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Friday, Jan. 25, 2013 Vol. 3, No. 1

To hen or not to hen

Hens like these could be coming to a backyard near you in Nelson.

Open house on backyard chickens and bees. See story “Hens and bees� on page 2

Chickens are are bear attractants. See commentary on page 8

Monica Nissan

Express readers opinionate about hens in Nelson. See survey results on page 9


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 2

“Hens & Bees” open house to be held at Nelson City Hall Wednesday, Jan. 30, 6:30-9 p.m. at City Hall in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 310 Ward St The Nelson HENS group (Homegrown Eggs for Nelson Sustainability) is encouraging Nelson residents to attend the City of Nelson’s “Hens & Bees” Open House. There will be presentations by the regional Apiary (Bee) Inspector and a local expert on bear issues at 7pm sharp. There will be information about how other municipalities are handling these issues, including some of the concerns and benefits. Whether you would

like to learn more about backyard hens and bees or you have some solution-oriented ideas to share with council, please attend this important event. The idea of backyard chickens is not new. Cities as large as Los Angeles, New York and Vancouver have passed bylaws allowing residents to keep a few hens, and communities as small and rural as Rossland and Kaslo have also successfully been keeping hens, so why not Nelson?

Of course, the City of Nelson is unique and homegrown ideas on how to make backyard hens and bees a success in our city are needed. For example, The Nelson Good Neighbours neighbourhood volunteer mediation program was put together precisely to support new initiatives such as this in our city. A few representatives of the program will be there to explain their potential role. The information presented will be made avail-

able on the City’s webpage after the event. There will also be an opportunity to leave comments online, so those who cannot attend the Open House can have their input heard. For more information on the Nelson HENS group, email Nelsonchickens@gmail. com or find them on Facebook at http:// www.facebook.com/#!/ NelsonBackyardHens submitted by The Nelson HENS group

For more information visit http://www.nelson.ca/EN/main/services/planning-building-services/current-planning-projects/hens-bees.html

Carnaval d’hiver celebrates French Canadian culture and language Friday, Feb. 1, 7- 9 p.m. at Trafalgar School Grounds Canadian Parents for coordinator. It’s an opporFrench (CPF), Nelson tunity to enjoy the outdoors chapter is once again host- with your friends and faming the Carnaval d’hiver ily and practice French to celebrate winter fun and speaking. French Canadian culture There’s something and language. They have for everyone: broomball, been hosting the annual dancing, crafts, winter winter carnaval since 2009 games, and entertainwith help from its sister ment, including les beaux organization AFKO, the chanteurs de l’AFKO West Kootenay franco- and PartyPartyDJ carnaphone association, and the val music. Admission to participation and support Carnaval is free. However, of the French Immersion bring your toonies for “la programs and students of piece de resistance” from Trafalgar and LV High the cabane à sucre – maple school and Nelson’s fran- sugar taffy. Also available cophone school Ecole for purchase will be deliSentiers Alpins. cious maple syrup prodAll are welcome to ucts and membership to participate in this fam- both CPF and AFKO, welily oriented event. “We’re comed to demonstrate supdelighted to be hosting port of French Language the 5th annual carnaval” learning. said Patricia Dehnel, event Canadian Parents for

French (CPF) is a parent led non-profit national organization that believes in a bilingual Canada and supports opportunities for French language learning and culture. For information about CPF or carnaval please contact pdehnel@hotmail.com. submitted by Canadian Parents for French BC & Yukon-Nelson Chapter

SUBMITTED

Fun at a previous Carnaval d’hiver

http://www.kolmel.com


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 3

Peace activist and former Iraqi hostage speaks in Nelson

Friday, Feb. 8, 7 p.m. at the Shambhala Music & Performing Hall, Selkirk CollegeTenth Street Campus, Nelson In November 2005, and American Tom Fox, U.S. detention, citing that Loney and three other men were kidnapped and held the prospect for a fair trial were captured by armed hostage in Baghdad in a was minimal. gunmen and held hostage story that made internaLoney’s story has in Iraq. Loney was part of tional headlines. Their 118 been captured in his highly a delegate from Christian days of captivity were the acclaimed book, Captivity: Peacemaker Teams – an ultimate test of personal 118 Days in Iraq and organization that sends strength. All four captives the Struggle for a World activists trained in nonvio- were handcuffed together Without War. Loney will be lence to conflict zones in which made basic physical sharing his personal experiorder to reduce violence. tasks like sleeping and eat- ence of captivity, his vision SUBMITTED The four were in Iraq in ing extremely challenging. of a world without war, and James Loney: Peace Activist and order to work with local Additionally, the boredom, his life-long commitment to Former Iraqi Hostage organizations on humani- the scarcity of food and pacifism. able at Otter Books, Selkirk tarian projects, to support not knowing whether one The event will be held College Bookstore (365local peace and human would make it out alive, at the Shambhala Music 1281) and are $16 adults, rights work, and to raise challenged their psycho- & Performing Hall, and- $13 students and seniors. awareness back home about logical and spiritual well- will feature a special per- For more information, call the human rights abuses being. Loney, Kember and formance by Castlegar’s 250.365.1234. being perpetrated by the Sooden were rescued in a Vision of Peace Youth submitted by American-backed war in high profile military opera- Choir. Tickets are availSelkirk College Iraq. tion after 118 days in cap“We are very happy to tivity. Tom Fox, however, have James Loney be part had been killed two weeks Call for Board of Director Nominations of the Mir Centre for Peace before their release. Winter Lecture Series. He Loney’s rescue did not brings a personal story end his relationship with that is very inspiring” says his former captors. Loney, Randy Janzen, Chair for Kember and Sooden pubthe Mir Centre for Peace at licly forgave their captors at Selkirk College. a press conference in 2006. Loney and his three In 2007, Loney and his colcolleagues, fellow Canadian leagues refused to testify Harmeet Singh Sooden, at the trial of their captors, Norman Kember of Britain who were being held in

