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theExpressNewsUpdate building Nelson & area community since 1988

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012 Vol. 2, No. 32

Man bites dog... bylaw

NELSON BECKER (L-R) Joshua, Abigail and David Aaron on the corner of Ward St. and Victoria St., a spot where dogs are currently banned

Nelson Lawyer, David Aaron, challenges dog bylaw

“Nelson’s dog bylaw is an example of over-regulation, in that it effectively banishes our pets from civil society. So what do Nelsonites do? They are forced to leave their dogs at home where they become unsocialized and alienated from people. Now that’s a recipe for a dog problem. A more reasonable balance would be for the law to allow dogs while requiring that they be leashed, passive and leave no trace. This dog is so much a part of my daily routine, which integrates all the members of my family. I could not imagine leaving her at home.” - Exerpt by David Aaron

Opinion by Nelson Becker

David Aaron, a Nelson lawyer and former mayoral candidate in the 2008 Nelson municipal election, received a notice of violation of the dog bylaw on August 27; but Aaron will not roll over and play dead. He has notified the City bylaw and enforcement department that he will dispute Bylaw #2333 section 8(e) on the grounds that what he is being charged with is inconsistant with the Charter Guarentee of Freedom, specifically freedom of expression, freedom of association, mobility and equality. He also states that the law is applied in an arbitrary and discriminatory way. It is my opinion that the No Dogs in downtown Nelson was bound to force a legal challenge. Cities should not have the right to make blanket laws against dogs in their downtown core. Laws already exist in our community that dogs have to be under the control of their owner. In our society, dogs are considered part of our family. Not allowing dogs to walk with their family is akin to not allowing children to walk with their family. It’s time to take this law off the books and for Nelson to move toward tolerance (this is Pride Week) and accept the dog family member back to civil society. My message to City Council is: now is the time to change the law, don’t let this go to trial.

What is your opinion about dogs in the downtown core? Click here or visit the link below

www.surveymonkey.com/s/Dogs_in_Downtown


CommunityNews theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 2

Recent police activity in the City of Nelson Nelson Police are reporting another busy summer weekend. Police attended calls for several noisy house parties over the weekend with two of the party hosts receiving Bylaw noise fines of $150.00. Other incidents of note include: Nelson Police have had several sightings of a bear in the lower Rosemont area over the weekend. The bear has been seen in the area of the 1100 block McQuarrie Street down to the pathway off Lakeview Crescent that leads to the tunnel under the highway heading down to Railway Avenue. Nelson Police are asking residents to be careful when out and about and not to leave garbage outside. If the bear is sighted, please call the RAPP line at 1877-952-7277 or the Nelson Police Department at 354-3919.

On Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 at approximately 9:40 p.m. Nelson Police were called to a local pub regarding a drunk patron who refused to leave the premise. NPD attended and located the male outside the pub. An Ambulance had been driving by and stopped to check the male as they had observed him staggering down the street. The male was immediately confrontational with police and EHS and began to insult members and swear at them. The 49 year old male was arrested for being drunk in a public place (under the Liquor Licencing Act) and transported to NPD cells where he was held until he was sober enough to take care of himself. The male was issued a Violation Ticket for Being Intoxicated in Public with a fine of $115.00 upon release.

On Friday, August 24th, 2012 at approximately 2:49 in the morning, Nelson Police responded to a call to High St regarding a drunk male screaming and yelling. The male was observed getting into a vehicle and leaving the area. The vehicle was located in the 500 block Vernon and checked by NPD. The driver, a 28 year old female was asked to provide a breath sample due to grounds established that she had been drinking and was driving the vehicle. The female driver failed the roadside screening test and was issued a 90 day Immediate Roadside Prohibition. Her vehicle was impounded for 30 days. The male who caused the disturbance in the first place was allowed to proceed due to identification issues. -Submitted by the NCPD

EcoSave Energy Retrofits Program a sweeping success The City of Nelson is pleased to announce that Nelson Hydro’s EcoSave Energy Retrofits Program has exceeded the two-year pilot phase target in just three months. The goal was to have 200 homes register for a home energy assessment during the pilot phase of 2012 and 2013. This number has already been exceeded and continues to grow. With the heating season just around the corner, Nelson Hydro customers, who own their home, are encouraged to register for a Home Energy Assessment, and join those who are learning about their home’s energy efficiency ratings and ways to improve them. The benefits of registering with EcoSave are: • Access to a home energy assessment at a reduced cost

• Access to rebates through LiveSmart BC • Low interest financing loans for energy efficiency retrofits. “There’s been such a positive response from the community of Nelson,” says Mayor John Dooley. “I encourage participants to take the next step and complete their EcoSave upgrades. The city and the Nelson and District Credit Union are offering great interest rates,” Dooley adds, “and the approval process is quick and easy.” “Over the thirty years that I’ve lived in Nelson, I’ve seen the City offer some great programs,” adds program participant Rod Sturtevant. “EcoSave is the best so far.” EcoSave’s funding partners, including FortisBC,

Natural Resources Canada and the Columbia Basin Trust are wholeheartedly encouraged by the program’s early success — a first-of-its-kind energy efficiency program for British Columbia and Canada. “The success in Nelson echoes the success we’ve seen Rossland,” stated Carol Suhan, Manager of PowerSense Service at FortisBC. “It shows

us that many people have a sincere desire to save energy in their homes, and by working directly with municipalities at the community level, we can really help them access the support they need. We are very pleased with the results and welcome the opportunity to work with other communities in a similar way.” -Submitted by the City of Nelson


EducationNews theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 3

New improvements and opportunities at Selkirk College Students at Selkirk College will benefit from improved and upgraded campus facilities, thanks to $556,000 in capital funding that is part of the government’s investment in B.C.’s post-secondary infrastructure this year. The upgrade work will ensure infrastructure and operational systems are functioning at optimal levels at three sites: the main campus in Castlegar and the Tenth Street and Silver King campuses in Nelson.

