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theexpressNewsUpdate building Nelson & area community since 1988

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013 Vol. 3, No. 12

GMO, oh no!

Photo by Nelson Becker

Protesters gather outside the Kootenay Co-op on Tuesday, Apr.9 to demonstrate against the proposed release of Monsanto’s genetically modified Roundup Ready alfalfa, which could hit the Canadian market as early as this spring. See story page 3

Watch the demonstration on the Express YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/expressnewsupdate?feature=mhee Coming up at

8 p.m Music & Laughter

Rick Scott Wed. April 24

Wednesday, Apr. 24,at$15 8 p.m. Tickets $15

Expressions

554 Ward Street, Nelson advance tickets or more information call 250-354-3910

Expressions

8 p.m.

554 Ward Street, Nelson

Listen to Bill at http://www.billbourne.com Listen to Rick at http://www.rickscott.ca/music advance tickets or more information call 250-354-3910

Saturday, Apr. 27, $20 Saturday, Apr. 27, 2013 at 8 p.m. Tickets $20 Expressions 554 Ward Street, Nelson

advance tickets or more information call 250-354-3910


theExpress Update

theClassifieds

Automotive-Cars

2010 FORD FOCUS SE - Under

warranty V.Low mileage - $12,250 obo Sports Appearance Package. 250 3543630

Automotive-Sleds/ Bikes

1984 YAMAHA DT 125 2-stroke street legal 15,000km recently tuned up $1200 250-354-7954

Automotive-Tires/ Parts/Other

TIRES-ULTREX AS4 TOURING

on rims 195/65R14 from Honda Accord, good condition, $200obo Call John 250-352-2603

Automotive-Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1994 TOYOTA HILUX Surf RH drive, 3.0 diesel, 4” suspension lift, 33 BFG’s, Travis 250.808.2172

1987

FORD

ECONOLINE

Camper Van. Gas/propane. Needs work/parts. $100 or obo. 226-6834

Boats 1973 COBRA SKI Boat, 115hp Merc, runs, good interior, transom needs work. $1750 obo. 250-3596649 1989 HOBIE 16 catamaran,calkins trailer,carbon racing rudder, cat dolly,double trapeese,lots of extras. $2900.00 250-354-4782

FREE

FREE POPLAR FIREWOOD in Nelson 250-354-4594

Private party ads are WANTED PLEASE:FENCING always free for the first 15 words KITS to protect my Garlic from the in the Express News Update. www. expressnews.ca

Furniture

House Sitting

PAR GLIDER WITH OTTOMAN; HOUSESITTER Forest green fabric with wood finish EXCELLENCE Anytime in May in $100 Call Darcie/John at 250-3522603 SOLID PINE DOUBLE pedestal dining room table with 6 matching chairs. $500. Call 250359-7234. PERSIAN RUG 100% wool from Afghanistan 5’ x 7’ intricate flower design $2000 250 551 2367

Garage Sales

Nelson, Slocan Valley,etc. Great references. 250-538-0086 t_lester@ yahoo.com

Lost & Found

LOST: CHILD’S ROYAL blue

backpack. From the covenant church on Saturday April 7th, has special items in it. Please phone 352-6154

Misc. for Sale

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Click here to submit your free classifieds https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/classified.php

Recreational Vehicles 1991 TRAVELAIRE RUSTLER 27ft. 5th wheel Very nice. Asking $5750.00 Ph. Ken 352-0136 email: kdrush@shaw.ca

Rentals

1 BDRM. SUITE close to down-

town. W&D avail.for use, NS, NP. $760 plus utilities 250-3541900/250-777-2812 CASA DEL SOUL B&B & Art Studio Nelson great ambiance, super rates, fantastic food. 250352-9135 email casa_del_soul@ netidea.com

SHARED. CENTRAL, FURNISHED master bedroom

ULTRA ELECTRIC ESTATE SALE, 20TH & 21st, KENMORE cooktop & wall oven, white, ensuite Antiques, furniture, tools, books, boat motor, misc. 209 Main Salmo, 9-4.

Home & Garden

CARPENTER CONSTRUCTION

ANT

provides excavation services. 3 sizes of machines to fit most any job site. Call Warren for all your BackyarDIGGIN needs.. 250-3547288. Concrete installations also available. AGAINST THE WIND Nursery & Gardens- Plants for your edible and ornamental landscapes. Beautiful demonstration gardens, personalized service, free gardening sessions, seasonal organic produce. 6376 Slocan River Road, Winlaw, 250.226.6957. www.againstthewindnursery.ca

This week’s expressNewsUpdate was produced by:

Nelson Becker Owner/Publisher

deer. Pay: cash or Garlic. 250-3529235

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Robin Murray Accounts/Sales/ Layout

Rory Case Administrative Assistant

195.00 Oak drawleaf table, 295.00 Phone:352-7154 FRIDGE FREEZER, SIDE by side, hotpoing, works well. new norco mountain bike. 250 352-9150 SUPER DOOPER VACUM cleaner. All the attachments...need muscles to move around....352-6533 after 12 noon please. JOBMATE TABLE SAW, like new. $45. With stand $80. 250-489-4201.

Music & Dance

15” VIOLA COMPLETE with bow and case. Great for student. $650. Call 250.352.9288

Notices

SENTINEL BOARDING KENNELS Open for the season.

Best rates in the Kootenays. Book your pet’s vacation! 250-359-7433

bathroom. Fireplace. Immediate occupancy, short / long term 1 800 611 5788 SMALL 1BDRM FULLY furnished WD N/S refs required Lovely riverside P@B 604-089-0258

3BDRM CHARMING, WELLMAINTAINED heritage home, May 1. Downtown, private, yard, off-street parking. $1600+ 352-2026.

Sports Equipment

EXERCISE/PILATES BALL,26 INCH black with pump, almost new, cost $50 new, sell $25 3523014 12 FT. TRAMPOLINE with walls, used one season $150 250-5511130 or 250-352-6554 PERCEPTION KAYAK - two seater, with paddles - Jocassee Model, sell or trade $420 OBO 354-3444

How to contact us

Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, by e-mail at express@expressnews.bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5.

Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

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Genetically modified alfalfa protests continued from front page A National Day of Action on April 9 was called for by the National Farmers Union-Ontario in an effort to stop Forage Genetics International from releasing Monsanto’s genetically modified (GM) Roundup Ready alfalfa. Alfalfa is a high protein feed for dairy cows, beef cattle, sheep, poultry and pigs and is a particularly valuable crop to organic farmers who use it to to build nutrients and organic matter in the soil. Here in Nelson, a rally was held on Baker Street where concerned citizens marched with signs. “Farmers have been clear – they don’t want or need Monsanto’s genetic manipulation of one of nature’s most perfect crops,” stated Colleen Ross, organizer of Nelson rally and vice president of the National Farmers Union.

“Our government has already approved GM alfalfa on health and environment grounds and now all the company has to do is register its varieties with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, ” stated MP Alex Atamanenko. “Only with enough public outcry can the company be shamed into keeping it out of our environment.” Atamanenko says the public must become involved because the government has no mechanism to deny approvals of GM crops based on public opinion, farmer concerns or market considerations. Health and environmental approvals are based on the company’s own scientific research that intellectual property laws allow them to keep secret. “It is incomprehensible that government regulations are so weak that people

Protesters on Baker Street in Nelson

have to take to the streets to try and stop this type of bullyish corporate behavior,” concluded Atamanenko. “I strongly urge people to check out the information at www.cban.ca or www.

photo by nelson becker

nfu.ca and take every action possible to make Forage Genetics International think twice about its plans to introduce GM alfalfa.” submitted by Alex Atamanenko, MP

Two “Zero Waste Home” workshops offered for Earth Month

Saturday, Apr. 20, 1-4 p.m., and Wednesday Apr. 24, 6:30–9:30 p.m. at the Self-Design High/Legion Building at 402 Victoria Street The Earth Matters Zero help Nelson and area resi- Earth Matters Upcyclers, links and discussions can Waste Youth Project, in dents begin to reduce waste contact Heather or Sarah be found at www.facebook. partnership with the RDCK, in their own homes. All are at 250-352-6011, ext 17, or com/earthmattersupcyclers. is proud to be hosting an welcome. email youth@nelsoncares. submitted by educational workshop to The Earth Matters Zero ca. Past project details, Earth Matters celebrate Earth Month. The Waste Youth Project is “Zero Waste Home” work- open to all Nelson and area shop will be offered for a youth aged 13 – 30, who are $5-$15 sliding scale fee and interested in learning more interested participants are about waste reduction, sewasked to register in advance ing, blogging, leadership by e-mailing youth@nel- skills and resource recovsoncares.ca. ery in the community. They From compost to recy- are currently busy turncling, plastic-free shopping, ing reclaimed tents from D.I.Y, upcycling, rethink- Shambhala Festival into ing waste and everything reusable shopping bags. http://www.kolmel.com in between, the Zero Waste For more information Home workshop aims to about the workshop or the


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

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Wednesday Downtown Market returns Nelson City Council approved the West Kootenay EcoSociety’s application to bring the Nelson Downtown Local Market back to Baker Street for 2013. For the fourth year, the EcoSociety will open the market on Wednesdays from June 12 to September 25 in the 400 block of Baker St. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each Wednesday, the market will offer a mix of local produce, plants, prepared foods, body care, and hand-made arts and crafts. Customers can rest assured that they are supporting the local economy due to the fact that 80% of each vendor’s wares must be made locally to be sold at the market. A recent study by the University of Northern

British Columbia showed that BC’s farmers markets add an additional $65.3 million dollars into BC’s local economies. Another study published in 2006 found that 74.5 % of people who go to farmers markets in BC intend to shop in other businesses on the same trip. Woodward said the EcoSociety is looking forward to working with businesses to capitalize on the hundreds of extra customers the market brings to downtown. The Downtown Market is completely sold out this year, with over fifty vendors scheduled for full-season spots, while another 35 vendors will be called upon to fill occasional vacancies. The Downtown Market has again been organized into product

Market goers flood Baker Street in 2012

sections that should make it easier for customers to navigate the market and find what they need. Eggs and honey will be available to complement seasonal fruits and vegetables from the region.

photo by Jesse R. Woodward

Crafts will include handmade hats and shoes, locally made clothing and jewellery, and an array of body and home care products. submitted by the West Kootenay EcoSociety

Support pours in for Camp Koolaree 2013 summer season Thirty people in attendance at the Camp Koolaree Society’s Annual General Meeting on Saturday April 6 voted to do all they could to run camps at the Kootenay Lake facility this summer. Increasing the size of the board from five members to eight, the meeting adopted a budget designed to allow the camp to operate in the black, and developed a fund-raising plan to complete paying down the camp’s twenty five thousand dollar debt. A new finance committee was formed, while other folk volunteered to help get the

message out to friends and supporters. The Society Board reported that donations of $14,000.00 had been received in the past two weeks, and laid out a plan of action that will, it is hoped, result in the balance of the $26,000.00 debt being cleared within the month. A further $11,000.00 will need to be raised before the camp commences operations in June. Several ideas were put forward at the meeting as people volunteered to make the connections needed to raise the

funds and keep kids coming to camp at Koolaree this year. Folks were optimistic that supporters of Camp Koolaree will come forward with all the help needed. A motion was passed calling on the Camp Board to present the budget, debt reduction and fund-raising plans to the spring meeting of Kootenay Presbytery, the regional body of the United Church of Canada. Those at the meeting hoped presbytery members would see the response of camp supporters and respond favourably themselves.

Submit your Press Release at www.expressnews.ca/pressreleases.php

Koolaree supporters will be contacting past campers, and community supporters with a variety of ways to help keep the camp going and kids going to camp. For more information, or to donate, contact a United Church, near you, or check www.facebook.com/ groups/2312531890/ To donate locally, cheques can be made out to Nelson United Church with Camp Koolaree in the subject line dropped off at Nelson United Church, 602 Silica St. submitted by the Camp Koolaree Society


Police News Proof

theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 5

Emergency 911 Non Emergency (250) 354-3919 Crime Stoppers 1-800-222-8477

Police News: suspect sought in liquor store break-in The Nelson Police Department is requesting the public’s assistance in identifying a suspect male who is responsible for Breaking into a Liquor Store located in the 700-block of Nelson Ave, and stealing multiple bottles of hard alcohol. On Friday, Apr. 5, at approximately 11:24 p.m.,

an unknown male suspect broke into the business and proceeded to fill his bag with unopened bottles of hard alcohol, before exiting the store. The male was last seen exiting the store into the rear alley north bound in the 700-block of Nelson Avenue. The suspect is described

as a Caucasian male, approximately 6 ft. in height, slim build, and large feet and was wearing distinctive basketball shoes, jeans, hooded sweatshirt and a bag or satchel over his shoulder. Suspect has short hair parted to the left side. The Nelson Police Department is requesting

anyone with information regarding this investigation to contact Cst. Laing at laing@nelsonpolice.ca or contact Crime Stoppers at 1800-222-8477 for a possible cash reward for information leading to an arrest. submitted by the Nelson Police Department

