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theExpressNewsUpdate building Nelson & area community since 1988

Friday, June 29, 2012 Vol. 2, No. 23

Water water everywhere...

NELSON BECKER

Rising waters cause flooding in Lakeside Park.

Kootenay Lake water levels continue to rise affecting many residents and our soccer fields. This photo, taken Wednesday June 27 of the soccer field near the Tramway, shows one of many flooded areas in Nelson. Another affected area is the dog walk near the airport, which has been closed due to high water. For more information go to page 2.

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Nelson Weather theExpressNewsUpdate


CommunityNews theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

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RDCK flood updates for Kootenay Lake The Regional District of Central Kootenay (RDCK) Emergency Operations Centre wants to inform residents living on Kootenay Lake about increasing lake levels. Inflow/outflow information from contributing dams, weather forecasts and the inflow of high-elevation snowpack melt from creeks and streams indicates the lake will remain at high levels until at least July 4, 2012.

Record precipitation amounts in June have initiated numerous flood events since the early part of the month. Intense rainfall (upwards of 60-80 millimetres over 24 hours in localized storm cells) last weekend resulted in a number of flood events and numerous states of local emergencies, evacuation alerts and evacuation orders being declared.

The combination of record precipitation and runoff from creeks and streams has elevated Kootenay Lake to near record levels. The lake is currently at 1753.0 (as of midnight June 25), about a foot below the modern historic level of 1754.24 set in 1974. RDCK is providing sand for residents at the North Shore Hall, Heroux Road at Nine Mile, Balfour Fire Hall and in

Ainsworth at the Silver Ledge site. Sand bags are available at most Regional District fire halls, the Kaslo Public Works yard and at RDCK’s head office on Lakeside Drive in Nelson. For more information on personal and family preparedness, including details on proper sandbagging techniques, visit: www.pep.bc.ca. Submitted by the RDCK

In emergency flood situations, residents near any body of water are advised to be particularly careful around high water. Here are some tips: Walking: * Stay away from floodwaters. If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go the other way - six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. * Never underestimate the swiftness of the water - flooded rivers and streams are unpredictable. Even though the surface water may be smooth, the water is moving very fast. * If you have to walk in water, wherever possible, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you. Driving: * If you come upon a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. * Never stay with your car in a flooded area - if your car stalls, abandon it immediately and get away from the water to safety. * If you are caught on a flooded road and waters are rising rapidly around you, get out of the car quickly and move to higher ground - most cars can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water. Boating: * Flood time is not a time

for play - flooded streams and rivers are not safe for recreational boating. * Boaters who must be on the water should use caution - be aware that your wake can cause greater flooding issues on land. Be courteous. Around dams or dikes: * Do not walk on dams or dikes. * Stay away from dikes and flood control devices - there is a high potential to be carried away by swift currents. * Heed warnings around flood-control devices. Children and pets: * Do not let children in or near any flood water! * Keep children out of the water. They are curious and often lack judgment about running water or contaminated water. * Never let children play near rivers or storm drains when the water is rising or high - swimming skills have nothing to do with surviving in a flooded river. * Pets can get into trouble, too - there have been cases of people drowning trying to rescue their pets. * Keep your family and yourself safe. To stay up-to-date on all alerts and public safety notices, visit: www.emergencyinfobc. gov.bc.ca.

The B.C. Coroners Service has confirmed the identity of the man who died when a bridge on which he was standing was swept away by flood waters on June 23, 2012. The man has been identified as Edward Posnikoff, aged 72, of Crescent Valley. On the evening of June 23, Mr. Posnikoff was standing on a bridge over Goose Creek near the edge of his property in Crescent Valley near Nelson. A family member witnessed the bridge collapsing under pressure from the flood waters, and Mr. Posnikoff being swept away. Mr. Posnikoff’s body was found and recovered by Nelson Search and Rescue on the morning of June 24, about one kilometre down-

stream from where he was seen to go into the creek. The family of Mr. Posnikoff has been notified of his death. On behalf of the family, the BC Coroners Service asks that the media respect their privacy. The BC Coroners Service offers its condolences to the family and friends of Mr. Posnikoff, and its appreciation for the assistance provided by the Nelson Search and Rescue team. The BC Coroners Service also stresses again to the public the dangers of fastflowing rivers and streams during this time, and urges everyone to take extreme caution when near any areas of high water. Submitted by BC Coroners Service

High waters should be taken Sudden death by drowning in Goose Creek, Slocan Valley seriously: Tips to stay safe

Submitted by the Government of B.C.

