Page 33

they had got hooked, then moved house and missed their weekly parkrun. This is partly due to its set up parkrun's are free and inclusive of all. You don’t have to be an elite runner, but they do ask for you to remember your barcode! To take part, all that runners need to do is register online and bring their parkrun ID barcode (printed out) with them if they want to have their run registered and get their time. It’s really that simple. In return, they get – usually within hours of the run – their time, age grading, and whether or not they got a PB. Additionally, most events provide a weekly run report and often photographs of the runners, all available from the parkrun websites or Facebook pages. As if that wasn’t enough, runners completing 50, 100 and 250 parkruns get a free technical T-shirt (under-18s also get one for 10 runs). VOLUNTEERS One of the great things about parkrun is that each event is managed by local volunteers. This aspect is of course essential to parkruns remaining free. However, parkrun volunteering, as much as running, changes lives. Through parkrun, volunteers have learned to stand up and speak to dozens or hundreds of people; to write ‘Run Reports’; to take photographs of runners; and to organise events and manage volunteers. These experiences have helped people to discover new talents and to grow more selfconfident. Additionally, volunteering

has given people a chance to give something back to parkrun, to running or to their local community, and it has provided injured runners with something positive to do while they can’t run. And, as many volunteers have discovered, in parkrun volunteering you get back more than you put in, with lots of smiles and gasped thanks from runners. It’s hugely rewarding, including the pleasure of sharing with parkrunners each triumphant milestone: running the whole course for the first time; running PBs; reaching 50, 100 or 250 parkruns; running at 50 or 100 different events; and many more personal achievements. JUNIOR PARKRUN Just like the 5k events, the first 2k junior event was at Bushy Park. This was started by Paul Graham as a monthly event for four to 14 year olds in 2010, and now attracts hundreds of children (and accompanying parents) every month. Three other junior parkruns started over 20112013. Later in 2013 new weekly junior parkruns started up, with Ironman triathlon champion Chrissie Wellington spearheading the development of the weekly format. By 2014 there were 35 junior parkrun events across the UK. So if you haven’t tried a parkrun, what are you waiting for? There are lots of local parkruns in our area, including Wisbech, Whittlesey, March and Peterborough. So why not join the revolution this Saturday? More information can be found at www.parkrun.org.uk

LOCAL PARKRUNS Central Park Junior parkrun This free, weekly timed 2k parkrun is aimed at children between 4 and 14 and held at 9am every Sunday. Held at Central Park in Peterborough, it’s open and safe for all to take part in. Peterborough parkrun Held at the beuatiful Ferry Meadows, this 5k timed run starts at the cafe every Saturday morning at 9am. This is a great one to bring the family to, as they can play in the park or enjoy a hot drink while they cheer you back to the finish. Whittlesey parkrun The newest in the area, Whittlesey’s parkrun has grown from strength to strength. Held at The Manor Leisure Centre on Saturdays, starting at 9am, all abilities are welcome. March parkrun March’s parkrun is held on Saturdays at West End Park on City Road. These parkrunners are a friendly bunch and encourage you to have a post run coffee at The Royal Exchange Tea Parlour on Market Place. Wisbech Junior parkrun Launched last year, this 2k run is held every Sunday at 9am at Wisbech Park on Park Avenue. Remember under 11s must run alongside an adult. The Fens | July 2019

33

Profile for The Fens magazine

The Fens Greater Peterborough July 2019  

The Fens July issue features an interview with Fenland artist Nick Tearle and we visit Ayscoughfee Hall

The Fens Greater Peterborough July 2019  

The Fens July issue features an interview with Fenland artist Nick Tearle and we visit Ayscoughfee Hall

Advertisement