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theexpressNewsUpdate building Nelson & area community since 1988

French market, Gypsy Music, the Lorax and more! See A&E pages 6-10

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013 Vol. 3, No. 6

Missing people found safe and unharmed see police report pages 3-4

What’s the buzz on radiation? see editorial pages 12-13

Why not make Friday, Mar. 1 a night of music and art? Check out the blue night art walk venues (see calendar page 14) and then wander on over to Expressions at 554 Ward Street to see Sarah Calvert Live ROOTS MUSIC SIMMERED IN THE BLUES WITH DASHES OF JAZZ AND HINTS OF COUNTRY

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'3*%": ."3  $0/$&35"51. “On this charming debut album, Toronto songstress Sarah Calvert (Que Sarah) delivers a breezy and refreshing blend of folk, jazz and roots stylings.� Kerry Doole, Exclaim Magazine, Toronto

“Could she be our next big Sarah; in the footsteps of McLachlan, Harmer and Slean? Her songs range from really good to really great and she has won over crowds with her acoustic original music.� Mike Beggs, The Mississauga News

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7 p.m. at Expressions 554 Ward Street Â?Â?ĂŠ*i>ViĂŠ >vjĂƒĂŠĂƒĂŒ>Ă€ĂŒĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠĂ‡ĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠ>ĂŒ Â?Â?ĂŠ*i>ViĂŠ >vjĂƒĂŠĂƒĂŒ>Ă€ĂŒĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠĂ‡ĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠ>ĂŒ Ă?ÂŤĂ€iĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜Ăƒ]ĂŠxx{ĂŠ7>Ă€`ĂŠ-ĂŒĂ€iiĂŒĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ iÂ?ĂƒÂœÂ˜ $5, Food and drink available Ă?ÂŤĂ€iĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜Ăƒ]ĂŠxx{ĂŠ7>Ă€`ĂŠ-ĂŒĂ€iiĂŒĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ iÂ?ĂƒÂœÂ˜

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theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 2

Nelson-Area students take the Eco-Challenge Wildsight’s Beyond Recycling program is teaching Grade 4-6 kids in Salmo, Balfour and Nelson how to shrink their footprints— their Ecological Footprints. The kids in intermediate classes at Salmo, Redfish and Rosemont Elementary Schools, are starting a month-long long survey of how their homes and schools use resources— energy, water, goods—and what they can do to improve the numbers. “The kids are investigating how big a footprint their daily lives have,” said Monica Nissen, Wildsight’s Education Program Manager. “They’ll measure things like electricity and gas use and find ways to reduce it. They’ll add up

the kilograms of garbage and find ways to recycle more. It’s an intensive process, but they’re ready to tackle it.” The students are taking part in the 22-week Beyond Recycling curriculum, which is the only program of its type in the Columbia Basin. Working with the classroom teachers, Beyond Recycling educators Mary Searchfield and Monica Nissen outline the key concepts of energy and water use and work to find ways to reduce waste. In Beyond Recycling, students learn how their lifestyles use and impact resources and land. During the Beyond Recycling curriculum, (which meets BC Ministry

submitted

Rosemont- John Schnare, Monica Nissen and Beyond Recycling students

of Education learning outcomes for science,) students study the ‘lifecycle’ of everyday items, the resources used to make them, and the various sources of energy used for heat, light and transportation.

The Eco-Challenge lasts four weeks. Students in Kathleen Hunter’s, Jann Schmidt’s and John Schnare’s classes will complete their challenge by mid-March. submitted by Wildsight

2013 MS Society Walk in Trail and Nelson announced Now registering! Sunday, April 28, at Giro Park in Trail and Sunday, May 26 at Lakeside Park in Nelson Registration has opened for the annual MS Society Walk in Trail and Nelson. Community members are invited to join in the family fun day and help put an end to MS. Individuals as well

as teams of friends & coworkers can walk to raising money to help local people living with MS and support research to find a cure. Multiple Sclerosis is an unpredictable illness - affecting vision, hearing, memory,

balance and mobility. Canada has one of the highest rates of MS in the world. That’s why every step matters. The events start with a hearty breakfast, registration, music and entertainments. There is a choice of a 1 km

or 5 km walk. Participants can register online at mswalks.ca or phone 1866-352-3997 for Trail or 1866-352-3997 for Nelson. Just do it! It’s a Walk in the Park! submitted by the MS Society

