a focus on informing and educating producers on issues ranging from funding and tax incentives to permits and location opportunities. Unlike any other film industry event in the country, the Cape Town Film Market will be a multi-purpose event; a business development and sales opportunity for industry support businesses, a networking event for all industry stakeholders, and an educational platform whereby best practice information will be shared across a range of competencies. The event is aimed to

encourage collaboration between Cape-based companies, as well as to forge relationships across the country and the continent. The event will also create the space for networking between businesses, and between business and government in order to drive the growth of the industry, not just regionally, but across the entire sector. Promoting the Cape as the ideal location for international and local shoots will drive tourism, growth of the industry and overall economic improvement for all associated businesses across the industry. To this end, the event is supported by the City of Cape Town, and Mayor Patricia de Lille has this to say of the event, “City of Cape Town Executive Mayor Ms Patricia De Lille adds “The City of Cape Town is indeed proud of the Cape Town International Film Market and Festival for making strides in developing the film industry in our city. We are committed to enhancing this growth by positioning Cape Town as the film hub of Africa and supporting the local film industry as it is a key job creator. We are determined to work harder so that Cape Town can become even more globally competitive in this important sector by creating an environment

that attracts investment and more international film productions.” The Cape Town International Film Market and Festival Marketing Director explains further, “the CTIFMF’s aim is to establish collaborative opportunities, discover new voices and to broaden their respective landscapes within which they conduct business and Cape Town is the perfect setting for this. Cape Town is a brand in its own right, and its alignment with the CTIFMF adds a tremendous amount of credibility and stature to the global film industry brand we are in the process of building.” Four days of speakers and discussions will provide invaluable information from industry organisations and government. All industry stakeholders, including all support services such as logistics, location support and scouting, crew hire, equipment sales and rental, security, catering, transport, post-production, technology and software, and related services are invited to take part by exhibiting their products and services in the official expo space. Further opportunities for these companies will include networking lounges, speaking opportunities, press conferences for product announcements and more.

WE ARE COMMITTED TO ENHANCING THIS GROWTH BY POSITIONING CAPE TOWN AS THE FILM HUB OF AFRICA AND SUPPORTING THE LOCAL FILM INDUSTRY.

All industry professionals are also encouraged to attend the event to enjoy the benefits of the full speaker programme, workshop sessions, networking opportunities, and most of all to do business. The Cape Town Film Market will run alongside the Cape Town International Film Festival that will include film screenings from across the world and a complimentary schedule of discussions workshops with a PanAfrican and international focus that delegates can also attend. All exhibition and registration information can be found on the website: www.filmfestival. capetown or please email Donovan Winterburn: sales@filmfest.capetown


NEWS / 03

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CANADA-SOUTH AFRICA CO-DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVE UNVEILED

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) and South Africa’s NFVF have inked an agreement to establish a dedicated incentive for the co-development of audio-visual projects.

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he Canada Media Fund (CMF) and South Africa’s National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) have inked an agreement to establish a dedicated incentive for the co- development of audio-visual projects between Canadian and South African producers. The total amount of funding available through the incentive is approximately C$120 000 or ZAR 1 200 000 ($99 000), with CMF and NFVF each contributing half of the funds.

The total maximum contribution for each project funded through the incentive is C$40 000 or ZAR 200 000 ($33 000). To qualify, projects must involve producers eligible under criteria from both organisations. Projects must be in the drama, documentary or children and youth genres, comprising at least one product for exhibition on TV, the internet or digital media platforms. “In the past 20 years, we’ve seen content produced between

Canadian and South African creators hit international markets with great commercial success and critical acclaim,” said Valerie Creighton, the president and CEO of CMF. “Through this incentive, we hope to develop strong partnerships between producers in both countries, enabling them to continue creating quality content that resonates with audiences around the world. We are very pleased to have found in the NFVF a strong international partner with which we can foster our

mutual objective of increasing co- production opportunities.” “This co-development incentive is a valuable initiative that will augment the existing audiovisual co-production treaty between South Africa and Canada,” said Zamantungwa Mkosi, the CEO of NFVF. “The treaty has been instrumental in ensuring that South African producers have international exposure and produce content that is memorable and impactful. ” - Courtesy of World Screen

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04 / NEWS

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Five Fingers for Marseilles . Photo by Graham Bartholomew, Unit Stills Photographer © Stage 5 Films, Be Phat Motel Film Company and Game 7 Films

THREE HOMEGROWN FILMS SHINE AT TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

High Fantasy, The Number and Five Fingers for Marseilles all featured at the prestigious festival.

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esgro’s Chief Business Officer, Yaw Peprah, and Head of Film and Media Promotion, Monica Rorvik, – on behalf of the agency – attended the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) to market Cape Town and the Western Cape to the international film industry. While there, they collaborated with the Consul General of South Africa to provide strategic support to a delegation of nearly 40 South African companies and national agencies, including the Department of Trade and Industry and the Industrial Development Corporation, with further logistics and collaborative events. “It’s been a great year for coproduction, with the Canada150

celebrations highlighting the years of co-production between Canada and South Africa. TIFF is one of the world’s leading film platforms and is a prime opportunity to attract investment and production into Cape Town and the Western Cape” said Wesgro CEO Tim Harris. There were three South African feature films in selection at this year’s festival. Jenna Bass brought her second feature High Fantasy, shot on her iPhone, and Khalo Matabane, returned to TIFF for the second time, bringing a real-life drama The Number. Michael Matthews’ directorial debut, Five Fingers For Marseilles is based on a true South African story, told in the style of a western, and made

pre-festival buzz for its style and prominence in the official TIFF trailer. These films will help cement the South African auteurs’ relationship with TIFF. These independent features are produced by many local companies but it is notable that Cape Town’s Big World Cinema helped produce the feature High Fantasy and Silas, a documentary feature film directed by Anjali Nayar and Hawa Essuman. This shows the diverse and pan-Africa reach by South African producers. Prior to the festival, City of Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille said: “We are indeed excited about this mission which seeks to expand the reach of our growing, vibrant film industry. In affirming our status as the film hub of

Africa it is essential that we reach all corners of the global to promote Cape Town as the ideal film destination and showcase our talent to the rest of the world. In doing so we can grow the success of the film industry in Cape Town and create even more skills development and job opportunities.” Alan Winde, Minister of Economic Opportunities said: “The Western Cape is a leading film destination, and key to further growing this sector is showcasing our province to strategic markets. Wesgro and the local municipalities across the province are doing an excellent job in attracting investment into our film industry.”


06 / SPOTLIGHT

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6 AUTODESK CONFERENCE TH

EXPLORES THE FUTURE OF MAKING THINGS

Autodesk hosted their annual conference, Autodesk University South Africa, on the 8th of September at the Century City Conference Centre.

events in 14 countries through classes, forums, and keynotes with product experts and thought leaders. Hundreds of thousands more participate through AU online, which offers free, yearround access to learning content and inspirational industry talks from the AU conference events.

A talk on sustainable design at Autodesk Conference

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s South Africa’s biggest event for design, architecture and engineering professionals, Autodesk University was a roaring success and buzzing with excitement. The aim of the conference was to provide a unique, hands-on experience in exploring the evolution of technology and the future of design and engineering and to tap into South Africa’s expertise in the design arena. The 6th edition of Autodesk University South Africa revolved around the theme The Future of Making Things and gathered over 700 attendees to learn, network and explore global and local innovations. AU conference is a platform where attendees have an access to thought leadership, hands-on classes and track sessions with experts and evangelists. It is a one-stop shop for all things Autodesk. This year, AU partnered with the likes of HP, RTI and Dell, making the conference an even more attractive event. Senior Autodesk global

executives including Callan Carpenter, the global VP for Named accounts; Tom Wujec, Autodesk Fellow, a popular TED speaker and best-selling author on design and creativity; Tatjana Dzambazova, Autodesk Senior Product Manager; and Simon Bromfield, Autodesk South Africa Country Manager, shared their insights through keynote speeches and direct engagement with the audience. Carpenter and Wujec gave an overview of the Future of Making Things and what it means for stakeholders in different industries. The keynote session was continued by nearly 40 different industry classes led by international and local experts. For more than 35 years, Autodesk software has helped designers, architects, engineers, visual artists, students and makers to create everything from buildings and bridges to cars and other physical products to movies and video games. Now in its 24th year, the AU conferences bring together more than 23 000 participants at live

The Callsheet caught up with Markus Schwaiger, Director of Media and Entertainment for EMEA at Autodesk, to find out why this conference is a must for the film industry. Tell us about AU and where it is now? AU gives customers insight into the latest technologies, allows them to attend sessions where they get tips and tricks where customers speak about how they solve issues. During this time we’ve seen more and more of an outlook into the future, which brings us away from being just a solutions provider to a technology leader. Where do you see the future headed in the next decade? I would say for the media and entertainment business we can see a very strong shift in the way content is consumed. Consumers want to have access to content from anywhere, whenever they want, the platforms – Netflix, YouTube and even Facebook I’m sure you’d see content in the near future. The other thing is the accessibility of the technology to produce that content. One of

THE CONFERENCE WAS TO PROVIDE A UNIQUE, HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE IN EXPLORING THE EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGY.

our missions is to help customers to imagine, design and create a better world, better things, and better movies. The provision of these technologies is something that will change substantially. We will have access to more computation power everywhere – just look at mobile phones and the amount of mobile devices that are used. Who watches movies on a regular TV anymore? How does this tie into what Autodesk offers? We provide the companies who are producing things like Game of Thrones with the technology so that they can do what they want. Everything is about storytelling, and the more sophisticated visual effects are, the more attracted the customers are to the product. In the past it was very much about getting your head around the technology that you used, you had to have specialists who were very experienced in that. Our goal is to provide solutions that take this part away so that they can really focus on the storytelling.


NEWS / 07

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NFVF/SWIFT

PARTNERSHIP ANNOUNCEMENT

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he National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF), an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture, is collaborating with Sisters Working in Film and Television (SWIFT) on research that focuses on the gender roles/matters in the South African Film industry. This partnership is in line with our strategic approach to collaborate with various stakeholders, and our mandate to transform the industry and to conduct research on the state of the film industry. SWIFT’s mission is to protect and advance the cause of women in the South African film and television industry; therefore, this partnership will meet the respective missions

of both organisations to the benefit of women in film. The study is a follow up on the recent study that was conducted by SWIFT and launched at the 2017 Durban International Film Festival. The study uncovered the prevalence of sexism, sexual harassment and unfair labour practices that women are facing in the South African film industry. The follow up study seeks to provide information and statistics on women participation, their roles in the local film industry, along with a more nuanced set of explanations and challenges they face as practitioners. The study further aims to uncover: • Trends and insights into

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the status of women in the SA film industry How various interventions (e.g. NFVF female filmmaker slate) assisted in addressing gender parity in the industry Challenges faced by female filmmakers The role played by advocacy groups such as Women of the Sun, Women in Film & Television in South Africa, and SWIFT Proposed interventions to fast track female filmmakers’ development

The study will employ different data collection methods, i.e. individual in-

depth interviews, focus group discussions to get more detailed and precise information and an online survey instrument will be employed to enable the researchers to profile the female filmmakers in South Africa. It is envisaged that the study will be completed by November 2017 and will assist other institutions in crafting and implementing programmes that are geared towards empowering women filmmakers. For more information on the project contact the NFVF’s research team at 011 483 0880, or email Tsietsi Themane at tsietsit@nfvf.co.za or Zilungile Tunzi at zilungilet@nfvf.co.za.

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08 / NEWS

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THE 2017 JAMESON MUSIC VIDEO GRANT

Director Carl Houston McMillan is the recipient of the R200 000 grant.

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n February 2017, we reintroduced V2.0 of The Jameson Music Video Grant, this time offering R200K in funding. We challenged local filmmakers and musicians to put their ideas out into the world. This year we received a record of 550 epic entries – evidence of how talented and brave the local industry is. Each and every one of the entries were so good that we had to get a handful of industry experts to help us choose a winner. Visionary director Sunu Gonera, bold stylist Crystal Birch and untamable musician Moonchild Sanelly helped us select the Top 10. The Top 10 were expected to stand up and present their treatments to us in person. Their relentless passion and authenticity was undeniably electric.

THE 2017 WINNER:

Director Carl Houston Mc Millan is the winner of the 2017 Jameson Music Video Grant. Carl is a director and writer living between South Africa and Lesotho, and the majority of his work explores the latter. He received R200K in funding to shoot a music video for ‘Impepho’ by Trap Funk & Alivio ft. Morena Leraba & ManKind. Inspired by the song, Carl dreamt up a music video that is a visual exploration and celebration of Basotho shepherd culture in the highlands of Lesotho. His music video concept was fearlessly authentic and unlike anything we’ve seen or heard of. “It is a story that must be told,” said Crystal Birch. A true original.