On Sunday Apr. 7, .at approximately 9:25 a.m. Salmo RCMP responded to a vehicle crash involving an automobile and a parked dump truck on Railway Avenue (Hwy 6) near 3rd Street in Salmo, BC. The male driver was transported to Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital by ambulance where he was pronounced deceased. The male has been identified as 52 year old Salmo resident, Roger Irwin. According to witnesses, the automobile made a wide left turn onto Hwy 6 from 3rd Street into the far parking lot on the west side of the hwy and drove slowly into the driver side rear tires of a parked dump truck. lnnitial investigation appears that Mr. Irwin may have been experiencing a medical condition just prior to the collision. The BC Coroner Service, Salmo RCMP, and West Kootenay Traffic Services are continuing to investigate this collision. Nelson RCMP are requesting the assistance of the public to identify a suspect(s) who damaged several signs on Highway

6 between Crescent Valley and Slocan Park in the early morning hours of Saturday, Mar. 23. Sometime overnight someone drove their vehicle into the ditches and over highway signs along Highway 6 between Crescent Valley, BC and Slocan Park, BC. Approximately 11 signs were damaged, with a cost to repair estimated at $4100.

It is lucky no one was injured during this incident, as the tire marks go quite a way off the road in order to strike these signs. Damages such as this cost the whole community. There are several residential properties along this stretch of road which could have been effected by this erratic and wreckless driving behaviour. Most of

the signs belonged to the Ministry of Transportation, but some private signs were also damaged. Anyone with information on this incident, please contact Constable Colleen LOWING at the Nelson RCMP at 352-2156 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477. submitted by the Salmo and Nelson RCMP

RCMP News: single car fatality, $4100 in signs damaged

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theExpress Update

HealthNews

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 6

Nursing students off to Guatemala The ten students, accompanied by a faculty member and community volunteer, leave on April 24th for just over three weeks in Guatemala. While there, the group will learn about how community development, health and prevention are positively linked and how Guatemalan project partners promote health by addressing fundamental social issues such as privatization, poverty, inequality and basic human rights. They will also be working side-by-side with local nurses

to raise awareness of locally identified health concerns such as sexual health, dental health and hygiene. Over $25,000 has been raised through financial donations made by individuals and various organizations, and the money makes these annual trips a reality. To learn more about the Selkirk College Nursing Program and their Guatemalan Practicum experiences visit http://selkirk.ca/photo_gallery/guatemalan-practicums submitted by Selkirk College

photo submitted

Selkirk College nursing student Tessa Munro traveled to Guatemala last year

Conference to create a more caring community

Now registering for conference Thursday, May 2 to Friday, May 3, at at Selkirk College in Castlegar, BC The Creating Caring vide an excellent opportuni- Users Network (REDUN) administration building in Communities Committee ty for healthcare providers, and will also feature an Castlegar. The Creating announced their second public health professionals, Aboriginal healing circle. Caring Communities annual spring conference. frontline staff and commu- Everyone is welcome. Cost Conference is presented in The theme for this year’s con- nity members to identify for the conference is $85 partnership with Regional ference, Keeping the Doors how policies affect margin- including lunch, beverages Mental Health & Substance Open: New Beginnings for alised populations and ways and snacks. Students can Use, ANKORS and Selkirk Creating Policy that Supports to encourage and develop pay a reduced fee of $30. College and is sponsored by Marginalized Populations, strategies for change. For more information, call the Public Health Agency features keynote speakers Breakout session topics ANKORS at 250-505-5506. of Canada, Trail Family & Carrielynn Lund, Eugene include harm reduction therTo register, call 250-365- Individual Resource Centre, Oscapella and Dr. Tessa apy, stigma in the emergen- 1208, email castlegarce@ Interior Health and IH Parkes. cy room, an introduction to selkirk.ca or register in per- Aboriginal Health. The conference will pro- the Rural Empowered Drug son at the Selkirk College submitted by ANKORS

National Advance Care Planning Day a time for conversation Tuesday, Apr. 16 Interior Health is encouraging residents to think and talk about their wishes for end-of-life care on April 16th - National Advance Care Planning day. “These conversations are important and desired, but can be difficult to initiate,” says Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid. “Advances in health care

mean we are in a position to intervene and extend lives. At the same time we have an increasingly aged population. These factors combined mean that having a plan in place for end-of-life care is more important than ever.” Advance care planning is a process of reflection and communication about future

health care preferences or instructions in the event that you become incapable of speaking for yourself. This process is important as evidence shows 95 per cent of Intensive Care patients lack decision-making capacity at the time a consent decision is required. Plans may include information about the type

of care an individual would or wouldn’t want, as well as other personal information, such as spiritual preferences or specific wishes for family members or friends. For more information visit the Advance Care Planning page under Your Care at: www.interiorhealth.ca submitted by Interior Health


theExpress Update

HealthNews

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

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Chronic pain workshop offers relief strategies Friday, Apr. 26, 1-3 p.m. Prestige Lakeside Resort, 701 Lakeside Drive, Nelson The non-profit society, their pain. care practitioners. Most don’t Pain BC announced it will Chronic pain, or pain receive the tools and educahold a two hour workshop for which lasts more than six tion necessary to properly people living with chronic pain months, and often years, diagnose and manage chronic entitled Innovations in Pain beyond the time expected for pain. In fact, veterinarian stuManagement - the Science an injury, surgery or other con- dents receive five times more Behind Self Management dition to heal, is a silent epi- pain management education led by Neil Pearson, PT. This demic affecting a full one in than do medical students. This interactive workshop is aimed five Canadians. Chronic pain upcoming workshop aims to at helping people living in is a complex condition that equip people in pain with the pain better understand what is is under-diagnosed, under- tools to become active parhappening to their bodies, as treated, and is widely mis- ticipants in their own pain well as how to better manage understood by many health management.