Kootenay Rhythm Dragons 2013 Membership Drive Saturday, Mar. 9, 10 a.m. – noon at the Community First Health Co-op Building in Nelson, 518 Lake Street (lower lever – CCRR office) Women interested in from Lakeside Park. Paddling dragon boat paddling for the is scheduled several times 2013 Dragon Boat season are a week and there are difinvited to come and learn the ferent groups for all interest basics of rhythmic paddling levels. For more info contact and be part of a great team Dorothy Hatto at 250-551who like to have fun. Coffee 3104 & muffins will be served. submitted by the Kootenay The boat is located across Rhythm Dragons

http://www.kolmel.com


theExpress Update

PoliceNews

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 3

Missing teen Sheldon Hicks located safely On Wednesday, Feb. 27 just after 6:00 p.m. Nelson RCMP received a call from Sheldon Hick’s mother that Sheldon had been located on a tip. A Constible from

the Integrated Road Safety Unit attended and spoke with Sheldon and his mother. The youth was reluctant to discuss where he had been, but said he was fine,

and returned home with his mother. Nelson RCMP reported the missing 14 year old on Feb. 20 and would like to thank everyone who put

up posters, called in tips, and generated information on Sheldon’s whereabouts. submitted by the Nelson RCMP

Just before 3 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 21 while on routine vehicle patrol a police officer observed a lone car parked at Lakeside Park. The park was closed at that hour of the night. The officer discovered a single female occupant sitting in the idling vehicle. The officer engaged in a conversation with the occupant, which piqued his curiosity. The answers she gave to the officer did not make sense. He continued the conversation and requested a second officer to attend in support. When the second officer arrived he glanced into the back seat of the car and observed two bags of marijuana protruding out of a back pack. The marijuana was in plain view. The driver was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and taken into custody. Inside the vehicle the officers located a larger bag of marijuana, a scale, and a large amount of cash.

The driver was processed and released. The officer transported her to her vehicle. The drugs and cash were seized as evidence. The investigation will be completed and charges are probable. On Friday, Feb. 22, the Nelson Police Department and Nelson Fire Department were called to investigate two suspicious vehicle fires in the 300-block of Jam factory Lane. One vehicle was fully engulfed and a second vehicle was damaged in the incident. Residents in the area were evacuated until the fire was extinguished. No injuries were sustained and residents were able to return to their homes. The file is still under investigation at this time but is deemed to be suspicious. On Saturday, Feb. 23, at approximately 03:40 a.m., a Nelson Police officer stopped a vehicle travelling at a very high rate of speed

in the 100-block of Highway 6. After conducting an investigation, the driver was deemed to be impaired by alcohol and was served a 90-day Immediate Road Side Driving Prohibition, a four month Notice of Driving Prohibition, from the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles and a violation ticket. The registered owner of the vehicle, who was in the passenger seat, was arrested for being intoxicated which was a breach of his release conditions regarding a separate police matter. The vehicle was impounded. The Nelson Police Department is grateful for the valiant efforts of the two Nelson youths who were able to help a distressed dog. On Saturday evening, a 12-year-old male and 13year old male, located a dog, which appeared to be limping, wandering in traffic on the Observatory Overpass. The youths were able to take control of

the dog and walked it to the Nelson Police Department to try to get help. The Nelson Police were able to contact the very relieved owner who advised the dog had escaped from the yard. The dog was not injured but was limping due to arthritis. On Monday, Feb. 25, the Nelson Police Department received a report of a Theft of a tip jar from a coffee shop, located in the 500-block of Baker Street. The theft occurred when the shop was busy and although there is a person of interest identified in this file, the Nelson Police would like to remind the public to protect property to the best of their abilities and consider keeping tip jars on the inside area of countertops. It is estimated that there was approximately $10.00 in the jar at the time of the theft. submitted by the Nelson Police Department

During the month of February 2013 Salmo RCMP have noticed an increase in thefts from motor vehicles that are being parked overnight for back country adventures.