We were also intruiged by Carl’s appetite for the unknown. Being an established filmmaker, Carl has never had the chance to shoot a music video. When Carl saw The Jameson Music Video Grant Call For Entries, he decided to that it was his chance to master this craft. Backed up by his fiece vision, fiery passion and impecabble attention to detail, The Jameson INDIE Channel team is proud to partner with such a brave filmmaker.

THE SHOOT:

Shortly after hearing the announcement, Carl went to Semonkong in rural Lesotho to start pre-production. He was joined by Mosotho musician Morena Leraba and a local fixer. They spent weeks scouting locations, predicting the weather and casting Basotho shepherds and local jockeys to play extras. On Sunday 17 August 2017, the full crew arrived for the shoot. The crew included: • Director Carl Mc Millan • Assistant Director PJ Makosholo • Director of Photography Christian Denslow • Producer Sean Drummond from Be Phat Motel’s • Assistant Producer Tara Desormeaux Joined by Morena Leraba and Mankind, the team shot for three days straight in and around Semonkong, a rural village in the heart of the mountain kingdom. From sunrise on Day One to sunset on Day Three, they braved the harsh elements to shoot the epic scenes that make up the

final music video. Photographer Kgomotso Neto Tleane was there to capture all the magical behind-the-scene moments.

DAY ONE | MONDAY 18 AUGUST 2017

A high-speed horse race, a dance battle in a local tavern, custommade Basotho Shepherd blankets AND a dramatic performance in the back of a bakkie. It’s all in a day’s work at the making of “Impepho” – and it’s only day one. On Day One of the Impepho Music Video shoot, with Director Carl Mc Millan and his crew, shot in three locations in and around rural Semonkong, Lesotho. The first take was at sunrise on an icy airstrip near Semonkong, tracking alongside eight Basotho Shepherds to shoot a highspeed horse race, with local jockeys and race horses. The second location of the day was a dimly lit Chinese inspired tavern in the heart of Semonkong village. Here Mankind’s crew, styled in slick city gear, started a dance battle with Morena Leraba and his crew, who were wearing custom Basotho Shepherd blankets by a local designer. The third and final location of the day is a dirt road outside the village. Here, Carl Mc Millan and his crew shot Mankind performing his verse of Impepho on the back of a bakkie, as the sun set.

DAY TWO | TUESDAY 19 AUGUST 2017

Another horse race, betting, a trick horse and portraits in a traditional Shepherd outpost. This is day two. On Day Two of the Impepho Music Video shoot and director

Carl McMillan and his crew are filming deep in the blue mountains of Semonkong, where a cold front that’s howling its way in has promised snow in the coming days. The first take was at sunrise at an old racecourse set against a mountain backdrop, where they shot a traditional horse race – a re-enactment of a regular event that’s a big part of Basotho culture. On Day Two the ballsy crew battled icy 30-40km/h winds to shoot at the old racecourse, its lines barely visible in the golden yet unforgiving landscape. The race gathered crowds of spectators, and even a trick pony. They placed bets, danced and cheered jovially. Later in the day at a rural Shepherd’s post the crew filmed moving portraits of the Basotho shepherds in their outposts with their livestock and dogs, and wrapped with a performance by Morena Leraba and Mankind as the sun set.

DAY THREE | WEDNESDAY 20 AUGUST 2017

Before dawn the fearless crew hiked into the barren mountain range overlooking a canyon. There, a hut was burnt - an epic backdrop to Morena Leraba’s performance. Traditionally, shepherds burn huts at the end of the season to show that they have migrated to another region. Later in the day the crew head to the picturesque grass fields of the mountain kingdom to shoot portraits with the shepherds. Finally, as the sun set, we head back to the village of Semonkong with our cast for detail shots. And… that’s a wrap! Stay tuned for the final Impepho Music Video.


NEWS / 09

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LOCALS ENTER

LSF SCRIPT SURGERY The prestigious London Screenwriters Festival announced successful applicants of the Euroscript Script Surgery. A number of South Africans were selected for the programme.

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he renowned London Screenwriters’ Festival took place in Regents Park from 15-17 September 2017, with several South African delegates in attendance. These screenwriters have been chosen to take part in the Euroscript Script Surgery programme, in which experienced script ‘doctors’ at the Story and Script Clinic read writers’ scripts and give advice about their stories, scripts and ideas. Successful applicants were able to book a 50-minute appointment through the LSF booking system, and could apply by sending a story outline, the first ten pages of a script, and questions about the project. Out of 1 000 attendees, only 12 are selected for this programme, and although nine in the WGSA delegation applied, two South Africans were chosen: Polani Fourie and Fazila Wahab-Kohl. “This market came very suddenly on us, the WGSA Council had to fight very hard to

help get this market approved with the DTI,” Polani explains, “Just when some gave up hope on its approval, the DTI approved it – so we all had to jump very quickly. It’s an absolute honour [to be selected], we’re both in shock, but incredibly honoured for this amazing opportunity. London Screenwriters’ Festival is regarded as one of the top screenwriter festivals in the world. What makes it amazing is getting access to people in the field that would’ve been otherwise very difficult to get to if it had not been for DTI’s investment, or this amazing platform. We’ll get a chance to pitch to international producers, directors and counterparts, and learn from top international screenwriting experts.” LSF is an annual three-day conference for screenwriters with over 1 000 writers, filmmakers, producers, practitioners, actors and executives in attendance. Here, most delegates report “massive breakthroughs” in their

understanding of the business and craft, and also report huge acceleration towards their career goals. LSF has around 130 structured seminars, lessons and workshops in its programme, with four conference streams to choose from. The British Screenwriters’ Awards take place on the Saturday night of the festival, with plenty of networking events opportunities during the other evenings. The WGSA delegation to London Screenwriters’ Festival: • Abyss Productions – Maria Dorothea Nel • Black Crow Films – Imran Hamdulay

• Bunduzboi Pictures – Johannes Mzandile Spirit • Byron Alec Abrahams • Crave Pictures – KelseyColin Kass Egan • Do Productions – Brigid Rosean Goldman • Fazila Wahab-Kohl • Four Mountain Productions – Caroline Emma-Jane Doherty • Imagen Heart Films – Desmond Denton • Julie Ann Hall • Maruwan Gasant • Polani Fourie • Priscilla Lowen • Production Films – Lukhanyo Sikwebu • Rare View Media – Reabetswe Thato Moeti

EXPERIENCED SCRIPT ‘DOCTORS’ AT THE STORY AND SCRIPT CLINIC READ WRITERS’ SCRIPTS AND GIVE ADVICE ABOUT THEIR STORIES, SCRIPTS AND IDEAS.


10 / SPOTLIGHT

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DISCOP JOHANNESBURG CELEBRATES AFRICA

The film industry in Africa is growing in importance and profitability. DISCOP Johannesburg brings all the players together under one roof.

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xcitement is building for DISCOP Johannesburg, taking place at the Sandton Convention Centre from 25 to 27 October 2017. This annual market for the film industry was launched in 2012 and hosts similar events in Dubai, Abidjan, Lagos and Zanzibar in addition to Johannesburg. It has become a major destination to buy and co-produce content from across Africa as well as sell international

film, television and digital content, adaptation rights and packaged TV channels into Sub-Saharan Africa. Germany will be DISCOP Johannesburg’s “guest country”. Sub-Saharan Africa is growing in importance in the international film and entertainment industry. IDATE predicts a 30% expansion in the next five years, amounting to nearly US$10-billion in consumer revenues by 2021. Pay-TV subscriber numbers are

expected to double and OTT video services increase during this time. Advertising revenues are another major source of future growth for the region. DISCOP Johannesburg is expected to attract more than 1 000 executives specialising in acquisition, development, production and distribution from over 70 countries. The three days will be dedicated to making deals, sharing knowledge and

networking. Around 250 public and commercial broadcasters, cable, satellite and mobile pay-TV operators, VOD platforms and territorial distributors servicing the Sub-Saharan region will be on the lookout for the latest innovative content, fresh ideas and cross-border projects. The 5 000m2 space will showcase individual exhibits including viewing boxes, meeting tables and stands and industry,

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SOUTH AFRICAN PARTICIPANTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1000 Hugs Films A+E Networks AFDA Africa Animation Network Africa Entertainment 365 Animation SA ASIB Films Avalon Group Avantgarden Films Basic Lead Bay TV BBC Big World Cinema Bladeworks Book Creative Partnerships Boondogle Films Born Free Media Canadian High Commission Cape Town Audio Post Cate Wood Hunter Christian Broadcasting Network CMP Coal Stove Pictures

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Community Media Trust Deep VR Digital Lab Africa Diprente Films Discover Digital DO Productions Dondoo Studios Durban Film Office E.TV Earcandy Audio Econet Media Embassy of Spain in South Africa Endemol Shine Africa Engage Entertainment Fireworx Media Five Star Media FLIC Fox Networks Group Africa Francois Odendaal Productions Goethe Institut South Africa Gravel Road Distribution Group IFLIX Imagenheart Films

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Inhlakanipho Films Kwese Channels M Cubed Productions Mad Little Badger Mahala TV Marche Media Matriarch Films M-Net Moby Group Modern Communications Multichoice Multichoice Africa NFVF – National Film and Video Foundation Nomad Africa Magazine Pan African Creative and Incubating Studios Pink Kola Nut Concepts Punch Monkey Studios Quizzical Pictures Rapid Blue Redhead Global Reel African Rous House Productions SABC Seed Entertainment/AAA

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Showmax Six Degrees Southside Movie Factory Ster-Kinekor Theatres Talia Productions The Business Nomad Magazine The Kitchen Africa The Re-Project The V Company Thisability Newspaper Triggerfish Animation TV One Africa TV Tech Underdog Productions United Productions SA Urban Brew Studios Viacom International Media Networks Africa Voice of America Welela Studios Writers Guild of South Africa Zeropoint Studios Zidaka ZWBDC Magazine


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Ayodele Elegba, Association of Comic Makers Nigeria

Ines Pohl, editor-in-chief, Deuche Welle

Chris Savides, Head of Africa Showmax

Joel Churcher VP & MD BBC Africa

national and regional group umbrellas for smaller-sized and independent companies. Nonexhibiting delegates (excluding visitors) have access to a dedicated Meetings on Demand (MOD) lounge to do business. Participants are encouraged to register online and pre-organise meetings between content buyers, sellers and producers and take advantage of the many opportunities to train, pitch, close deals and network. The online content catalogue lists the films, TV series, documentaries, animation, game and other format content that will be presented at the market. Advice on organising hotels, visas and flights can also be found on the organiser’s website. The Next Gen Programme will run concurrently with the exhibition and includes three full days of presentations, workshops, panel discussions, master classes and round-table discussions to explore the opportunities and challenges of every creative and business angle. The programme

targets film, television and digital content producers to improve pitching, business and networking skills. A full itinerary of topics plus speakers may be found on the website and the organisers are keen to assist delegates identify suitable suppliers and implement an effective meeting planning strategy based on company activity, content type and content genre. The African Animation Network has partnered with cinema franchise Ster Kinekor to debut Fupitoons Festival at Rosebank Nouveau, being held from 26 to 29 October. Derived from the Swahili word for “short”, Fupitoons is a short film festival that provides a platform for African animation content producers to be recognised and test audience. DISCOP Johannesburg 2017 has a host of additional sidebar programmes and partner exhibitions. This year DISCOP Johannesburg is inclusive of a host of content types, from TV to digital and film. New partnerships

and programmes will make this the biggest DISCOP to date with an expanded outreach and programme. With the recent announcement of DISCOP Zanzibar 2018 and DISCOP Lagos 2019, these regions will be highlighted at specific pavilions hosting a range of partner organisations. Another exciting feature this year will be the Mahal.tv Pitching & Pilot Marathon that will see three days of elevator pitches focused on short content for digital platforms. Daily screening sessions of African generated Pilots will also take place within the Mahala.tv Screening Lounge on the exhibition main floor. There will also be a pavilion devoted specifically to animation, with its own pitching competition, hosted by the African Animation Network, and a special focus on VR with Digilab Africa. In addition to visiting the key pavilions DISCOP’s Next Gen Program is a full three-day schedule of panel discussions and presentations from some of the world’s top experts in their fields. One of these discussions will be the panel discussion that is the launch of what will be new DISCOP stand-alone programme, DISCORE, that focuses on the music industry, synch deals, and the importance of music within content. DISCORE is being produced in conjunction with Nairobi-based PHAT! Music & Entertainment, an authority on African music since 1999, under its social enterprise arm, ONGEA! Africa. The best way to do business at DISCOP is to plan ahead. DISCOP’s meeting service enables buyers and sellers to connect, and delegates will be matched with potential business partners in meetings throughout the event. Delegates are encouraged to plan their meetings around the key events they would like to attend and also make sure to visit all the stands on the exhibition floor.

