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theExpressNewsUpdate building Nelson & area community since 1988

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012 Vol. 2, No. 43

Inside this week

Yuki returns

Affordable Housing

Columbia River Treaty

Homefront column

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Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

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by Robin Murray

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NELSON BECKER

Former Kootenay Coop Radio host and Selkirk College music student, Yukiko Tsutsui has just been granted her permanent residence status in Canada and is celebrating in her Canadian “hometown” of Nelson. Also in celebration of her birthday the following day, Yuki will be performing her original Japanese

tunes and some traditional Japanese folk songs with the western twist at Expressions on Tuesday night. She will also treat her audience to a slide show about her recent time in Japan. Tickets are $5 but if you give the secret password to Nelson at the door, he’ll probably let you in for free. The password is “Yuki is my friend”. Shhh.

�������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Residents will have another chance to talk to the Province about the future of the Columbia River Treaty in November. The Columbia River Treaty (CRT) Local Governments’ Committee encourages Basin residents to attend the consultation workshop in Nelson on Tuesday, November 27. Workshops are also being held in Jaffray, Valemount, Trail, Creston, Nakusp, Revelstoke and Golden. These workshops are the next step in the Province’s commitment to consult with the residents of the Columbia Basin to ensure their concerns are heard in the Provincial Review of the 1964 CRT between Canada and the U.S. Residents will learn about the initial results of the studies being done for the Provincial Review and can provide the Province with feedback on the impact of CRT scenarios in the future and how those scenarios could affect local interests.

“The Province has completed a number of important studies, including a report summarizing the available information about the socio-economic benefits and impacts of the CRT and analyses of the potential impacts of CRT scenarios on Basin interests. It is essential that Basin residents understand this information and express their views,” says Deb Kozak, CRT Local Governments’ Committee Chair and Councillor, City of Nelson. The CRT Local Governments’ Committee includes representatives of regional districts from across the Canadian Columbia Basin. With the support of Columbia Basin Trust (CBT), the Committee is working to help Basin residents and local governments engage in decisions about the future of the CRT. submitted by the Columbia River Treaty Local Governments’ Committee

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kolmel http://www.kolmel.com

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������������������������������������������������������������������ The West Kootenay EcoSociety will be holding a series of conversation cafès over the winter and early spring. The environmentallyfocused conversations will cover hot topics such as forestry, energy, food systems, and waste. The first conversation café will be held on November 22, at Oso Negro Café and will address the possibility of building housing that is both sustainable and affordable. The Affordable Sustainable Housing conversation will feature short presentations and a facilitated discussion among the panellists and the attendees, who will learn about a 6unit multiplex being built

The range of products available is daunting, but I think that window technology is an important one to understand because windows account for approximately 35 per cent to 50 per cent of the heat loss in residential buildings. They are holes in your wall through which heat passes from the interior to the exterior and vice versa. A good window will reduce heat loss to the exterior and capitalize on solar gain in the winter. However, it is a little more complex than that. Let’s start with modern window technology. Modern windows are built

of shipping containers in Vancouver. Local builders will also show off so-called “Tiny Homes,” new ideas for laneway homes, and an example of a passive solar home in our region. Nelson City Councillor Paula Kiss, City Planner Dave Wahn, and Nelson CARES Society Director Jenny Robinson will keep the conversation grounded in what is possible in the context of affordability and implementation in our community. “We’ve been cooking up this café series for a few months,” said John Alton. “We’re excited to bring together both experts and community members to have real conversations about some

SETH REIDI

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of our communities’ challenges.” Alton is EcoSociety’s Outreach Committee Chair. Everyone is welcome to attend and share their thoughts and experiences

with making homes more affordable and sustainable. More information on the café series is available online at www.ecosociety.ca submitted by the EcoSociety

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as sealed unit thermo pane (double glass) windows. Each pane of glass has two surfaces. You will have an option to have one of the four glazed surfaces coated with a low emissivity (loE) coating. The location of this coating on one of the four glass surfaces significantly affects the window’s performance characteristics. For instance, when you want to pull solar heat into the building, the best location for this loE coating is on the third glass surface from the exterior. In other words, windows with this feature take best advantage of the sun’s ability to reduce your heating require-

ments by drawing solar energy into your home. However, there will be locations in your home, perhaps along the south wall where you may want to reduce the heat of the sun so your home will be cooler during summer months. The loE coating on these windows should be installed on the second glazing surface from the exterior. If you are planning to install a heat pump / air conditioner, this window glazing choice will reduce energy consumption for summer cooling or simply help keep your unconditioned house cooler in warm weather. The loE coating can

contribute about 10 per cent to 27 per cent of the total energy requirements of your home. As well, you have an option to fill the vacuum between the two panes of glass with inert argon gas. This gas significantly increases the thermal performance of the window (its R value). Some European countries mandate triple glazing because windows are the single biggest contributor to heat loss in a building. This fact may also affect your decision to install skylights which are essentially holes through your ceiling and roof, the last and most important heat loss membrane in your house.

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In Trafalgar Middle School News: 450 Students clapped, sang, and even gave bull fighting a go at a School wide Assembly at Tragalgar Middle School Gym on Thursday, Nov. 8. Diego Alcatraz has performed as a professional musician for over 50 years. Originally one of the trio “El Presidantes” from Mexico; a very popular

��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ing a movement that chalThe Canadian Labour members of Local 362, the both screenings. We Are Wisconsin lenges not only the bill, but International Film Festival union was stunned – not (CLiFF) will play across only by the lockout but also tells of when a Republican the soul of a nation. Canada, in parts of the by the seeming rejection Governor’s bill threatens to The festival is sponUnited States, and, for the of their company loyalty wipe away worker rights sored by the West Kootenay first time, will screen in the which had sustained them, and lock out public debate, Labour Council through Kootenays. On November the company and the com- six ordinary citizens force the support of the United 24th CLiFF’s Nelson venue munity for 144 years. In their way into the Wisconsin Steelworkers Local 480. times of wavering support State Capitol, and spend the submitted by the West will be Expressions. Kootenay Labour Council More and more media for the need for unions as next twenty-six days buildis being concentrated into well as their questionable fewer hands, making it very relevancy, this is a story of difficult for stories told solidarity and the impact of by workers to be seen and a lockout on a community. It’s About Respect tells heard. CLiFF, based in Toronto, presents feature of New union leader seeks films and videos made by, support for a strike by prifor, and about the world of vate radio workers in Saint work and those who do it . John, NB. Milk, Honey and The Festival includes work produced in Canada and Tomatoes is about a young Palestinian, Zidan, quits throughout the world. The festival has two school and goes to work events, a matinee at 3:00pm as a tomato picker in the which will showcase four Israeli settlements to earn films: “A Day in the Life some money for his family of Your Taxes” (Canada); and to save something to “Drink ‘Em Dry” (Canada); start a shop with his best “It’s About Respect” friend, Rachman. But when (Canada); “Milk, Honey and Rachman decides to go back to school, Zidan has to Tomatoes” (Netherlands). A Day in the Life of reconsider his plan. One day Your Taxes illustrates some Zidan has to work in a setof the public services our tlement that has been built taxes provide for a better on confiscated land once community and a better belonging to his father. He realizes that this land will life. Drink ‘Em Dry: never be his again, and that Solidarity for Success is a the plan for the shop seems candid and progressive view to be his only way out for of union solidarity which an independent future. The evening event developed despite tremendous odds in a Maritime begins at 7:00pm and community in eastern will feature the documenCanada. When Moosehead tary “We Are Wisconsin” Breweries pushed away (U.S.A.). There will be an from the negotiating table opportunity to discuss the and locked out the 175 issues raised by the films at