Kootenays to send busload to pipeline hearing Monday, Jan. 28, 6 a.m. - 10 p.m., Nelson to Kelowna The West Kootenay and returning at about 9:30 EcoSociety is charter- or 10 p.m. that evening. ing a bus for a one-day, The cost for participants there and back, trip to will be only $30 each for show opposition to the the trip. Anyone interestEnbridge Pipeline hearing ed can contact the West in Kelowna on Monday, Kootenay EcoSociety at Jan. 28. The bus will be 250-354-1909, or via email leaving Nelson at 6 a.m., at info@ecosociety.ca. picking up people in submitted by the West Castlegar and Grand Forks, Kootenay EcoSociety

Enrich your community and your life by joining our Board of Directors

http://www.nelsoncu.com/

There are three positions up for election. Two Directors-Nelson Representative Area (3 year term) One Director at Large (3 year term) Please contact Executive Assistant, Virginia Makaroff for information - 250.352.7207. Applications must be received no later than Thursday, January 31, 2013. www.nelsoncu.com


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 4

9 men to run for Mr. Nelson 2013

Saturday, Feb. 16, 7 p.m. at Finley’s Irish Pub & Grill, $15.00 for single/ $25.00 for two The 3rd Annual Mr. charities are KidSport and 4-1, Patrick/Canadian Nelson Contest/ Fundraiser the Nelson Food Cupboard. Postal Service, Sevrin announced the nine contes- For more information, con- Baker/Posture Health & tants for this year’s event. tact Facebook page: Mr. Development,Abe Fominoff/ Prize basket for winner is Nelson B.C AM Ford/ Annie’s Boutique estimated at $500.00. There The 9 men running this Tickets are available at will also be prizes for year and their sponsors are: Finley’s Irish Pub and Grill Mr. Ticket Sales and Mr. Roy Wood/Nelson Chrysler, and through contestants at Congeniality. All prizes have Greg Bishop/Nelson Ford, their businesses. They are been donated by Nelson Nikko Forsberg/Eddy all vying for Mr. Ticket Businesses. Music, Dustin Stashko/103.5 Sales! Tickets will also be Past years events have The Bridge FM, Ed Wilkie/ available at the Door raised over $5000 for char- Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill, submitted by the ity in one night. This year’s Dan Cosens/Canadian 2Mr. Nelson, BC contest

Mr. Nelson 2009 Robert Boyd

Nelson Leafs home game to be a fundraiser for the MS Society Saturday, Feb. 2, 7 p.m. at the Nelson & District Community Complex The Nelson Leafs son home game against Tickets to the game hockey team are hosting Beaver Valley. There will are available at Stuart’s a fundraising night for the be a silent auction and News and in the floorWest Kootenay Chapter some raffles, as well as ing department of Maglio of the MS Society dur- kids crafts and an activi- Building Centre. A poring their regular sea- ties table. tion of the proceeds from

the tickets sold at these locations will go towards the MS Society. submitted by the MS Society of Canada, West Kootenay Chapter

Solutions to prevent frozen pipes The hot and cold water pipes under my kitchen sink have both frozen during this recent cold snap. None of the other water pipes throughout the house have been effected. Can you suggest a reason for this and possible solutions?

Home Front

by Bill Lynch, Paul Muntak & Steve Cannon

There are several possible sources of cold from the exterior that can cause water pipes to freeze. Because the pipes at your kitchen sink are the only ones that have been affected this may indicate that a small portion of the water piping travels through a section of exterior wall before the pipes reach your sink. Occasionally, for convenience or appearance,

plumbers will install a small portion of the hot and cold piping in an exterior wall just before it comes into the sink cabinet. Insulation installers in turn, split the insulation batts around the piping which ensures that only half of the wall insulation is installed between the piping and the exterior siding. This means that the piping is protected by R10 instead of R20 insulation. During a cold snap this is often insufficient pro-

tection to prevent pipes from freezing. If during your investigation you find that this is the case consider relocating the pipes closer to the inside warm surface of the exterior wall. Also, increase the amount of insulation on the cold side of the wall by installing high-density ridged insulation behind the pipes, which has a higher R-value per inch of thickness than traditional Fiberglas insulation.