SAMPLE OF SPEAKERS • Ines Pohl, editor-inchief, Deutsche Welle • Renee Williams, acting group executive: television, SABC • Jean-Luc Cronel, director: marketing and distribution, TV5MONDE • Joel Churcher, vice president and general manager: Africa, BBC Worldwide • Solomon Mugera, regional editor: Africa, BBC World Services • Ayodele Elegba, Association of Comic Makers Nigeria • Nick Wilson, founder, African Animation Network • Wendy Spinks, head of content and festival director, African Animation Network and Fupitoons • Shmerah Passhier, head: production course, AFDA • Ingrid Kopp, co-founder, Electric South • Ulrico Grech-Cumbo, cofounder and CEO, Deep VR • Chris Savides, head: Africa, Showmax • Pascal Schmitz, head of acquisitions and executive producer, AAA Entertainment • Welela Haileselassie, deputy managing director, KANA TV • Thomas Imboywa, head of business development, Nairobi Comic Con

FACT FILE Website: www.discop.com Email: info@basiclead.com or discop@basiclead.com Telephone USA: +1 (323) 782 13 00 Cost: Sellers US$1000; Buyers US$250; Producers US$250; Visitors US$400; Influencers US$400


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Robert Bentley and team on location

MANAGING THE

UNIT SUPPLY CHAIN The unit manager, whether combined with location or transport management functions, is the glue that holds a commercial or film project together. Susan Reynard speaks to three veterans of the field.

I

f the apocalypse threatens, you want to be in the company of a unit manager. In addition to vast knowledge of the ins and outs of the commercial and film production industries, this is the person who heads up the team that prepares and plans for every eventuality for a range of people and equipment, each with different needs to create a highly specialised and specific work environment, and then tidies it all up again.

SKILLS SET

“There are many specialities involved – it’s a very mixed bag when it comes to explaining my job description,” says Mike Begg, location manager for First Film Unit. Now focussing mainly on commercials, Mike used to be involved in feature films during winter and commercials during summer until about ten years ago. On commercials, Mike says the unit manager doubles as the location manager, whereas

on feature films this role will usually be split, with one person in charge of each department because of the extended time, greater workload and increased number of locations and people involved. “As time went on, this became difficult to maintain because of various reasons, one of them being age and not being able to maintain the work hours required and having kids and wanting to see them grow up – having some

free time to do that – as the film industry can swallow you whole if you let it,” he notes. Deon du Preez, Independent Location Manager has been a location manager for more than 22 years and says nothing gives him greater pleasure than to see a project through, from start to finish, until it’s on screen. He adds, “I also believe that no matter the size of the project, whether it’s a small TV show or a massive blockbuster, the


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PRODUCERS WANT UNIT MANAGERS WHO ARE:

Brin Kushner, pictured here on set of The Most Interesting Man, says that Unit Managers must respect the filming locations, to ensure further shoots at those locations.

same amount of hard work and energy needs to be put into it to make it a success.” Deon says he’s always had a great love for movies and loved to travel, see new places and meet new and interesting people. “After a few years in a boring suit-and-tie job, I had a brother who was a location manager in the industry. Every spare moment I had I hung out on sets and it wasn’t long before I made the decision to join the industry,” he says.

SCOPE

Unit and location managers on commercials have such a diverse range of responsibilities that it necessitates incredible attention to detail plus countless contacts, finely-tuned diplomacy skills and a cable tie to hand always. “I guess I would describe myself as the cartilage between the crew and the public,” notes Mike. “We are the MacGyvers on set, the complaints department, the ‘Mr Fix-its’: there are 99

ways to skin a cat and we have to know all 200 of them.” Robert Bentley, Independent Location Manager, says there is little difference between film and commercial unit and location managers, with features often allowing more time to prepare. The people we chat to in this feature come highly recommended by their peers. Robert puts this down to “passion for my job and a respect for the craft that each crew member brings to the set”.

1. Courteous and friendly when dealing with location owners and the public. “When hired by us they become representatives of our company and it is crucial that they respect the locations that we film at to ensure that we do not paint the film industry and our company in a poor light, and that we are able to access those locations again,” says Brin Kushner, executive producer at AFS Productions. 2. Organised, up to date with filming regulations and competent with paperwork to ensure that all permitting of locations is done in a timely and correct manner. 3. Excellent preparation at each location when shooting at multiple locations, so that on each company move when clients and crew arrive everything is set up and runs perfectly.

LANDSCAPE

“Overseas the location departments have more crew so that there is less overtime worked,” explains Robert. “I am a member of the Location Managers Guild International and it is good to read about and speak to other location managers.

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THE NATURE OF THE COMMERCIAL INDUSTRY IS THAT OFTEN THE UNIT OR LOCATION MANAGER IS BROUGHT ON TOO LATE AND AT THE LAST MINUTE, NOT LEAVING ENOUGH PREPARATION TIME TO MAKE SOLID LOGISTICAL ARRANGEMENTS. Unit Managers must manage all personnel on site, and install all necessary infrastructure. © Courtesy of AFS Productions

LITTLE BLACK BOOK Unit managers build up essential contacts as they scout locations, work in different areas and network with industry: 1. Local and provincial film commission or office (e.g. Cape Town Film Commission www. capefilmcommission.com; Gauteng Film Commission www.gautengfilm.org.za; Durban Film Office www. durbanfilmoffice.co.za) 2. Municipalities and their various departments 3. Traffic department 4. Residents’ and ratepayers’ associations 5. Suppliers of tents, canopies, tarpaulins, signage, barriers 6. Caterers 7. Vehicle rental companies 8. Health and safety officers 9. Hospitals and emergency services 10. Fire extinguisher and other safety equipment suppliers 11. Hardware stores and shopping centres 12. Accommodation providers 13. Game rangers and insect specialists 14. Water testing experts 15. Hazardous waste experts

Unit managers must work closely with permit offices to secure access to locations © David Condrey

The world over, location managers are having to reskill, as health and safety legislation improves we are becoming more involved, location contracts are becoming more onerous and as the industry matures it has to subscribe to a greater level of professionalism.” Deon notes, “In the UK the unit managers would manage the locations facilities and the logistics of a shoot, similar to what we do in SA. In the US, the unit manager or unit production manager does the work similar to that of a line producer and will focus mostly on keeping the project within budget.”

CHALLENGES

Robert says that on the commercial side of the business, turnaround times for permits and permissions are problematic. “However, a lot can be done to ensure that when you are in a position to commit to a location your paperwork is correct and complete. This comes with experience.” Deon agrees that issues surrounding short turnaround times mainly affect the commercial industry. “The nature of the commercial industry is that often the unit or location manager is brought on too late and at the last minute, not leaving enough

preparation time to make solid logistical arrangements and get all the necessary permits in time for the shoot, which in turn escalates the pressure, with the result that often locations which could have worked are not used due to not being able to secure permits and permissions.”

ROLE

Deon says that on feature films, location managers often get involved in the very early stages of a project, often as early as the bidding process. Their input includes supplying information and location options which a particular project may


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ALL IN A DAY’S WORK Unit managers take care of every aspect of some or all of the following logistical essentials for a shoot: 1. Location scouting 2. Location preparation 3. Permits and agreements organised 4. Contract negotiations 5. Community negotiations 6. Team management on site 7. Diary and timing management 8. Base camp set up 9. Install all necessary infrastructure at location 10. Power and water supply 11. Sanitise and remove hazardous waste 12.Clean location before, during and after shoot 13. Parking arranged for all vehicles 14. Cordon off and signage for out of bounds areas 15. Shade, comfort and refreshments for all people on site

16. Additional equipment and accessories for all crew 17. Safety and security compliance for crew and equipment 18.Traffic management planning 19. Signage alerting public and road users 20.Directions, maps and signage for crew 21. Hire wildlife specialists and other location-related experts where needed 22.Budget and payments management and reconciliation from start to finish 23.Maintain good relationships with all suppliers of products and services, crew and the public 24. Legacy strategy design and implementation 25.Remain calm and openminded in the face of adversity (Sources: Mike Begg, location manager for First Film Unit and Robert Bentley, Independent Location Manager). Unit Managers, among many other things, ensure the safety of all crew © Courtesy of AFS Productions.

THE UNIT AND TRANSPORT AND LOCATION TEAMS WORK VERY CLOSELY TOGETHER AS THE ONE TEAM OF CREW’S SUCCESS IN RUNNING A PROJECT SMOOTHLY IS RELIANT ON THE SUPPORT OF THE OTHER.

Robert Bentley demonstrates the unglamorous side of the job.

require, including advice and input on whether a specific country, landscape or period could be replicated in South Africa, if it is indeed possible, and then to provide reference options from a database. “Once a project has been confirmed and the decision has been taken to film it in SA, the hard ground work starts where the location manager would then physically go out and re-scout some of the presented locations for updated location pictures as well as scout for more project and script specific locations. These options are then continuously presented to the designer, director and producers for their input,” Deon says. “Once they arrive in the country, the shortlist location options will be recce’d and decisions will be made by the producers, director and designer which will start

shaping the project in a specific creative direction, look and feel. Final options are then selected and once this has been done, official pre-production would have commenced and a team of crew will be put together by the producers. “It’s at this stage that the unit and transport team starts on the project – they are often the same person as their jobs are very intertwined – and based on the logistical challenges which the selected locations will present, he will put his own team of crew together and start sourcing logistical equipment and vehicles. The unit and transport and location teams work very closely together as the one team of crew’s success in running a project smoothly is reliant on the support of the other,” he notes.


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Unit Managers need to hire wildlife experts for certain locations. © Joel Herzog

While seemingly mundane, sufficient parking is essential on set. © Gerrie van der Walt

The Unit Manager must ensure that all behind-the-camera aspects are in place, to ensure a smooth day (or night!) of filming.

“On commercials, often the production will make use of the services of a location scout to either source database images to present or to scout script or brief-specific locations to assist them in landing a project. Once he’s submitted his options, some time may pass before the actual project takes place and it’s at that stage the commercial production company will employ the services of a unit manager for the project. Often, he is brought on at the last moment, with the production team having had done most of the groundwork of booking locations etc.” Deon explains.

LEGACY

The film industry in Botswana benefited from the success of the TV series The Number One Ladies Detective Agency, which

Deon was involved with in 2007 and 2008 on location with the late Anthony Minghella as director (Cold Mountain and English Patient). “We spent almost a year on the pilot project and more than eight months on the next season of episodes, first scouting every nook and cranny for the most spectacular locations to match what Anthony envisaged and the script required, before filming the show. “Before we filmed the show, Botswana had a small film industry, focussing mostly on supporting a thriving wildlife documentary industry. We forged strong relationships at government level and employed many local residents as film crew and once filming was completed, had many well

WHEREVER POSSIBLE I TRY TO INVOLVE THE COMMUNITY WE ARE FILMING IN. ONE WAY IS TO USE SCHOOLS, CHURCHES AND OTHER COMMUNITY CENTRES AS OUR BASE CAMP. THIS ALLOWS US TO SUPPORT THEM. trained local crew who since then have gone on to work as qualified crew on many other features and TV projects,” he says. “Wherever possible I try to involve the community we are filming in. One way is to use schools, churches and other community centres as our base camp. This allows us to support them,” explains

Robert. “The Ottery Youth Care Centre is a facility that takes youth at risk and tries to give them an alternative to the life they are currently leading. The headmaster, Mo Mahadick, does amazing things with the little he has. The film industry has supported the OYCC over a number of years and have helped to keep it going,” he says.


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Nakhane Toure stars in The Wound (Inxeba) © Urucu Media

© Keeping up with Kandasamys

TV, FILM AND COMMECIALS SECTORS

HEALTH OF THE

Kim Crowie takes a look at how each sector has been faring, and what we can expect in the months ahead.