These thefts are primarily occurring on Hwy 3 at the summit between Salmo and Castlegar as well as the summit between Salmo and Creston. Please do not leave valuables in any vehi-

cle overnight, ensure your vehicle is locked and report any suspicious activity to local police. Among some of the items stolen have been IPhones that have APP’s available that can

help you track your phone if it is lost or stolen, please research what APP is best for you. submitted by the Kootenay Boundary Regional Detachment RCMP

Police News: suspicious fire, dog rescue, tip jar theft

Salmo RCMP warns of theft from unattended motor vehicles


theExpress Update

PoliceNews

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 4

RCMP Reports: Missing skiiers and boarders found On Sunday Feb. 24, at approximately 7:00 pm the Nelson RCMP received a complaint of two skiers who had not returned home. The skiers were a father and son, ages 37 and 15, who had planned on hiking up to Ymir Peak and skiing the backside of the mountain. The wife and mother of the skiers became concerned when they failed to return home by dinner time. Nelson Search and Rescue were contacted, however, due to darkness a decision was reached to search for the pair at first light. The avalanche conditions were considered high in the alpine area causing additional concern for their and the rescuers safety, as

several minor avalanches had been reported ealier that day. The next morning, as the search was underway the two skiers managed to ski out safely. The two people were not equiped to spend the night nor did they have proper avalanche equipment. Upon questioning they stated they got disoriented due to darkness and wind so decided to bed down in a tree well for the evening. Other than being a little cold and hungry they were fine. People are reminded to check the conditions before venturing out into the back country due to the risk of avalanche. On Tuesday, Feb. 26 at 10:48 hours Nelson

RCMP received a call of two overdue snowboarders from Whitewater ski hill. The pair were a 30 year old male and 40 year old male, both from Nelson. The men were described as good snowboarders but not frequent out of bounders. Neither person was carrying survival gear, shovels, or beacons which is necessary gear for skiing the back country. Cpl. Stefani attended the ski hill and located the subjects vehicle in the lower parking lot. An inquiry was made with Whitewater staff on site and they were advised of the two missing men. Cst Lowing from Nelson detachment called the Provincial Emergency Program (PEP),

who in turn dispatched Nelson Search and Rescue (SAR). At first light Nelson SAR attended Whitewater and commenced a search by helicopter but visibility was poor. Cst. Long located a couple on the hill who had seen the missing men the previous day and were able to point SAR in the direction of Prospector. Fresh tracks were located and the missing boarders were eventually found at around 3:00 p.m. and taken to the ski hill lodge. A doctor on site checked the pair over and they were found to be in good condition, but suffering minor forms of frost bite. submitted by the Nelson RCMP

Ice build up around chimney chase Home Front

by Bill Lynch, Paul Muntak & Steve Cannon

Probably your wood framed chimney chase is attached to the outside wall of your home near the eave of a roofline. The most common cause of this problem is a lack of insulation and vapour barrier on the inside of the framed chase. These walls should be insulated the same as any exterior

Every winter a large volume of ice builds up around our house’s wood framed chimney chase. Over the winter the ice volume keeps increasing, hanging in sheets from the eaves on both sides of the chase. What’s happening? wall. The hot air from the metal chimney inside this chase is probably escaping into the adjacent attic space, melting the snow on your roof. This melting snow is then freezing as it travels down the unheated eaves at the sides of the chimney chase forming sheets of ice.

If your chimney chase is large enough, you may be able to insulate it by either removing the top chimney “lid” or the “soffit” on the under side. Install as much insulation as the framing will permit. As well, be sure to insulate the space between the chase and your attic. Keep

the insulation at least two inches clear of the metal chimney vent and install a vapour barrier on the warm side of the chase walls. Keeping the chase warm will also ensure that the hot flue gases in the metal chimney will exit the chimney quickly. This should correct the problem.