The college and government also announced today how $457,000 in onetime funding -http://ow.ly/dbutB - will be used to offer short-term training in the region. The college expects to create seats in a variety of fields over the coming year, including administrative skills, early childhood education, and introduction to practical nursing, along with trades foundation programs. B.C. taxpayers are providing close to $26 million for Selkirk’s operations

Should I wear a hat or sunglasses or both to be protected by the sun? dr. science Christine Humphries

What is the difference in protection to your eyes from UV radiation wearing good-quality sunglasses versus a wide-brimmed hat? Should I be wearing my sunglasses when I am wearing my hat?

The reason it is recommended we wear a hat, long sleeve t-shirts, long pants and sunscreen when we are out in the sun is to protect our skin from UV damage. Sunglasses, on the other hand, are recommended to protect our eyes from UV damage. In the same way that the sun damages skin, the sun can also damage the eyes. Sunburn of the eyes is a condition called photokeratitis and has symptoms similar to a skin sunburn (redness and sensitivity). Although the eyes can recover from a sunburn, long-term exposure to the sun’s harmful UV rays can cause serious damage to the retina and an increased chance of cataracts. This is why eye experts recommend that sunglasses, at a minimum, protect from

90% of both long and short wave UV rays (UV-A and UV-B). Good sunglasses also offer two other types of protection to our eyes: they protect from glare, and they protect from intense light. These additional types of protection are important because our eyes can only handle a certain intensity of light. The brightness of light is measured in lumens and our eyes function well up to a level of about 3500 lumens. On a bright sunny day, the light can reach in excess of 6000 lumens. The sunlight is even brighter when it reflects off highly reflective surfaces, such as water, and at these levels of brightness our eyes no longer see properly and detect only a white glare. Worse, when sunlight reflects off snow, the intensity of the light can be so high that it can cause blindness. It is therefore recommended to wear both a hat to protect the skin on the head, face and neck, and a good pair of sunglasses to protect your eyes from both UV rays and the brightness of the sunlight.

Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

this year - including an allowance for general infrastructure maintenance up from $20.3 million in 2001-02. The number of funded student spaces at the college has increased over six per cent over that time. Over $10 million in capital investments have been made at the college since 2001, including renewal of the Tenth Street campus’ residence and music hall, and expansion of the Castlegar Aviation Centre. -Submitted by Selkirk College

260 free backpacks for West Kootenay families in need This year, the TELUS Community Ambassadors of the West Kootenays are easing some of that back-to-school financial strain for families throughout Nelson and area. Two hundred and sixty students will receive a free backpack filled with school supplies in time to start the new school year. This initiative is part of TELUS’ Kits for Kids program, an annual tradition through which thousands of backpacks are distributed to young students in need across Canada. Since 2006, nearly 60,000 Kits for Kids backpacks have been given to kids in need. The kits are prepared by ����������������������������� Community Ambassadors each May during the annual TELUS Day of Giving – a special day in which TELUS team members and retirees across Canada volunteer in support of local activities to make positive, heartfelt and lasting connections within their communities. The backpacks are filled with the essential school supplies needed for each grade: pencils, loose-leaf sheets, pencil cases, rulers and much more. The kits then are delivered to school districts in June to allow the schools to determine need and to be able to notify recipient children and parents before they break for the summer. -Submitted by Telus

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NEW SCHOOL AGE CARE PROGRAM Cornerstone Children’s Centre Before and after school care and full days on Pro-D days. Includes pickup and drop off at Hume school September to June • Monday to Friday Start Date: September 4, 2012 Cost: Before school : $8 • After School : $15 250-352-9910 Kristin Konzelman kristin@fbcnelson.ca www.fbcnelson.ca 611 Fifth Street, Nelson, BC V1L 2X1

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HealthNews

theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 4

Ombudsman speaks about improving seniors care in BC

BC Ombudsperson Kim Carter is visiting Nelson & Castlegar September 12 and 13 to present her findings regarding improving seniors’ care in BC, with special reference to the West Kootenay area. Those organizing her visit to the area have scheduled events in both Nelson and Castlegar at different times of the day in the hope that as many people as possible will be able to hear her important recommendations for change. In Nelson, she will speak on Wednesday, September 12 at 7pm in the Nelson United Church Hall, 602 Silica Street. The following day, on Thursday, September 13 she’ll make a similar presentation in Castlegar from 12

noon to 2pm at the Castlegar Recreation Centre, 2101 6th Avenue. An optional lunch, by donation, will be available at 11:30 am. Both presentations are free of charge. The BC Government has been given a unique opportunity to improve the lives of seniors in the province if it follows the 176 recommendations made by Ms. Carter in her recently released report “The Best of Care: Getting it Right for Seniors in BC”. However, according to Castlegar Health Watch member and event organizer, Bud Godderis, “The government needs encouragement to fully implement the Report’s recommendations. The public is encouraged to

come out to meet the BC Ombudsperson, learn about her Report and find out what concerned citizens can do to urge immediate government action.”