S

outh Africa’s film, television and commercial industries continue to flourish this year, with a number of trends and movements beginning to change the shape of these sectors. According to the National Film and Video Foundation’s annual report, history was made in 2016 at the local box office with Happiness Is a Four-Letter Word, which made R12.2-million last year. Building on this in early 2017 was Keeping Up With The Kandasamys which earned R16million in 12 weeks – a roaring success for Durban film. Although the local industry saw domestic films grow by 25%, recording a box office gross of R69-million with 22 South African releases last year, audience interest and access to cinemas remains a pivotal issue. According to the NFVF, Afrikaans language films continue to do well at the South

African box office, claiming 65% of local revenues (R45-million). Internationally, the commercial industry has seen some serious disruption thanks to a change in media consumption, which, as a result has directly impacted ad spending. According to a recent Forbes report, the next big trend is the “continuing rise in paid entertainment sites that are displacing broadcast and cable TV”. This, in turn, has seen a host of branded films produced in South Africa and across the continent for international brands such as the Absolut One Source campaign with Egg Films. According to Colin Howard, the situation is rather dire. “The tough economic times and uncertain political situation kills business confidence and has a knockon effect on our marketers,” he explains. “Combined with the influx of (often culturally

irrelevant) global campaigns, in-house production companies, and budgets that don’t grow with inflation, this has created an overtraded directors market that is barely profitable. The closure of iconic companies like Velocity Films is testament to this; the risks are too high and margins too low. We continue to try and adapt to the rapidly changing world of advertising (in all it’s forms), but it is not easy.” Bobby Amm, Executive Officer of the Commercial Producers Association has called for transparency and change in an industry where ad agencies are increasingly scooping up production work and taking it in-house to bolster diminishing profit margins. As a service destination, SA continues to thrive, with companies like Film Afrika, Out of Africa, Advantage Entertainment

and Moonlighting bringing a host of high-profile television and feature films into the country. Most recently, productions like Starz’ Outlander, Nat Geo’s Origins, Pure Flix’s Samson and BBC’s Our Girl have shot in Cape Town and surrounds, while Johannesburg continues to be a force to be reckoned with in terms of local productions despite a worrying outlook for the local public broadcaster SABC at the beginning of this year. A slew of new international productions are already set for South Africa in the new year including the recently wrapped The Red Sea Diving Resort, Bruce Lee-inspired Warrior and a number of others.

INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILMS LOVE SA

Cape Town remains a preferred destination for international productions, thanks to its


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Five Fingers For Marseilles © Photo by Graham Bartholomew

© Keeping up with Kandasamys

versatility as a location in being able to duplicate up to 80% of the world within a two hour radius of the city. According to Wesgro’s annual report, there’s been a definite increase in demand for the region as a production centre, with 7 307 permits issued in 2014/15 and 7 462 issued in 2015/16. “The booming industry showcases Cape Town, its diversity of locations, technical film capacity and talent, and also provides value-added marketing and investment collateral for the city. In addition, it ensures valuable skills transfer from international to local crews, which is critical for the future sustainability of the industry.” Although the Western Cape receives the majority of international productions, KwaZulu-Natal is also a growing location, most notably for its beaches, harbour and lush forests and jungles in which the Roots mini-series and selected episodes of Hooten and the Lady were recently shot. South Africa has also been focusing on exporting its content in order to ensure there is a balance between local and international media consumption in the country. “If there are any lessons to be taken from the success of the movie Keeping up with Kandasamys,” says Carol Coetzee, CEO of KZN Film Commission, “It is the fact that the South African audience is hungry for local content. The

likes of HBO and NBCUniversal and it’s easy to see how we’ve now hit the point that more great TV is being produced than can actually be watched as it airs.” He says the next trend to watch in this arena is a “deluge” of hyperlocal content. “It’s the antithesis of the model of making a show to appeal globally. This hyperlocal content approach is where we see an opening for Showmax Originals and something we’re now pursuing in SA with the likes of Tali’s Wedding Diary.” Says Ari Kruger, Director of Tali’s Wedding Diary: “It’s been a hugely exciting project to work on as Showmax gave us full support and creative freedom to make the show that we wanted to make. I really do believe that it will be a sea change in the landscape of South African television.” He believes that as the world moves towad VOD becoming a norm, and with mass commissioning of original content by giants like Netflix and Amazon, “we should definitely be seeing a surge of original and unpoliticised content coming from SA. Right now, Showmax are making the first moves in this direction locally, but it’s inevitable that more VOD networks will emerge with the same agenda. There’s never been a better time to be making content than right now, and SA has a lot of catching up to do with creating original content that the world wants to watch.”

selection of the movie The Number to screen in Toronto is also another sign the world is ready for our content, and the screening of films at the BFI London Film Festival – The Wound, Five Fingers For Marseilles, The Forgiven and Robot and Scarecrow – demonstrate the shift from South Africa from being a service destination to a country which exports its content.”

THE GOLDEN AGE OF TV… OR IS IT?

A few years ago we wrote about the golden age of television – and it is true, more incredible series are being shot in South Africa on a regular basis. However the usual broadcast formats and distribution models are a thing of the past. Showmax is the largest local online streaming service in South Africa at the moment, with a notable number of local and international content hosted in the platform. According to Chris Savides, Showmax Africa’s Head, the company has been working hard to better their offerings and have even kicked off production of Showmax Originals. “We’re reaching a watershed moment in video entertainment in that the sheer volume of content being created is changing the industry. Look at Amazon Prime and Netflix – their combined content spend this year will reportedly be more than $10-billion. Ten billion dollars! Add that to the fantastic shows produced by the

THERE’S NEVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO BE MAKING CONTENT THAN RIGHT NOW, AND SA HAS A LOT OF CATCHING UP TO DO WITH CREATING ORIGINAL CONTENT.

CURRENTLY IN PRODUCTION, RECENTLY WRAPPED, OR BOUND FOR SA • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

3 Way Junction Aankhen 2 Action Park Inside Out: Escape from Pretoria Jim Button and Luke the Engine Driver Maze Runner: The Death Cure Our Girl Season 3 Outlander Season 3 Red Sea Diving Resort Strike Back Season 6 The Blue Mauritius The Forgiven Tomb Raider Tremors 6 Troy: Fall of a City Warrior Year of the Great Storm


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© Alicia Vikander as Lara Croft in Tomb Raider, set for release in 2018.

According to Sasani Studios CEO Eileen Sandrock, in addition to five local soaps shot in their complex, they have also welcomed a host of new shows for Vuzu Amp, SABC, kykNET and eTV. She says that although the volatility with the SABC has continued, “there is a glimmer of hope with the new board, but there is still untold anxiety in the industry in this regard.” The most exciting development to date was hosting two series of The Voice in their studios concurrently – a world first. “We have The Voice Nigeria 2 in our new Stage 4 studio and have The Voice Afrique Francophone in our Stage 1 studio and support offices. Never before in the history of The Voice, have two series been produced simultaneously in the same facilities’ complex.”

COMMERCIALS HITTING IT OUT THE PARK

South Africa saw considerable success despite an international downturn in budgets in the commercial industry. Not only have local directors and creatives scooped multiple awards globally, but some of these campaigns have been applauded and dissected on the international stage. Most notably was Absolut One Source campaign with Khuli Chana, which had its day at Cannes Lions 2017, although

Egg Films have reported their best runs at awards in the last year with Gold for Sunu at the Bookmarks, Loeries and Cannes Lions, as well as a Grand Prix for Terence Neale’s Adidas Originals campaign. “We’ve been scouting for talent for a while, so we were delighted to sign Zwelethu Radebe and Dan Mace as new directors this year, with both working, winning awards and growing rapidly,” says Colin Howard. “We’re also excited to be repping Kyle Lewis for commercials; he’s the most exciting South African director in music videos and his talent is translating well into advertising. Dani Hynes was our busiest director last year; Lebogang Rasethaba’s just screened at TEDGlobal; and Slim is as consistent as ever, so the directors are all challenging and inspiring each other at the moment.” He says that for years advertising depicted a sanitised South African world with Western advertising as its primary reference point. “I think the dreaded word ‘aspirational’ was in most briefs,” he explains, “Thankfully, South African advertising is finally celebrating our uniqueness and amazing culture, allowing us to show the real, gritty, crazy country

Blood Drive © Syfy

we live in and love. After years of being way behind, we are starting to do relevant South African work at last, even if it’s still a small percentage of what’s being produced.” Here, too, people are seeing the rise of hyper local content, and because it’s getting harder to buy people’s attention, it’s imperative that advertisers begin to make content that audiences want to watch – rewarding both the viewer’s time and the brand’s budget.

THE EVER-GROWING WORLD OF ANIMATION AND POST The post-production industry has done well in 2017 and is an ever-growing sector that will continue to expand as more international productions trust the full capabilities of South Africa’s talent. Examples of this are Refinery JHB doing

Blood Drive for NBCUniversal, while Refinery CT had a great run of large international film productions – Maze Runner, Tomb Raider, Tremors, Action Park and full post for Bring it On and local productions The Wound and Five Fingers. “The local industry appears to be in a bit of a slump, with its main pressure being funding and management of cash flow to final delivery,” says Refinery MD Tracey Williams, “With regards to the international work, our industry must do everything to keep these clients coming back as service work benefits a huge cross section of our industry from cast, art department, camera rentals and post. A successful service industry has a very positive impact on the local industry and gives people opportunities.” She says the ratio of international and local

THANKFULLY, SOUTH AFRICAN ADVERTISING IS FINALLY CELEBRATING OUR UNIQUENESS AND AMAZING CULTURE, ALLOWING US TO SHOW THE REAL, GRITTY, CRAZY COUNTRY WE LIVE IN AND LOVE.


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TOP LOCATIONS IN THE WESTERN CAPE Cape Town City Centre Camps Bay/Bakoven Clifton Beach Sea Point Schotschekloof Gardens Zonnebloem Foreshore Constantia Muizenberg

© CAKE has announced a partnership with Triggerfish Animation Studios to coproduce Mama K’s Super Four

TOP 5 LOCATIONS IN KWAZULU-NATAL

Source: City of Cape Town permit statisticsfrom 1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016.

TOP LOCATIONS IN GAUTENG

LOCATION

DESCRIPTION

Johannesburg City Centre

Sugar Cane Farms

Situated all along the coastal side of Durban

Soweto

Beach Front

Warm water and weather calls any production to pull off water scenes in the winter season

Durban CBD

An old look and feel allowing film productions to create their own little India

Alexander

Harbour

Durban’s Harbour is known for its bustling and activity, as well as unique ocean set up

Sandton

Mzamba Valley

Situated near the Wild Coast, this region has forest, rivers and jungles for tropical productions

Tembisa

Source: KZN Film Commission

work varies regionally with Cape Town serving internationals and Johannesburg the local industry. In terms of animation, Cape Town remains the major hub with Triggerfish Animation Studios at the helm. They released Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes for BBC1 in late 2016, and they are currently in production on The Highway Rat for BBC1’s Christmas special. “The Highway Rat has been by far the most ambitious and challenging project we’ve ever worked on, and we’re excited for its release in December,” says Stuart Forrest, CEO of Triggerfish. He says one of the issues the

Pretoria Braamfontein Randburg Melrose Arch Fourways/Diepsloot

Source: Gauteng Film Commission. NB: These are only permits facilitated by the GFC and not all film permits granted across Gauteng.

industry faces is the DTI rebate, which is not performing as well as it used to. “As this is a critical element of almost all film work in South Africa, without a strong, reliable and easy-to-access rebate, we are finding it harder to get projects into production— specifically in animation, which has different needs to live action and is not currently accommodated in the guidelines. The animation feature industry is being held back by the inflexibility of the current programme and would benefit from a restructured rebate which is available to locally produced animated feature films.” In terms of commercial

production in animation, Tulips and Chimneys have done well with the adorable Cerebos Snow ad, which was their first time working with branded content rather than a straight TVC. Says Nina Pfeiffer: “Given the reaction the spot has received, I can’t imagine why brands wouldn’t do this more. It seems so obvious that good brand communication tells a story rather than hard selling consumers – but it definitely requires a strong agency and a brave client to take the plunge.” Ree Treweek comments: “South African brands are also taking their online

communications more seriously, and we are doing a fair amount of animation for Facebook and Instagram. It’s a great place to engage consumers and with traditional TV becoming more and more a thing of the past, this is a great trend to grow on.” “SA has always been a strong service destination and I can’t imagine that would change in the next two to three years as our bread and butter,” adds Pfeiffer. “I’m much more interested in how the quality of our productions seems to be improving exponentially, which is going to lead people naturally to content creation.”


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Cornellskop Animal Encounters © Kristian Schmidt

Cornellskop Animal Encounters © Kristian Schmidt

ANIMAL PERFORMERS: ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW

The Performing Animals Protection Amendment Act (PAPA) 2016 was passed into law in July of this year. We unpack what it means for productions using animal performers, and what it means for handlers, too.

F

ilming with animals is no picnic in the park – although very rewarding. With the newly passed Performing Animals Protection Amendment Act 4 of 2016 (PAPA), things are set to become more challenging for filmmakers, animal owners and handlers. Having said that, this is great news for animals as more stringent laws mean more protection for our furry friends on set.