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MADELINE GUENETTE

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Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

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Columbia Basin Trust is making $150,000 available for projects that benefit Basin youth through two granting programs. “We confirmed in our 2011-2015 Youth Initiatives Strategic Plan that we wanted to continue to support a range of opportunities that allow youth to engage with their communities and one another,” said Sabrina Curtis, CBT Director, Sector Initiatives. “These two granting programs will make funds available for more youth projects.” Columbia Basin Youth Grants (CBYG) funds projects that directly benefit Basin youth aged 12 to 29 for up to $15,000; Applicants must be registered non-profit organizations, school districts, First Nations organizations or local governments-plus youth aged 15 to 29 with a sponsoring organization.

The next deadline is December 17, 2012. For application forms and guidelines, visit www.cbt. org/cbyg. For Youth Action Grants (YAG), Youth aged 12 to 19 can apply for up to $3,000 with projects that demonstrate youth-led action with positive outcomes. There will be monthly intakes for YAG, on the first of every month, starting December 1, 2012. For application forms and guidelines, visit www.cbt.org/yag. Applications to both programs are adjudicated by CBT’s Youth Advisory Committee, a group of SUBMITTED youth from around the Basin whose involvement further ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� promotes the active engage- �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������ ment of youth in regional CBT supports efforts to CBT programs and initiadecision-making processes. CBT supports youth and deliver social, economic and tives, visit www.cbt.org or communities through a range environmental benefits to the call 1-800-505-8998. submiited by the of programs. Visit www.cbt. residents of the Columbia Columbia Basin Trust Basin. To learn more about org/youth for more details.

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������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 3rd annual TEDx SelfDesign High School is a that bring people together where x = independently SelfDesign High School free event that peels away bar- to share a TED-like expe- organized TED event. The event turns it’s full focus on riers and opens an expansive rience. At a TEDx event, TED Conference provides youth by asking, “What do space where youth voice their TEDTalks video and live general guidance for the Youth Need to Thrive?”. A hopes, dreams and stories of speakers combine to spark TEDx program, but indinumber of youth will speak, how they see the world, and deep discussion and con- vidual TEDx events are as well as other experienced what they need to thrive in it. nection in a small group. self-organized. submitted by SelfDesign TEDx is a program of These local, self-organized and wise people will give perspectives on this topic. TEDx local, self-organized events events are branded TEDx, High School

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���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Young people curious youth ages 13-21 from all empowering young people about environmental and over the world are partici- to take action in their comsocial justice issues canoin pating on a local and global munities. The process is a local youth to explore these scale to collaborate about three day interactive workshop that culminates on the issues and create change in issues concerning us. our communities and the This is a youth leading third evening with a public world. On November 26-28 youth movement focused on community forum, from 7

p.m.- 9p.m. Nov. 28th at the Hume Hotel where youth are able to present their action plans to the public for feedback, support and guidance. submitted

Upcoming events page 14

Film Festival page 9

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Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

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Craft Faire guide page 8 group that performed for 5 Mexican Presidents and still are heard on Mexican radio today. Diego has Made Penticton his home for the past 30 years. It is events like this that involve the students in bridging the gap between cultures. submitted by Tragalgar Middle School

A whole page of youth news! page 5

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●●●Delhi 2 Dublin at The Spiritbar

●●●Great Bloomers & Wool on Wolves w/ Jenny & The Jets at The Royal 8 p.m.

●●20th Annual Queen City Christmas Craft Faire Prestige Lakeside Resort

●●12th Annual Baker Street Christmas Craft Faire Best Western, Nelson ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. �����������

●●●Wax Romeo Album release Tour w/ DJ Soup at The Royal 9 p.m.

●●●Angel & Cedar, Allison Kane, Mountain Station at Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions (on Facebook), Noon-3:00

●●Beginners Cross Stitch. Free Workshop from Community Threads and Women’s Centre. Call 250-5514951 to register

●●SelfDesign High 3rd annual TEDx “What does it take for youth to thrive?” 10:30am to 3:30pm SelfDesign High, upstairs 402 Victoria Street.

●●The Nelson and District Chapter of the Canadian Federation of University Women at the New Grand Hotel on Vernon Street 9:30 a.m. coffee, 10 a.m. meeting, 11 am. talk on home design by Kate Bridger.

●●Annual Eagle Ladies Borscht Luncheon at Eagles Hall from 11-2 Delicious!

●●Community Connect Day in Nelson Central School Gym 10 am to 2pm, free and inclusive.

●●Slocan City Christmas Craft Faire 10am-3pm at the Slocan City Legion Hall, 502 Harold St.

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion.

��������������●● ��������������� 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727.

●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. �����������

●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 9p.m. ●●●Madison Violet w/ guestsl at The Royal 6 p.m.

●●African Dinner and Silent Auction by Grans to Grans at the Nelson United Church. Doors open at 4:30 p.m.

●●Dance-a-thon Fundraiser for Kukua Pamoja at SelfDesign High, upstairs 402 Victoria Street. 9:30 Registration 7 dance classes attend one or all. ●●Queens Jubilee Medal Ceremony open to the public, Hume Room at the Hume Hotel in Nelson, 2-4 p.m. 1-877-388-4498 to RSVP

●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308.

●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail. com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822.

●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727.

●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone welcome.

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���������������������������������������������� Allison Kane, a new to the area songwriter and traveler, will be playing at 1 p.m. at Ellison’s Cafe. She performs on a collection of little string instruments (ukulele, strum stick and guitar). Allison blends folk, soul, reggae, country, melody, poetry and feeling in a storytelling fashion. For more about Kane visit:

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submitted by Ellison’s Cafe

●Texas Hold’em Poker at the Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727. ������������ ●●●Sarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. ●West Kootenay Ostomy Support Group meets at Kiro Wellness Center at 2 pm. Info, call 250368-9827 ●Scottish Country Dancing at the Central School Gym. Your first class is free! ●Pool Table Nights, Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill ●Heritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-352-6892 ������������� ●●●Cliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge

●●●Welcome back Yukiko! Japanese music at Expressions 7 p.m. $5 ●●●Liam Titcomb, Josh Hyslop, & James Lamb at The Royal 6 p.m ●●Design charrette (idea gathering) for Wildflower School’s new

SUBMITTED

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playground, 7pm. Community members welcome. RSVP 250-505-7020 ������������ ●●● Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ●●●The Wooden Sky w/ Wildlife at The Royal 7 p.m ●Nelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free. http://www.nelson-tech-club.info/ email info@nelson-tech-club.info ●Nelson Women’s Centre Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. Darts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727. ●Girls’ Night with MargaretAnn at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-3525656. ●Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org or phone 250-352-6008.


theExpress Update

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CommunityNews

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Expressions hosts a night of Japanese music Tuesday, Nov. 20, 7 p.m. at Expressions, 554 Ward Street, admission $5

by Robin Murray

Yuki at a previous performance in Nelson

NELSON BECKER

Former Kootenay Coop Radio host and Selkirk College music student, Yukiko Tsutsui has just been granted her permanent residence status in Canada and is celebrating in her Canadian “hometown” of Nelson. Also in celebration of her birthday the following day, Yuki will be performing her original Japanese

tunes and some traditional Japanese folk songs with the western twist at Expressions on Tuesday night. She will also treat her audience to a slide show about her recent time in Japan. Tickets are $5 but if you give the secret password to Nelson at the door, he’ll probably let you in for free. The password is “Yuki is my friend”. Shhh.