To read the full Report go to www.bcombudsperson.bc.ca For a 14 page summary of the Report go to www. bchealthcoalition.ca

17th Annual Parkinson Superwalk Fundraiser Sunday Sept. 9 at the Rotary Shelter in Lakeside Park. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Walk starts at 11 a.m. This September, thousands of people across British Columbia will be lacing up their shoes to participate in the national annual fundraiser for Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson SuperWalk. SuperWalk will take place in 15 locations in BC and in 90 communities across Canada. SuperWalk aims to raise $3 million nationally and $325,000 in British Columbia. Proceeds from SuperWalk directly support the goals of Parkinson Society British Columbia: advocacy, education, community outreach, scientific research and public awareness. Go to www.parkinson.bc.ca to register as a walker or to make a donation.

NDCU donates to EAPP

(L-R) Tom Murray, Nelson & District Credit Union Senior Manager of Operations; Christie Heuston and Alex Wallach, Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Program (EAPP) and Resource Centre; and Tom Atkins Nelson & District Credit Union Marketing Manager.

The Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Program (EAPP) and Resource Centre with six outlying community volunteer groups would like to thank both the Nelson & District Credit Union and the Kootenay Savings Credit Union Community Foundation for their generous donations. Their donations will support an expansion of advertising and also support education about the prevention of elder abuse and the benefits of early intervention for seniors and the community. In the last year the Nelson & Area EAPP, under the umbrella of the Nelson and District Seniors Coordinating Society, has taken part in 14 public presentations and spoken to over 325 individuals. If your group is interested in having a presentation, please call (250) 352-6008 and leave a message with the Nelson and District Seniors Coordinating Society. More information on volunteer opportunities; abuse prevention, early detection and intervention options can be found at www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org”


LiteraryNews theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 5

One Book, One Kootenay 2012 winner announced Rita Moirs, The Third Crop, comes out on top

The readers read, they considered—and they voted. Author Rita Moir’s The Third Crop: A personal and historical journey into the photo albums and shoeboxes of the Slocan Valley 1800s to early 1940s (Sono Nis Press 2011) is the book to read in 2012 according to Kootenay book-lovers who took part in the 2012 One Book, One Kootenay reader’s choice event. OBOK is an annual project of the Kootenay Library Federation. “It was close,” says OBOK organizer Helen Graham. “It was an exciting, neck and neck race. I couldn’t call it until the last of the nineteen participating libraries, in the Kootenay Library Federation, weighed in. All three books were popular choices, but in the end, Rita’s really spoke to the majority of OBOK readers.”

Moir’s beautiful book of image and essay about the history of the Slocan Valley reflects sentiments both local and universal. In The Third Crop, Moir embarks on a personal journey through memorabilia found in private albums, dusty shoeboxes, and community archives, skillfully and passionately recounting the stories of an era. More than 180 historic photographs are beautifully juxtaposed with contemporary images of the valley. For anyone living rurally, or simply loving history, the stories resonate. The Third Crop is Moir’s fourth book. Survival Gear (Polestar, 1994), Buffalo Jump: A Woman’s Travels Author Rita Moir signs a copy of the 2012 One Book, One Kootenay selection The Third Crop (Coteau, 1999), The Windshift Hubert Evans award. To find out when she will be at Line: A Father and Daughter’s Moir is delighted that The a library near you go to www. Story (Greystone, 2005), have Third Crop got the nod. obok.ca, ask at your library, or all been shortlisted for or have In October, Moir will watch for an announcement in won awards, including B.C.’s embark on a multi-library tour. your local newspaper.

Kootenay book weekend guest author Katherine Govier will be in attendance on Sunday morning September 23 and will be giving a talk at 11 a.m. at the Best Western on Baker Street in Nelson. Now in it’s 9th year, Kootenay Book Weekend is pleased to have Katherine Govier as this years guest author. She is the winner of Canada’s Marion Engel Award for female writer (1997) and the Toronto Book Award (1992) She is the author of nine novels and three collections of short stories. Her book up for discussion this year is “The Ghost Brush”, a novel about a daughter, Oei, of the famous Japanese printmaker Hokusai, creator of “The Great Wave”. This novel brings a great woman artist to life and shows how she lost her place in history as an accomplished painter. This talk is open to the public. Tickets are $10.00 and are available at Otter Books, Booksmyth and at the door. For more information visit our website at www. kootenaybookweekend.ca

Storytimes at the Library The word is out: storytimes are fun! Join us at the Nelson Public Library, where we play with pirates, cavort with dragons, frolick with fairies, and enjoy books, music, felt boards, fingerplays, and more. Stories for Growing is a preschool Storytime for 3- 5 yr olds that runs Wednesdays at 10:15 beginning Wednesday, September 19th. Tales for Twos is especially for 2 – 3 year olds, beginning Saturday, September 22nd at 10:15 a.m. Tales for Twos is a parent participation

storytime. Preregistration is required, and opens on Tuesday Sept. 4th. Visit the library, call 250-352-6333, or email nradonich@nelson. ca to register. Reading stories and playing word games with children is the first step in literacy and love of reading that will follow a child through a lifetime. Storytimes have been running at the library for more than half a century! By bringing your kids to storytimes, you’re not only part of a long tradition—you’re part of the future.


theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Pride Week News Commentary

Kootenay Pride is growing year by year and it’s been 16 years in the making. The organisation’s goals have always been to promote acceptance, diversity, respect and tolerance for LGBT people. The focus has become about celebration of community in the past few years and in a sense saying thank-you to the people who make this community of Nelson and the West Kootenays such an amazing place. A place where LGBT people, can live, work, and be respected in their homes; a place without the need for closets, and where intolerance is a minority position. The work done by Pride in the past is part of that foundation of respect that we now celebrate. As we go forward into this year’s Kootenay Pride celebration we have raised a new banner. We have included more events that the general public might attend, and we’re serious when we say anyone can attend our events. It’s important to us that the whole community is welcome and that everyone feel proud that this place represents the rainbow of human experience. The Kootenays is pretty amazing and we should all be proud of that. You should be proud that LGBT people can and do live and work in your community with their heads held high. You are a part of making that a reality in 2012 and beyond. The parade and rally this year on September 2nd at 3pm on Baker St. will bring together more groups than ever. We have delegations from the School District, Churches, The City of Nelson, The City of Castlegar, our MLA Michelle Mungall, the Derby