WHAT THE NEW LAW ENTAILS

By law, anyone using an animal for film, entertainment or exhibition

has to use a licenced trainer, with the onus on the trainer to supply details to the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) rather than magistrates as before. The State Veterinarian will inspect both the performing animals and the conditions in which they’re kept before issuing any licenses to handlers and owners. In addition, it is now compulsory for a DAFF-approved welfare inspector or officer to be involved not only on set, but also when the animal is being transported to and from the location, and while it is

accommodated on the shoot. “The up-side is that a credible and independent party can vouch for the fact that animals have been humanely treated,” says Bobby Amm, Executive Officer at the Commercial Producers Association. “This, in turn, protects the reputations of all stakeholders, and prevents the inconvenience and burden of dealing with potential prosecution by the NSPCA.”

THE WORD FROM AN ANIMAL WRANGLER

Luke Cornell has been operating Union Pictures since 2007

where he lives on a 117-hectare farm an hour from Cape Town, “surrounded by my lions, cheetahs, caracal, hyena, ostriches, zebras, deer, you name it!” he says. As an animal wrangler and lead trainer, he’s been involved in the film industry since 1987 and brings 20-odd years of insight as former commercials 1st AD into the marriage of animals and camera, and only last year decided to only do animals. His farm even has a custom-built studio with in-house power, sloping floors for easy cleaning, and a psyche wall. According to Luke, the law does not affect producers at


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all except to book a ‘nominated person’ through DAFF and a licensed trainer. “All producers have to do is hire a licensed trainer, check their license is valid for the species used, and to ensure a nominated officer or person is present for filming – we will know soon who those people will be, whether AACL, AIM, ECO’s or an actual State Vet,” he explains. “In the past, some producers have relied upon the art department to supply animals as this was cheapest method, however this is now prosecutable. To date, the State Vets Department has been very open to hearing how best to manage this change. If you need animals, call a known supplier, ask for their license, check they

TIPS FROM THE CPA The Commercial Producers Association gives ten useful tips for shooting with animals. 1. Do your research beforehand. Many of the larger trained animals, like apes and elephants, are no longer available in South Africa. 2. Check the ASA Code. Ensure the animal action required is in line with the ASA Code (Advertising Standards Authority), and remember that every animal is protected under PAPA. 3. Get experienced insight. Use a professional production company that’s familiar with the legal requirements. 4. Only use licensed professionals. Use the services of a properly licensed and reputable animal handler. Licences are renewed annually and must be valid on the day of the shoot. 5. Confirm that the handler matches the animal. Check that the animal handler is licensed to

can provide the species required and contact the State Vet.” For an animal handler, however, things are different. “Being on set with an animal means you are being exposed to the most critical assessment publically. Crew will not tolerate abuse, and often we are even in public spaces. The fact is I own and raised most of my animals and would sooner abuse a director than one of my animals as they need to work again for me, and not me for some director.” In addition to the scrutiny, he says that he can work and move easily around the Western Cape as he has his own specialised transportation trailers, carry mobile pens, and animals are always accompanied by a licensed

work with the animal you need. This will be noted on their documentation. 6. Check that the animal is responsibly sourced. Ideally, it will be provided by the animal handler. 7. Find an animal welfare officer. Ensure an animal welfare inspector who is recognised and approved by DAFF is available to oversee your shoot. 8. Keep communication open. Provide the handler and inspector with all relevant information well in advance, and communicate with them constantly. This will prevent problems arising on the day. 9. File all relevant documentation. Keep a copy of the animal handler’s and inspector’s authorisations and other relevant documentation on file. 10. Keep all reports secure. Ensure you get your welfare report from the inspector and keep it on file in case of queries or complaints. It is not possible to obtain one later.

handler who knows their specific needs. When it comes to other provinces, however, he then has to apply for inter-provincial permits required from the various conservation authorities. “It would be great if producers actually realised the effort, time, money, and passion involved in having animals on call for the Industry,” Luke says, “Our animals don’t just magically behave the day they are needed – it’s a 365-days-a-year job.”

THE FUTURE OF PAPA

PAPA was first brought to the attention of the public in 2015, and the amendment was informed by the Constitutional Court judgement of 11 July 2013,

wherein the court declared two sections of the Performing Animals Protection Act of 1935 unconstitutional in that they assign the function of issuing licences for training, exhibition or use of animals to magistrates. This is the main change in the Amendment, although its passing into law was sudden considering the industry had been waiting for an outcome for over two years. Governing bodies and industry stakeholders alike have been running workshops and creating dialogue around the subject to ensure the implementation of the law, although sudden, is as smooth and convenient as possible for the film and entertainment industries.

A wild photoshoot at Cornellskop Animal Encounters in the Western Cape

Luke Cornell shares a moment with his pride and joy © Chris de Bruyn


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SA’S FILM HEROES We put out a call to find out who makes your world go round – and these are the incredible individuals who have been nominated as South African film, TV and commercials industry heroes for going the extra mile and touching the lives of the people they work with.

BRADLEY SWEETMAN, UNIT AND TRANSPORT MANAGER As a Unit and Transport Manager, Bradley moves all equipment and crew between locations, and anything with wheels is his responsibility. He also ensures actors are collected on time for shoots. As a Unit Manager, he ensures cast and crew are comfortable on set. He also runs base camp and catering areas. “The base camp is the area where we get the artists ready for set – make up, wardrobe, etc. The base camp is like a mini city that needs power, light and depending on the time of year, warmth or airconditioning,” Sweetman explains. He recently worked on Serenity, and before that did Tomb Raider and Resident Evil: Final Chapter. He says one of the best moments of his career to date was working in Mauritius on Serenity. “The people were

fantastic, the island is beautiful and I had the best time over there. I have worked on many great productions in and around South Africa, all with their own memories, but working on Serenity was by far the best – great crew, great locations, fantastic weather and an awesome cast. Definitely the highlight so far.” According to Sweetman, the film industry is not for everyone. “Working in the unit and transport departments often means long hours and weekend work. If you chose to join the film family, know that you are going to be a part of something special. I have met some amazing people from many different places. I have shared some amazing experiences and seen awesome locations that the average person can only dream about. If I can offer any advice, take your time, learn as

much as you can, and take your opportunities when you ready.”

HAJOO CASSIM, WRITER, DIRECTOR AND PRODUCER, HAJOO ENTERTAINMENT Hajra Bibi Cassim – known fondly as Hajoo – has a passion for storytelling that finally found a home in the film industry after a stint as senior purser in the airline industry, a post-graduate marketing degree, and a film, electronic and digital media Internship at the SA F.I.L.M. Academy. She currently manages skills development and training at the SA F.I.L.M. Academy, providing a bridge between education and employment, where trainees and MICT-SETA interns gain hands-on experience in `Learning-by-Doing’, working on local and international feature films and series. Hajoo’s special focus is in women filmmakers. “Our country is richly blessed with so much raw talent and creative genius and the biggest challenge lies in nurturing and shaping that talent into great filmmaking and great films.

Hajoo Cassim

Believe me, there is no shortage of amazing stories out there!” She says one of the biggest rewards is watching young graduates who have joined F.I.L.M. immerse themselves in in the industry and developing into crew and ultimately Heads of Departments and as independent directors in their own right. “As a producer, writer and director myself, I recently I took the plunge and started my very

own production company called

OUR COUNTRY IS RICHLY BLESSED WITH SO MUCH RAW TALENT AND CREATIVE GENIUS AND THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE LIES IN NURTURING AND SHAPING THAT TALENT INTO GREAT FILMMAKING AND GREAT FILMS. Bradley Sweetman


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Hylton Heather

SUCCESS IS RESERVED FOR THOSE WILLING TO STAY THE COURSE, AND GO THAT EXTRA MILE TO SOLVE A BUSINESS PROBLEM OR CREATIVE CHALLENGE. Hajoo Entertainment. With the shoe firmly on the other foot, I had to learn accounting, costing, operational cash flows, tax compliance and strict financial management within a very short time. It’s a scary, daunting process as film finance is very industry-specific. As Hajoo Entertainment grows and develops, it is my goal to create local, South African films while sharing valuable life and occupational skills with trainees and interns.” Last year she was given the opportunity to write and direct a short for the NFVF/ Blingola female slate. “The NFVF/Blingola experience and getting a SAFTA nomination for Best Director for a short documentary was amazing.” Her job allows her to meet new and interesting people on set, providing mentorship, training and career opportunities

to graduates. “I get to experience life at the coalface on the one hand, and the massive scale of international series and productions right here in South Africa on the other; I connect with interns and trainees as if they were family, and I tell my son that his mummy gets paid to do something I truly love. My career has been shaped by my desire to make a difference in the world. In order to make a difference, you must be authentic and comfortable in your skin,” she says.

HYLTON HEATHER, PRODUCTION DIRECTOR, NINETY9CENTS (99C) Hylton Heather heads up one of the advertising industry’s busiest production departments, in one of the country’s biggest agencies. Hylton, who joined 99c shortly after its inception in 2008, is also part of the 99c Executive and one of seven shareholders in the company. Post completing his studies, Hylton began his career at Vertical Salt – a specialist postproduction company – where he remained for six years before joining The Jupiter Drawing Room as a TV Producer. In 2008, Hylton was approached by 99c Managing Director Andrew Brand to join the agency (still a start-up at that stage), where he was tasked with establishing and heading up the production department. Cut to nine years later and Hylton manages a team of over 15 people, produces and sends off over 300 unique commercials in any given month, and services brands all across South Africa and the pan-African region. A core focus of Hylton’s department is the production of strategically-driven, expertly crafted commercials that deliver business impact. Most recently he’s produced commercials for Checkers Oh My Goodness range featuring celeb

SHE WAS ALSO THE FIRST PERSON TO HOLD THE POSITION OF HEAD OF MARKETING AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS FOR THE NATIONAL FILM AND VIDEO FOUNDATION (NFVF), WHERE SHE HELPED TO LAY THE FOUNDATION FOR THE PROMOTION OF SOUTH AFRICAN FILM.

chef Gordon Ramsay and his daughter Matilda (in partnership with Objective Media Group and Director Paul Radcliffe). “Being good at what you do is about being passionate, and having perseverance and grit,” Heather says. “Success is reserved for those willing to stay the course, and go that extra mile to solve a business problem or creative challenge.” What he enjoys most about his job is that it’s ever-changing, it’s creative and it’s fast-paced. “No two days are the same. It allows me to combine my driven, business-orientated side with my artistic streak, to produce creative work that delivers a measurable result for our clients.”

JACKIE MOTSEPE, CHIEF OPERATION OFFICER, KWAZULU-NATAL FILM COMMISSION A woman who has helped shape the film industry of KwaZulu-Natal, Jackie Motsepe has over 15 years’ experience across a broad spectrum of communications, media relations, marketing, stakeholder relations, both in South Africa and overseas. She currently promotes SA and KZN as a premier film and TV production destination. Her history includes GM of the SABC, where she was responsible for the acquisition of international content for the three national stations, as well as television content for all genres. She was also the first person to hold the position of Head

of Marketing and Public Affairs for the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF), where she helped to lay the foundation for the promotion of South African film and afforded the industry respect and prominence on an international level. “What keeps me passionate are the endless possibilities and potential of the industry. It is a privilege to work in this industry and see new projects created, engage in the development of new talent, develop and implement strategies that can bring lasting change to the industry. I believe in the principles of transformation and diversity that have impacted the industry the world over. Through our diversity we are stronger and better. The next frontier is worldclass South African projects that reach local audiences and have an international footprint. It is possible and I remain positive.

Jackie Motsepe


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Dr Lwazi Thembelihle Manzi

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collaborated with Jahmil XT Qubeka for whom she Executive Produced the multiple awardwinning feature Of Good Report. In 2016, Lwazi partnered with leading U.S. property developer and Councilman of Sacramento Allen Warren in pioneering the project “Cineculture” which aims to develop a network of cinemas and media networks in townships and rural areas. Lwazi believes her leadership skills were inherited from her late grandmother, Gladys Manzi, who has two streets named after her in recognition of her sacrifice to the struggle for the freedom of South Africa from the injustices of Apartheid.

DR LWAZI THEMBELIHLE MANZI, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER AND COFOUNDER, MERCURIAL PICTURES

SIMON WOOD, DOCUMENTARY DIRECTOR, SALTPETER PRODUCTIONS

As Executive Producer and CoFounder of Mercurial Pictures, Dr Lwazi Manzi has worked both as a creative entrepreneur and on the frontlines of community support and healthcare. Her keen interpersonal skills, unique creative voice and strong leadership skills have made her an excellent young Film Producer and in 2014 she founded a joint venture with Spier Films. In 2000 she was hailed as a promising creative voice when she took second place in the Alan Paton poetry competition, and most notably

A celebrated director, Simon Wood’s latest film The Silent Form won four SAFTAs in 2017, adding to a successful year for the film, which had its world premiere in Toronto at Hot Docs, North America’s largest documentary film festival. Remarkably, this was the second year running that Wood has had a film selected for Hot Docs following the hypnotic journey he takes through Umlazi in Orbis, which still features on the international festival circuit, most recently being selected for the South African Focus at Visions du Réel 2017.