Province consultes citizens on the Columbia River Treaty Tuesday, Nov. 27, 6 - 9 p.m. at the Nelson & District Rod & Gun Club 801 Railway Street Residents will have another chance to talk to the Province about the future of the Columbia River Treaty in November. The Columbia River Treaty (CRT) Local Governments’ Committee encourages Basin residents to attend the consultation workshop in Nelson on Tuesday, November 27. Workshops are also being held in Jaffray, Valemount, Trail, Creston, Nakusp, Revelstoke and Golden. These workshops are the next step in the Province’s commitment to consult with the residents of the Columbia Basin to ensure their concerns are heard in the Provincial Review of the 1964 CRT between Canada and the U.S. Residents will learn about the initial results of the studies being done for the Provincial Review and can provide the Province with feedback on the impact of CRT scenarios in the future and how those scenarios could affect local interests.

“The Province has completed a number of important studies, including a report summarizing the available information about the socio-economic benefits and impacts of the CRT and analyses of the potential impacts of CRT scenarios on Basin interests. It is essential that Basin residents understand this information and express their views,” says Deb Kozak, CRT Local Governments’ Committee Chair and Councillor, City of Nelson. The CRT Local Governments’ Committee includes representatives of regional districts from across the Canadian Columbia Basin. With the support of Columbia Basin Trust (CBT), the Committee is working to help Basin residents and local governments engage in decisions about the future of the CRT. submitted by the Columbia River Treaty Local Governments’ Committee

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Residents from the Nelson area took part in information sessions last year to learn more about the Columbia River Treaty.

kolmel http://www.kolmel.com


7.8” x 9.9” theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

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theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 4

EcoSociety Launches Conversation Café Series Thursday, Nov. 22, 7 p.m. at Oso Negro Café, admission by donation The West Kootenay EcoSociety will be holding a series of conversation cafès over the winter and early spring. The environmentallyfocused conversations will cover hot topics such as forestry, energy, food systems, and waste. The first conversation café will be held on November 22, at Oso Negro Café and will address the possibility of building housing that is both sustainable and affordable. The Affordable Sustainable Housing conversation will feature short presentations and a facilitated discussion among the panellists and the attendees, who will learn about a 6unit multiplex being built Home Front Bill Lynch, Paul Muntak & Steve Cannon

The range of products available is daunting, but I think that window technology is an important one to understand because windows account for approximately 35 per cent to 50 per cent of the heat loss in residential buildings. They are holes in your wall through which heat passes from the interior to the exterior and vice versa. A good window will reduce heat loss to the exterior and capitalize on solar gain in the winter. However, it is a little more complex than that. Let’s start with modern window technology. Modern windows are built

of shipping containers in Vancouver. Local builders will also show off so-called “Tiny Homes,” new ideas for laneway homes, and an example of a passive solar home in our region. Nelson City Councillor Paula Kiss, City Planner Dave Wahn, and Nelson CARES Society Director Jenny Robinson will keep the conversation grounded in what is possible in the context of affordability and implementation in our community. “We’ve been cooking up this café series for a few months,” said John Alton. “We’re excited to bring together both experts and community members to have real conversations about some

SETH REIDI

This Nelson tiny home built by Seth Reidine is one affordable housing option

of our communities’ challenges.” Alton is EcoSociety’s Outreach Committee Chair. Everyone is welcome to attend and share their thoughts and experiences

with making homes more affordable and sustainable. More information on the café series is available online at www.ecosociety.ca submitted by the EcoSociety

We are starting construction of a new house on the lake and our contractor has asked us to start selecting our “window and door package.” I had no idea there were so many choices in window frames and glazing. Can you provide a little background on modern glazing choices, hopefully, in simple terms, so I can get a basic understanding of our options before we start selecting products?

as sealed unit thermo pane (double glass) windows. Each pane of glass has two surfaces. You will have an option to have one of the four glazed surfaces coated with a low emissivity (loE) coating. The location of this coating on one of the four glass surfaces significantly affects the window’s performance characteristics. For instance, when you want to pull solar heat into the building, the best location for this loE coating is on the third glass surface from the exterior. In other words, windows with this feature take best advantage of the sun’s ability to reduce your heating require-

ments by drawing solar energy into your home. However, there will be locations in your home, perhaps along the south wall where you may want to reduce the heat of the sun so your home will be cooler during summer months. The loE coating on these windows should be installed on the second glazing surface from the exterior. If you are planning to install a heat pump / air conditioner, this window glazing choice will reduce energy consumption for summer cooling or simply help keep your unconditioned house cooler in warm weather. The loE coating can

contribute about 10 per cent to 27 per cent of the total energy requirements of your home. As well, you have an option to fill the vacuum between the two panes of glass with inert argon gas. This gas significantly increases the thermal performance of the window (its R value). Some European countries mandate triple glazing because windows are the single biggest contributor to heat loss in a building. This fact may also affect your decision to install skylights which are essentially holes through your ceiling and roof, the last and most important heat loss membrane in your house.


YouthNews

theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 5

Grants offered for activities both for youth and by youth Columbia Basin Trust is making $150,000 available for projects that benefit Basin youth through two granting programs. “We confirmed in our 2011-2015 Youth Initiatives Strategic Plan that we wanted to continue to support a range of opportunities that allow youth to engage with their communities and one another,” said Sabrina Curtis, CBT Director, Sector Initiatives. “These two granting programs will make funds available for more youth projects.” Columbia Basin Youth Grants (CBYG) funds projects that directly benefit Basin youth aged 12 to 29 for up to $15,000; Applicants must be registered non-profit organizations, school districts, First Nations organizations or local governments-plus youth aged 15 to 29 with a sponsoring organization.

The next deadline is December 17, 2012. For application forms and guidelines, visit www.cbt. org/cbyg. For Youth Action Grants (YAG), Youth aged 12 to 19 can apply for up to $3,000 with projects that demonstrate youth-led action with positive outcomes. There will be monthly intakes for YAG, on the first of every month, starting December 1, 2012. For application forms and guidelines, visit www.cbt.org/yag. Applications to both programs are adjudicated by CBT’s Youth Advisory Committee, a group of youth from around the Basin whose involvement further promotes the active engagement of youth in regional decision-making processes. CBT supports youth and communities through a range of programs. Visit www.cbt. org/youth for more details.

SUBMITTED

Three Cranbrook youth who participated in CBT’s Youth Action Summit received a grant for their “Speak Up, Speak Out - Youth Dinner” in Cranbrook. (L-R) Lani Davis, Laureen Nilsson and Darelyn Hutchinson (front).