You can also consider installing heat tape on an exposed portion of the pipe near the area of freezing. Purchase a good quality, thermostatically controlled tape because it will last longer and conserve electricity by coming on only at lower temperatures. Check your heat tape every fall for function before relying on it to protect your pipes. There are other possible causes for frozen water piping. Sometimes a set of

Steve, Chris and Bill are Building Consultants with Lynch Building Inspection Services Ltd. of Nelson. http://www.lynchinspections.com


theExpress Update

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

BusinessNews

Page 5

Free Aboriginal business course coming to Nelson After being presented to over 1,500 people in 85 communities around BC, the free Aboriginal BEST (Business and Entrepreneurship Skills Training) program is coming to Nelson. Aboriginal BEST is open to anyone who self-identifies as Aboriginal, in full or in part. BEST helps participants identify business opportunities and determine their feasibility. They learn how to conduct market research, write business plans and explore financing options. If they want, they get to pitch their business idea to a panel of community leaders. A wide variety of guest speakers round out the training. Graduates then have the unique opportunity to apply to a loan program set up just for BEST participants. And take part in a Dragon’s Den-type business com-

petition in Vancouver in March, all expenses paid. Nelson resident Bruce Lacroix is the Provincial Coordinator of BEST and created the training program and will be facilitating the Nelson course. “We do not ask for Aboriginal ID at the door. Many Canadians have Aboriginal lineage. A parent, grand parent or great-grand parent who was First Nations, Metis or Inuit means that you are Aboriginal for the purpose of this program. The program is supported by the B.C. Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation and Service Canada. Its goal is giving Aboriginal people the skills needed to create their own jobs and build capacity in local communities. The program has generated many successful busi-

nesses including restaurants, heavy equipment operators, cycle shops, fishing charters, tutors, trainers, catering, native art, furniture manufacturer, lawn care, first-aid trainers, computer recycling, tour-guiding, gift-shop, website developer and home maintenance businesses. The free program will be offered in mid-February in partnership with Community Futures.Anyone interested in finding out more is invited to a free information session on Wednesday, January 30th at Community Futures, 514 Vernon Street. And you can go online to www.aboriginalbest.com to learn more and see what others have to say about the program or to register in advance. submitted by BC Ministry of Aboriginal Relations

Scope Creep workshop brings project management expert to Nelson Wednesday Jan. 30, 1-4 p.m. at the Prestige Lakeside Resort in Nelson Lurking in the heart of many proj- managing project scope. ects and contractors is the dreaded “Projects are one of the key eleScope Creep. Gradually and subtly, ments to most businesses, whether it begins to expand the breadth of the it is developing a new product or project, already underway, with the managing a new marketing initiative. addition of new ideas and features. Most businesses have experienced the The result for project staff and frustration of a project going over contractors can be a loss of time and budget, over time, or spiralling away money, but when handled well, scope with customer change requests. It is change can allow projects to be more not only frustrating, but can impact tailored to fit client needs, and allow company profits and brand.” said the client to better understand what Amber Hayes, KAST Mentorship and additional factors should be consid- Business Assistance (MBA) Program ered. Jamal Moustafaev, president of Coordinator. Thinktank Consulting and internation“We are fortunate to have the ally acclaimed expert in the areas of opportunity to learn from an expert project management, scope definition like Mr. Moustafev. Making changes and requirements analysis, will address to how projects are written and delivthese issues in a half-day workshop on ered can make a real and very positive

impact on Kootenay businesses.” Mr. Moustafaev is a highly regarded speaker and the author of “Delivering Exceptional Project Results: A Practical Guide to Project Selection, Scoping, Estimation and Management”, and “Project Scope Management: A Practical Guide for Engineering, Product, Construction, IT and Enterprise Projects”. The workshop is being offered free of charge and is coordinated by the Kootenay Association for Science and Technology (KAST). Space is limited, and registration is required. Visit kric.ca or kast.com for more information and to register. submiited by Kootenay Rockies Innovation Council

Did you know? Past issues of The Express News Update and even some of The Express Newspaper can be found at www.issuu.com/theexpressnewspaper


theExpress Update

ScienceNews

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 6

Ever wonder how it is possible to skate on ice? dr. science Christine Humphries

Skating is a good example of how the laws of physics apply to everyday activities. To get moving the first step in skating is pushing off. Here, Newton’s third law comes into play; it states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. When you push off, your back

leg applies a force on the ice and the ice applies an opposite and equal force on your leg causing you to move forward. You now have kinetic energy (motion energy) as you glide forward and, in theory, you will keep moving until acted on by an external force, such as friction (Newton’s second law). The contact between the blade andDifficulty ice, however, has a low coefficient of friction such that even a small push will keep you

Sudoku Classic

gliding for a long distance. The low friction between the blade of your skate and the ice is due to a thin layer of water on the surface of the ice. Scientists used to think that the ice melted beneath the blade due to heat caused by friction or pressure. However, scientists have now determined that the top layer of ice always has a thin layer of water Level - Easy because the crystalline structure of ice molecules is not favoured at the ice/

air interface. Without this layer of water, the ice would have a friction coefficient similar to concrete! Stopping on skates also involves physics. Although bumping into the boards is one way to stop, the proper stopping technique involves turning the skate blade perpendicular to the direction of motion to increase the friction between sk9E000036 the edge of the Difficulty blade and the ice. Enjoy skating, and physics, this winter!