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CommunityNews ��������� theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

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�������������������������������� With summer officially upon us, when most of us start thinking about vacations and backyard barbecues, Nelson’s Fire and Rescue Services reminds residents that the threat of wildfire also comes with the warmer weather. The accumulation of combustibles in and around residential and commercial properties greatly increases this risk and is in violation of the City of Nelson’s Bylaw #3217 (*). The City of Nelson Operations Department has noticed an increase in the number of structures encroaching on city property in lanes. These are in the form of composters, garbage containers retaining walls and fences. Overgrown shrubs, trees, yard and tree clippings also encroach on city property. Improperly parked vehicles in the lane create difficult and unsafe passage for city garbage trucks, hydro line trucks, fire trucks and ambulance emergency service vehicles. What you can do to help: • Place garbage containers, composters and materials onto private property • Remove structures encroaching on city property • Trim overhanging trees and shrubs • Dispose of combustible materials, including dry leaves, yard and tree clippings • Make sure parked vehicles do not obstruct through traffic. Residents can dispose of materials at the Transfer Station located at 70 Lakeside Drive. The hours of operation are Monday to Saturday from 8:30am to 4:00pm. Fees for disposal are: • Small bag - $2.50 • 2.5 cubic meters or less - $5.00 • Metric ton - $50.00 We ask residents for their active participation in this joint endeavour to reduce fire hazards and to provide safe vehicle passage for all through traffic. At the end of the two week lane cleanup campaign, Nelson’s Fire and Rescue Services and the City of Nelson Operations Department will conduct lane asessments to identify any remaining problem areas.

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������������������ Mayor Dooley of Nelson appointed ������������������ federal position ���������������

Mayor John Dooley has been ������������� elected by his political peers to the Board of the Federation of Canadian ������������ (FCM), for his 7th Municipalities term, as well as, to the Chair position �������������� of the FCM’s B.C. Caucus. ����������� The Mayor ���� is one of eight members of the Caucus, which represents ����������������������� the best interests of rural communi������������������������ ties, towns and major cities all across British Columbia in dealings with the Government of Canada on important matters including taxation, infrastructure, housing, transportation and green initiatives. “The recognition for the City is considerable,” says Dooley, ”It’s a privilege. You’re amongst a small group of people who are given the responsibility of representing all of Canada’s communities at the National level.” ������������������������������ Mayor Dooley has also been appointed as the Union of BC ������������������������ Municipalities’ (UBCM) representative ��������������������� to the FortisBC Resource Planning Advisory Group, where he’ll speak on behalf of the interests of homeowners ���������������� and small community business owners. The Mayor says the role is another great opportunity to build important relationships and confidence in the City of Nelson. “The fact that the City of Nelson has its own hydro generation facility—the only Municipality in B.C. that does—is going to be a real benefit. We work with FortisBC very closely.” Submitted by the City of Nelson

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Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser

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EducationNews theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

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Kokanee Creek Park Visitors Centre opens Canada Day

Suzy Hamilton Making a nest is easy... once you have the right materials, say home schoolers (L to R) Adielle Lewis, Galena Lewis, Myra Reasoner, Kai Dykstra-Braumandl, Lu Geraghty, and Dove Geraghty (Permission from all parents given).

Do mosquitoes exist only to bug us? dr. science Christine Humphries

I recently went on a hike in the woods above Ymir, and when I got out of the truck I immediately realized I had come out into the bush totally unprepared... I had forgotten my DEET insect repellent. The mosquitoes were everywhere. During my (brief and unpleasant) hike, I wondered why mosquitoes exist. They are one of the most dangerous animals in the world; they spread disease by carrying pathogens that cause malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever and encephelitis, which cause the death of between 2 and 3 million people a year. And, although this is on a totally different scale of harm, they suck our blood and the blood of other animals, and leave behind itchy bumps. Even their blood sucking can be

lethal. Scientists have reported large animals being killed by swarms of mosquitoes. One scientist exposed his bare arm in Northern Canada, in the name of science, and recorded 280 mosquito bites a minute. At this rate, it would take less than two hours to drain half the blood of an adult male. Mosquitoes do however have some good points: they make good food for fish, birds, bats and other insects and; they pollinate plants. It is debatable, however, whether they play a vital role in the ecosystem. Although we may be tempted to rid our woods of mosquitoes, we may not yet understand or appreciate their value. They have been around for 30 million years and it is quite possible we still have something to learn from them, including how to develop effective anti-itch creams!

Dr. Science, is in real life Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

Six home-schoolers volunteered to build the Osprey nest for the new Web of Life display for the opening of the Kokanee Park Visitors Centre July 1. This is the second season the centre will be operated by the West Kootenay EcoSociety. Last year the organization received a Community Legacy Grant from the B.C. Conservation Foundation to provide upgrades to existing displays and make them more interactive. This year the centre will be open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. thanks to grants from Columbia Basin Trust, RDCK’s Area E, F and H, as well as the Young Canada Works program who is funding two summer students

with the Friends of West Kootenay Parks. “This is a real coming together to make this happen,” says the centre’s coordinator Mel Reasoner. “We will have yoga and a great dance fitness program for men and women in the morning, hikes, more kids day programs and the evening presentations will continue seven days a week.” Reasoner says that volunteers were the key to the success of the centre last year and he invites interested residents to come out to the centre for a shift. For a complete schedule of the centre’s activities, go to www.ecosociety.ca or facebook. Submitted by the West Kootenay EcoSociety