CBT supports efforts to CBT programs and initiadeliver social, economic and tives, visit www.cbt.org or environmental benefits to the call 1-800-505-8998. residents of the Columbia submiited by the Basin. To learn more about Columbia Basin Trust

Local Nelson Youth speak out on “What do Youth need to Thrive”

Saturday Nov. 17, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 402, SelfDesign High School, Victoria St, at the Legion Building, in the Commons Room 3rd annual TEDx SelfDesign High School is a that bring people together where x = independently SelfDesign High School free event that peels away bar- to share a TED-like expe- organized TED event. The event turns it’s full focus on riers and opens an expansive rience. At a TEDx event, TED Conference provides youth by asking, “What do space where youth voice their TEDTalks video and live general guidance for the Youth Need to Thrive?”. A hopes, dreams and stories of speakers combine to spark TEDx program, but indinumber of youth will speak, how they see the world, and deep discussion and con- vidual TEDx events are as well as other experienced what they need to thrive in it. nection in a small group. self-organized. and wise people will give perTEDx is a program of These local, self-organized submitted by SelfDesign spectives on this topic. TEDx local, self-organized events events are branded TEDx, High School

Youth Lead Congress

Monday, Nov. 26 to Wednesay, Nov. 28, 10 a.m.- 3 p.m., at the Legion 402 Victoria Street Young people curious youth ages 13-21 from all empowering young people about environmental and over the world are partici- to take action in their comsocial justice issues canoin pating on a local and global munities. The process is a local youth to explore these scale to collaborate about three day interactive workissues and create change in issues concerning us. shop that culminates on the our communities and the This is a youth leading third evening with a public world. On November 26-28 youth movement focused on community forum, from 7

p.m.- 9p.m. Nov. 28th at the Hume Hotel where youth are able to present their action plans to the public for feedback, support and guidance. submitted


theExpress Update

PoliceNews

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 6

Vehicle burned - RCMP seeks information Between November 6 and 7, 2012, a vehicle was parked off a deserted road near Kapak Road, about 20 kms north of Salmo on Highway 6. This is a popular area for people cutting firewood. The driver had been cutting wood and left his 2001 Red Mazda 4x4 vehicle unattended overnight. When he

returned he discovered that the vehicle had been burned and completely destroyed. RCMP are seeking the public’s assistance in this investigation and would like to talk with any citizens who have been in the area recently or speak with anyone having knowledge of this

incident. Please contact Salmo RCMP at 250-357-2212 or CRIME STOPPERS at 1-800-222-8477. Callers to CRIME STOPPERS remain Anonymous and may be eligible for a reward. submitted by the Kootenay Boundry RCMP

Nelson Police Reports: repeat vandal, pedestrian struck by vehicle On Saturday Nov. 10, at 2:50 a.m. Nelson Police members noted some fresh graffiti on the side of the Nelson Library/Nelson Police building. Seeing that it appeared to have just been done they searched the area and found more on the Telus building and the BC Assessment building. Noting some of the words painted on the buildings were “ozone” and “Katie” the members recalled another incident from September where the same words were used and a suspect was identified. After searching for approximately two hours the suspects’ vehicle was found, with him sleeping in it.. He was arrested and held for 7 counts of mischief to property. He was released later the same day on bail to appear in court in Nelson Dec 4. He is bound by numerous conditions until that date, including a ban from the City of Nelson. The Nelson Police Department is asking business owner to contact them

if they have had any recent vandalism to their buildings that use the same words. On Saturday Nov. 10, at 5:30 p.m. a male making a left turn from Victoria St onto Josephine St and struck a female pedestrian in the crosswalk, dragging her approximately 15 feet. The Nelson Police, Nelson Fire Department and BC Ambulance responded to the 911 call from a witness. The 32 year old female was transported to Kootenay Lake hospital and admitted for injuries to her head and pelvis. They are serious but non-life threatening. Nelson Police are investigating the cause of the collision. Drugs and alcohol have already been ruled out. Drivers and pedestrians are reminded to be more cautious when out this time of year. It is getting dark earlier and with the dipping temperatures the roads can be slippery. Pedestrians are encouraged to wear bright or reflective clothing when

out in the early morn- crosswalks when driving in ings or evenings. Drivers high pedestrian areas. should slow down and take submitted by the Nelson an extra moment to look at Police Department

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Submit your Press Release at www.expressnews.ca/pressreleases.php


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

NonProfitNews

Page 7

Community Connect Day brings relief to those struggling Saturday, Nov. 17, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Central School Gym, 811 Stanley Street (Mill street entrance) In Nelson BC struggling community members to visit offering everything from to make ends meet is famil- this year’s event. dental exams, haircuts, flu iar reality for many. In recParticipants can relax shots, acupuncture, employognition of this, Community and enjoy coffee while tak- ment counselling, warm winConnect Day is an annual ing in local music at the café ter items plus much more. event that provides access to area; create and contribute Kootenay Kid’s Society a wide range of free services to art making projects; and will provide child minding and activities all under one check out a variety of free and fun kid’s activities. The roof. Organizers are extend- services. There will be over Nelson Fire Department will ing a warm welcome for 20 booths on-site this year be dropping by with truck

Living Off the Land Monday, Nov. 26, 8 p.m. at the Seniors Centre, Selkirk College, Trail, 900 Helena St. Local educator Les Anderson will be the guest speaker at the West Kootenay Naturalists’ month-end meeting. He will describe how to live compatibly on the land, drawing on the vivid experiences of his childhood in the ‘ 40’s and 50’s living in remote Northern villages in Sask. Although his family would be considered by most standards

poor, located at times 450 miles from the nearest store, they always managed “hit and miss” to eke out a living.. Les has carried this knowledge into his adulthood and has taught many what he has learned. All are welcome at what is sure to be a most stimulating presentation. submitted by the West Kootenay Naturalists

tours for the kids too. The 5th annual Community Connect Day is a free and inclusive event. A free shuttle leaves on the hour from the Salvation Army store front on Vernon Street, starting at 10am and going until 1pm. submitted by Nelson Cares

What’s in the Cupboard?

Recipes from the Nelson Food Cupboard Rice Cakes 2 eggs, well beaten 1⁄2 cup milk 3 cups cooked brown rice 1 tsp. salt 3 Tbsp. flour 1 to 2 tsp. parsley 2 to 3 Tbsp. finely chopped onion

By Anna Kirkpatrick

Blend eggs into cooled rice. Add flour, onion, milk and seasonings. Mix well. Drop by spoonfuls onto hot frying pan. Flatten, brown and flip.

Did you know?

Nelson Food Cupboard strives to offer respectful, barrier-free service. 99% of our customers feel comfortable accessing the Food Cupboard.

