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chairs positioned in front of the perfume counter and cabinets of curiosity, displaying scientific apparatus and products (particularly in-keeping with the Liberty aesthetic). This commitment to revelatory process is part of an intriguing trend, tied not only to the olfactory market but one that is also predominant in others sectors. Pioneering the idea since its inception in 1999, Nick Knight’s fashion and arts website, SHOWstudio allows viewers to witness the entire creative process of the fashion industry, through its live broadcasts and behind-the-scenes footage; and more recently, guests at Dolce and Gabbana’s Spring/Summer 2008 catwalk show were shown video-footage of the creation of hand-painted garments before models emerged wearing the respective pieces. In the totally unrelated food industry, the concept of process is a

prevalent component: patrons of Fergus Henderson’s east London restaurant, St. John, share space with the kitchen staff, as their food is prepared; and in Heston Blumenthal’s ‘In Search of Perfection’ series, each episode was dedicated to extensive researching, sourcing and meticulous preparation of traditional dishes. More than ever before, we are concerned with where things come from and how they are made and such examples of careful explanation, dissection and demonstration are incredibly refreshing and make for a fascinating, compelling experience. Le Labo is a perfect example of what modern perfumery should be. One interesting comparison for Le Labo at Liberty is G. Baldwin & Co, London’s oldest and most established herbalist founded in 1844, which has built a solid reputation based on quality, affordable natural products. Baldwin’s standalone store on the

ISSUE 1 — ­ 81

Issue 1: The Fashion Almanac  

A Graphic and Textual Exploration of the Fashion World

Issue 1: The Fashion Almanac  

A Graphic and Textual Exploration of the Fashion World

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