Bear Smart Tip: Feeding pets outside will attract bears. Store food and feed them indoors. Get Bear Smart info: eekbears@hotmail.com 250-359-6611 www.bearsmart.com


theExpress Update

YouthNews

Friday, June 29, 2012

Page 5

International Celebration of Skate spawns community donation

Thursday, June 21 is known internationally as “Go Skateboarding Day” and can now be recognized as the day Nelson & District Credit Union (NDCU) stepped up to help Kootenay Lake Outdoor Skate Park Society (KLOSPS) members realize their dream of an outdoor skate park for Nelson. Tom Atkins of NDCU met with Rob Levesque and several local skaters at the foot of Baker Street to celebrate the announcement of the donation of $10,000. The relationship between NDCU and KLOSPS goes back 10 years when Nelson skate park pioneers approached the Credit Union requesting some help, reflects Tom Atkins of NDCU. “It all started with some in-kind donations of binders, pens and some photocopying. There was an informal group of skaters, parents and community members that got the ball rolling with a meeting at the old Lord Nelson banquet hall. NDCU recognized the tireless Tom Atkins (kneeling holding cheque) of NDCU presents cheque to several local skaters at the foot of commitment of this group early on, and we are Baker Street to celebrate the announcement of the donation of $10,000. happy to be here today with this announcement of $10,000 for the Nelson outdoor skate park.” Robert Levesque, society president adds, “The future looks bright. This has been one heck of a year, we got our location, we’ve acquired a design and the community support has been phenomenal. This kind of donation means everything. To have an organization like Nelson & District Credit Union make such substantial donations shows the youth that this community cares.” Please visit www.nelsonskatepark.com. Submitted by the Nelson and District Credit Union

Outdoor Climbing Camp Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 8:30 a.m. Nelson Rock Climbing Crag.

Youth are invited to join this early summer holiday condensed rock climbing camp, designed for people to experience climbing safely on real rock. Participants will learn from an experienced guide and instructor and enjoy the thrill of ascending different rock routes. This two-day course conveys basic safety standards for outdoor top-roping climbing practices, includes general crag safety, anchor construction, rappelling, basic rope handling, movement skills and lead-belaying for those interested. A second youth camp will occur in the third week of July. Parents of younger youth should attend and are welcome to participate and climb, older participants can be independent. Youth Rock Camp will provide all climbing equipment needed. Good fitness, interest and enthusiasm required. Contact 354-4884 for more information or email info@summitmountainguides.com. For more information, contact http://summitmountainguides.com/courses/p/rock_transition.

Cool teen stuff for a hot summer at the Library Wednesdays, July 11 to August 15, 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m. at the Nelson Public Library.

This free program, running most summer Wednesdays, includes prizes, snacks, and a chance to learn something cool. Teens can learn to make buttons with a professional button-making machine, get their game on with retro board games,Wii and Xbox 360, take old books and recycle them into something extraordinary or take a nail art program (teens are asked to pre-register for this program by calling Joanne at 250-505-5683 or emailing jharris@nelson.ca). For more information visit the Nelson Public Libraries website at nelson. bclibrary.ca or by calling 250-352-6333. Submitted by the Nelson Public Library

French summer day camp Camp de jour

old 12 years ren 6 to d il h c r o F y $26 / da k e e w / $95

From July 2nd to Aug 17th Tuesday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm

For informat ion

& registratio n:

250.352.3516

campjourafk

o@gmail.com


theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

Opinion&Editorial Publisher’s note

Happy Birthday Canada

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By Nelson Becker

I am Canadian, but Canada is not where I was born. I was born in New York and immigrated to Canada during the October Crisis in 1970. There were troops with machine guns on the streets of Montreal. And still I felt I had to come to a place that felt like home, even before I arrived here. I somehow understood that Canadian people, whether they were born here or immigrated like me, all shared an undefined personality trait. What is it that makes Canadians different than Americans? It is certainly not genetics. I think it is a case of example being the best teacher. When you see someone feeling good because they Nelson Becker are helping another, you will want to do the same. I I came to a country where people help each other. A country is more than just it’s geographical mass, mountains and lakes. What makes Canada unique is it’s people. Canada is not perfect. We suffer from poverty and homelessness. This Canada day, I will make a birthday wish. I wish that each of us as individuals, see ourselves as part of a larger community, and realize that by taking care of others, we will help others take care of us. Happy birthday Canada.

Letters to the Editor Policy and Guidelines We encourage our readers to write to us. Please address letters meant for publication to the editor and send via email to express@expressnews.bc.ca or submit through our website at www.expressnews.ca We do not accept open letters. Letters must be short (200 words maximum) and to the point. We reserve the right to edit letters for taste and clarity, and the decision to publish or not to publish is completely at the discretion of the editor and publisher. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. Only your name and the community where you live will be published. We will not print “name withheld” letters. Opinions in the paper are not necessarily those of the Express Update or its advertisers.

Two New Solitudes – Part II Equitable Government or Corporate Influence?