Nelson Food Cupboard www.foodcupboard.org 250-354-1633

Why does my stomach rumble when I am hungry? dr. science Christine Humphries

I think few of us have been spared the embarrassment of an ill-timed stomach rumbling in our life. Why does the stomach make these loud rumbling sounds when we are hungry? The medical term for this sound is borborygmi, an onomatopoeic term first used by Ancient Greeks to

mimic the sound of a stomach grumbling. Borborygmi are defined as intestinal rumblings caused by moving gas. These rumblings are a normal part of digestion. Digestion is the conversion of foods into substances that can be absorbed into the bloodstream and used by the body to satisfy hydration, mineral balance and nutritional needs. The rumblings actually originate from the small intestine, not the stomach, and involve muscular

activity, called peristalsis, through the stomach and small intestine. These muscular contractions function to mix and propel food, gasses and fluids down the gastrointestinal tract. Stomach rumblings are simply the sound of the stomach juices and gasses travelling through the intestinal track. Receptors in the wall of the stomach induce these contractions when the stomach and the small intestine have been empty for about two

Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

hours. The rumblings usually last 10 to 20 minutes and repeat every one to two hours until food is ingested. Borborygmi are not, however, always a sign of hunger and/or an empty stomach. They also occur when there is food in the stomach and can be triggered by anxiety, fright or even just by the sight or thought of food. They are just louder, and more socially embarrassing (!), when the stomach is empty.


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 8

Arts&Entertainment

Latin American music and culture shared at Trafalgar In Trafalgar Middle School News: 450 Students clapped, sang, and even gave bull fighting a go at a School wide Assembly at Tragalgar Middle School Gym on Thursday, Nov. 8. Diego Alcatraz has performed as a professional musician for over 50 years. Originally one of the trio “El Presidantes” from Mexico; a very popular

group that performed for 5 Mexican Presidents and still are heard on Mexican radio today. Diego has Made Penticton his home for the past 30 years. It is events like this that involve the students in bridging the gap between cultures. submitted by Tragalgar Middle School

MADELINE GUENETTE

Tragalgar Middle School students try out bull fighting moves

Kootenay Christmas Faire Guide 20th Annual Queen City Christmas Craft Faire

Nelson Waldorf School Winter Faire

Friday, Nov. 16, 12 noon-8 p.m., Saturday, Nov.. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. & Sunday, Nov.. 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.. at the Prestige Lakeside Resort. Lots of crafts, bake table and door prizes. Admission: $3, kids 12 & under free

Saturday, Nov. 24 children’s activities 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; artisan market 10 a.m.-4p.m. Admission children 4yrs +younger $5, 5yrs+ $7. Snowflake Theatre performance $3/person, 11a.m., 12 p.m., 1:30 p.m.. 250-352-6919.

12th Annual Baker Street Christmas Craft Faire Wildflower Fair Trade Fair

Friday, Nov. 16, 10 a.m.-9p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-5 Saturday, Nov. 24 at Central School Gym vendors wanted, if p.m.; Sunday, Nov.. 18, 10 a.m.-3p.m..Best Western, Nelson, you support Fair Trade, work with Humanitarian Groups, or Admission, $2. Over 40 vendors! Great door prizes. International Develop.m.ent and have crafts or goods to sell, contact Isabelle at isabelleh@kootenaykids.ca

Slocan City Christmas Craft Faire

1st Annual Christmas Bigby Place Craft Fair

Sunday, Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-3p.m. at the Legion Hall, 502 Harold St. 20 Vendors will be awaiting your arrival! Santa will visit Friday, Nov. 30 and Saturday, Dec. 1st, Bigby place, 509 Front St. The event will feature artisans, a raffle, chair massages, between 11a.m. & noon. Everyone welcome! refreshments, live music and a visit from Santa!

29th Annual Kootenay Artisan Christmas Market

Friday, Nov. 23 to Sunday, Nov. 25 Nelson and District Arts Council presents the only juried faire of its kind in the Kootenays. Fne hand-made crafts and goods! 305 Hall Street, Nelson Community Complex.

Country Christmas Craft Faire

EcoSociety’s Winter Craft Fair

Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Central School Gym 811 Stanley St For ONE DAY ONLY, find the region’s finest crafts all under one roof, at Central School in Nelson. Whether you’re shopping for Hannukah, Solstice, Christmas, Kwanzaa, or the Chinese New Year, the Winter Craft Fair is a great place to shop and support our local economy.

Friday, Nov. 23, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Saturday. Nov. 24, 10 a.m.5:30 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 25, 11a.m.-4p.m. at the Hume Hotel. Kaslo Christmas Craft Faire Admission $2. Support Nelson & area Friends of the Family, $5 Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m at the Kaslo Legion Hall. includes tea and Craft Faire admission. Enjoy Wine & Appies Filled with local artisans. Enjoy baked goods, comradery. while you shop! Friday, 8-10 p.m., $10 Supports Friends of the Winlaw Hall Christmas Craft Fair Family. 250-352-5027 Saturday, Dec. 8 at Winlaw Hall, Winlaw Still accepting Craft, Bake And Gift Sale: Our Daily Bread indoor/outdoor vendors. Call Carey, 250-226-7702 or email Friday, Nov. 23, 5-9 p.m., Saturday Nov. 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 812 winlawhall@live.com Stanley St. To book a table, call 250-354-2077


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 9

Arts&Entertainment

Unique Labour Film Series Comes to Nelson

Saturday, Nov. 24, 3 p.m. short films and 7 p.m. feature documantary at Expressions, 554 Ward Street, admission by donation The Canadian Labour members of Local 362, the both screenings. ing a movement that chalInternational Film Festival union was stunned – not We Are Wisconsin lenges not only the bill, but (CLiFF) will play across only by the lockout but also tells of when a Republican the soul of a nation. Canada, in parts of the by the seeming rejection Governor’s bill threatens to The festival is sponUnited States, and, for the of their company loyalty wipe away worker rights sored by the West Kootenay first time, will screen in the which had sustained them, and lock out public debate, Labour Council through Kootenays. On November the company and the com- six ordinary citizens force the support of the United 24th CLiFF’s Nelson venue munity for 144 years. In their way into the Wisconsin Steelworkers Local 480. will be Expressions. times of wavering support State Capitol, and spend the submitted by the West More and more media for the need for unions as next twenty-six days buildKootenay Labour Council is being concentrated into well as their questionable fewer hands, making it very relevancy, this is a story of difficult for stories told solidarity and the impact of by workers to be seen and a lockout on a community. heard. CLiFF, based in It’s About Respect tells Toronto, presents feature of New union leader seeks films and videos made by, support for a strike by prifor, and about the world of vate radio workers in Saint work and those who do it . John, NB. The Festival includes work Milk, Honey and produced in Canada and Tomatoes is about a young throughout the world. Palestinian, Zidan, quits The festival has two school and goes to work events, a matinee at 3:00pm as a tomato picker in the which will showcase four Israeli settlements to earn films: “A Day in the Life some money for his family of Your Taxes” (Canada); and to save something to “Drink ‘Em Dry” (Canada); start a shop with his best “It’s About Respect” friend, Rachman. But when (Canada); “Milk, Honey and Rachman decides to go Tomatoes” (Netherlands). back to school, Zidan has to A Day in the Life of reconsider his plan. One day Your Taxes illustrates some Zidan has to work in a setof the public services our tlement that has been built taxes provide for a better on confiscated land once community and a better belonging to his father. He life. realizes that this land will Drink ‘Em Dry: never be his again, and that Solidarity for Success is a the plan for the shop seems candid and progressive view to be his only way out for of union solidarity which an independent future. developed despite tremenThe evening event dous odds in a Maritime begins at 7:00pm and community in eastern will feature the documenCanada. When Moosehead tary “We Are Wisconsin” Breweries pushed away (U.S.A.). There will be an from the negotiating table opportunity to discuss the and locked out the 175 issues raised by the films at