Publisher’s note

By Nelson Becker

By Jason Peil -Kootenay Pride Rep teams, and all of the traditional LGBT groups like Ankors, etc. Pride is putting on a free show down at Cottonwood for the public at 4:30pm that day. Public speakers, but also music, performances, comedy and just good old fashioned fun! Pride is for everybody so the public is encouraged to come watch the parade, and then join it and march to Cottonwood where you’ll be entertained and welcomed. We’re bringing out the rainbows this year in a big way! The business community has really jumped on board for the window decoration contest in Nelson and over in Castlegar dozens of prizes and donations have been given. The support from our local community has grown leaps and bounds, partly due to reaching out and engaging the community, and partly because the community is looking for ways to support the idea of diversity. It’s a win win for Pride and for the people of the area with so many businesses offering discounts and incentives during Pride week! It is historic to note that Castlegar will do a Pride event for the first time this year! A crew of dedicated volunteers has turned over a new page in Castlegar and we’re seeing Kootenay Pride grow and branch out. We will not likely ever have a Pride the size of Vancouver but we’re proud to host one of Canada’s largest Pride celebrations! 16 years running, and with Castlegar it’s growing! It’s probably the only Pride community in North America based in such a small place. For that we can really be proud. All of us, LGBT and everyone. Diversity builds community.

Kootenay Pride

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Pride Week Events “8” a new play by Dustin Lance Friday, Aug. 31, 7:30 p.m. at the Capitol

Kootenay Pride Annual Meet ‘n Greet Friday Aug 31 9pm at Finley’s Irish Bar and Grille entry by donation (*not all request DJ)

Word Jam Music Slam Saturday, Sept. 1, 12:30 p.m. at Expressions, 554 Street (Old Express office)

Tret Fure with Kate Reid Saturday, Sept 1, 8 p.m. at the Spirit Bar

La Diva Drag show Saturday, Sept. 1, 10 p.m. at Spirit Bar. $15 at the door

Pride’s Parade, March and Rally! Sunday, Sept, 2, 3 p.m. on Baker Street Gathering at Cottonwood Falls Park. The public is invited to march with the parade down to the park to be entertained by free performers and speakers 4:30-7PM!

Pride’s Funk ‘n Disco Dance Sunday, Sept. 2, 8 p.m. starts at the Rod ‘n Gun Club Hall at Cottonwood Falls $20 at the door. Everyone is welcome.

Pride’s wrap -up brunch “Mimosa Monday,” Sept. 2, 11 a.m. at the Hume For more complete information just visit Kootenay Pride on facebook and check the events listing at the top of the page.

We all have reason to be proud

By Nelson Becker

The word pride, in some ways, does not have a good rap. In some context it may express a feeling of superiority, but that’s not what Kootenay pride is about. Kootenay pride is about being proud of your own diversity and being proud to live in a community of other diversities. It is important to understand that people who are intolerant of one group are likely to be intolerant of others. Being tolerant is not enough. I want to live in a society where we encourage diversity of all kinds. Diversity will lead to creative acts, creativity and growth


theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

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theExpress Update

Bears&You

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 7

From the Governement of B.C. do not secure attractants. Residents who intentionally leave out items that attract dangerous wildlife could also be issued a Dangerous Wildlife Protection Order. Failure to comply with an order carries a $575 fine. In communities where attractants are managed properly, there has been a decline in related human-bear conflict and the number of bears that have to be destroyed. In 2011-12, the COS received approximately 37,500 calls regarding human-wildlife conflicts. Of those calls, approximately 23,800 involved humanbear conflicts. Over the past five years in B.C., an average of 600 black bears have been destroyed each year, while 93 were relocated. The public is encouraged to report human-wildlife conflicts that threaten public safety or result in significant property damage by calling the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) line, tollfree at 1 877 952-7277 (RAPP), or visit the RAPP website at: www.rapp.bc.ca

Bears are out, so public asked to be pro-active With bears seeking out non-natural food sources, Environment Minister Terry Lake is spreading the word to British Columbians to do what they can to control bear attractants and reduce conflicts with bears. The main cause of human-wildlife conflicts in B.C. is access to non-natural food sources. Bears that learn how to get at exposed pet food, ripe fruit, improperly stored garbage, dirty barbecues or composts become conditioned and will continue to return to the area. British Columbians are encouraged to prevent human-bear conflicts by adopting the following practices: •Keep garbage secured in a bearresistant container or in the house, garage or shed until pick-up day and return the containers to the secure site once they are emptied. •Pick ripe and fallen fruit daily and remove any unused fruit trees. •Use bird feeders only in winter. •Keep the ground free of seeds and nuts.