Commentary by Alex Atamanenko, NDP for BC Southern Interior In my last column I introduced the idea of “two new solitudes” that have emerged in Canada, that I labelled “NeoConservative” and “Progressive.” These two new solitudes have major differences in how they perceive the world, and especially the role of government versus the role of corporations in our lives. One solitude believes that government should minimize regulations on markets and industry because market forces (multinational corporations) do the best job at creating a strong economy and a healthy society. If corporations influence public policy, the better off we will be as the benefits trickle down to all of us. Government has no role in providing programs like childcare or affordable housing and the individual is ultimately responsible to find work and to save for retirement. Low income taxes will stimulate the economy and give people more spending power. Low corporate taxes will allow corporations to better compete in world markets and we will all, eventually, benefit from this. On the other hand, the “Progressives” believe that government does have a role in our lives. The officials you elect to represent you should be driving the public policies and regulations that address the diversity of our communities’ economic, social and environmental needs.

A fair taxation policy can more equitably distribute who pays what and to ensure long-term benefits for all. For example, by investing more in education and training, society reaps the benefits of a welleducated, skilled and competitive workforce. By providing affordable housing, childcare and pensions, government can increase personal and community health, increase the numbers in a productive workforce, reduce health care expenses and make business more competitive. Corporate “free trade” agreements are not free. What is needed is a “fair trade” policy. What sense does it make to sign a trade agreement and lose control of our natural resources to corporations? Or lose our government’s right to protect local hiring, set rules that protect us or the environment or prevent farmers from going out of business? Any trade agreement should be fair to Canadians and be based on basic human rights, the rule of our Canadian laws, fair labour practices and environmental safety. I belong to the “Progressive” side and believe that government has a role to play in fostering a fair and just society for all. It is possible to work for and with our businesses, our workforce and our communities to create a prosperous future for our children and future generations.


theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

Opinion&Editorial

Page 7

Do you think there is a difference between Canadians and Americans?

Click here or visit the link below www.surveymonkey.com/s/Canadians_and_Americans Last week’s survey responses:

Do you agree with the cuts to education made by SD8? 85% of our survey responses say they disagree, while 15% say they agree. SLASH and burn is NOT the appropriate or fair response to the endless funding problems. Destroying our children’s chances of a full and balanced education by cutting music and arts programming from the school system is backward thinking. As parents we weren’t even given the option of contributing directly to support these programs. Instead we are simply being told, the music program, that has so enriched our son’s life for the last three years, suddenly will no longer exist. Deal with it. So now what? Do we have to move him, in the middle of high school, at a critical time for him socially and developmentally, to a private school while still paying taxes to support a weakened and problemridden public system? How fair is that? At least let us contribute directly, if that’s what it takes! Better yet, cut government ineffiencies and waste instead of cutting off our kids’ education. And if you want to know where to cut, look to the Auditor General’s report (federally) and the Provincial equivalent. I think a cut in administrative expenses would better serve the kids.

CUT at the top. Less Kids does not equal more administration. THEY should look at cutting a proportional amount of Administration (Management) staff, not just teaching staff. TEACHERS have MUCH too high an opinion of themselves. Their s*** does stink. THEY have cut far too deep on the frontlines and are planning to run a rural school district on a cookie cutter approach. It is not equitable for smaller schools. I don’t agree with charging for out-of-catchment busing because those that “have” can make a choice and those that “haven’t” can’t afford to make those choices. The removal of the resource centre will also mostly effect those schools that are too small to have a teacher librarian or beginning teachers. It is an erosion of “public” schools. WE do not need any cuts involving education; our government has done a feeble job and let the education in our Province completely fall apart in their attempt again to break unions. All of us need to give teachers, the mentors for our children, all the support possible.

CUTTING an education budget is the best way to assure provincial poverty, an ill-informed public, and an elitist government. And that a conservative (with a small c) point of view. WHY are we paying out penalties for our schools not meeting energy efficiency requirements but putting no money into bringing them up to energy efficiency standards? We could save thousands by simply weatherstripping some of the older school buildings. TEACHERS have consistently borne the brunt of budget shortfalls. After these cuts the SD8 board will have cut 1 teacher for each 6.5 decline in student enrolment. That’s excessive and not in the best interests of students. PUBLIC Schools are the only safeguard to offer a quality education to all. The current Provincial Government has redirected a huge amount of public funds into Private Schools for the Advantaged, while cutting deep into Public Education. IF the money isn’t there, it’s not there. Everybody wants, but they say they already pay too much.

WITH all the pressures and difficulties the younger generation will face in the future to pay off their schooling it seems like double jeopardy to cut school programs in public schools. SD8 has increased upper management, is micromanaging, buying new iphones for those at the board office, yet not properly funding classrooms... no new resources, no support, large class sizes and students who generate extra funding for support are not getting the support that they are supposed to. IT seems an idiotic process. I would get rid of some of the district administrators. The school board office used to be next to the Bent Fork. All the district staff used to fit into this building. Now they have outgrown their current location and are planning to move into Central School. In order to do this, they must put in an elevator (apparently). I think that there are ways to reduce costs at the board office before cutting into classrooms........... again.