Watch a trailer for We are Wisconsin at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uP0jM4P5bmg


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 10

Arts&Entertainment

Nelson artist Brigitte Desbois part of Kootenay painter’s group

Friday, Nov. 30, 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Show opening at Rouge Gallery, 2004 Columbia Avenue, Rossland, exhibit Dec.1-31 Local artists Jenny Baillie, Brigitte Desbois, Louise Drescher, Stephanie Gauvin and Mirja Vahala will be kicking off Rossland’s Rekindle the Spirit of Christmas Festival with their December art exhibition. The exhibit of new paintings is based on the artists’ September saga of hiking to over 7000 feet within the Selkirk Mountains for a painting bonanza. Blue skies, a full moon, golden backlit larches, rocky ‘scapes and towering crags were the inspiring views for their new works. The comfort of Brian Cross’s snug Mount Carlyle Lodge provided respite during their five-day trip. An amazing 52 studies were painted on location. A selection of these studies, plus larger works by each of the artists, is being SUBMITTED displayed. ‘It was a unique experience where Artist Mirja Vahala at work during a September artists’ retreat in the Selkirk Mountains we had the freedom to apply our per- endowed’ she continues. to show, through our paintings, the sonal perspective in an atmosphere ‘We definitely have a great new of Canadian landscape, espeabsent of pressure,’ states Rossland painter’s group,’ states Rossland art- majesty cially here in the West Kootenays. It artist Jenny Baillie. ist Stephanie Gauvin, who spearis our intention to repeat this type of ‘It was with a comradely spirit headed the paint-out. ‘We believe event.’ that ideas were shared, doubts voiced, we can build on this and continue submitted and encouragement and acceptance

Anne DeGrace draws a crowd at the Slocan Library On Sunday, November 4th, the Slocan Community Library held the second reading in its 2012 authors’ series with special guest Anne DeGrace. A large audience of some 28 to 30 listened intently as Anne shared her interest in writing novels and read excerpts from her books: Treading Water (which won the Kootenay Librarians choice award) and Flying with Amelia, her latest book. As an accomplished writer, illustrator, award winner and librarian, Anne had much to tell about her book writing experience including

the ups and downs of working with various publishers and the trials involved in getting her books published. The Slocan Community Library will hold the library’s 3rd and final Author Reading for 2012 on Sunday, November 25th at 1:00 p.m. Author Gary Wright speak about his experience as a war resister, a member of a radical anti-war group, his life in the Slocan Valley including the years he served as the mayor of New Denver. One chapter in Gary’s book, Unrepentant, was written by Corky Evans, our recent MLA. submitted by the Slocan Library

SUBMITTED

Author Anne DeGrace reads from one of her books at the Slocan Community Library


theExpress Update

Publisher’s note

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 11

TheSurvey

If you’re going to celebrate the commercial season, then having a plan of action that multiplies your intent is the way to go. This is the By Nelson Becker season of giving, so buying things does not seem in the spirit of giving.

Yeah, shop local but...

But anyway, I am buying gifts for my friends.They should not think of me poorly. I am thinking of them and that is what is important. I am also faced with the moral conundrum of the shop local meme. Just because a business is a local business does not make them moral and just because a business is from out of town does not make them immoral. I live in paradise and I accept there

is a cost to that. I am prepared to pay more to buy local. I understand a local business may need to charge more for the same product that is for sale in Kelowna because of shipping and inability to buy large quantities. What is a reasonable add on? It’s hard to determine. I guess, the best gift that I could give is something handmade that expresses my love, affection and appreciation.

Where do you look for your holiday gifts?

Craft Faires, local stores, Kelowna, the internet? Do you make your own?

Click here or visit the link below

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/look_for_gifts

Last week’s survey responses:

What is your connection to the armed services?

I am a veteran or in active service

4.3%

I am a child or grandchild of a veteran

65.2%

Someone else close to me is a veteran or in active service I am a conscientious objector I have never served in the Armed Forces I have no connections to the Armed Services

4.3% 21.7% 21.7% 21.7%

How is the Express doing? Fill out our ongoing reader survey! Click here or visit the link below

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/express_2012


theExpress Update

The S urvey Last week’s survey responses continued:

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 12

How have you been affected by the Armed Services?

TAUGHT me the need for self-discipline as a young man. MY Grandfather, a warrior, was by nature among the “First People” in Western Canada to serve in World War 1 and protect this land. He was rewarded by being stripped of his so-called Canadian Indian Status and deemed rights. Our People continue to fight for Creator given “rights and freedoms” and the protection of our land. My Father served in World War 2 as a mechanic and lost a lung. People mocked his solitude and eccentricities. His life was cut short. These men, shunned and forgotten, are my heroes; but not for serving in war. War is a miss-guided man-made horror. They are my heroes because when forced to make a choice, they selflessly and fearlessly acted on what they believed to be right in making our world a better place. We are blessed to have inherited our forefather’s gifts to act selflessly and fearlessly. Have we accepted them? I am an holocaust survivor who surely would not be alive were it not for those that gave their lives in WW2 for the kind of society we have. SINCE my dad was a soldier in WW11 (landed at Juno Beach, and wounded soon after), my post secondary education was completely paid for by Veterans Affairs Canada. I think of the sacrifices made by our families in times of war and it affects me deeply with gratitude and emotion. After saying that, I am not an advocate for war. MY five older brothers all served in WW2....each one in a different campaign. My oldest brother won the DFC and was a bomber fighter with the “Dam Busters”, Thank God they all returned to the U.K. at the end of the war.......I’m very proud of my family. MY grandfather and 2 greatuncles went to the second ww at the ripe old age of 16...they enlisted illegally. I remember them well and they they not speak much about their experience. Which is common for that war, as the soldiers did not

actually know where they were from week to week...no actual geographical GPS systems back then. They just knew they were in Italy or France...but they could not tell you which town or village. My grandfather lost a lung, one greatuncle had shrapnel still in his body. The medical teams at the time just left the shrapnel in soldiers. And I remember first ww vets that got exposed to mustard gas living in abandoned cars as hobos when they were older. No one but the village families took care of them by offering meals to them when they walked by. Such a shame to abandon them. DAD was a WW2 Vet, All, three bothers and a sister served in the military, I was Army Reserve and I lived 5 miles from an Air base MY relatives were conscientious objectors in WWII. IT led to me an early marriage because of a marriage deferral. I have had a relationship with a military personal, only to have them cut short as they were suffering from post traumatic stress and refused to seek treatment. RELATIVES killed. THE armed services never fought a war that threatened Canada, so they did not fight for my freedom. I am a military brat. My father was in the armed service as I was growing up. He is a veteran often forgotten as he was with the service during the cold war. Still - he witnessed a lot and had a few tours with the UN in peacekeeping missions, Cyprus being one of them. I feel strong ties to the Canadian Military as it was a large part of my upbringing. That being said, I am not in favour of war. Growing up, though soldiers were obviously being prepared for combat, there was a focus on the service being for peace and to support our own communities as well as other communities internationally with various sorts of support - whether it was natural disasters or recovering from the aftermath of civil unrest. Remembrance

Day has always been a time of internal remembrance. My family on my mother’s side are German and were greatly impacted by the Second World War, losing their homeland (Silesia - now Poland) and many family members. Remembrance Day has such an emphasis on the Canadian military and does not allow much room to reflect on the impact that war has on everyone - allies, enemy, soldiers, civilians. BECAUSE I’m a ‘pacifist’ the armed services has affected me, because I pay federal taxes which support the armed forces. As a citizen of Canada I ought to have a right to determine where my portion which goes to ‘military taxes’ could be diverted to a more humanitarian organization. RAISED without a father since the age of 6 yrs. MY Dad got his first university degree through the US military’s benefit package (G.I. Bill) and being from a poor and poorly educated family, that made a huge difference in his life. He wouldn’t have met my mother without it. On the other hand, my Grandfather died before I was born of complications related to posttraumatic stress disorder from his WWII experience. His death also changed my father’s life and therefore mine.