Admission to the workshop is by donation and preregistration is required. For more information and to register for the workshop, please visit http:// nelsonworkshop.eventbrite. com/. For more information on workshop presenter Neil Pearson, PT, please visit http://www.lifeisnow. ca/hcp/about-neil/. submitted by Pain BC

During Daffodil Month, the Canadian Cancer Society is asking Nelson residents to wear a daffodil pin as a symbol of support for people living with cancer and to join the fight against cancer by making a donation to the Society. This year’s national Daffodil campaign is particularly meaningful as 2013 marks the organization’s 75th anniversary.

tion and deliver programs to prevent cancer and support those living with cancer, and support advocacy for public policies that improve the health of Canadians. To donate online or to find out where you can get a daffodil pin, go to fightback. ca or contact 1-800-656-6426. The pins are also available at participating locations. submitted by Canadian Cancer Society

Canadian Cancer Society celebrates its 75th anniversary The Canadian Cancer Society was founded on March 28, 1938 and through the years has grown into Canada’s leading national cancer-fighting charity. Today – thanks to the years of support of volunteers and donors in cities like Nelson – the Society has the reach, strength and experience to make the most impact against cancer. Daffodil Day on

Saturday, Apr. 27, helps wrap up the Society’s campaign by designating a special day where we can reflect upon the thousands of Canadians who are on a cancer journey and also to remember those who have not survived. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society during Daffodil Month help fund research to outsmart cancer, assist in providing informa-

Vermiculite insulation in my attic

Recently I heard that vermiculite is a health hazard, I should remove it?

Home Front

by Bill Lynch, Paul Muntak & Steve Cannon

First, it is a good idea to positively identify that it is vermiculite. This type of insulation is grey in colour and shaped like small pellets. Some vermiculite is harmless; however, according to a CBC National news article entitled “Deadly Dust” by Fredrick Zalac, the product sold under the brand name

Zonolite, produced at the Libby mine, was contaminated with tremolite asbestos, a significantly toxic form of asbestos fibre. It is impossible to tell if the vermiculite in your attic was produced at the Libby mine. If you find empty Zonolite paper bags in your attic and the bags state that the product was processed by WR Grace Canada, Grant Industries or F. Hyde & Co., the vermiculite is probably from Libby and likely con-

taminated with tremolite asbestos. The only sure way to tell is to collect a small quantity and have it analyzed at a laboratory. The good news is that according to Zalac’s article, if left undisturbed this type of insulation poses minimal or no health risk at all. The asbestos fibres must be air borne to be inhaled. Therefore, leaving it undisturbed in your attic or sealed in a wall or floor assembly is a cost free, effective strategy.

If you are going to renovate and cannot avoid disturbing the insulation, wear a proper respirator and a disposable full body suit. Ensure the fibres do not spread to other areas of your home. It is recommended to hire a contractor qualified to work with asbestos because specialized equipment such as vacuum cleaners equipped with highly sensitive HEPA filters may be required to effectively control the asbestos during the removal operation.

Steve, Chris and Bill are Building Consultants with Lynch Building Inspection Services Ltd. of Nelson. http://www.lynchinspections.com


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

BusinessNews

Page 8

Businesses Giving Back: Kootenay Co-op offers scholarships The Kootenay Co-op has three community giving programs which are open for applications: $1000 Members Scholarship Trying to finance your post-secondary education? The Kootenay Co-op can help! The Co-op has created a $1000 Members Scholarship to support learners of all ages pursue their education. This scholarship offers financial support to an active Co-op member, or the child of an active Co-op member to attend an accredited post secondary institution. The deadline is April 30th. Details at www.kootenay.coop and

at the Customer Service Desk. The $500 Environmental Grant Does your group need funding for an environmental project? Apply for the Kootenay Co-op’s $500 Environmental Grant. This grant offers $500 for a specific environmental project in our community that encourages local awareness and involvement in environmental initiatives, from local to global! The deadline is April 15th so apply now! More information in our Community outreach Pamphlet. Applications are available online at www.kootenay.coop and at the Customer Service Desk at the Kootenay Co-op.

Yes Camp Hey Youth! What are YOU doing this summer? Want to go to an amazing outdoor leadership camp for 14 to 17 year olds paid for by your local food co-op? Well then apply for our $625 Yes! Camp Scholarship. This scholarship offers financial support to the child of an active Kootenay Co-op member to attend the incredible Yes! Leadership Camp. For more information about the camp, check out www.theyes.ca. Want to apply for the Scholarship? Applications are available online a www.kootenay.coop and at the Customer Service Desk at the Kootenay Co-op.

Selkirk business students bring innovative ideas to competition Selkirk College Business Administration students impressed their judges with innovative and wellthought out business ideas at the 8th Annual Business Competition. The competition was held at the Castlegar Campus on Thursday, March 28 and included more than 60 students and six local business people who volunteered their time to judge the students’ work. There were two parts to the competition; a marketing challenge for the first-year students and a business case competition for the second-year students. The first year students participated in a mock trade show where they formed marketing companies and then created an ad campaign with a virtual $1,000 budget. This year they created an ad campaign to promote another Selkirk College program -- the Digital Arts and New Media Program. The students came up with many creative ideas including the utilization of social media networks. One group made a cell phone App through YAPP that could be photographed by a phone and then would display all

the event information on the screen. Another suggested “guerilla” marketing where they would have hundreds of sticky notes with event information stuck in a form of heart to a public wall. The second year students were really put to the test when they were given a virtual business to transform Westlake Lanes Bowling Alley. In the morning they presented their business plan to improve an existing business to a panel of four judges. In the afternoon those judges mixed things up by telling the students that the building their business leased would be foreclosed on by the bank. They then had to reformulate their plans to accommodate the change. “I think the competition is a great opportunity and culmination of what we learned. Throughout our two years it has been a good trial run for experiencing real life,” said Lauren Zanier, a second-year Business Administration student. At the end of the day, first place for the Marketing Trade Show and the Student’s Choice award went to Zach Bomak, Nick Cecconi,

Beau Taylor, Marrisa DeRosa and Jared Seutter of Phoenix Marketing. Second place was awarded to Hailey McLean, Taryn Scarff, Lara Hunter and Connor McLaughlin of Queens and a King Marketing. Third place went to Cody Fidgett, Colin Minardi, John Proctor, Stephen Saretsky and Sahib Singh of Housley Marketing. The top spot for the Business Case Competition went to Jeromie Parker, Wade Swagar, Jacob Swanson and Steve Robert, second place went to Guy Dilena, Alex Gordon and Rob Squires and third place went to Jordon Wood, Shawn Reichert, David Langille and Eri Yamada. Rob Squires also won the top student award as picked by the judges. The Students’ Choice Award for the top business case analysis went to Melanie Wasilenkoff, Brittany Horswill, Erik Craft and Chelsea Grisch of Brilliant Dam Consulting. To learn more about Selkirk’s Business Administration Program visit http://selkirk.ca/program/business-administration submitted by Selkirk College