Sudoku Classic

Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

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theExpress Update

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 7

Arts&Entertainment

New art classes offered at Oxygen Art Centre The Winter/Spring semester at Oxygen kicks off in February with Writing the Wild a new course from Kootenay eco-activist and author of 5 books, K.Linda Kivi. Visual artists have a plethora of workshops to choose from for all ages and experience levels. Both adults and youth are welcome to sign up for the 1 day long painting workshops with local painter Karen Guilbault. How Did You Get That Colour? is an

introductory course, while Starting a Painting: Moving from Abstract to Realism requires some prior experience. Acrylic Painting Intermediate with instructor Jillian Davis is an indepth exploration of acrylic paint. Painting & Drawing Workshop: The Human Face with Deborah Thompson is a 3-day studio workshop intensive beginning with studies of the skull and anatomy of the head that will lay a foundation to go on to

explore the human face and its infinite expressions. March sees the return of the ever-popular Collage Painting with Natasha Smith. April brings Singing the Blues & Singing Beyond the Blues with the fabulous Bessie Wapp, as well as a painting course: Creating Space with Deborah Thompson, and welcomes Elana Banfield and Will Klatte with their new course Spoken Word and Slam Poetry, which both Youth

and Adults are welcome to attend. May finishes strong with the very popular Painting with Beeswax and Advancing The Basics: Encaustic Painting with Erica Konrad. Early registration is recommended to guarantee a place in the course. Visit their website: www.oxygenartcentre.org info@oxygenartcentre.org To register for courses phone: 250-352-2821 submitted by Oxygen Arts Centre

Kids Dance Classes offered at the Harrop Hall

The Outlet District Kootenanny Society announced registration for Kids Dance Classes at the Harrop Hall, with Dance Teacher & Choreographer Rosslyne Campen. Lessons are offered in different age groups. There will be classes in footwork, tim-

ing, balance, and style, to classic as well as modern music genres. Classes will be held on Feb. 18th, 25th. Mar. 4th, 11th, 22nd, and 29th. For more info call 250-229-5370, or email kootenannyman@gmail.com submitted by the Outlet District Kootenanny Society

Kootenay Gallery: Call for artists SUBMITTED

Trillium School of Dance students share their hard work at their annual recital, “For The Love of Dance”. This year it will be held at the Capitol Theatre on May 26.

Dance classes for all ages offered in South Slocan The Trillium School of Dance studio in South Slocan offers 15-week dance classes for all ages with classes beginning Wednesday, Feb. 6 and Thursday, Feb. 7. For

more information & to register Contact A.S.A.P: Jennifyre at 250-359-2288 or 250-355-2781 or e-mail trilliumdance@yahoo.ca submitted by Trillium School of Dance

Visit the Express YouTube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/expressnewsupdate?feature=mhee

Deadline for submissions: Friday, Mar. 8 In celebration of the invited to submit artwork Craft Council of British for consideration. The Columbia’s 40th anniversa- curated selection of artwork ry, the Kootenay Gallery of will highlight the artist’s Art will host an exhibition dedication to creative pracof contemporary craft that tice, familiarity with chosen demonstrates artistic inno- materials, craftsmanship, vation in the creative use and the understanding of of craft materials and pro- the communicative potencesses. The exhibition will tial of contemporary craft. take place at the Kootenay For more information Gallery of Art, Castlegar, or a copy of the Call for British Columbia, from Artists application visit September 20 - November www.kootenaygallery.com 9, 2013. or contact the Kootenay Artists who create one- Gallery at 250-365-3337 or of-a-kind and/or production kootenaygallery@telus.net. work in traditional and consubmitted by the Kootenay temporary craft media are Gallery of Art


theExpress Update

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 8

Opinion&Editorial

What you should know about hens and bees within city limits Commentary by Grant MacHutchon, Wildlife Biologist, M.Sc., R.P.Bio. I support the efforts of Nelson dents adhere to those regulations. If pose little danger to humans. What residents to raise their own food, a better job is not done to regulate risk would you rather have, the small however, I also know from my 30+ and manage all bear attractants, then possibility that a child is mildly year professional experience as a hens and bees in the City will exac- shocked by an electric fence or the biologist specializing in bears that erbate an already very difficult situa- larger possibility that they bump into hens and bees can be powerful attrac- tion. Multiple bears are killed every a black bear or grizzly bear roaming tants to bears and other predators. year and human property damaged the City destroying coops and beeIn principle, it is possible to raise in the City because of the inaction hives? hens and bees and have minimal con- of individuals and the community at · Chickens should be housed in flict with bears and other predators. large. appropriate coops that meet City However, this requires a concerted Consequently, I would only sup- specifications and should not be effort on the part of individual resi- port the keeping of hens and bees roaming freely. dents and also strong guidance and in the City of Nelson if there was a · Chickens should be put in a direction from City staff. I would be strong bylaw regulating their hus- hard sided hut within the coop at more optimistic about this possibil- bandry and effective enforcement of night. ity, but, unfortunately, to date City this bylaw to ensure residents were · Chicken feed should be stored staff and residents have not done a meeting or exceeding the regulations. in a bear-resistant container or facilvery good job of managing garbage, This bylaw should contain the fol- ity and extra chicken feed should be fruit trees, and other attractants. A lowing: cleaned up every day. revised Waste Management Bylaw · Beehives and chicken coops · Residents raising chickens or with wildlife attractant regulations must be protected by a properly con- bees must be registered with the City has been in place since June 2011, structed and maintained predator- and sign an agreement to maintain but there has not been a concerted exclusion electric fence. Despite the chickens or bees according to the effort by City staff to make sure resi- some people’s fears, electric fences bylaw.

My Opinion

by Spencer Pollard

What to Wear and Why Should I Care? Often the first thing we do when we get up is decide what to wear; it can be the most important decision of the day. What do you want others to see you as? As the funloving guy in the office or the stern leader? It’s something people often don’t think about too much. My general process regarding clothing is really non-existent, I generally wear whatever I have gotten good feedback from others. If I remember getting a compliment from a shirt i’ve worn to the office it usually is my first choice.