Answers to Crossword

see puzzle on page 17

The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

Page 13

Opinion&Editorial Fish Heads and Flowers

Fish Heads Stinky fish heads to the person who keeps shooting my cat with bb/pellet gun, may karma get you 1000 times over. He’s been shot 3 times in the last 2 weeks! My cat is not a “target practice” and if i ever catch you...... Signed: Love my Cat

Flowers to people who serve communities as Emergency Room staff, especially ones who do more than take home a paycheck but genuinely care. It can’t be easy to keep on caring when you see so much suffering every day. I am blown away by your gifts. Signed: glad not to be in the ER, but glad I went

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This week’s

Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, e-mail, express@expressnews. bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5. Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher

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My Opinion

by Spencer Pollard

An Ode to Neckbeards I am a proud owner of a Neckbeard. Alright maybe not so much proud as “lazy” but I’ve never understood the stigma that they attract. They are more a sign for me that it’s okay not to care what other’s think and to present yourself however you choose. As I stated earlier mine is due to laziness and a dislike of shaving but it could also be viewed as a different viewpoint. It’s something that I feel paints an unfair picture of myself. True, I could easily get rid of it and it might benefit me socially or even at work but

it just seems silly that people will judge you based on a little bit of extra hair. Granted I understand that a clean-shaven look is more hygienic or professional, I just find people judge the most trivial things. My message is this, looking your best and presenting yourself in a appropriate matter in important but so is maintaining your individuality. Choose the look that feels right to you and if for whatever reason you don’t have the desired look do what I do; throw out other people’s opinions and go with your heart.

Spencer Pollard is an young man living in Nelson BC with an interest in digital arts and writing. His ideas are of benefit to all of Nelson, and to stroke his abnormally large ego

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

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lish or not to publish is completely at the discretion of the editor and publisher. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. Only your name and the community where you live will be published. We will not print “name withheld” letters. Opinions in the paper are not necessarily those of the Express Update or its advertisers.

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The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

What’sHappening

Page 14

Nelson & Area: Fri. Nov. 16 - Sun. Nov 25 ●●● Live Music Fri. Nov 16

●●●Delhi 2 Dublin at The Spiritbar

●●●Great Bloomers & Wool on Wolves w/ Jenny & The Jets at The Royal 8 p.m.

●●20th Annual Queen City Christmas Craft Faire Prestige Lakeside Resort

●●12th Annual Baker Street Christmas Craft Faire Best Western, Nelson ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Nov 17

●●●Wax Romeo Album release Tour w/ DJ Soup at The Royal 9 p.m.

●●●Angel & Cedar, Allison Kane, Mountain Station at Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions (on Facebook), Noon-3:00

●●Beginners Cross Stitch. Free Workshop from Community Threads and Women’s Centre. Call 250-5514951 to register

●●SelfDesign High 3rd annual TEDx “What does it take for youth to thrive?” 10:30am to 3:30pm SelfDesign High, upstairs 402 Victoria Street. ●●The Nelson and District Chapter of the Canadian Federation of University Women at the New Grand Hotel on Vernon Street 9:30 a.m. coffee, 10 a.m. meeting, 11 am. talk on home design by Kate Bridger.

●●Annual Eagle Ladies Borscht Luncheon at Eagles Hall from 11-2 Delicious! ●●Community Connect Day in Nelson Central School Gym 10 am to 2pm, free and inclusive.

●●Slocan City Christmas Craft Faire 10am-3pm at the Slocan City Legion Hall, 502 Harold St.

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion.

●● Special Events ● Ongoing Events 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. ●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Nov 18 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 9p.m. ●●●Madison Violet w/ guestsl at The Royal 6 p.m.

●●African Dinner and Silent Auction by Grans to Grans at the Nelson United Church. Doors open at 4:30 p.m.

●●Dance-a-thon Fundraiser for Kukua Pamoja at SelfDesign High, upstairs 402 Victoria Street. 9:30 Registration 7 dance classes attend one or all. ●●Queens Jubilee Medal Ceremony open to the public, Hume Room at the Hume Hotel in Nelson, 2-4 p.m. 1-877-388-4498 to RSVP ●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308.

●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail. com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727.

●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone welcome.

Saturday, Nov. 17, Noon - 3 p.m. 523 Front St. Allison Kane, a new to the area songwriter and traveler, will be playing at 1 p.m. at Ellison’s Cafe. She performs on a collection of little string instruments (ukulele, strum stick and guitar). Allison blends folk, soul, reggae, country, melody, poetry and feeling in a storytelling fashion. For more about Kane visit: http://www.rootsandgroundings.com/Music

submitted by Ellison’s Cafe

●Texas Hold’em Poker at the Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727. Mon. Nov 19 ●●●Sarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. ●West Kootenay Ostomy Support Group meets at Kiro Wellness Center at 2 pm. Info, call 250368-9827 ●Scottish Country Dancing at the Central School Gym. Your first class is free! ●Pool Table Nights, Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill ●Heritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-352-6892 Tues. Nov 20 ●●●Cliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge ●●●Welcome back Yukiko! Japanese music at Expressions 7 p.m. $5 ●●●Liam Titcomb, Josh Hyslop, & James Lamb at The Royal 6 p.m ●●Design charrette (idea gathering) for Wildflower School’s new

SUBMITTED

Allison Kane

playground, 7pm. Community members welcome. RSVP 250-505-7020 Wed. Nov 21 ●●● Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ●●●The Wooden Sky w/ Wildlife at The Royal 7 p.m

●Nelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free. http://www.nelson-tech-club.info/ email info@nelson-tech-club.info ●Nelson Women’s Centre Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. Darts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Girls’ Night with MargaretAnn at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-3525656. ●Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org or phone 250-352-6008.


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

What’sHappening

●●● Live Music

●● Special Events

Thurs. Nov 22 ●●●Rob Johnson & Guests at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m. ●●●Tom Fun Orchestra w/ The Strumbellas at The Royal 6 p.m ●●EcoSociety Conversation Café Series “Sustainable and affordable housing" at Oso Negro Café, 7 p.m. admission by donation. www.ecosociety.ca ●●2012 Banff Mountain Film Festival at the Capitol Theatre 7 p.m. ●Toastmasters: Improve your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month. www. toastmasters.or. ●Nelson Women’s Centre. Drop-in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250352-9916. ●Acupuncture for Addictions. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. Located at 333 Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-505-7248.