Simon Wood

IF YOU COULD SAY IT IN WORDS THERE WOULD BE NO REASON TO PAINT. I VIEW MY WORK AS AN EXPLANATION TO THE PEOPLE CLOSE TO ME – PRIMARILY TO THE ONES I LOVE – HOW I SEE, FEEL, SENSE, AND ULTIMATELY INTERPRET THE WORLD AROUND ME. “I have come across few people in South Africa who have invested more into the work of other practitioners than documentary director Simon Wood,” Producer Michael Klein says, “Personally, I have learned more from working alongside Simon and watching him work than I have at any film institution and I know that there are many in the industry who are better filmmakers because of his encouragement, his criticism, his willingness to engage and his desire to strengthen the documentary films that come out of South Africa.” Simon’s next film Untamed has been chosen for the 2017 feature slate at Independent Film Week in New York City, where he presents a rough cut to international distributors and festivals. Untamed is a collaboration with poet Ian McCallum, exploring the evolution of the human psyche. In 2017, Simon also signed a deal to make The Lord has Hidden, a documentary on the Zephany Nurse story which he will co-direct with Emmy award-winning director Francois Verster. “Edward Hopper, the great American realist, said, ‘If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint’. I view my work as an explanation to the people close to me – primarily to the ones I love – how I see, feel, sense, and ultimately interpret the world around me,” Simon explains. “To the older generation (myself included),

I think we should watch out for the vast amount of talented young people falling out of film schools across South Africa. There is a political consciousness and fearlessness of challenging the status quo in creative ways that has endlessly impressed me and I look forward to being washed away by the beauty of the oncoming artistic tsunami.”

TRACEY ROLLINO, COURSE DIRECTOR, T3 TRAINING COURSE Tracey Rollino is Course Director of the T3 Training Course, an initiative in which she has trained young entrants to the film industry – the vast majority of whom are from disadvantaged backgrounds. T3 initially ran for three years from 1996 to 1998 during which 90 students (30 per year) attended the course. Of these students, a large portion is still in the industry, several now respected Heads of Departments. In 2014 Tracey revived the T3 Programme and over the past three years has tutored a further 80 students, 95% of them at no cost to the student. The course is self-funded, with assistance from a few companies who offer lecture space and equipment. Lectures are given by selected, respected Heads of Departments who donate their time. 11 September saw a further 20 students commence the 2017 programme, with three of these students paying to travel from Johannesburg to attend, the remainder located in Cape Town.


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Over the years, the T3 has proved its worth in providing meaningful, practical training for these students, with a course that is highly valued by production companies who take on the new trainees after completion. “People always ask me why I do this course,” says Tracey, “The answer is simple: I love teaching. I have 30+ years of experience and the South African film industry is in dire need of crew who are disciplined, eager, wanting to learn, and don’t have a bad attitude. Teaching youngsters about the film industry is a way of giving back to an industry that is the life-blood to so many people. If we don’t look after our industry, we run the risk of destroying something that is vibrant, exciting, challenging and quite frankly, the only place I know how to work. It really is quite simple!”

WERNER GROBELAAR, DIGITAL IMAGE TECHNICIAN AND DAILIES COLOURIST, DIGITAL THERAPY A straightforward man with an eye for excellence, Werner Grobelaar is responsible for image and colour quality control on set. His role is to act as a second set of eyes for both the DOP and the post-production team doing colour, data and workflow. “Call it a creative IT

THE WORLD IS GETTING SMALLER AND IT IS AMAZING FOR US TO BE RECOGNISED AND SUPPORTED ON AN INTERNATIONAL SCALE AS WE HAVE IN THE LAST FEW YEARS.

HONOURABLE MENTIONS These folk may have slipped our grasp this time around, but we’d still like to honour them for the stellar work they do on a daily basis in the local film industry.

Tracey Rollino

person,” he says. “I also help the camera department build and maintain camera equipment and construct creative digital workflows from set to post. Although I did study, this is not a prerequisite – a good attitude is.” Werner has worked on some incredible shoots and has accrued a host of knowledge in the live broadcast sector before moving into commercials and features. “I have done some really cool shoots for really talented people, one of them being my hero, Robert Yeoman (Moonrise Kingdom, The Darjeeling Limited) as well as local visionaries Justus de Jager (Keeping up with the Kandasamys) and Jozua Malherbe (Wolwedans in die Skemer).” As co-owner of Digital Therapy, he assists in rentals and training for fellow DITs and VTOs, with the company recently expanding to London. “The industry today is not what it was when I started,” he says, “It’s better. The world is getting smaller and it is amazing for us to be recognised and supported on an international scale as we have in the last few years. We are one of the best crews in the world and I’m proud to do my small part. I believe all it takes to make it in this game is a little bit of luck, a strong stomach, good time-keeping skills and a sense of humour – and also coffee can be traded for knowledge!”

• Andre Scholtz | Producer (Panic Mechanic, n Paw Paw vir my Darling) “One of my most favourite people to work with,” says Tracey Williams of Refinery • Danie Bester | Producer (Vaselinetjie, Vir Altyd) for his string of Film Factory successes and ability to identify and develop talent • Julia Anastasopoulos | Content Producer who pioneered a YouTube audience with SuzelleDIY and created the first Showmax Original, Tali’s Wedding Diary. • Kaley Meyer | Kyle Lewis’ stylist who consistently pushes boundaries with her work • Kyle Lewis | Director at Arcade/Egg,

Werner Grobelaar

who signed to Black Dog Films (UK) and knocked his first international music video out the park Lester Sweetman | Awesome Unit and Transport Manager at Moonlighting Four Productions Mike Buckland | Head of Production at Triggerfish; unsung hero for his work on Revolting Rhymes and Stick Man Ree Treweek | World Builder – sculptor, painter, illustrator, animator, director – at Tulips and Chimneys Rory O’Grady | Director of Photography, for his work on the One Source campaign Stephen du Plessis | A most interesting Editor, who works with Kyle Lewis and Dan Mace Sunu | Director at Egg, the first ever black director to be the most awarded director at the Loeries, currently in the USA directing Madam Secretary Vincent Moloi | Director behind hit SABC show Tjovitjo, the most-watched drama series in SA


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AN INDUSTRY COMPROMISED

BY IN-HOUSE PRODUCTION COMPANIES by Bobby Amm, executive officer of the Commercial Producers Association of South Africa (CPA)

A

n ad agency’s in-house production company (IHPC) can be a tempting choice when looking for a commercial producer. With the ‘lower costs’ and the convenience of a single supplier, most business people would consider it, especially when production costs are so high for low-end work. On closer inspection, though, the Commercial Producers Association has found that any benefit of engaging the services of an IHPC on mid-to-highend projects is short-lived. And this is why:

1. IT’S NON-COMPETITIVE AND LOWERS QUALITY

When using a professional commercial production company, clients can commission the best creative professionals in the market, with more than 100 directors available in South Africa. When using an IHPC, though, one’s options are limited – especially since an IHPC director is already employed. This is a difficult situation for clients, because the IHPC is likely to recommend its in-house director rather than the best professional for the project. In terms of competition, the most debated predicament is that agencies with IHPCs often play the roles of both service provider and client; calling for pitches from production houses, and pitching their own treatments for the

same job. Because of the high chance of bias in these cases, many production houses remove themselves from the race for these jobs. This diminishes competition, and with fewer producers pitching, it impacts on quality. The traditional relationship between agencies and commercial production companies also improves the quality of the product. By repeatedly pushing production houses to do more, agencies often deliver a better commercial at no extra cost to themselves. But, when an agency carries the expense of that production pressure itself, one speculates whether the agency would push as hard.

2. IT DOESN’T COST LESS IN THE LONG RUN

An IHPC may look cost-effective now. But once it’s functioning at a similar level as a commercial production company, its business expenses will probably rise. Why? Because a production company has less downtime and superior efficiencies of scale thanks to it working with multiple clients at once. An IHPC, on the other hand, only produces for itself. IHPCs have put an enormous strain on production companies, compelling some to downsize or even shut down. With fewer production houses competing in the industry, a lower commercial production standard could present

itself across the board. But this isn’t just a quality issue... Less competition also means higher expenses for the client. As Steve Davies, CEO of the Advertising Producers Association in London said at this year’s Advertising Week, “In any over-competitive market you cannot put your prices up. You have to bid as low as you can to win the work. That’s what clients should take confidence from.”

3. IT’S SMOTHERING THE ENTIRE INDUSTRY

We live in difficult economic times, so it’s only natural that agencies want to diversify for financial reasons. But if you take a deeper look, the IHPC model is unsustainable as the leverage only lasts as long as production houses do. If the competition dies out, the costs balance out (or escalate) and the overall standard is lower; disarming the industry. Production houses are also key developers of new talent as they invest in fledgling

directors and other production professionals: teaching them, and helping them grow their careers. With financial results in mind rather than the overall industry, the IHPC approach doesn’t provide the same level of encouragement and the investment in the market falls away entirely.

COMPETING IN AN EVOLVING MARKET

The commercial production industry is continuously working to stay up-to-date and competitive in a changing market. Some production companies have had to close their doors because of a refusal to reconsider their business models, so keeping up in this changing market should be of high importance. However, in a world where large corporations are saving costs by outsourcing their non-core services to experts, it seems regressive, and even perilous, for the commercial production industry to be hauled the ‘wrong’ way by agencies trying to make a quick buck.

THE TRADITIONAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGENCIES AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION COMPANIES ALSO IMPROVES THE QUALITY OF THE PRODUCT.


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FILM INDUSTRY STRATEGY DISCUSSION – AN OVERVIEW

Lance Greyling from the City of Cape Town gave the following presentation during the annual pre-season briefing, held recently at the CTICC.

VALUE CHAIN

DISTRIBUTION

Activities surrounding the release and promotion of the finished product across various platforms.

POST-PRODUCTION

The ‘raw’ output of the production phase is transformed into its intended final form.

PRODUCTION

The active production phase where all the elements of the production are brought together and put to work, and a rough product is produced.

PRE-PRODUCTION

The planning phase of a production as well as the early activities that must take place to ensure that a project gets off the ground and production can proceed smoothly.


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IN BRIEF:

Cape Town and the Western Cape is a value for money destination • Turnover for Cape Town: R3.5-billion (2015) [WC: R3.6-billion] • Cape Town Jobs: 9 320 (direct and indirect 2015) - [WC: 13 370]

• Cape Town Film Studios: Economic value R3-billion • Cape Town Film Permitting Office: 7 359 location permits (2015) • Size of businesses surveyed: 26-50 employees • Age of employees: 70% are < 40 years

TO SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASE THE AWARENESS OF CAPE TOWN AS A PREFERRED FILM AND MEDIA DESTINATION, WITH A STRONG VALUE FOR MONEY PROPOSITION, WHILST INVESTING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOCAL TALENT AND SKILLS AND PROVIDING THE NECESSARY INFRASTRUCTURE TO ENHANCE THE VALUE PROPOSITION ALONG THE VALUE CHAIN.

• Value chain: pre (34%), production (35%), post (24%), distribution (7%)

as a preferred film and media destination, with a strong value for money proposition, whilst investing in the development of local talent and skills and providing the necessary infrastructure to enhance the value proposition along the value chain. Disrupter: Intensify investment in tech/animation/ gaming/post-production, etc.

THE VISION FOR CAPE TOWN:

To position Cape Town as the preferred film and media destination in Africa. Underlying principles/values: • Inclusive growth • Intensive talent development • Rapid growth to maturity in 5-10 years • Strong USP awareness and international recognition • Select and invest in winning sub-sectors • Local economic beneficiation • Environmental integrity • Socio-economic upliftment

CRITICAL ISSUES:

• Vexing Issue of a Film Commission – Geographical representation – Functions to perform – Funding responsibilities/ model • Creation of a Film Office – Geographical representation – Functions to perform – Funding responsibilities/ model

FILM STRATEGY:

To significantly increase the awareness of Cape Town

CONSTRAINTS Limited training and development programmes Lack of awareness amongst South Africans or industry as viable Lack of direct flight access to Cape Town Lack of exposure of local film and media market Difficulty in applying and being granted City of Cape Town Availability of film and media studio facilities Lack of film locations in City of Cape Town during peak event Limited number of highly skilled industry personnel Visa and Work Permit regulations Insufficient funding from national, regional and local sources Difficulties in applying and being granted local incentives More attractive incentives from other film destinations

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Level of Impact 1= no imact, 10= very high impact

10

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%


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• Increase production Infrastructure • Expand incentives • Reduce red tape • Marketing assistance and exposure • Skills development programme

• Input on the film permitting functions of the City

THE WAY FORWARD:

• Roleplayer engagement • External communication • Joint Film and Media Strategy for (industry) City and Province • Cooperation agreements • Co-design of strategy, business plan and implementation initiatives

IMPLEMENTATION MECHANISM:

Cape Town Film and Media (Commission) Partnership: Main functions: • Initiate inputs and advise on local government regulations and bylaws affecting the film and media industry • Drive development support • Manage destination and industry promotion • Manage the relationships between industry, government and other roleplayers

OVERVIEW OF PRIORITY ASSETS PRESENTATION Priority Assets include: • City Hall • Grand Parade • Good Hope Stadium • Athlone Stadium

BOOKING NOTES:

DISRUPTER: INTENSIFY INVESTMENT IN TECH/ ANIMATION/GAMING/POST-PRODUCTION, ETC.