•Clean the barbecue grill after each use, and store it in a secure area. •Bring pet food dishes inside and store the pet food inside. •Do not add meat products or uncooked food to compost. Turn it regularly and keep it covered. •If residents spot a bear, they are advised to remain calm, keep away from the bear and bring children and pets indoors, if possible. •People should never approach a bear and should not run from it, as bears can move very quickly. •Once a bear has left the area, residents should check their yards to ensure no attractants are available. The Conservation Officer Service (COS) is the primary responder to human-wildlife conflicts where there is a risk to public safety, conservation concerns or where significant property damage has occurred. Recent changes to the Wildlife Act give Conservation Officers the ability to issue a $230 ticket or notice for a court appearance to residents who

Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser

Get Bear Smart

Bear Smart Tip: Electric fences are an effective way to prevent bears from raiding gardens, orchards, beehives, chicken coops and livestock. Get Bear Smart info: eekbears@hotmail.com 250-359-6611 www.bearsmart.com


theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Opinion&Editorial

Page 8

Shop Local and Shape the Economy

Commentary by Alex Atamanenko, NDP for BC Southern Interior All leakage is happening more nomic climate for local busiCanadians every day across the country ness. Consider what our comwant a thriv- as a result of online shopping, munities will look like if those ing econ- cross-border shopping or vis- dollars are regularly spent outside of the local economy. omy, but we’ll never have iting distant locales. So what does it mean to Making informed purchasing one if we don’t all share the responsibility for achieving it. shop local? Shopping local choices in the long term is one Every one of us, consum- can stretch past the limits of way we can all contribute to ers and business owners alike, our corner grocery store. It maintaining and developing makes choices every day that may be showing our econom- thriving local economies. Local store owners have impact the strength of our ic support for the community economy, now and in the 20 minutes down the road or tough decisions to make about future. Until we acknowledge looking at broader regional how they can best give back that each choice we make, initiatives. What’s good for to the community. Businesses however small, has a con- the community next door is are often asked to support and sequence, we won’t see the good for the communities that assist in fundraising efforts for youth sports, community kind of prosperity we seek we live in, too. Here’s just one example events and charitable organiin our communities. Making a commitment to shopping of how where we spend our zations. Pragmatism dictates local whenever possible is a money can shape our future: that the consumers who supone locally spent dollar can port their local businesses will great place to start. When it comes to shop- turn over in the community be the ones rewarded with ping local, many challenges about six times. In the six- commercial support. Small businesses also and barriers exist for both turnover scenario, the benefit consumers and business is that the equivalent of about struggle to be competitive owner/operators—the prob- $1.65 for every dollar spent when faced with competition lems are on both sides of remains in the community, from corporate purchasing the cash register. Economic providing a sustainable eco- power. Pricing structures are passed on to the consumer not of a business markMy Opinion by Spencer Pollard because up, per se, but as a reflection wholesale cost. (MarkThe youth & unemployment of ups are quite comparable in Ever since the recession began in 2007, unem- Canada and the U.S., by the ployment rates are shockingly high. way.) In Spain, unemployment is currently around Consumers may struggle 25% which is in my opinion, insane. How did all of this start? Is our government to blame or is it our spending? Many culprits are out there but the biggest victim here is our youth. We generally struggle more then your average person looking for their next job, mostly due to lack of experience. It is especially hard in a town such as ours with a small population and an even smaller job market. A good idea for any struggling youth looking for employment would be to improve your networking. Ask anyone you know about local jobs in the community, odds are you’ll know someone who can at least help out. Another great idea would be to scour job searching sites, they often have dozens of jobs available with a least a handful that even someone with little to job experience is capable of doing. Being employable with minimal experience is hard as I’ve struggled to find any real meaningful employment, but with time and effort my struggle will pay off and hopefully yours will too.”

Spencer Pollard is an young man living in Nelson BC with an interest in digital arts and writing. His ideas are of benefit to all of Nelson, and to stroke his abnormally large ego

to support small business when they feel that the customer service is poor or the selections are inadequate. As consumers, it’s important for us to play a role in effectively communicating our concerns and needs to the business we frequent. Commerce is anything but a one-way street, and it’s up to business owners to ensure that those needs and concerns are heard and, wherever possible, addressed. Taking ownership of the impact of our purchasing choices and service-related decisions will help to shape what our local communities will look like in the future. Many local chambers of commerce are actively involved in shop local campaigns, as are labour unions, advocating for their business members through building positive community awareness. With that awareness, commerce and consumer can be brought together in a way that ensures our communities’ economic potential moves from dream to reality in the years to come. Let’s all work together to support the economic vibrancy of the places we live in.

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clarity, and the decision to publish or not to publish is completely at the discretion of the editor and publisher. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. Only your name and the community where you live will be published. We will not print “name withheld” letters. Opinions in the paper are not necessarily those of the Express Update or its advertisers.

Submit your Letter to the Editor at www.expressnews.ca/letters.html The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


InMemory

theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 9

Fay Irene Collier November 23, 1942 - August 24, 2012

Barbara Ann

Buckshot – Poitras October 9, 1941 - August 29, 2012 “It is time for your moccasins to make their happy journey. May the stars gracefully greet you and wipe away our tears. Know that you are loved and missed.” It is with a heavy heart that I announce the death of my Mom Barbara Buckshot-Poitras on August 29th, 2012 at the young age of 70. A Funeral Service will be held in the chapel of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd., 613 Ward Street, Nelson at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, September 4th, 2012. A public visitation will be held prior to the service at 10:00 AM. Following the service a Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, September 8th, 2012 at our home, 116 Chatham Street, Nelson from 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association, 1589 Sutherland Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 5Y7. Online condolences may be expressed at www. thompsonfs.ca. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd. She will be missed by all.