It makes the most sense to choose something you already know will get a positive reception. You should also of course dress the part, just because wearing your dirty old tshirt at home is alright doesn’t make it appropriate for a work setting. Clothing is important, sure it’s not as important of a thing to talk about as global or economic issues but it’s something we have to deal with everyday. So the next time you decide what to wear for the day, think smart and do what works for everyone.

Spencer Pollard is an young man living in Nelson BC with an interest in digital arts and writing. His ideas are of benefit to all of Nelson, and to stroke his abnormally large ego

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We encourage our readers to write to us. Please address letters meant for publication to the editor and send via email to express@expressnews.bc.ca or submit through our website at www.expressnews.ca We do not accept open letters. Letters must be short (200 words maximum) and to the point. We reserve the right to edit letters for taste and clarity, and the decision to publish or not to publish is completely at the discretion of the editor and publisher. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. Only your name and the community where you live will be published. We will not print “name withheld” letters. Opinions in the paper are not necessarily those of the Express Update or its advertisers.

Submit your Letter to the Editor at www.expressnews.ca/letters.html

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The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

TheSurvey

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 9

The Nelson Transfer Station will be moving, eventually. This will open up some prime waterfront real estate for potential development.

What do you think would be an appropriate use for this property?

Click here or visit the link below

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/transfer_station

Last week’s survey responses: How do you feel about backyard hens in the City of Nelson? I support backyard hens in Nelson and plan to keep them myself

40.0%

I support other people keeping backyard hens in Nelson

43.6%

I do not think backyard hens should be allowed in city

12.7%

I need more information to decide

PROS: It’s a great, clean source of fresh high quality nutrition. Would love to see more city farming, greenhouse farming, and fish -stocking in our lake. It’s one more step towards Food Security. Good for citizens and children to be more in touch with the land. It’s traditional. CONS: Hens only, no roosters! Roosters can be brought into town for day visits :) No Killer Bees! HENS provide valuable services and don’t present a risk to city-dwellers! It’s a no brainer- Nelson get with the times!

3.6%

Additional comments:

AS long as they are being kept in sanitary humane conditions and there is a system in place for dealing with people not meeting humane conditions. I think the more backyard food production we can all do, the better. PROVIDES sustainability, better, healthier eggs, one less thing people have to buy from corporations. IT just needs to be done right. ATTRACTANT to predators, Noise Potential health hazard.

BECAUSE having chicken helps to create stronger food security and stronger communities. THE locallest and freshest eggs possible! Friendly birds! There’s lots of great designs out there for small scale, humane, and neighbourly chicken coops - and the density in my area (Uphill) is definitely low enough that there’s plenty of space to share some with chickens and bees. NO roosters - they are noisy as soon as the sun comes up.

3 or 4 backyard hens provide good eggs and compost to those who keep them. They are quiet (but not silent) and provide a tiny bit more autonomy a family can have over exactly what it eats. A major part of my families diet as well as a great tool for teaching my 2 young children some great life lessons and responsibility. IT’S all part of food security. We need to produce more of our own food and not rely on everything being trucked/flown in.

The Express Survey is not a scientific survey but is intended to promote discussion in our community. The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

TheSurvey

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 10

Last week’s survey comments continued: IT’S crazy to have such sustainability-minded folk not being able to sustain themselves on their own property! I can’t see there being a bear problem as long as the chickens are kept enclosed at night and aren’t running all over the neighborhood. As for the noise, most times that’s the rooster...so I agree with limiting it to just hens. WHY should it be a crime to produce food for ourselves? Shouldn’t we all be more self sustaining? Shouldn’t we help the environment by using local eggs in our backyards than driving to stores where the eggs were also trucked in from hundreds or thousands of kilometers away? OVERALL people are responsible with their pets/ animals: which department would monitor the care of these hens, if concerns about their care were to arise. AS long as there are bylaws that are enforced regarding quantity, safety/odor and animal welfare issues, I think having backyard hens (and/ or bees) could help with in providing local, sustainable and healthy food sources. RAISING hens brings food security to people, and keeps them in touch with nature. Hens eat food scraps, thus becoming composters. Hens are wonderful for children to be around, and help with the related chores. URBAN chicken coops should be occupied by hens only. Crowing roosters are one of the reasons why some people might be opposed.

RAISING our own eggs and chickens locally is a step toward enhanced food security. I don’t think chickens would be any more irritating to neighbours than dogs already are. And if tensions should arise between neighbours over backyard hens, there is a free voluntary mediation service available from the Transition Nelson Good Neighbour program. HENS don’ scare me I would like to support this idea but I don’t think that most people realise the work involved in properly cleaning a chicken’s cage/ area so that it doesn’t smell bad to their neighbours. It’s a lot of responsibility, and I would only support it if there were guidelines and someone from the city who was responsible for checking on the cleanliness and health of the cages/yards/chickens on a regular basis. I belive that this would work very well if the number of hens is limited and “farmers” are required to take out an annual permit that the City can keep track of hen holders for statistical reasons and to be able to control noncompliant hen holders. THE more connected people are to where their food comes from, the better. If residents of cities like Vancouver, New York and London can have chickens, it’s crazy that we can’t in Nelson! THEY attract predators to the city which could endanger children. It would cost too much to police.