What’sHappening theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

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Nelson & Area: Fri. June 29 - Sun. July 8 ●●● Live Music

●● Special Events Sat. June 30 ●●●Gisto and Natural Flavas . The Royal. 9 p.m. Tickets $10 at the door. ●●●House Revolution w/ Craig Mullin & Justin Pleasure at the Spiritbar. 10 p.m. $5 at the door.

●●Andean Despacho Ceremony. Crystal Mountain – the land where the ceremony will be held - is at the top of Svoboda Road, about two kilometres above Fairview. There is no fee for the ceremony; there will be a donation basket for René and his family, and a selection of Andean arts and crafts available to purchase. See more on this page.

Market Fest 2012 West Kootenay EcoSociety will kickoff of the Market Fest season on June 29, 6 p.m. on the 200 and 300 block of Baker Street Market Fest 2012 will feature Vancouver’s Blackberry Wood and a lineup of local favourites appealing to every audience. Samba drumming, folk dancing, and a kids’ tent round out a jam-packed schedule that also features over 90 vendors selling everything from hot food to local produce.

The family-friendly street party will start off with the Moving Mosaic Samba Band, and will feature performances by Rusty Water and the Broken Troubadours, Rippin Rattles, and Roxy on the Stanley Stage presented by the Nelson District Credit Union. Folk Fusion Dance, Blackberry Wood, and Gisto will grace the Kootenay Stage, presented by the Royal. The Market Fest is now in its 7 year. The festival will also happen July 27 and August 24 to complete the summer season. There is a $5 suggested donation for the festival. More information is available on West Kootenay EcoSociety’s new webpage at www.ecosociety.ca. Fri. June 29

●●●Dj Premier with Freddy Foxx Live at Spiritbar. 10 p.m. Internationally known by his stage name DJ Premier (also known as is an American record producer and DJ. First $100 tickets $20 at the Hume front desk. ●●●All Request DJ. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●●●The Royal’s 100th Birthday. Celebration w/ Blackberry Wood. The Royal. 9 p.m.. The music starts around 10pm following Marketfest.

●●Market Fest. In the evening at the 200 and 300 block of Baker Street. The street festival will feature Vancouver’s Blackberry Wood and a lineup of local favorites that appeals to every audience. Samba drumming, folk dancing, and a kids tent round out a jam packed schedule that also features over 90 vendors selling everything from hot food to local produce. See more on this page. ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362.

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727.

●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. July 1 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

● Ongoing Events ●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 9p.m.

●●Nelson Lions Club Canada Day Pancake Breakfast. 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. on the 500 block of Baker St.

●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. ●Nelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month at the Back Alley Studio (across the alley from Oxygen) at 7PM. Bring a story to tell, a friend and your open ears.

●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail. com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727.

Andean Despacho ceremony Saturday, June 30, 10 a.m. at Crystal Mountain, Svoboda Road, (Crystal Mountain – the land where the ceremony will be held - is at the top of Svoboda Road, about two kilometres above Fairview.) René Franco Salas from the village of Pisac in the Andes Peru is returning to Canada in July. René will be accompanied by his daughter, Urpi Gabriela. René and Gabriela will be offering a traditional Andean “Despacho” ceremony on Crystal Mountain. It will be held outside on the land near the sweat lodge and tipi. There will be an opportunity to visit with René and Gabriela after the ceremony - they speak Quechua, Spanish and some English. There is no fee for the ceremony; there will be a donation basket for René and his family, and a selection of Andean arts and crafts available to purchase. Any food offerings for sharing after the ceremony are welcome. If you have any questions, please email listenbreatheletgo@gmail.com or call Terence at 250-352-0818 or Jim and Carol at 250-825-0104.


What’sHappening theExpress Update

●●● Live Music Sun. July 1 - continued ●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. 1805 Silverking Rd. All are welcome. 250-3522515. ●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of each month in Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 250-226-6701. Everyone welcome.

●Texas Hold’em Poker at the Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727. Mon. July 2 ●●●Sarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. ●Pool Table Nights, Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●Heritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-352-6892 Tues. July 3 ●●●Cliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge

●●●Rabs and DJ Olive (NO COVER). The Royal. 9 p.m. Wed. July 4 ●●●Variety Shows w/ Estevan and Tracy Lynn. The Royal. 8:30 p.m. Come to listen, come to play! The stage is open. ●●●Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●● Special Events

●Alzheimers/ Dementia Caregiver support group meetings. 2nd Wednesday Monthly. 7 p.m. Call 250-352-6788 or email Lhoskin@alzheimerbc.org for more info.

●Nelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free.http://www.nelson-techclub.info/ email info@nelson-techclub.info ●Nelson Women’s Centre Drop-in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916.

●Darts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727. ●Girls’ Night with Margaret-Ann at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-352-5656.

●Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org or phone 250-352-6008. Thurs. July 5 ●●●Kiyo Elkuf and friends at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m. ●Toastmasters: Improve your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month. www.toastmasters.or.