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Home&Garden

Page 9

Trash to Treasure Day a celebration of Earth Month Saturday, Apr. 20 neighbourhoods throughout the region The Regional District’s for residents to search their semi-annual celebration of community for their neighwaste reduction provides bours’ unwanted treasures. participants with an opportuOn April 20th, resinity to give away used items dents are encouraged to place to those who may find value any gently-used, unwanted in them. This is also a chance household goods together at

the front of their property in a location that can be safely accessed by treasure hunters. A sign should clearly indicate which items are available to take home. By 4 p.m. the same day all remaining items

should be gathered up and taken inside. Visit the RDCK’s website to download a Trash to Treasure sign for your lawn: www.rdck.bc.ca. submitted by the RDCK

Permablitz comes to Nelson

Sunday, Apr. 14, 2-6 p.m. at the Nelson Women’s Centre, 420 Mill St.

Volunteer gardeners at the Nelson Women’s Centre

photo submitted

Permablitz is a garden party where participants help transform a community site from bare earth to garden oasis in one afternoon. Actions are taken based on Permaculture principles (ecology-based resilient design). This Sunday Nelson & District Women’s Centre & the Foodtree Permaculture are teaming up and offer-

ing a Permablitz in the Women’s Centre garden. Those new to gardening, seeking spring inspiration, or just wanting to pitch in are invited to come by and get their hands in the dirt, transforming this community garden and installing an affordable greenhouse. submitted by Foodtree Permaculture

Why and how do cats purr? dr. science Christine Humphries

The sound of a cat purring is a wonderful sound. It is often interpreted by cat lovers as the sound of happiness, contentment and pleasure. But why do cats purr, and how exactly do they make the sound? To help me answer this question, I spoke to Dr. Kelly Fraser at the Selkirk Veterinary Clinic.

She told me that cats purr on a sliding frequency scale of between 25 and 150 Hertz such that the purring can sound like a soft vibration or like a loud rumble. Several theories have been proposed to explain how cats purr, including a special purring organ (it has never been found), the vibrations of small bones that connect the skull and the larynx, and vibrations of blood passing through a large vein in the cat’s chest. However, scientists

now believe that purring involves the vocal chords, laryngeal muscles and a timing-mechanism in the brain. Nerve signals from the brain causes the laryngeal muscles to open and close a space between the vocal chords and the diaphragm acts like a pump to create the purring sound. Unlike during miaowing which only occurs during expiration (breathing out), purring does not involve air movement but is a neurological impulse. Cats purr when they

Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

are contented, but strangely enough, also purr when they are badly injured, near death, during delivery or while nursing. The reason for this may be because purring is a natural healing mechanism that helps heal and strengthen bones and organs. Dr. Fraser told me that purring may be a signal for the release of endorphin, a neurochemical made by the body that stops pain. Who would have thought petting your cat could be so good for them?

Nelson City yard waste burn period April 13 - 28. Permits required and burning subject to bylaw: https://nelson.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?Id=18081&Search=1&Result=1 $10 fee can be paid by cash or cheque at the Nelson Fire Department, 919 Ward Street.


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 10

Arts&Entertainment Alpha Yaya Diallo grand finale to Capitol Season Friday, Apr. 19, 8 p.m.

West African musician Alpha Yaya Diallo

Photo Submitted

A true multi-cultural artist, Alpha Yaya Diallo performs in French, English and his native Guinean languages of Fulani, Malinke, and Sosoxi. Diallo’s dexterous acoustic and electric guitar-playing, with its fluid melodic lines and compelling grooves, places him in the front ranks of African musicians. His band, Bafing, features high energy African rhythms, visually captivating dancers and a hypnotic percussion section. By successfully uniting the traditional and the contemporary, Diallo has carved a niche for himself beside such West African luminaries as Salif Keita, Baaba Maal, Youssou N’Dour, and Ismael Lo. Tickets are $30Adult $24 Full Time Student. www.capitoltheatre.bc.ca submitted by the Capitol Theatre

La Cafamore String Quartet Presents: Black Angels and Death And The Maiden Thursday Apr. 18, 7:30 p.m. at “the Old Church Hall”, 602 Kootenay St., Nelson La Cafamore String American avant-gardecom- gious strife of his time. The Quartet is enjoying their poser George Crumb, and first violin represents the fifth season as a performing Death and the Maiden by devil in this work,while the ensemble, andare amongst 17th century Austrian com- cello represents the voice the best string players in the poser, Franz Schubert. of God. The piece has been Kootenays. Since the beginBlack Angels is nota- championed by the Kronos ning, the quartet hasbeen ble for its unconventional quartet, and was featured bringing exciting programs instrumentation, which calls in the sound track of the to concert goers throughout for electricstring instru- movie “The Exorcist”. the region. Their concert- ments, crystal glasses, and The String Quartet No. this year will consist of two two suspended tam-tam 14 in D minor known as famous pieces that exam- gongs. Crumb was inspired- Death and the Maiden, is ine the theme of death. The by experimental atonal one of the pillars of the concertwill feature Black piano music of the 60’s for chamber music repertoire. Angels: Thirteen images this work, and meant for it Composed in 1824, after from the Dark Land by to explore the world’s reli- the composer suffered

through a serious illness and realized that he was dying, it is Schubert’s testament to death. The quartet is named for the theme of the second movement, which Schubert took from a song he wrote in 1817 of the same title. Tickets are $15/adult, $10/student or $45/family. Visit the event website: https://www.facebook.com/ events/568924949809050/ submitted by La Cafamore String Quartet

Did you know? Past issues of The Express News Update and even some of The Express Newspaper can be found at www.issuu.com/theexpressnewspaper