Submit free obituaries or birth announcement to express@expressnews.ca

It is with sadness and sorrow that we announce the passing of our dear Fay Collier at the age of 69. Fay was born in Dagenham, Essex, England on November 23, 1942. Fay was recently pre-deceased by her cherished husband and caregiver Dave Collier. Fay was also pre-deceased by her Father Charles and Daughter Sharon. She is survived by her Mother Irene, Brother Roy (Maureen), Sister Beryl (Kennedy), Brother Barry (Hazel), Daughters Frances, Marianne (Denis), Karen (Stuart) and Lesley. Grandchildren, Amanda (Matt), Alex (Isabel), Emma, Maxine, Joseph, Jeremy, Justine, Gabriel, Ashley and Adrian. Great Granddaughter Mya. Many dear Nieces, Nephews, Brother and Sister in Laws, Cousins, Aunts, Uncles and Friends. Fay worked in retail in her earlier years in England. When we moved to Canada she worked in retail and then spent many years bookkeeping at Nasmyth, Morrow and Goody (Bogusz) law office. Fay enjoyed golfing and camping in her ear-

lier years and always enjoyed reading, knitting and sunbathing at their house on the lake in Nelson. Nana’s greatest joy was her grandchildren. She loved them all so much and never missed a birthday or Christmas. She was a very loving wife, mother, daughter, grandmother, sister, and friend and we will all miss her very much. The family would like to extend sincere appreciation to those who have helped and expressed condolences. Many thanks to the following: Thompson’s Funeral Services/ Dr. Kirsten and the staff at Kootenay Lake Hospital/ Rev. Marcella Mugford/ Nasmyth, Morrow and Bogusz/ Nelson Chrysler/ Carol and Ted Ryan/ CIBC and CIBC Wood Gundy/ Friends, Family and Neighbors. Cremation has taken place and a Celebration of Life has taken place. Sincere apologies to those who did not know in time to attend the Ceremony. AS an expression of sympathy family and friends may make donations to the Kootenay Hospital Foundation 3 View Street, Nelson, BC. V1L 2V1. Online condolences may be expressed at www.thompsonfs.ca Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd.

James, Jim (Bud) Reed March 24, 1926 - August 5, 2012 Reed James Jim or Bud to friends and family, passed away peacefully in Kelowna on August 5, 2012 at 86 years of age. Born in Scott Saskatchewan March 24, 1926, Bud was the only son of William and Jane Reed. Jim went to Creston Valley High were he met wife Carmen (nee Fletcher). They were married on December 10 1949 in New Westminster B.C. Jim was a member of the Teamster’s local Union #31. Jim was predeceased by daughter Susan in 1953 son Alan in 1991 and by wife Carmen in 2003. Jim will be lovingly remembered by his daughters Valerie Schweers and Marilyn Gillberg, Son’s Jim, Dana and Don. Jim leaves twelve loving grandchildren and twenty two Great grandchildren, as well as many other relatives and friends to remember the time spent together enjoying each other’s company.


This week’s

ExpressNewsUpdate was produced by:

E

theExpress Update

An intimate evening with

Nelson Becker Owner/Publisher

Erica Fletcher Admin/Creative

Page 10

xpressions Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

presents...

Garnet

Rogers Saturday, Sept. 16, 8 p.m. at Expressions, 554 Ward St. Nelson

Robin Murray Accounts/Sales

How to contact us

Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, e-mail, express@expressnews.bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5. Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher

Opening set by Daniel Champaign

Tickets are $30 plus HST at the door or in advance by calling 250-354-3910. Visit Garnet’s website at www.garnetrogers.com and Daniel Champagne’s website at www.danielchampagnemusic.com

Please bring a non-perishable food item


What’sHappening theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 11

Nelson & Area: Fri. Aug 31 - Sun. Sept 9 ●●● Live Music

●● Special Events

Johnson’s Landing Fundraising “Hoe Down” Saturday, Sept. 1 at the Lardeau Valley Hall in Meadow Creek Featuring: 5 Trick Pony Dr. OOP Aloon Dj Sleuth Red Eyed Soul Chizelspank

Ages 0-12 are free, 13-18 are $5, 19 and up are $15 or more. Camping $15 - call 250-366-4342 to book

Proceeds go to the Johnsons Landing Community Association Fri. Aug 31

●●●All Request DJ. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●●●Von Butcher & Friends. The Royal. Tickets are $5-$10. Doors open 9pm. Von Butcher is a 5 piece ol timey /country space rock outfit.

●●Free Quilting Workshop with Susan Foot! part of the Community Threads Project. 10:00am to 1:00pm at the Nelson and District Women’s Centre locate at 420 Mill st. ●●Drop-in Fibre Arts Skill Share Session at the Nelson and District Women’s Centre. drop in from 10am to 1pm every friday and bring a project!

●●The spoken word play called “8” at the Capitol Theatre, 7:30 p.m. .Advance tickets are $11 and are available at the Capitol Box Office 250-3526363 or online at www.capitoltheatre.bc.ca. Tickets are $13 at-the-door beginning at 6:30pm Friday August 12. ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Sept 1 ●●●Tret Fure, American songwriter and singer arrives from Madison Wisconsin to perform for the Women’s

Centre’s fundraiser at the Spiritbar. Visit her website at www.tretfure.com The dynamic and fun Kate Reid has just be announced as her opening act. Tickets are at Otter Books, the Hume Hotel and at the door for $20. ●●●DJ Pappa Roots & Friends. The Royal. No Cover. Doors open 9pm. Join us for a night with one of Nelson’s favourite DJ’s! Pappa Roots is back with his global grooves for an evening of earthy dancefloor beats. ●●Word Jam Music Slam: a Literary and music Coffee House and Open Performance Space. 12:30 p.m. until 3 p.m. at Expressions, 544 Ward Street, Nelson. Everyone is invited to this free Nelson Pride week event

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727.

●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Sept 2 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 9p.m.

●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250-3543308.

●Nelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month at the Back Alley Studio (across the alley from Oxygen) at 7PM on Sunday. Bring a story to tell. a friend and your open ears. ●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail.com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. 1805 Silverking Rd. All are welcome. 250-3522515. ●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone welcome. ●Texas Hold’em Poker at the Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727.

● Ongoing Events Mon. Sept 3 ●●●Sarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. ●Pool Table Nights, Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●Heritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-3526892 Tues. Sept 4 ●●●Cliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge

●●●Rafferty Funksmith (No Cover). The Royal. Doors open 9pm. Tuesday nights feature local musicians. Sometimes they’re a DJ, sometimes it’s a band or artist. Whatever the sound, it’s always quality and it’s always free! Come support local music! d. Sept 5 ●●●Variety Shows w/ Estevan and Tracy Lynn. The Royal. 8:30 p.m. Come to listen, come to play! The stage is open.

2012 Soap Box Derby Racers In the 4th annual Soap Box Derby are slated to rocket down Kootenay Street on Friday, September 7. Participants will hit the starting line at Carbonate Street starting at 5 pm. Competing in 3 categories, (12 and under, 12-18, and over 18) all racers will get a minimum of 3 runs. Best 2 out of 3, win 2 races and you’re in the finals. You can race any style of soap box you like, from a professional racer to a GT Racer with wheels, or maybe a bath tub? Or an outhouse on wheels? Get creative and start building! Brakes and Helmets are MANDATORY and pretty much the only rule! Registration forms available at this year’s major sponsors, Fair Realty (402 Baker Street), Nelson Chrysler and Nelson Box Office. Registration closes on Wednesday Sept 5th at 5pm. Entry is free with a donation of a non-perishable food items for the Salvation Army to help support our community. Please feel free to Contact Elliot Carter at 250.3523542 or 250.505.0284 for further information.


What’sHappening theExpress Update

●●● Live Music Wed. Sept 5

●●●Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●●●Electric Wednesdays w/ Estevan. The Royal. Starts 8:30pm. Take your turn in the spotlight, or enjoy the music of those who do, at one of the Kootenay’s best open stages. Talk to Estevan to sign up for a timeslot during the night. ●Alzheimers/ Dementia Caregiver support group meetings. 2nd Wednesday Monthly. 7 p.m. Call 250-352-6788 or email Lhoskin@alzheimerbc.org for more info.

●Nelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free.http://www.nelsontech-club.info/ email info@nelsontech-club.info ●Nelson Women’s Centre Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. ●Darts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Girls’ Night with Margaret-Ann at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-3525656.

●● Special Events

●Toastmasters: Improve your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month. www. toastmasters.or. ●Nelson Women’s Centre. Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916.

●Acupuncture for Addictions. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. Located at 333 Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-505-7248. Fri. Sept 7 ●●●All Request DJ. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●●●Sonny Rhodes & His Band. The Royal. Tickets are $20 and are available at The Royal, Urban Legends, The Music Store and liveattheroyal.com. Doors open 6pm. Showtime approx 8pm. Sonny Rhodes is a legendary American blues singer and lap steel guitar player.

●●SEED plant and move day. 9:30AM. at the Lakeside Park Greenhouses. No experience needed...bring love of plants! We will be mixing soil, planting seeds, and moving our already tall seedlings inside . It is `set up and start up` time.

Sudoku Classic

●●●Kiyo Elkuf and friends at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m.

●●●Acres of Lions w/ Colin Lindren. The Royal. $10 at the door. Starts at 7pm. Acres of Lions return to the Royal! This foursome is a pop-rock band based in Victoria, BC. Their music is lyrically-driven and influenced by early 90’s emo bands such as The Get Up Kids and Jimmy Eat World.

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●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-3545362. Sat. Sept 8 ●●●Purity Ring w/ Evian Christ & Headaches. The Royal. Tickets are $10 and available at The Royal, Urban Legends, The Music Store and liveattheroyal. com. Doors open 8pm. Showtime approx 9:30pm.

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250352-7727. ●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-3526936. Sun. Sept 9 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

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●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail.com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. 1805 Silverking Rd. All are welcome. 250-352-2515.

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TO WIN : EVERY ROW, COLUMN AND 3 BY 3 SQUARE MUST EACH CONTAIN THE DIGITS 1 TO 9. SOLUTION ON PAGE 13

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●Nelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month at the Back Alley Studio (across the alley from Oxygen) at 7PM on Sunday. Bring a story to tell. a friend and your open ears.

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●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250-3543308.

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●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 9p.m.

●●●An Evening with Sloan - Twice Removed Tour 2012. The ●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday Royal. Tickets are $25 in advance of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. and $30 day of show. They Difficulty L Difficulty Level - Easy sk9E000039 are available now at The Royal, Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone welUrban Legends, The Music Store come. and liveattheroyal.com. Doors ●Texas Hold’em Poker at the open 6pm. Showtime approx Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday 8pm.. of every month. 250-352-7727.

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● Ongoing Events

Sudoku Easy

●Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org or phone 250352-6008. Thurs. Sept 6

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theExpress Update

Page 13

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

theClassifieds

Automotive-Cars

Music & Dance

‘98 SUBARU OUTBACK AWD for PIANO: $ 300, Brand: Willis & Co. sale. Heated seats, roof racks, CD player. 230000km $4500 250-226-6911 SELLING 73 VW camper van, no rust, runs well. $4000. call 352-1204 2010 FORD FOCUS SE. 13,000kms for $13,250. V.Fuel efficient. Warranty. Manual. Sports Appearance. 250 8253427/5511844.