Young Women Peace Maker Camp Friday, July 6, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mir Centre for Peace, Selkirk College, Castlegar. Evening Gaia Shifts Retreat Centre, Nelson BC. Saturday, July 7, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Gaia Shifts Retreat Centre www.gaiashifts.org. Sunday, July 8, 12 noon - 2:30 p.m. Gyro Park Gazebo, Nelson. This weekend workshop is open to young women ages 15-35 with interest or experience in careers and volunteer activism, reducing violence, conflict resolution, nonviolent models of security and protection services, peace studies, reconciliation, and other forms of creating a culture of peace. Registration fee: $50.00. Call Selkirk College 250-365-1208 to register “Exercise your nonviolent muscles.”

Friday, June 29, 2012

Page 9

● Ongoing Events

Art Walk presents “Moving... Pictures” Friday July 6 at Expressions, 554 Ward Street at 7 p.m. (short performance.)

“Moving... Pictures” presentation, “White.Light” will perform their way down Baker Street, making their way back to Expressions for another short performance at 8:30 p.m. Members of the ensemble are Brandy Erin Dicks,Tamasine Drisdale, Andrej Hostynek, Heather Hutchinson, Melody Lucian and Michael Sheely. For more information visit http://ndac.ca/nelson-artwalk. ●Nelson Women’s Centre. Drop-in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916.

●Acupuncture for Addictions. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. Located at 333 Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-5057248. Fri. July 6 ●●●All Request DJ. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill

●●●The Dudes at the Spiritbar. 10 p.m. Rock music with flavour. First 100 tickets are $10. Available at the Ume front desk. ●●●After Work Swing Party w/ Clinton Swanson and Friends. The Royal. 6 p.m. No Cover!

●●●Alan Kirk Band. Cedar Creek Cafe, Winlaw. 7-9 p.m. Featuring our Guest: Michael Frederick ●●●Roller JamDown! - A roller derby after party. The Royal. 9 p.m. Tickets $7 at the door. $5 for Derby Ladies.Dj’s Rhapsody and Jorma will be playing.

●●●Revolver returns to Balfour another great night with The Beatles. Featuring The Grizzlies beer garden. at the Kootenay Lake Veiw Lodge. For more info email info@kootenay lakeviewlodge.com ●●Art Walk Grand Opening. Tour downtown Nelson starting in the early evening to many local shops and businesses to see art, live preformances and all the best that nelson has to offer. The exhibit will remain for veiwing for the month that follows. For more information visit http://ndac.ca/nelson-artwalk/

●●Young Women Peace Maker Camp. Starts July 6, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mir Centre for Peace, Selkirk College, Castlegar. Evening Gaia Shifts Retreat Centre, Nelson BC. Saturday, July 7, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Gaia Shifts Retreat Centre www.gaiashifts.org. Sunday, July 8, 12 noon - 2:30 p.m. Gyro Park Gazebo, Nelson. Registration fee: $50.00. Call Selkirk College 250-365-1208 to register ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362.


What’sHappening theExpress Update

●●● Live Music

●● Special Events

Sat. July 7

Sun. July 8

●●●Modern Grass w/ guests. The Royal. 9 p.m. Acoustically inspired jazz, bluegrass, gypsy, blues and folk music. Tickets are $10 and are available at liveattheroyal.com and at the door. ●●●Demigodz Apathy & Celph Titled Live at Spirit bar. 10 p.m. Hiphop, DJ duo. Tickets $20 at the Hume Hotel Front Desk.

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727.

●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936.

Friday, June 29, 2012

Page 10

● Ongoing Events

“A Midsummer Nelson’s Dream!”

●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

You like your Elizabethan drama served earthy and organic as intended, which is why you’ll be at the IVth Annual Bard in the Bush Shake-speare Festival in downtown Nelson’s Gyro Park! ACT I: “Shake-speare Shorts VII: Greatest Love Scenes” kicks off the bill in romantic style! Lisel & Jeff Forst reenact the Bard’s legendary affairs of the heart, July 18th, 19th, 20th, & 21st, Wednesday to Saturday at 7:30pm, live under the maple leaves. ACT II: “Romeo & Juliet @ Verona High!” follows the Bard in the Bush summer-love theme, August 17th & 18th, Friday & Saturday at 11:00am. ACT III: “Juliet & Romeo: the Alternate Ending” is the classic version of Shake-speare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, with a dramatically modern twist. What will it be?! Find out August 24th & 25th, Friday & Saturday at 10 a.m. All-weather, all-terrain, and all-by-donation.Audiences are encouraged to port their own comfy thrones and yummy feasts to the festival. Non-alcoholic beverages are welcome! Visit forstmedia.ca for more information about Nelson Youth Theatre and the IVth Annual Bard in the Bush Shakespeare Festival.

●●●Karaoke. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 9p.m. ●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308.

●Nelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month at the Back Alley Studio (across the alley from Oxygen) at 7PM on Sunday. Bring a story to tell. a friend and your open ears.