THERE a no problems with the idea that cannot be easily overcome, and we can certainly be more responsible for our own food local production. I support 100 % having domestic birds in the city. I live on the edge of Nelson and worry about attracting predators hoping the meeting will address this and would like to keep goats as well. ITS ridiculous if you want hens have hens. If you have close neighbours ask then if they will have issue, but really if you take care of them properly your neighbours won’t even know. A small number of well managed hens reduces our collective carbon footprint and gives good compost. I kept hens in Procter, a high-density urban-like area for 15 years with no problems with either neighbours, nor wild-life which is certainly prevalent, for the city to be standing in the way is absurd. HENS will draw coyotes and other animals that prey on chickens. Not everyone will keep their hen coops clean resulting in very smelly air. Houses are too close together in most areas of Nelson so neighbours’ chickens will sound as if they are in one’s yard. CHICKENS are a wonderful resource for feeding ourselves with their eggs. They also can be very rewarding in that they are entertaining to watch, can have stunning plumage, and are great for keeping pests out of your garden.

GROWING concerns about food safety and security have led to an increased interest in citizens (such as myself) having more control over their own food supply. City Council needs to show its leadership on this issue, and can do so by promoting different programs and initiatives that promote local, community food sources. As more people living within urban environments realize the lack of connectivity they have with the majority of their food sources, they need to have ways to become more involved in their own food production. Raising a few chickens in a contained environment in their own backyard ensures an accessible, healthy, organic, and local source of nutritious protein in the form of fresh eggs on a daily basis, and is one simple solution to the problem. For the few people that would undertake owning and caring for chickens in the city, a simple set of rules laid out by a new City bylaw (such as restricted numbers of chickens per owner, limited coop and pen size vs. lot size, set distances from other buildings, etc.) could easily be set in place to ensure that the City maintains its charm, while further demonstrating that Nelson is a place that promotes sustainable living, environmental awareness, and forward thinking. Surely if larger cities such as Toronto, Vancouver, New York and London have found ways to make it work, a city such as Nelson can as well, not to mention all the other place across BC that are now allowing people to take part in growing their own food.

The Express Survey is not a scientific survey but is intended to promote discussion in our community. The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 11

InMemory Annie Pearl Sylvester April 22, 1921 – January 19, 2013

On Saturday, January 19, 2013 at the Fairview

Home, Brandon, MB, Annie “Anne” Pearl Sylvester, beloved wife of the late William (Bill) Sylvester, passed away at the age of 91 years. Predeceased by her husband William (Bill), her parents; 3 brothers and 2 sisters. Anne is survived by her 2 sons: Robert (Pat) of Nelson, BC; 3 grandchildren Chris (Mel) and their children Cade and Brooke of Amman,

Jordan, Leigh (Elyssa) and their children Tayler and Ty of Edmonton, AB and Tricia (Harold Alexander) of Castlegar, BC; and son Gary (Brenda) of Brandon, MB. Anne’s life was wrapped up in her home, family and friends. Should friends so desire, memorial donations may be made to the Portage District General Hospital Foundation, 524

Fifth St S.E., Portage la Prairie, MB, R1N 3A8 or to a charity of the donor’s choice. Condolences may be sent to the family c/o Omega Funeral Home, 83 Royal Road South, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, R1N 1T8, 1-800-303-4621 or friends may leave a message of sympathy on their web site: www.omegafuneralhome.com or www.thompsonfs.ca

Anne Chernoff

Anne was born on August 25th, 1920 to Bill and Annie Barabonoff in Pelly, Saskatchewan. She was the older sister to her only sibling Fred. Anne, her parents and brother Fred left Pelly and moved to Salmo, BC. On December 29th, 1944 Anne married Pete Chernoff and together they made their permanent home in Salmo, BC. Pete worked at the Rotter Lumber Mill while Anne stayed back and tended to the household. Unfortunately they were never blessed with any children. In 1971, Pete

passed away at the early age of 51. Anne remained in Salmo and began caring for her mother Annie Barabonoff. On November 13th, 1984 Grandmother Barabonoff passed away and Auntie Ann remained in the town of Salmo. Auntie kept busy and was very well known for her handy-crafts. When you walked into her house she had her crocheted doilies placed on the furniture and hung on the walls. Afghans with matching pillows laid everywhere. You knew that if you received a gift it would be one of those items that would be treasured forever. In 1993, she made the move to Castlegar and bought herself a trailer near the “Banana” store (No Frills). There was no mistaking which home belonged to Anne. The flowers seemed to fill

every square inch of her yard; but it was the Red Rose bush in the front that stood out the most. Auntie spent her time singing with the Nelson Doukhobor Ladies Choir and traveling. She loved travelling but it was her trip to Russia that was the most memorable and would remain in her mind as some of the happiest moments spent in her life. She did take several other trips that included; the Oregon Coast, Laflin, Hawaii as well as the various bus trips exploring the countless gambling places in the state of Washington. In 2011, Auntie was moved to Castle Wood Village. During her time there she made many friends and enjoyed an active social life. On December 23rd, 2012 she was not feeling well and was admit-

ted to Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital. Due to complications of her illness she passed away peacefully on January 16, 2013 at the age of 92 years. She is predeceased by her parents William and Annie Barabonoff, beloved husband Pete Chernoff and numerous 1⁄2 brothers and sisters. She is survived by her brother Fred, countless nephews and nieces as well as many friends. A Funeral Service will be held on Thursday, January 24th, 2013 from 9AM until Noon at the Crescent Valley Hall with burial to follow at the Krestova Cemetery. Online condolences may be expressed at www.thompsonfs.ca Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd.