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 11

Arts&Entertainment

“Generation Squeeze� to party for political change

Monday, Apr. 15 to Wednesday, Apr. 17, 7-10 p.m. at the Dam Inn Pub in South Slocan and at Finley’s Irish Pub in Nelson The under 45 genera- ing imbalance between booking, tweeting, email- course while having had tion are getting tired of younger Canadians and ing, gathering, and making a great time with their working and studying spending on retirees so it merry in common cause peers.� To join the party more, to have less. With becomes part of the cam- to give all generations check out the facebook rising home prices, cost paign conversation for the a chance to reduce the page West Kootenay Early of living, and incompa- upcoming election.� squeeze using the knowl- Years and check out the rable wages, young peoGeneration Squeeze edge they gain through events page. A large netple and their families are party organizer Sonia the presentation. All this work of partners support being squeezed of time, Tavares, West Kootenay is to be followed by an the Generation Squeeze and income, and are being Early Years Coordinator exciting live performance Campaign (gensqueeze. forced into crushing debt. hopes to start a conversa- by Chrisy V and Worldly ca) to ensure younger genThe Generation Squeeze tion about the Squeeze in Strings in Trail and South erations have a chance. A Campaign is dealing its Trail, South Slocan and Slocan and Karaoke night chance to deal with lower first round to local sup- Nelson and ways to ease in Nelson. wages, higher living costs, porters looking to party it, while getting the socialThe goal is to have environmental change and their way to a better gen- ly savvy under 45 gen- people leave the parties an imbalance in governeration deal for young eration out to party. The knowing no one is per- ment spending without people. party schedule includes sonally responsible for compromising the family Generation Squeeze a short presentation from the fact wages are down they have, or the family Campaign spokesperson, Generation Squeeze staff, for young people while they want. Dr. Paul Kershaw explains then, attendees from all the cost of housing has submitted by the further, “We want to shine walks of life can start skyrocketed,� explained Kootenay Boundary a light on the spend- chatting, texting, face- Sonia Tavares, “and of Community Services Co-op

Water issues subject of film and discussion at free event Tuesday, Apr. 16, 6:30 p.m. at Senior Citizens’ Branch 51, 717 Vernon Street, Nelson In July 2010, the United agriculture. It also focuses Nations General Assembly on threats from the large overwhelmingly agreed to European bottled water a resolution declaring the industry which eyes our human right to “safe and abundant drinking water clean drinking water and resources as a commodity sanitation�. After years of to be bought and sold. national and international According to Paul pressure, the Canadian gov- Manly, the maker of ernment finally signalled Troubled Water: “Most that it will recognize the of us take our water for human right to water and granted in Canada but sanitation. However, the we shouldn’t. Our water Canadian Government has resources are under threat AS W O L failed to adopt a NationalS from a wide variety of ! fronts.??E I was motivated Water Strategy. Q The film Troubled to Hmake this film after I ST Water deals with some learned about some of the of the threats to drinking things that were going on watersheds on Vancouver in my local watersheds. Island from industry such Unfortunately, these probas logging, mining and lems are widespread and



largely ignored or unnoticed.� Do you know what’s going on in your local watershed? This Nelson screening of the film Troubled Water is presented by the Nelson Chapter of the Council of Canadians. Local

Hydrologist, Martin Carver, will be on hand to lead a discussion and answer questions following the 45minute film. Admission is free. Donations will be accepted at the door. submitted by the Council of Canadians

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theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 12

Arts&Entertainment Central Asian Double feature films comes to Nelson

Wednesday, Apr. 17, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. at The Capitol Theatre FLiKS presents a Central Asian afterwards. “We’re really excited to be Double Bill, at the Capitol Theatre. bringing Mongolian Bling to Nelson. Opening at 7 p.m. is Mongolian Bling, What I love about Nelson is that despite an exciting and unique documentary its remoteness, there is always plenty by former Nelsonite Benj Binks who is of national and international bands and currently on a North American tour with films coming town. Mongolian Bling the film. Mongolian Bling delves into hopes to continue that tradition.” the traditions, history, western influ“What I found really unique about ence, music, culture and the search for this story is Hip Hop is revitalizing identity of Mongolia’s youth through traditional Mongolian Culture. It’s not personal stories of Gennie, Mongolia’s really known for that kind of thing in first female rapper; Quiza, a rap super- the West” says FLIKS founder Tamara star who blends traditional music with Smith. hip hop; and Gee, an emerging artist Following Mongolian Bling is The from the slums of Ulaanbaatar. Light Thief at 9 pm, a comedic drama “Hip hop is the voice of the by Aktan Arym Kubat with a Robin country’s youth and it’s such a great Hood plot that has a humble electrician way of telling the story of modern stealing electricity to light his village in Mongolia. There’s definitely a parallel Kyrgyzstan. films are PG and run Level - Easy sk9E000068 DifficultyBoth Level - Medium between modern hip hop and tradition- approximately 90 minutes. Tickets are al Mongolian music”, says Binks who $10 for one film or $15 for both. is returning to Nelson for the screening For more info visit www.FLiKS.ca and will be participating in a Q & A submitted by FLIKS

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theExpress Update

Page 13

Arts&Entertainment Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Author Kawatski gives reading at the Nelson Library Tuesday, Apr. 16, 7:30 p.m. at the Nelson Public Library In a weaving of tales, generations, and miles traveled, Salmon Arm author Deanna Barnhardt Kawatski takes her readers on the road in her new book Burning Man, Slaying Dragon. As a headstrong young woman, Kawatski leaves her Shuswap home seeking meaning and enlightenment in an astounding and sometimes dangerous quest that takes her overland from Photo submitted Europe to India, only to find Author Deanna Barnhardt Kawatski

herself at home—in more ways than one. Decades later, Kawatski heads out again, this time with her own headstrong daughter Natalia. The destination is the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert, but the journey is much more than the distance traveled as Kawatski recounts her experiences and mother and daughter navigate the present, and look to the future. Kawatski is also the

Saturday, Apr., 20, 5-7 p.m. at the Capitol Lobby Jane Merks’ mixed intricate stitching, the beauty media lace collages entitled of the repetitive pattern and ‘Enlacement’ are featured the patience required to crein the lobby of the Capitol ate each object. Theatre until the end of May. Merks uses these disJane first started collecting cards in a way that begs you old lace, crocheting and for- to look at old lace again, gotten needlework when she but with new eyes. Jane’s realized people were discard- background and education ing the handmade objects is a bit of a mixed media as they emptied their grand- bag as well. She has studied mothers’ and mothers’ homes. photography, painting, sculpIt also seemed a metaphor ture, printmaking, graphic for the way the elderly were design and bookbinding at treated. And yet, looking at a post secondary level, but one doily by itself and you started learning sewing from can’t help but marvel at the her mother when she was

ten. After teaching graphic design for a number of years at various universities throughout Canada and the United States, Jane retired to the Kootenays with her husband Peter Bartl and started PB+J Press in Balfour, an experimental private press that produced limited edition artists books and other letterpress ephemera. Now living in Nelson, she plans to continue creating new work from old. submitted by the Capitol Theatre

author of the best-selling memoir, Wilderness Mother (Lyons & Burford, New York) and the BC Book Prize-nominated Clara and Me, (Whitecap Books), plus the novel Stalking the Wild Heart (Gracesprings Collective). Her roots in the north Shuswap go back a hundred years, where she is a director of the Shuswap Writers’ Festival. submitted by the Nelson Public Library

Artist Reception: Jane Merks mixed media lace collages

photo submitted

Mixed media lace collage by Jane Merks. Her work will be in the lobby of the Capitol Theatre from April 2 to May 31 Hours from noon to 4:30 pm Tues thru Fri.

Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 14

Opinion&Editorial Publisher’s note

The nickel isn’t big anymore

Now that we have gotten rid of the penny, lets get rid of the nickel. Just as By Nelson Becker we have been able to round off the penny to nickels, we can easily round off nickels to dimes. You can’t buy anything with a nickel anyways; you can’t even buy 5 pennies. Getting rid of the nickel would make it easier for our 5th graders doing math. With fewer coins, maintaining holes in ones pocket would be easier. And just as we maintain the penny for electronic purchases, we would do the same for the nickel.

Flowers to the young lady who left us a note on the car saying she hit the bumper of our car, we are sorry it caused so much damage but you did the right thing. signed: the car couple

The downside to no more nickels would be that we lost our favourite Canadian animal. Maybe we could incorporate the beaver and the bluenose?

Submit your Fish Heads and Flowers at www.expressnews.ca/fishflowers.html

My Opinion

by Spencer Pollard

Voting & You: A Guide to a New Voter

Have you ever felt confused by numerous candidates to vote for and were not sure whom to vote for? I have been in this boat numerous times, so how do you get out of it? Well, that is easier said then done. For starters you need to weigh your options. Odds are every candidate has pros and cons that you have to consider. One candidate might have many positive attributes but has a policy that you can’t agree with

Fish Heads and Flowers

while the other might have many flaws but is a leader in many causes you advocate. The decision is never easy but as I stated earlier; way your options and make the choice you see as the best one. Another choice is to research the party the represent, they have many of the same ideals but not everyone in said party will always have the same opinion. Candidates come and go but the choices they make can affect us all on a global scale. So the next time you vote please vote wisely.

Spencer Pollard is an young man living in Nelson BC with an interest in digital arts and writing. His ideas are of benefit to all of Nelson, and to stroke his abnormally large ego

Flowers I am so glad we moved into Nelson! I know it was hard on my husband and I thank him with all my heart. signed: Learning to walk up that hill

Submit your Letter to the Editor at www.expressnews.ca/letters.html

Letters to the Editor Policy and Guidelines We encourage our readers to write to us. Please address letters meant for publication to the editor and send via email to express@expressnews.bc.ca or submit through our website at www. expressnews.ca We do not accept open letters. Letters must be short (200 words maximum) and to the point. We reserve the right to edit letters for taste and clarity, and the decision to publish or not to publish is completely at the discretion of the editor and publisher. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. Only your name and the community where you live will be published. We will not print “name withheld” letters. Opinions in the paper are not necessarily those of the Express Update or its advertisers.

The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

TheSurvey

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 15

Do you support the elimination of the nickel? Click here or visit the link below

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/nickel

Last week’s survey responses: What age do you feel is appropriate in Canada to be able to vote? Younger than 14: 3% 14: 3% 15: 0% 16: 28% 17: 6.3% 18: 47% 19: 6.3% 20: 0% Older than 20: 6.3% It’s not about age, it’s about literacy. As a parent of a responsible, passionate, informed, intelligent teenager I would prefer to see 16 year olds voting than some of the uneducated, consumer-oriented, self-centered adults who do. as a 16 year old I do feel like I should be able to vote for this reason. I care and have to deal with the long term consequences. With

voter turn out so low, we need to open our doors to the few people at 16 + who actually want to. 18 is good. By the time people are 18, they can think more comprehensively about issues and vote the way THEY believe, not the media, not their friends,not their parents. The problem is getting anyone to vote, period. Young people, especially, don’t think it makes any difference if you vote or even who gets in office.

Sadly. In my mind, it is more important to get the young vote out than to make the voting age younger. We need younger leaders. Kids should be old enough to understand political issues so 18 is OK If young people are expected to learn sex education in junior high school then what is wrong with allowing them to vote? I mean, it seems to be strange to me that preventing a pregnancy for some reason is not a bigger deal than simply allowing a young person to vote? If unwanted pregnancy is a bigger deal then youths should be voting by now! I think it is ludicrous! Why stop at 14 or younger. They start school at 5 some 4 for kindergarten and if they are old enough to go to school they are old enough to vote!!! Increasing voters participation is not going to happen with lowering the age of voting. What a ludicrous argument... Having the voter age at 16 would allow us to integrate voting and the importance of it into high school teaching without having students be too young to vote. Students could have active discussion about the process of voting, what options are out there, and what democracy should look like. This

would generate both interest in voting and education surrounding it. That or we institute mandatory voting like in Australia. Lowering the age to 17 would include most high school seniors, who at that age, are mature and enlightened enough to vote for the party they feel will govern Canada best. This country sorely needs electoral reform (transferable votes / ELECTED Senate) in order to prevent anyone from forming a ‘majority’ government with only 39% of voters support. The young voters would be most likely to bring about these changes for a truly democratic process. What we have now clearly doesn’t work for the majority of Canadians and our environment. Voting age is irrelevant - I think voter intelligence/ knowledge/education/rational thinking skills should be involved (maybe a skill testing question? : ) ). Obviously the comment is made in jest but, on a more serious note, some people vote without any idea of what the implications of their vote means or how valuable it can be. Too young and “individuals” will simply follow their parents lead without any true thought about their vote. I also don’t have any sympathies or time for people who don’t vote and then complain about “the system”. Get out there and change it by voting!