• •

• As from July 2017, all bookings are now done electronically. • The department no longer request reference numbers

from Revenue – it is now automatically created. All quotations, invoices and refunds are generated via the SAP system (clients are rid of the challenges they faced with SARS) Booking transactions are done with more accuracy. Changes to film tariff schedule. Standard categories applies to all facilities. Future Plan: Clients will be able to check availability of facilities online and even make provisional bookings that will workflow to the respective booking clerks.

TO BOOK, CONTACT:

Athlone Stadium Booking clerk: Nomsa Klaas 021 4440671 Nomsa.Klaas@capetown.gov.za Facility Manager: Ricardo de la Cruz 021 4174905 Ricardo.delaCruz@capetown.gov.za City Hall, Grand Parade, and Good Hope Centre Booking clerk: Fazlin Simon 021 4440747 Fazlin.Simon@capetown.gov.za Facility Manager: Tyrone Africa 021 4443191 Tyrone.Africa@capetown.gov.za

COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Opportunities offered by changing demand patterns for different delivery medium from traditional to new Assistance offered by public sector film and media industry associations (e.g. film office) Assistance offered by private sector film and media industry associations Availability of DTI film incentives Ability to deliver high quality within the required timeframes and budget Quality of service provided by Western Cape crews High demand for foreign films and television productions Ease of working in the location due to availability of infrastructure, hotels, restaurants, etc Flexibility and diversity of locations Internationally competitive cost of production

1

2

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7

8

9

Level of Impact 1= no imact, 10= very high impact

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32 / LOCATION SPOTLIGHT

www.thecallsheet.co.za

TANZANIA

A country with a melting pot of vibrant cultures and a growing film repertoire, Tanzania is ideal as a service destination for film and television.

T

anzania is a well-known film location offering a range of looks and spectacular things to catch on tape – from mass wildlife migration and unique cultures to snow-capped mountains and the pristine beaches of the island of Zanzibar. Popular locations in the country include Mount Kilimanjaro, Serengeti National Park Lake Manyara, the Ngorongoro Conversation Area and a host of other game reserves, parks and lakes to explore. The archipelago of Zanzibar offers palm-fringed, white sand beaches, and is ideal for underwater photography. Located here are Pemba Island’s floating underwater hotel, Stone Town bazaars, and fascinating winding colonial alleys. Tanzania also has agricultural looks such as coffee, tea, cotton and spice plantations, while Dar es Salaam, Arusha and Zanzibar are the main cities in which productions are based.

FILMS SHOT IN THE COUNTRY

With a history in film going back to the 1950s with the classic King Solomon’s Mines and West of Zanzibar, Tanzania is no stranger to productions. John Wayne’s Hatari was also shot here in 1961, as well as the film adaptation of Michael Crichton’s Congo, which used Mwanza Airport as a location. Although recent years have seen a slew of wildlife and cultural documentaries shot in the country, Tanzania is still a large film hub in East Africa, with an ever-growing local pool of talent. Most notably, the Zanzibar International Film Festival takes place in July every year, with locals and internationals converging on the island to enjoy the latest from Africa and the diaspora.

FILMING ON LOCATION

Permits for filming in Tanzania can be expensive and time-

Beit-el-Sahel, the 19 th century palace of the sultans of Zanzibar, now a museum © David Stanley (via Flickr)

consuming, so plenty of lead time should be given to this side of the process. After completing all application forms with the help of a fixer, your local Tanzanian consulate will complete the application. Film licenses can cost around US$1 000 when applying three months in advance, or US$3 000 for a speedy permit. Additional permits are a necessity for shoots in wildlife parks, while photography of unauthorised public locations is illegal. The best time for filming the Serengeti migration is between November and August, while all-round game viewing in other

parks peaks between June and October. Mount Kilimanjaro is best climbed between July and October or January and March, while the best time to film coastal areas is in August, September and October. Although there is a small pool of key crew in Tanzania, local support crews can assist with basic projects. Experienced crews can be sourced either in Kenya or South Africa, while Tanzania’s talent pool is wide, with 120 ethnic groups including the famed Masai warriors, East Indians, Arab and Caucasian looks. Most film equipment will need to be sourced abroad.

THE ARCHIPELAGO OF ZANZIBAR OFFERS PALMFRINGED, WHITE SAND BEACHES, AND IS IDEAL FOR UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY.

Tarangire National Park, Tanzania © Joel Herzog (via Unsplash)


LOCATION SPOTLIGHT / 33

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CLIMATE Because of Tanzania’s tropical climate, the country is suitable for filming year-round. Coastal areas are hot and humid, while inland areas are warm and dry. Average Annual Temperatures in Arusha, Tanzania 400C 30 0C 20 0C 10 0C 0 0C

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Max temp

Jul

Aug Sep Oct

Nov Dec

Min temp www.weather-and-climate.com

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania © Antônio Soletti (via Unsplash)

Average precipation in Arusha, Tanzania 350 mm 300 mm 150 mm 100 mm 0 mm

Jan

Feb

Mar Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep

Oct Nov Dec

www.weather-and-climate.com

ACCESS As a major tourist destination, Tanzania has 22 commercial airports serving the region with the most three international ones: Julius Nyerere, Kilimanjaro International, and Songwe International. Carriers to the country include: • Air Mauritius • Etihad Airways • RwandAir • British Airways • Kenya Airways • South African • EgyptAir • KLM Airways • Emirates • Meridiana • SWISS • Ethiopian • Oman Air • Turkish Airlines • Qatar Airways Airlines

POPULATION 53 950 935 (CIA World Factbook, July 2017 est.) Serengeti National Park, Tanzania © Jaliya Rasaputra (via Unsplash)

CONTACT Tanzania Tourist Board Head Office: Utalii House, Laibon Street/ Ali Hassan Mwinyi Road Tel: +255 22 266 4878 / +255 22 266 4879 Email: md@tanzaniatourism.go.tz / info@tanzaniatourism.go.tz Web: www.tanzaniatouristboard.go.tz

FIXERS Derrick Kibisi Talking Film Production Tel: +256 790 912 494 / +256 755 902 991 Email: info@talkingfilmproduction.com / dkibisi@talkingfilmprduction.com Web: www.talkingfilmproduction.com View of one of the ZIFF 2017 venues © Zanzibar International Film Festival


34 / FILM FINANCE WORLD FORUM

www.thecallsheet.co.za

FILM FINANCE WORLD FORUM 2017

4TH EDITION OF

The business of making films.

T

he 4th annual Film Finance World will take place in November in Johannesburg. Film Finance World (FFW) has become the leading forum for both established and aspiring filmmakers to gain insights on the latest developments in film and television productions particularly when it comes to the business elements of the film industry. FFW is also the place to be for filmmakers to meet and network with leading industry experts and service providers including financiers, distributors, marketers,

accountants and broadcasters. More South African films are being produced than ever before and this is further complimented with recordbreaking international productions visiting our shores. However, many South African filmmakers and aspiring filmmakers still face challenges in raising funding for their projects. This is often due to a lack of understanding and knowledge of the business model of the domestic and international film and television industry. This year’s Film Finance World Forum will focus on the fundamentals of film funding and will unpack elements such

FILM FINANCE WORLD (FFW) HAS BECOME THE LEADING FORUM FOR BOTH ESTABLISHED AND ASPIRING FILMMAKERS TO GAIN INSIGHTS ON THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN FILM.

as getting your script production ready to putting together a package, budgeting, sales and distribution. FFW 2017 will host some of South Africa’s leading financing institutions so that delegates can gain insights on what financiers are looking for and what influences their final decisions. Destiny Media has once again partnered with Film&Event Media and the Callsheet as media partners and with their tremendous support we will be able to reach thousands of filmmakers and industry stakeholders. Destiny Media’s partnership with the Callsheet over the past four years has been a major contributing factor

to the continued growth and success of Film Finance World. The programme for FFW 2017 will return to basics so that filmmakers who attend will be able to leave the conference with a clear understanding and action list that will make their film projects a reality. Also a critical outcome for FFW is to assist filmmakers in ensuring that their projects are commercially viable. Film Finance World Africa is where the film industry converges to learn, network and exchange knowledge on the latest trends in financing, producing and distributing features and TV Content.

CONTACT DETAILS Email: keabetswe@destinymediaafrica.com Tel: +27 11 050 1312 Website: www.filmfinanceworld.com

Film Finance World Forum 2017


GUEST SPEAKERS INCLUDE: Joel CHURCHER VP & MD BBC AFRICA

NEXT GEN PROGRAM October 25-27, 2017

The Golden Age Of Entertainment The Next Gen Program is a unique, three-day live experience designed expressly for creative, production and distribution executives aspiring to become leaders in the entertainment industry. Running parallel to the annual Johannesburg edition of the DISCOP entertainment content market, the carefully

Morgan BOUCHET

Head of VR & Director of Digital Content and Innovation ORANGE

Steven MARKOVITZ CEO & Producer BIG WORLD CINEMA

Bernard AZRIA CEO COTE OUEST

Alain MODOT CEO DIFFA

Sonke KIRCHHOF CEO INVR.SPACE

Liz LEVENSON

VP Intl. Acquisitions & Sales GRB ENTERTAINMENT

Todd BROWN CEO XYZ FILMS

Ines POHL

constructed agenda will help improve business, networking

Editor-in-Chief Deutsche Welle

and pitching skills. The Next Gen Program will guarantee ac-

Renee WILLIAMS

cess to indispensable information on alternative distribution and funding opportunities, virtual reality content production, expanding relations between Francophone and Anglophone Africa, and between Germany and South Africa, and much more. The program will also put under the spotlight, Ethiopia, a country with a population in the upwards of 100+ million; animation, Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fastest-growing and most creative con-

Acting Group Executive: Television SABC

Jean-Luc CRONEL

Director: Marketing & Distribution TV5MONDE

Jana WOLFF

Marketing & Advertising European Film Market, Berlinale Africa Hub

Robyn SMITH

Chief Content Strategist Econet Media / KWESE TV

David ALEXANDER

tent production and distribution segment; and the new global

Founder & Managing Director Sheer Publishing Africa

streaming services and their impact on homegrown original

Pascal SCHMITZ

content production. The Next Gen Program will feature influential speakers and experts from major corporations, smaller companies and select start-ups and is designed to give participants valuable, actionable information and tools along with unparalleled connections to key players in the industry.

Organized By

development | sales

Head of Acquisitions & Executive Producer AAA Entertainment

Welela HAILESELASSIE Deputy Managing Director KANA TV

Mike STRANO

Founding Director PHAT Music & Entertainment Ltd.