Museum Docent Saturdays

Saturday, July 7, 10:30am -12:30pm Touchstones Nelson Every Saturday this summer at Touchstones Nelson a museum docent will be available for guided tours. Beginning July 7th and running to August 25th 2012 ●Ascension Lutheran Church ●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, tours will be available from 10:30am- 12:30pm. Free every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Service 10:15a.m. 1805 Silverking with Admission. Rd. All are welcome. 250-352-2515. Learn the history of the Kootenays, view artifacts Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail.com and watch historical footage of the area. A knowledge●Quaker Meeting 4th Sunday of ●Nelson United Church Service. able docent will be happy to guide individuals through Sudoku Classic Difficulty Level Medium Sudoku Classic Difficulty Level - Easy month in- Winlaw. 11 a.m. Phone 10 a.m. All are welcome.sk9E000030 602 Silica each the museum and answer questions. 250-226-6701. Everyone welcome. St. 250-352-2822. For more information, contact ●Texas Hold’em Poker at the ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage info@touchstonesnelson.ca. Nelson Legion. 12p.m. Last Sunday of every month. 250-352-7727.

room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727.

Sudoku Medium

Sudoku Easy 8

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Answers to 7 5 Crossword 8

3 1 7 3

72

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27

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TO WIN : EVERY ROW, COLUMN AND 3 BY 3 SQUARE MUST EACH CONTAIN THE DIGITS 1 TO 9. SOLUTION ON PAGE 12

5

2 8 28

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37

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see puzzle on page 13

6

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theExpress Update

This week’s

ExpressNewsUpdate was produced by:

InMemory

Friday, June 29, 2012

Page 11

Marieanne Charlotte “LOTTIE” Weinerth Nelson Becker Owner/Publisher

Erica Fletcher Admin/Creative

Robin Murray Accounts/Sales

How to contact us

Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, e-mail, express@expressnews.bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5. Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher

Marieanne Charlotte “LOTTIE” Weinerth passed away peacefully on June 12, 2012 at the age of 91 at the Slocan Community Health Centre in

New Denver. In 1953, after a long 2 year wait, Lottie was finally able to immigrate from Germany to join her husband, Henry in Nelson. While raising their young family, Lottie graduated from nursing school and made a career as an LPN at Mount St Francis Hospital. She loved her job and had many stories to tell. Lottie retired from Mt St Francis in 1986 at the age of 65. She then worked in the housekeeping department at the Lord Nelson Hotel until the young age of 80. Finally, at the age of 84 she felt it was time for someone else to do the looking after so she moved to the New Denver Pavilion. Once there she could not let her nursing skills go to waste and kept busy helping with the other resi-

dents, folding laundry and even kicking people out of bed so that their sheets could be laundered. The residents loved the attention and the Care Staff loved her for relieving them of some of their duties. Finally, at 91, she decided that her work here on earth was finally finished and now she is able to rest. She was a loving and caring mother, grandmother and her grandchildren meant the world to her. She loved every minute that she spent with them. Lottie is survived by her son, Peter (Lorelei) Weinerth, daughter Irene Cook and grandchildren Christopher (Julie) Cook, Jason Cook, Mike Weinerth (partner Jennifer) and Kevin Weinerth. She was predeceased by her husband, Henry in 1980. Lottie touched the hearts of everyone she met and will be sadly missed by all. Private service arrangements have been made. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Slocan Community Health Centre in New Denver.

Gordie Jameson Gordie Jameson of Castlegar passed away at the age of 66 years in the Kootenay Lake Hospital Nelson, BC. Gordie was predeceased by his parents and youngest son Randy. Gordie is survived by his wife Gail, sons James & Brandi, grandson Kristopher & granddaughter Ashley, Douglas & Amanda, his brother Gary, niece Kim, nephew Rocky and family, and many other relatives in BC and Alberta. Gordie was known for his music as well as all the deliveries of the explosives. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd. Online condolences may be expressed at www.thompsonfs.ca

Joan Corner

A service was held on Monday, June 25th, 2012 at 11:00 AM at St. Saviour’s Pro-Cathedral 723 Ward Street, Nelson BC

Submit free obituaries and birth annoucements to express@expressnews.bc.ca


theExpress Update

Page 12

Friday, June 29, 2012

theClassifieds

Automotive-Cars

Health & Fitness

1998 SUBARU WAGON (AWD) WANTED: STATIONARY BIKE $3900 standard, great mileage and condition, 188000kms, 2sets tires+rims. niagara_12@hotmail. com 359-8004

1996 VOLKSWAGON JETTA 4 door, automatic, 168,000kms in good condition. Asking $ 1,800 OBO 250-352-0920 2010 FORD FOCUS SE Sedan $12,700 only 13800kms. Sports Appearance Pkge. Fuel efficient. Contact:natashaedney@hotmail. com

Automotive-Sleds/ Bikes

1984 HONDA INTERCEPTOR

VF750 classic motorcycle, red. Great shape, extra parts, manual. $1800 Peter 250-352-1956 2004 HONDA AERO 750cc. 27,500 km, never dropped, one owner, asking $5000. Call 250-3543806. 2007 YAMAHA WR450F Powerful, fast bike. Carb kit, bar risers, rad guards, $3900 357-2758

Automotive-Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

TOYOTA 92 P/U, ext/cab, canopy,

chains, winter/summer tires, some rust, runs great. $1200. 250-3529235

Boats

14’ BOAT WITH 40hp Evinrude

hardly used $3500 & 9.9 Yamaha short shaft used once $1700. THREE COMPLETE WIND surfers: boards, sails,mast,booms. $295 each. 250-354-4782.