Submit free obituaries or birth announcements to express@expressnews.ca


theExpress Update

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

What’sHappening

Page 12

Nelson & Area: Fri. Jan. 35 - Sun. Feb 3 ●●● Live Music

Fri. Jan 25l Request DJ. ●●●Prince Edward & The Islands w/ guests at the Royal 8 p.m. ●●●Kori K at Spiritbar 10 p.m. ●●Speed Dating in the Kootenays at Spiritbar 8 p.m. Fundraiser for the Kootenay Lake Hospital Foundation Pre-registration is required. http://www.humehotel.com/spiritbar ●●Nelson Leafs Hockey Home game vs Spokane at the Nelson and District Community Complex 7 p.m. ●Women of all ages get together to knit, crochet lace, make rugs & more. Women’s Centre 10-1 p.m. ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Jan 26 ●●●Nelson Overture Concerts Society presents: Allison Girvan, “Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home” Allison performs works by composers Kurt Weill and George Gershwin, Adam Guettel and Ricky Ian Gordon. Joining her on stage will be pianist Christoph Martens, upright bassist Mark Spielman and violinist Don Macdonald. 8 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre ●●●Spoon Castro, Junipuur Jupiter, Kyla Hanna, Emaline Delapaix at Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions, 12-3 ●●●Rain Dogs - A Tribute to Tom Waits at the Royal 8 p.m. ●●Nelson Leafs Hockey Home game vs Grand Forks at the Nelson and District Community Complex 7 p.m. ●Tales for Twos. Nelson Public Library 10:15. 2 - 3 yr. olds. Preregister 352-6333/ scummings@nelson.ca 8 weeks

●● Special Events ● Ongoing Events ●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. Local and German musicians to perform 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. ●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Jan 27 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ●●Nelson Leafs Hockey Home game vs Revelstoke at the Nelson and District Community Complex 2:30 p.m. ●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515. ●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone welcome. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Texas Hold’em Poker at the Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727. Mon. Jan 28 ●●●Sarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. ●●Enbridge Hearing in Kelowna: The West Kootenay EcoSociety is chartering a bus leaving Nelson at 6 a.m. $30 each 250-354-1909, info@ecosociety.ca ●●West Kootenay Ostomy Meeting, Pharmasave Store, Trail, 2 pm. Guest: Video conference, Convatec rep. Info: 250368-9827

Saturday, Jan. 26, Noon - 3p.m. 523 Front St.

Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions presents four singer/songwriters this week starting with Spoon Castro and Junipuur Jupiter, two local young musicians with a half hour each. They will be followed by Kyla Hanna from Salmo who has studied at Selkirk’s music program and has been featured on a compilation CD of Kootenay artists called “Sound Vibes 2007”. Closing act is Berlin based Australian singer songwriter will be Emaline

Delapaix who’s on a solo winter tour of SUBMITTED BC. She Emaline Delapaix performs on piano, guitar and will also be at the Bluebelle Bistro in Kaslo on Thursday, Sleep is for Sissies in Winlaw on Friday, John Ward’s Fine Coffee in Nelson on Sunday and Drift Izakaya in Rossland on Tuesday. submitted by Ellison’s Cafe

●Walk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates, Mon & Thurs 9:30-10:30

●Overeaters Anonymous Education Room Community First Medical Clinic 518 Lake Street Nelson noon

●Heritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-3526892 Tues. Jan 29●●●Cliff ●●●Cliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge

●●●Open Mic Night Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 2-5 p.m. Wed. Jan 30

●●● Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●●Backyard Hens and Bees information and feedback session at Nelson City Hall Council Chambers 310 Ward Street 6:30-9 p.m.

●●Scope Creep business workshop restige Lakeside Resort in Nelson 1-4pm kric.ca or kast.com to register. ●Learn to make a QUILT with Susan Foot at the Women’s Centre 9-11.45 call 551-4951

●Nelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free. http://www.nelson-tech-club.info/ email info@nelson-tech-club.info ●Nelson Women’s Centre Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-3529916.

●Darts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Girls’ Night with MargaretAnn at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. 250-3525656.

●Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. Phone 250-352-6008. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org


theExpress Update

What’sHappening Thurs. Jan 31 ●●●Kiyo & Guests at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m. ●●●The Tequila Mockingbird Orchestra w/ Tofu Stravinsky at the Royal 8:30 p.m. ●●Ballet Jorgen Canada Swan Lake at the Capitol Theatre 8 p.m. www.capitoltheatre.bc.ca ●●Lions Club Variety show First Baptist Church Hall, 611 5th St. 6:30 p.m. ●6 week grief support group at Public Health, 333 Victoria, Multipurpose room, facilitated by Nelson Hospice. Preregistration required nelsonhospice@netidea. com ●Walk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates, Mon & Thurs 9:30-10:30 ●Nelson Women’s Centre. Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. ●Acupuncture for Addictions. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. Located at 333 Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-505-7248.

Fri. Feb 1l Request DJ.