TO REGISTER discop.com | info@discop.com | TEL + 1 (323) 782 13 00


36 / EVENTS TO DIARISE

www.thecallsheet.co.za

OCTOBER SAN DIEGO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 4–8 San Diego, USA

NOVEMBER

MARBELLA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 4–8 Malaga, Spain BFI LONDON FILM FESTIVAL 4 – 15 London, United Kingdom OUT AT THE MOVIES INTERNATIONAL LGBT FILM FEST 5–8 Winston Salem, North Carolina HAMPTONS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 5–9 East Hampton, USA SITGES FESTIVAL INTERNACIONAL DE CINEMA FANTASTIC DE CATALUNYA 5 – 15 Barcelona, Spain

CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 12 – 26 Chicago, USA CARMEL INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 18 – 22 Sunset Centre, California TALLGRASS FILM FESTIVAL 18 – 22 Kansas, USA SANTA FE INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL 18 – 22 Santa Fe, USA SHNIT WORLDWIDE SHORTFILMFESTIVAL 18 – 29 8 Cities Internationally

IRIS PRIZE FILM FESTIVAL 10 – 15 Cardiff, Wales

SAN JOSE INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 19 – 22 San Jose, USA

NEW ORLEANS FILM FESTIVAL 11 – 19 New Orleans, USA

PHILADELPHIA FILM FESTIVAL 19 – 29 Philadelphia, USA

CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL FILM MARKET & FESTIVAL 12 – 21 V&A Waterfront, Cape Town

VIENNALE (VIENNA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL) 19 – 2 November Vienna, Austria

MOSTRA SAO PAULO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 20 – 2 November Sao Paulo, Brazil DISCOP JOHANNESBURG 25 – 27 Johannesburg, South Africa TOKYO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 25 – 3 November Tokyo, Japan AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL 26 – 2 November Austin, USA

AMERICAN FILM MARKET & CONFERENCES 1–8 Santa Monica, USA LEEDS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 1 – 16 Leeds, United Kingdom THESSALONIKI INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2 – 12 Thessaloniki, Greece HAWAII INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2 – 12 Hawaii, USA

SOUTH AFRICAN HORRORFEST 26 – 3 November Cape Town, South Africa

FORT LAUDERDALE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 3 – 19 Florida, USA

AFRICA IN MOTION 27 – 5 November Glasgow, Scotland

CARTHAGE FILM FESTIVAL 4 – 11 November Carthage, Tunisia

SAVANNAH FILM FESTIVAL 28 – 4 November Savannah, USA

NAPA VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL 8 – 12 Napa, USA

AFRICA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 29 – 4 November Lagos, Nigeria

LONESTAR FILM FESTIVAL 8 – 12 Fort Worth, USA


EVENTS TO DIARISE / 37

www.thecallsheet.co.za

PALM SPRINGS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2 – 15 Palm Springs, USA LONDON SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 12 – 21 London, United Kingdom

DECEMBER CUCALORUS FILM FESTIVAL 8 – 12 Wilmington, USA STOCKHOLM FILM FESTIVAL 8 – 19 Stockholm, Sweden DOC NYC 9 – 16 New York, USA AFI FEST 9 – 16 Los Angeles, USA KOLKATA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 10 – 17 Kolkata, India BLACK NIGHTS FILM FESTIVAL 11 – 27 Tallinn, Estonia BARCELONA INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL 14 – 20 Barcelona, Spain INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY FESTIVAL AMSTERDAM 15 – 26 Amsterdam, Netherlands

INTERFILM FESTIVAL 20 – 26 Berlin, Germany INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF INDIA 20 – 28 Goa, India CAIRO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 21 – 30 Cairo, Egypt SINGAPORE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 23 – 3 December Singapore TORINO FILM FESTIVAL 24 – 2 December Torino, Italy WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL 29 – 3 December Vancouver, Canada

GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS 7 Beverly Hills, USA

FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL DU FILM DE MARRAKECH 1–9 Marrakech, Morocco

NEW YORK JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL 10 – 23 New York, USA

DELHI INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 4–9 New Delhi, India

DHAKA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 12 – 20 Dhaka, Bangladesh

DUBAI INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 6 – 13 Dubai, UAE

WORLD INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (TORONTO) 19 – 20 Toronto, Canada

MONACO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 7 – 10 Monte Carlo, Monaco

SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 18 – 28 Park City, USA

FESTIVAL INTERNACIONAL DEL NUEVO CINE LATINOAMERICANO (HAVANA FILM FESTIVAL) 8 – 17 Havana, Cuba BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 10 – 17 Harbour Island and Nassau, Bahamas METRO MANILA FILM FESTIVAL 25 – 1 January Manila, Philippines

SLAMDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 18 – 25 Park City, USA GERARDMER FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL DU FILM FANTASTIQUE 24 – 28 Paris, France INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL OF ROTTERDAM 24 – 4 February Rotterdam, The Netherlands GÖTEBORG FILM FESTIVAL 26 – 5 February Gothenburg, Sweden

© Andrew Branch / Unsplash

JANUARY


38 / ASSOCIATIONS NEWS

CPA & SAASP HOST LOCATION WORKSHOP The Cape Town Location Workshop and Pre-Season Briefing 2017 was hosted by the Commercial Producers Association and the South African Association of Stills Producers along with the City of Cape Town on 16-17 August 2017. The two-day event was a success, with industry stakeholders engaging and discussing developments over the past year, as well as opportunities and challenges in the coming year. “Cape Town is one of the top ten film locations centres globally. The province’s beautiful locations, great climate, high quality infrastructure, the industry’s lowest annual

operating costs, and over 2 500 direct service providers by our last count have positioned the local film and media industry as a key emerging sector,” Wesgro CEO Tim Harris said. “In the past few years, permit office applications have doubled, showing the strength of this industry. Through our Cape Town and Western Cape Film and Media Promotion division we will continue to attract more film production investment in the city in order to create jobs and opportunities.”

www.thecallsheet.co.za

NFVF RELEASES MIDYEAR BOX OFFICE REPORT The National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) has released a South Afcan Box Office Report for the first half of 2017/18 financial year. From January to June 2017, the performance of local films has once again been very weak, with most earning less than R3.5-million. This, according to the NFVF, is due to increased process and weak economic growth resulting in deterioration of domestic spending. The results found that: • The year under review showed a decline in box office revenues, for both local and international earnings • The total South Africa’s box office receipts in the first half of 2017 were R568.1-million, down 3% compared to 2016 • SA-produced films earned over R30-million revenues (down from R43.8-million in the previous year) translating to a 31% in decline of box office earnings • South Africa’s market share fell to 5% of the box office revenue from 7% in the previous year • A total of 106 films were released in South African cinemas, out of these only 10 were SA-produced

• Of the 10 SA produced films, 40% (4) of the films were partially NFVF funded earning R22.9-million in total at box office • The top earning releases in 2017 were Fast and Furious 8, Beauty and the Beast, as well as Fifty Shades Darker • Amongst the top 20 films, Keeping up with the Kandasamys, as South African production was number 11th ; earning R16.3-million on its own. • Action was the most popular genre among SA cinemagoers in 2017, followed by Action/Adventure and Animation. Drama films had the highest proportion of releases. The NFVF believes the second half of 2017 is promising, with a number of local releases set for theatres including The Wound (Inxeba), Krotoa, Finders Keepers, Nommer 37, Pop, Lock ‘n Roll, Vaya, and Liewe Kersfeesvader (Dear Father Christmas).


ASSOCIATIONS NEWS / 39

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In a recent collaboration with City Press, SOS Coalition has been following the interviews of shortlisted candidates for a new SABC board. The beat by beat report is available on both websites and social platforms and because of recent happenings at the public broadcaster, SOS Coalition feels that exercising vigilance is imperative during this time, particularly where state-owned enterprises are concerned, they said. “More importantly, given our current political climate, and the looming 2019 national elections, the need for an independent public broadcaster is now more urgent than ever.” According to the Broadcasting Act, 12 nonexecutive members of the board must be appointed by the President on advice of the National Assembly. The National assembly selects the 12 from a shortlist compiled from publically nominated applicants who have consented to serve. The candidates who

make it on the shortlist are interviewed in Parliament and the final 12 is sent to the National Assemble. The way in which the new board should be appointed should ensure public participation in the nomination process, transparency and openness, and a published shortlist of candidates. “The SABC and the people of South Africa need a skilled, representative, and independently-minded SABC board that will uphold the public interest over commercial and/or political interests and agendas,” SOS Coalition said, “The incoming SABC board should, as a result, ensure that the SABC’s independence is fiercely protected, and that its public mandate as a public broadcaster is fulfilled.” For more information on the results of the SABC board nominations, visit www.soscoalition.org.za.

ACA CHAIR AND VICE CHAIRS 2017/18 ANNOUNCED The Association for Communication and Advertising has announced that Boniswa Pezisa, Group CEO at BBDO SA, has been elected to the position of Chair of the ACA Board following a special meeting of its Board of Directors on 27 July 2017. Gareth Leck (CEO and Co-Founder, Joe Public United), Thabang Skwanbane (MD , FCB Joburg) and Paul Middleton (MD Ebony+Ivory) were elected Vice Chairs. “As an industry body we are committed to ensure that are members always act and deliver with integrity at all times,” Pezisa said. “As a voluntary body, it is important that we hold each other accountable for our actions, therefore as a new board we have the responsibility to build on the foundation laid by the previous board whilst ensuring that we guide the industry to evolve in line with both market and the country’s needs.”

SWIFT ANNOUNCE NATION BOARD 2017/18 Sisters Working in Film and Television have announced a new national board for 2017/18. The national board are as follows: • Fazilla Wahab-Kohl (Western Cape) • Odette Geldenhuys (Western Cape) • Caroline Doherty (Gauteng) • Zoe Ramushu (Gauteng) • Aliki Saragas (Gauteng) • Flavia Motsisi (Gauteng) • Sara Blecher (Gauteng) “We have achieved so many of [our] goals over the past year and look forward to further growth and success over the years to come,” SWIFT said in a recent social post, “Thank you to all our members, partners and supporters.”

Print in a hurry. Callsheets, contact cards, booklets, posters, signage, banners and a whole lot more.

Gardens +27 21 461 9334 sales@wizardz.co.za

V&A Waterfront +27 21 419 7153 wft@wizardz.co.za

Constantia +27 21 794 1394 hellocv@wizardz.co.za

Stellenbosch +27 21 883 8515 hellosb@wizardz.co.za

25 YEARS

IN DIGITAL PRINT

© Pineapple Supply Co / Unsplash

SOS COALITION: WHY SABC BOARD INTERVIEWS MATTER


40 / DIRECTORY

www.thecallsheet.co.za

DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS COMPANY

TELEPHONE

EMAIL

WEBSITE

PAGE

Africade Productions

+27 21 447 4114

steve@africadeproductions.com

www.africadeproductions.com

Inside Front Cover

Aquila Private Game Reserve & Spa

+27 21 430 7260

res@aquilasafari.com

www.aquilasafari.com

03

DISCOP

+1 323 782 1300

discop@basiclead.com

www.discop.com

35, Inside Back Cover

Durban Film Office

+27 31 311 4243

sharon.ngcobo@durban.gov.za

www.durbanfilmmart.co.za

05

Film Finance World

+27 11 050 1312

keabetswe@destinymediaafrica.com

www.filmfinanceworld.com

34

Global Bodyguard Solutions

+27 11 824 0334

saint@intrigue.co.za

www.bodyguardservices.co.za

13

Kenings

+27 21 555 9561

shannon@kenings.co.za

www.kenings.co.za

17

KwaZulu-Natal Film Commission

+27 31 325 0200

lungiled@kwazulunatalfilm.co.za

www.kwazulunatalfilm.co.za

Outside Back Cover

Lion & Safari Park

+27 87 150 0100

info@lionpark.com

www.lionandsafaripark.com

09

Living Assets

+27 76 688 8342

clintgordon@mweb.co.za

17

Puma Video

+27 11 886 1122

henk@pumavideo.co.za

www.pumavideo.co.za

07

Santana Lifting Projects

+27 10 220 5185

info@santanaprojects.co.za

www.santanaprojects.co.za

17

Wizardz

+27 21 461 9334

andrew@wizardz.co.za

www.wizardz.co.za

39

CONTACT US Cover Image: Image courtesy of Alexandre St-Louis © Unsplash Publisher: Lance Gibbons lance@filmeventmedia.co.za Editor in Chief: Katie Reynolds-Da Silva katie@filmeventmedia.co.za Assistant Editor: Kim Crowie kim@filmeventmedia.co.za

Head of Design: Sheree Steenkamp sheree@filmeventmedia.co.za Special Projects Designer/Illustrator: Lauren Smith lauren@filmeventmedia.co.za

Business Manager: Coleen Tapson coleen@filmeventmedia.co.za Account Executive: Jennifer Dianez jennifer@filmeventmedia.co.za Account Executive: Nola Seef nola@filmeventmedia.co.za

Junior Designer: Caitlin Perrett caitlin@filmeventmedia.co.za

Production Manager: Aayesha Parker aayesha@filmeventmedia.co.za

Writer: Susan Reynard susan@filmeventmedia.co.za

Data Capturer: Ricky Ortell info@filmeventmedia.co.za

Regent Square, Ground Floor, Block A, Doncaster Road, Kenilworth, 7745 Tel: +27 21 674 0646 www.thecallsheet.co.za

JOIN US DISCLAIMER: Opinions expressed in The Callsheet do not necessarily represent the official viewpoint of the editor or the publisher, while inclusion of adverts/advertising features does not imply endorsement of any business, product or service. Copyright of this material is reserved. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, The Callsheet and/or its employees may not be held liable or responsible for any act or ommission committed by any person, including a juristic person, referred to in this publication. It and they furthermore accept(s) no responsibility for any liability arising out of any reliance that a reader of this publication places on the contents of this publication.


July 11-13, 2018


The Callsheet Issue 10  

Issue 10 of the Callsheet is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we unpack the new regulations for those using animal performer...

The Callsheet Issue 10  

Issue 10 of the Callsheet is brought to you by Film & Event Media. This month we unpack the new regulations for those using animal performer...

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