Sudoku Classic

Sudoku Easy 1

8

3

9

3 4 7

2 6

6

7 2 3

6 7

9 8

7

4

7

8

4

3 3 9

2

6

1

9

6

7

3

8

2

8 1 8 9 3 6 4 77 4 8

4

1

59

2 3 6

6 7 5 9

8

1 4 8

2 8 7 2 4

8

8 7 6 2

3 1 9

63 6 5 1

4 7 4

3 98

1 8 2

37

2 1 6

9

2

4

●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. ●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail.com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727. ●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515. ●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone Difficulty Level welcome.sk9E000456 ●Texas Hold’em Poker at the Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727.

Sudoku Medium

8 7

5

● Ongoing Events

Fri. Nov 23All Request DJ. ●●Nelson Waldorf School Winter Faire children’s activities ●●●Snow Motion 2012 w/ 10 am-3 pm; artisan market 10 Sunshine Drive at The Royal 7 p.m am-4 pm. ●●2012 Banff Mountain Film ●●Wildflower Fair Trade Fair Festival at the Capitol Theatre 7 p.m. Central School Gym. ●●Craft, Bake And Gift Sale: ●●2012 Banff Mountain Film Our Daily Bread, 812 Stanley Festival at the Capitol Theatre 7 Street p.m. ●●Kootenay Artisan Christmas ●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. Market Nelson Community 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Complex 305 Hall Street Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. ●Gender Outlaws, a support and ●The Nelson Scrabble Club social group for trans and gender meets at 1p.m. For further infordiverse folks. 250-354-5362. mation, please call 250-352Sat. Nov 24 6936. Sun. Nov 25 ●●●Electro Swing Circus Burlesque, Live Music and DJ at ●●●Niko at the Hume Library The Royal 8 p.m Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ● ● Canadian Labour ●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish International Film Festival Level Difficulty Easy Bar and-Grill. 9p.m. (CLiFF) at Expressions, 554 Ward ●●The Secret Life of Walter Street. Short films matinee at 3 p.m., feature documentary “We Manny at the Capitol Theatre (Capitol Kids Series) 2 p.m. Are Wisconsin” at 7 p.m.

Sudoku Classic

Page 15

TO WIN : EVERY ROW, COLUMN AND 3 BY 3 SQUARE MUST EACH CONTAIN THE DIGITS 1 TO 9. SOLUTION ON PAGE 16

4


theExpress Update

theClassifieds

Automotive-Tires/ Parts/Other

FOUR 185/60/14 STUDDED winter tires on volkswagen Passat/Jetta rims 10000kms $240.00 call 250226-6727 4 GOOD RIMS for Matrix or other 195/65/15 ish. Five holes. $100 obo 352-0188

Children

13, black with spiders/web design. $70 (250)357-2758

Christmas Craft Faires

MOUNTAIN SKY SOAP Seconds Sale, Great deals on bulk soaps. Saturday December 8th, 9-4pm, 2276 Hwy#6, Crescent Valley,3596850

Events

YOGA RETREAT BALI Feb.24-

March8 Join Karuna & Paul Erickson for this transformative yoga and cultural adventure. www.yogakaruna. com 2502294793

EAGLE

LOST: ALUMINUM 12 ft. 3 seater

rowboat/dinghy. From about 1.5 km upstream of Nelson/B.O.B. on the waterfront. Please call Andre 250505-5031 FOUND - IPOD on Nov 6th. Call and describe. 250-509-1510.

Misc. Wanted

LOOKING FOR MOTHER Mother

BOGS NEW WITH tags on, size

ANNUAL

Lost & Found

LADIES

Borscht Luncheon at Eagles Hall from 11-2 on Saturday, November 17th. Delicious!

FREE

FREE MAPLE LEAVES. You

rake, you bag, you take home. 616 5th street, Ben 505-2106.

SPACIOUS, CLEAN 3BDRM/ 2BATH Nelson home, energy-effi-

cient, minutes to downtown. $1200. per mo+utilities. DD/FS/WD/NP/NS. Email: z12ski@yahoo.com. 2 BEDROOM MAIN floor 15 min walk to downtown No/Pets Dec.1 until Apr.1 $900.00 plus utilities 352-6926

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 16

Sports Equipment

RAZOR AGGRESSIVE ROLLER Blades, mens size 7, FOR SALE, like new, asking $120 obo. 250359-2946

Shared Accom.

ROOM FOR RENT in Nelson avail-

able immediately in 2 nice bedroom house. 1 block from Selkirk College. beautiful lake views. non smoking. $450/month. 250-551-5411 Sudoku Sudoku Classic Difficulty Level -till Easy 2 ROOMS IN Ymir May:Classic 20 Rentals min to Nelson, 15 to Whitewater. LARGE BRIGHT 2-BEDROOM $450inc. laundry, wifi. 250-357lower duplex, private entrance, car- 0050 port, deck. Near hospital. Available Submit your classifieds @ Dec. 15. Being renovated: new paint, molding, laminate flooring. $975 + https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/classified.php utilities. Mike 403-763-8338 ticket PLEASE! Call 250-352-6123 WANTED, CLEAN 4 litre glass jars with lids. 354-1340

CLEAN/FRESH 1.5 BEDROOM

(plus loft) cottage available Dec. 1st, Blewett -$800 per/mth. PETS WELCOME contact:ptras@shaw.ca 3 BDRM, 2 bth @ Longbeach. w/Waterfront. NS. Pets considered. Available now. Prefer long-term. 250-354-8225 QUEENS BAY SUITE, near Balfour 1 bdrm,n/s,n/p/ w/d. suitable for 1. utilities included $600. Heather 250-229-4682 NEW FURNISHED SUITE, upper Fairview, on busroute, quiet household, n/s, n/p, extras, ref, $850/mo 354-3444

Difficulty Level - Medium sk9E000456

sk

Solution to Sudoku Easy

Medium

9 4 3

6 7 2

2 8 1

5 3 9

7 6 4

3 4 7

2 6 1

8 9 5

4 9 6

7 8 1

3 2 5

6 9 2

7 5 8

4 3 1

7 5 3

4 2 6

9 1 8

9 2 3

6 4 8

9 7 2

1 5 3

5 1 8

5 3 9

1 4 8

2 7 6

6 5 3

4 8 9

1 5 8

4 6 5 7 2 3

1 8 7 4 9 6

9 8 1

5 3 2

7 6 4

1 2 7

2 1 4

8 7 9

3 5 6

8 7 5

2 9 4

6 3 1

1 8 7

3 6 4

8 1 7

5 9 2

2 4 9

9 1 2 Solution

3 6 5

8 4 7

5 3 9 8 7 6 Solution

6 2 4 3 1 5

see puzzles on page 15

Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser

© 2005 www.puzzle.tv www.valusoft.com © 2005 www.puzzle.tv www.valusoft.com Generated by Ultimate Sudoku - all you need to create BILLIONS of unique Sudoku puzzles Generated by Ultimate Sudoku - all you need to create BILLIONS of unique Sudoku puzzles


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Page 17

12

FOR MORE CROSSWORDS BY BARBARA OLSON AND DAVE MACLEOD, CHECK OUT THEIR BOOKS, O CANADA CROSSWORDS, VOLS. 8, 9 AND 10, AVAILABLE AT OTTER BOOKS AND COLES.

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