FREE

WE HAVE THREE free Climette air conditioners, all work well! Contact if interested. 250-354-1147

Furniture

BOOKSHELF FOR SALE. Four feet tall, three wide. White with wooden trim $30. 505-1185

phone 250-354-4794.

CONCEPT II ROWING machine,

model B or C, $260 obo, good condition ph 354-3444

Help Wanted

WE NEED STREET petitions to force transit to improve our service in Nelson contact bkvt@telus.net

Home & Garden

NEW WINE FRIDGE, holds 48 bottles $300. Phone 352-3827

Lost & Found

JUNE 19 - Lost MacBookPro in

black zippered case across from LVRogers. Please return 250-3529370. Reward offered. LOST: BLACK ‘LILLIE & cohoe’ hat left in car hitchiking from the “Tiny Lights” festival on Saturday. 250-505-9294 LOST 4 PIECE fishing rod in purple case between Lemon Creek and Passmore. Jim 359-6649.

Misc. for Sale

BABY STUFF (0-12 months) - clothes, shoes, bassinette, CuddlyWrap, contour change pad etc. 250-505-5098 LEXMARK PRINTER FOR sale. model X3470 $30 please call 5051185

Misc. Wanted

OUTDATED PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER, old 35mm cameras. Fred

@ fdr at netidea dot com or 3522129 NEED USED METAL roofing for building horse shelters asap, will pick up/trade/pay 250-226-6863 LOOKING FOR GARLIC SCAPE. Natural please. Willing to pay too. Thank you! 250-352-9235

Music & Dance

GUY LAPOINTE AUDIO Services

Call me for engineering your show, 20+ years experience - digital and analog - Live music, weddings,

conference, movie, film, recording studio, lighting - equipment rentals. 250-352-2322, 250-354-8885 guy@crowhealingnetwork.net

Pets & Livestock

Sports Equipment

RECUMBENT BICYCLE PERFORMANCE XPR Stiletto,

brand new, paid $1440, make an offer, tel. 250.355.2536 Sudoku Classicinfo@hauslemon.com, Difficulty Level - Easy FRESH, CLEAN STRAW FOR BRODIE DIABLO MOUNTAIN pets/horses or landscaping. Contact bike for sale. 7” travel front and Carl: 250-352-9705 or leave mes- rear mint condition $1000, 250-354sage. Thank you! 8853. 2012 HAY FROM Bridesville area avail. late July / August. $130/t brome 160/t alfalfa/grass. Call now if interested 780-665-3486 stanhoward@hotmail.com

sk9

Solution to Sudoku

Real Estate

4-BEDROOM RENOVATED Classic HOME on double Sudoku lot in uphill, Nelson. $379,000. Email: beverlyseip@gmail.com for photos & info NEW DENVER $133,000 Estate Sale, 690 sq ft-indoor workshop, 1 bdrm, 1 bath, 2012 assessment $151,600. 250-818-5664

Recreational Vehicles

1995 OKANAGAN 5TH Wheel

Model 27-5M, big slide,AC,solar panels,2-batteries, skylights,very good condition $8,000 O.B.O. 250355-2469 AWNING FOR RV, or adapt to sundeck, A&E brand, 10 foot, good condition $200 352-1697

Rentals

Easy 8

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5 1 3 9 6 7 2 Difficulty Level - Medium 7 2 6 8 9 5 4 2

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© 2005 www.puzzle.tv www.valusoft.com 6 4 9 3 2 7 1 8 5 Generated by Ultimate Sudoku - all you need to create BILLIONS of unique Sudoku

LARGE 2 BED, 2bath uppersuite of

home. Private entrance, deck, vaulted ceilings, fireplace. Nice yard. Close to golf course, Selkirk college, bus stop, corner store. Small pet considered. References please. $1200 plus utilities. Available immediately. 250-8627719 or 250-767-6343.

Solution see puzzles on page 10

Rentals Wanted

SENIOR COUPLE ARTISANS/ MUSICIANS seek© 2005long-term www.puzzle.tv

www.valusoft.com

Generated by Ultimate Sudoku - all you need to create BILLIONS of unique Sudoku rental. Need 1 bedroom+ fiber arts studio space + woodworking/luthier studio space. Steady pension income. Small pets. 250-354-1412 message

Submit your classifieds at secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/classified.php


theExpress Update

Friday, June 29, 2012

Page 13

10

FOR MORE CROSSWORDS BY BARBARA OLSON AND DAVE MACLEOD, CHECK OUT THEIR BOOKS, O CANADA CROSSWORDS, VOLS. 8, 9 AND 10, AVAILABLE AT OTTER BOOKS AND COLES.

The Express News Update  

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