The Express Survey is not a scientific survey but is intended to promote discussion in our community. The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

What’sHappening

Page 16

Nelson & Area: Fri. Apr. 12- Sun. 21 lll Live Music Fri. Apr. 12 lllRequest DJ. Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill lllMax Ulis at the Spiritbar 10 p.m. llNational Poetry Month! Susan Andrews Grace book launch. Oxygen Art Centre, 320 Vernon St. (alley). llSeussOdyssey presented by Mt Sentinel 7:30 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre lWomen of all ages get together to knit, crochet lace, make rugs & more. Women’s Centre 10-1 p.m. lGender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Apr. 13 lll Kobra Kabana & Friends, Britta Wolfert, Red Moon Road (trio from Winnipeg) at Ellison’s Cafe, 12-3 lllClassified at the Spiritbar 10 p.m. lllPickwick w/ Jordan Klassen at the Royal llTNT play reading series Two plays: Babel Rap and Essay at The Old Church Hall, 602 Kootenay 7 p.m. Tickets $12 llSeussOdyssey presented by Mt Sentinel 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates 1st & 3rd Saturdays 12-1 lMeat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. lThe Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Apr. 14 lllNiko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

ll Special Events

l Ongoing Events

llCapitol Theatre Summer Youth Program Auditions. Contact Eva at the Capitol to book an audition time 250-352-6363. lSt. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. lAscension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515. lNelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. lCribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727.

Mon. Apr. 15 lllSarah & Rich at the

Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. lllK-OS w/ Rich Aucoin at the Spiritbar 10 p.m.

llOstomy Support Group,

2 pm, Kiro Wellness Center, Trail. Guests, Fitness instructor, ET nurse. llAlternative Heat & Power for Small Communities - Yasodhara Ashram - Walkers Landing Road Evening of Learning 7-9 p.m. lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates, Mon & Thurs 9:30-10:30

photo submitted

Red Moon Road, a folk roots trio from Winnipeg will be playing on Saturday, April 13, 2 p.m. at The Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions

lRC Indoor Electric plane and helicopter flying, beginners welcome, small gym rental fee. 4pm at Central School Gym. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail.com

lLearn to make a QUILT with Susan Foot at the Women’s Centre 9-11.45 call 551-4951

lHeritage Harmony ll FLiKS presents an Asia Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming Double Bill with MONGOLIAN

Drop-in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250352-9916. lDarts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727. lGirls’ Night with MargaretAnn at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-3525656. lNelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. Phone 250-352-6008. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org

Medical Clinic 518 Lake Street Wed. Apr. 17 Nelson noon lll Paul Landsberg at the lNelson Women’s Centre Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John BLING and The LIGHT THIEF. 250-352-6892 Capitol. www.FLiKS.ca

Tues. Apr. 16 lNelson Tech Club: for eleclllCliff Maddix and friends tronic hobbyists and Arduino

6p.m. The Library Lounge

lllTwo Hours Traffic w/

Rah Rah at The Royal

llDocumentary film Troubled Water at the Seniors Centre in Nelson, 717 Vernon St. 7 p.m. free, donations welcome.

lOvereaters Anonymous Education Room Community First

enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free.http://www.nelson-techclub.info/ email info@nelsontech-club.info


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

What’sHappening

Page 17

lllThe Capitol Theatre llArtist reception: lllNelson Acoustic Jam Thurs. Apr. 18 presents Alpha Yaya Diallo & with Enlacement: Mixed media lace Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 2-5 lllKiyo & Guests at the Bafing- West African Summit. collages by Jane Merks in the p.m. Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets at capitoltheatre.bc.ca Capitol Theatre lobby. 5 - 7 p.m. llCapitol Kids Series: Axe lllDavid Newberry, The lllRequest DJ. Finley’s Capoiera: Brazilian Dance, Music llMens Match Play Golf Nautical Miles, & James Lamb at Irish Bar and Grill

The Royal

llCelebrate 100 years of lllLa Cafamore String Rotary in BC at Rotary’s open Quartet: Black Angels and Death And The Maiden at: “the Old Church Hall”, 602 Kootenay St. Nelson. 7:30 p.m. llArtist talk with Graham Gillmore at Touchstones Nelson. 7pm. Admission by donation.

llA Fierce Green Fire: the

Battle for a Living Planet at the Civic Movie Theatre 7:30 p.m. lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates, Mon & Thurs 9:30-10:30

lToastmasters: Improve your

public speaking, communication and leadership skills. 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month. www. toastmasters.or.

lNelson Women’s Centre.

Drop-in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250352-9916.

house at the Hume Room of the Hume Hotel from 4-6 p.m. llGreeting Death with a Cup of Tea, explore hospice philosophy, death and dying at Kalein Hospice. 402 West Richards, 5-8 p.m. llSilver Linings Playbook at the Civic Movie Theatre 7:30 and 9:15 p.m. lWomen of all ages get together to knit, crochet lace, make rugs & more. Women’s Centre 10-1 p.m. lGender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362.

Sat. Apr. 20 lllTequila Mockingbird Orchestra, Hornography, Jenny

and the Jets & Friends at The Royal lllStickybuds 420 at the lAcupuncture for Addictions. Spiritbar 10 p.m. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. Sudoku Classic sk9E000068 Difficulty - Medium llTrash toLevel Treasures Day Classic - Easy Located Difficulty at 333 Level Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-505-7248. llRotary Family Fun Run in support of Polio Eradicationat Fri. Apr. 19 Lakeside Park. Registration forms lllLint at The Royal at: nelsonrotary.info

Tournament at Balfour Golf course 1-877-229-4141 to register.

llCanadian Federation of University Women monthly

meeting at the New Grand Hotel. 9:30-coffee;10-meeting;11-speaker Pauline Daniels: personal life coaching. 12-lunch. All welcome. https://sites.google.com/site/nelsoncfuw/home llMovies: Ponyo 4 p.m . Castle in the Sky 6:45 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook 9:15 p.m. at the Civic Movie Theatre lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates 1st & 3rd Saturdays 12-1 lMeat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-3527727. lThe Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. mation, please call 250-352-6936.

Sun. Apr. 21 lllNiko at the Hume

sk9M000096

Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

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4 1 5 2 3 see puzzles on page 12 Solution

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United

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lAscension Lutheran Church

Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

Click here for

http://www.wunderground.com/swf/Rapid_Fire.swf?units=metric&station=IBRITISH76

Nelson Weather Answers to Crossword

Medium

5

lNelson

Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. lCribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-3527727.

theexpressNewsUpdate

Solution to Sudoku Easy

and Capoeira at the Capitol Theatre 2 p.m llNelson Cycling Club Bike Swap. Rod and Gun Club. Drop off 11:00, sale at 12:30. lSt. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308.

http://www.uniserve.com/

see puzzle on page 18


theExpress Update

Friday, Apr. 12, 2013

Page 18

17

For more crosswords by Barbara Olson and Dave Macleod, check out their books, O Canada Crosswords, vols. 8, 9 and 10, available at Otter Books and Coles.

The Express News Update  

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