●●●Top 40 all ages requests at Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●●●Bocephus King w/ guests at the Royal 8:30 p.m ●●Family Winter Carnival - Carnaval d’hiver at Trafalgar School Grounds 7-9 p.m. All are welcome to celebrate winter fun and French Canadian culture and language. ●Women of all ages get together to knit, crochet lace, make rugs & more. Women’s Centre 10-1 p.m. ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Feb 2 ●●●Shane Philip w/ guests at the Royal 8 p.m ●●The Change Agents Film at the Capitol Theatre. Showings at 7 and 9 p.m. Tickets $10/$8 ●●Nelson Leafs Hockey Home game vs Beaver Valley at the Nelson and District Community Complex 7 p.m. Fundraiser for the MS Society.

Submit your Calendar Events at

Classic

Difficulty Level - EasyClassic Sudoku

sk9E000036 Difficulty Level - Medium

●Walk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates 1st & 3rd Saturdays 12-1 ●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. ●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Feb 3 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. ●Nelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month at the Back Alley Studio (across the alley from Oxygen) at 7PM on Sunday. Bring a story to tell. a friend and your open ears. ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727.

Click here for

sk9M000049

https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/calendar.html

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 13

SUBMITTED

Bocephus King will be playing Friday, Feb. 1, 8:30 p.m. at the Royal on Baker.

●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

Nelson Weather theExpressNewsUpdate

Answers to Crossword

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theExpress Update

theClassifieds

Automotive-Cars

Furniture

SUBARU IMPREZA WAGON BROWN COMPUTER DESK AWD 78,000km Immaculate Includes brand new winter tires o/ rims $15,500 354-3861

Automotive-Tires/ Parts/Other

TIRE CHAINS FOR 14” wheels.

Easy to use. From an old 2WD Nissan truck but will fit any 14” wheel. $10 each. 250-551-5683. Nelson.

Automotive-Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1991 TOYOTA PREVIA, 255km

4wd, $3250 Automatic, winter and summer tires Well maintained, kootenay dream 250-352-3635

FREE

WARDROBE BOX FOR moving.

Cardboard with metal hanger rod. 354-1412 27” TOSHIBA FLAT screen (not HD) with remote. Works well. 250352-0588.

$50.00, portable Genesis waster distiller and purifier $50.00, large brown table $50.00 250-3597284

Home & Garden

MEDIUM CHEST FREEZER No

freon. Excellent condition. $150 Phone after 6 p.m. 250-825-9964 2006 ARCTIC SPA “Cub” Hot Tub. Brand new Controller, Heater, Lid. Immaculate. $3500. 250-354-3861.

House Sitting EXPERIENCED HOUSE SITTER with excellence references. Anywhere in the Kootenays. Available May 1. t_lester@yahoo. com 250-538-0086

Misc. Wanted

ARTISAN BAKER LOOKING for old-style, deep breadpans. Will trade some great bread! Anthony 250-225-3296

This week’s ExpressNewsUpdate was produced by:

Nelson Becker Owner/Publisher

Robin Murray Accounts/Sales/Layout

Rentals

DOWNTOWN NELSON FURNISHED bachelor (util., park-

ing). Clean, quiet, mature, responsible ns/nd/np tenant only. 838/mo. Nelsonmindscapes@telus.net. FOR RENT - Winlaw Hobby Farm, 3 bedrooms, semi-furnished. $1200.00/month NS, NP, W/D, utilities extra. 250-355-2303 - Deb

APARTMENT

FOR

RENT.

Available Feb. 1. No lease. $680/ month. Two bedroom, washer dryer/ parking. Pets welcome. Downtown locale. 250-352-2324

LOVELY FURNISHED 1BDRM smsuite. Bright, floorheat,W/D, deeptub/shower, loftbed. Peaceful N/S, Ymir. $625/mo., Feb.1 604989-0258

QUIET SPACIOUS 1BEDROOM

on shared property just outside Nelson woodstove, sunshine gardens $775 email:Nelson051027@yahoo. com BACHELOR SUITE CLOSE to Downtown. Pets OK, util. included.

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 14

Click here to submit your free classifieds https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/classified.php

No W/D. Available Immediately $625/month 250-352-7269 SUNNY CHARACTER ONE bedroom 700sqft on 12 acres 10 minutes to Nelson. Creekside, woodstove, hardwoodfloors. 850$ email heidmcgregor@hotmail.com SPACIOUS WALK OUT SUITE FOR RENT. One bedroom, private balcony and entrance. Call Rachel. $800incl. 250-352-0850

Rentals Wanted

RENTAL

WANTED!

2-3

BEDROOMS, Garden, Workspace, Natural Setting. Timothy, Cindy & 3 Pets: (250)505-2027 Excellent References!

Sports Equipment

YOUTH SNOWBOARDS: LTD, 48”, $100. Dakine 52” ; evolution boots, size 4. $80. 505-5152

Volunteering

COMMUNITY THREADS IS look-

ing for steering Committee members. Fibre arts of all types. Get involved

How to contact us

Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, by e-mail at express@expressnews.bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5.

Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher

Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser


theExpress Update

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Page 15

13

FOR MORE CROSSWORDS BY BARBARA OLSON AND DAVE MACLEOD, CHECK OUT THEIR BOOKS, O CANADA CROSSWORDS, VOLS. 8, 9 AND 10, AVAILABLE AT OTTER BOOKS AND COLES.


The Express News Update