Automotive-Sleds/ Bikes

NEW SNOWBLADE FOR Yamaha ATV for sale. $550 Phone 355-2491

Automotive-Tires/ Parts/Other

580K CASE BACKHOE clean machine $9900 250-352-1619

Boats

USED 13 FOOT canoe including

2 paddles + vest,+ brackets to store. $250. 250-352-6804 14’ FIBERGLASS BOAT 40hp Evinrude hardly used $3200, 9.9 Yamaha short shaft used once $1600. 250-229-4544 16’ GLASCRAFT BOAT & Trailer with 40HP (not working)+ 10HP, no seats, $500 OBO 250-354-4417

FREE

WORKING TABLE LOOM, 70s

encyclopedias, national geographics, various nails/screws, Toyota Tercel tires, old skis, science text books. 250354-4594

Misc. for Sale

BEAR CAT WOOD Splitter for sale.

Year 2012. $1,800 like new. 250-2295467 STURDY UTILITY TRAILER with hitch, for farm/acreage. $50.00. Email: z12ski@yahoo.com for pictures. or call 250-357-2055. DENON RECEIVER 120W x 7.1 Dolby Digital AV Surround Multi-Zone, AVR 2106. $375 Call 250-505-7866

Misc. Wanted

TODDLER SLIDE. STANDALONE or for attachment to swing set. Please call 250-551-5287

Limited, Montreal. Needs tuning. Picture: jurech@netidea.com. Contact Jake @ 250-352-1695

Pets & Livestock

KEEP YOUR GIRLS satisfied and

secure. Handsome young roosters, approximately 4 months. $10. 250 354 1340 33G FISH TANK w/hood & lights. Comes w/Hagen AquaClear 50 power filter. Good condition $100(OBO) 250505-5015 17” COLLEGIATE ALL Purpose English Saddle. Some staining on cantle and one side flap. 250-357-2768

Real Estate

$30,000.00 UNDER ASSESSED

value!! Beautiful new Nelson home. $269,900. Appliance included, freshly painted. 2000 sq. ft. Energy efficient! Email z12ski@yahoo.com for pix and info.

QUAINT ROSEMONT HOME.

GREAT views, gardens. Close to parks and schools. $329,000. More info & pictures, 250-352-9235

Real Estate Wanted

1500 SQ.FT BAKER STREET ROOM AVAILABLE IN shared furnished 3 bedroom. Sunny deck, bathroom, kitchen, laundry & parking. Available October 1. 250-505-4925

ONE BEDROOM FURNISHED

suite at 1 mile/beach. All inclusive with w/d, gasBBQ, very sweet. $1000.00 250-354-4485 NEW 3 BDRM home in uphill Hardwood, heated tiles,stainless appliances. Sept 1, $1300/ mth + utilities 825-9228 3 BEDROOM HOUSE on 5.6 acres in Winlaw for rent. $1100 + utilities. Call Jim @ 250-226-6911 COZY 2 BEDROOM home uphill Nelson. Non smoking, no pets, small storage shed, no laundry. References required $1050/month or $1650/month furnished, beginning Sept.19 or 30. 354-4884

GRANITE

rm workshop, moduline home in nelson less than yrs old. 250 492 6371

Rentals

CLEAN, MODERN, 1 bedroom garden suite. Private. Suits 1 quiet person. Washer/dryer. No pets/smoking. Uphill. $700. 250-352-6399. 1 BEDROOM - 800Sqft. in renovated heritage duplex in fairview. Available Sept.1 N/S $825.00/mo. Chris - 250 354-4475

BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BATH SPACIOUS Nelson home.

$1200 monthly+utilities. DD/np/ns References. Mature occupants only. central location, close to downtown, golf course, shopping, lovely yard email: z12ski@yahoo.com SEPT 1 MID Nelson. $875.00 incl power, gas heat. No pets no smoking any kind! “long term” working adult. View 250-551-0289 clear messg. Or estherlc147@gmail.com

VILLAS

Rentals Wanted

Trade/Swap

TRADE STURDY FARM utility trailer for hay or straw. Email: z12ski@yahoo. com or call 250-357-2055

Vacation Rentals

3 BDRM HOUSE on Baker St.

furnished. Charming heritage home. Garden, BBQ, off-street parking. $1000/wk 352-2026.

Submit your classifieds @ https://secure.awe-hosting. com/express-secure/ classified.php

Answers to Crossword

HANDY-TYPE LONG TERM tenants seek lease on acres 30min to nelson, 1200$+/-, have dogs/farminals, zoe:cptaquarius@gmail.com

Shared DifficultyAccom. Level - Easy Sudoku Classic

Sudoku Classic

WANTED A 3 bdrm & 2 bath dining

POINTE

Townhouse Available Oct.1 , 3 br., 2.5 bath. 1400.00 + util. For info call, 250-551-2205.

home in uphill. Nice home in great neighbourhood. $425/ 352-1204 LOVELY FURNISHED ROOM for rent;parking, clean, w/d, 10 minute walk dtwn, $475/mo, includes utilities/ internet 551-1667

sk9E000039 Difficulty Level - Medium

ROOM (200 SQ feet) two minutes

from Taghum beach with kitchenette (stove, bar fridge). Private entrance, great sun exposure, pet friendly. Includes Wi-Fi internet, heat, electricity, snow removal. Available October 1st. Contact 250-354-7808!

see puzzle on page 14

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theExpress Update

Friday, Aug. 31, 2012

Page 14

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FOR MORE CROSSWORDS BY BARBARA OLSON AND DAVE MACLEOD, CHECK OUT THEIR BOOKS, O CANADA CROSSWORDS, VOLS. 8, 9 AND 10, AVAILABLE AT OTTER BOOKS AND COLES.


The Express News Update