Steve, Chris and Bill are Building Consultants with Lynch Building Inspection Services Ltd. of Nelson. http://www.lynchinspections.com

Did you know? Past issues of The Express News Update and even some of The Express Newspaper can be found at www.issuu.com/theexpressnewspaper


HealthNews theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 5

How To Treat Cat Diabetes At Home

Pets - Purely Natural

By: Dr. Andrew Jones

Cat diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed, and currently it affects more than 1 in 400 cats. Diabetes is very treatable, and does not need to shorten your cat’s life span. Most pet owner’s first suspect that their cat has diabetes as their cat is drinking and urinating much more than normal. This may be accompanied by increased appetite, but also

weight loss. Occasional there is noticeable leg weakness, or dropping down on the rear legs. If you suspect your pet is diabetic, have this confirmed by your veterinarian. Most cats begin with insulin, but with some diet alterations may come off insulin therapy. Ask your veterinarian about Glargine (brand name Lantus) Insulin – it is longer acting and better at regulating difficult to better at regulating difficult to regulate diabetic cats. The insulin injections can be given at home, and at the same time each day. The proper type of insulin, dose, and frequency of administration needs to be determined by your veterinarian. If your cat is to have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), you’ll need to be able to recog-

nize it, and respond quickly. This usually happens within an hour of giving the insulin injection. Your cat will be weak, trembling, dazed and may begin to shake or seizure. If you suspect this, immediately give a sugar boost. Have corn or maple syrup on hand and give 1-2 tablespoons. Then take your cat to your veterinarian immediately. Recent studies have shown that cats benefit greatly from higher protein, lower carbohydrate diets. Changing to a less than 5% carbohydrate, high protein canned food is the single most important change to make. Eliminate the dry kibble, and only feed canned. This gives your cat the greatest chance to come off of Insulin Therapy. I am finding that we can control dia-

betes in about 50% of diabetic cats this way. Chromium is a supplement that makes the cells more receptive to taking up blood glucose (sugar). Diabetes affects the other cells in the body, damaging tissue and organ cells. Antioxidants limit this damage. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are two common antioxidants I would suggest. Another effective supplement is fish oil. It is a source of omega 3 fatty acids, and fish oil may increase insulin sensitivity. Cinnamon is a tasty spice that has been shown to help regulate blood sugar- it is also a potent antioxidant. The active ingredient is called MHCP, which mimics insulin to improve blood sugar regulation. Ask you Veterinarian about appropriate doses.

DISCLAIMER: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your own veterinarian. Dr. Andrew Jones resigned from the College of Veterinarians of B.C. effective December 1st 2010, meaning he cannot answer specific questions about your pet’s medical issues or make specific medical recommendations for your pet

Why is milk pasteurized?

dr. science Christine Humphries

Drinking raw milk may provide many nutritive and health benefits, but it may also make you very sick. There are many harmful yeast, mold and bacteria in raw milk that can cause serious gastro-intestinal upset, diseases or even death. Pasteurization is a process of flash heating milk, or other foods, to destroy most of the

disease-causing pathogens. The process of pasteurization is named after its inventor, a French scientist called Louis Pasteur, who first discovered that microorganisms could be killed by heat. There are now two common pasteurization methods. In Europe, milk is heated to 138°C for at least two seconds and then rapidly cooled. This ultra-high temperature (UHT) pasteurized milk can be stored at room temperature for several months. In North America, milk is normally pasteurized by heating it to

72°C for 15 seconds and then cooling it rapidly to 10°C. This process is called HTST for high temperature short time pasteurization. HTST reduces the amount of viable microorganisms in the milk by a factor of 5 (0.00001 microorganisms compared to raw milk) giving this milk a safe shelf life of two to three weeks at 4°C. Although most harmful bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, campylobacter, listeria, salmonella, yersinia and brucella, are killed during pasteurization, some scientists in

Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

Submit your Press Release at www.expressnews.ca/pressreleases.php

the UK have raised concerns that one bacteria which has been linked to Crohn’s disease, mycobacterium paratuberculosis, may be resistant to current pasteurization standards. These scientists have lobbied the government to increase the time milk is heated by 10 seconds to kill even this heat-resistant bacteria. Other techniques, such as irradiation or the use of chemicals to kill the harmful organisms in raw milk, are also options for ensuring the safety of milk.


theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 6

Arts&Entertainment

French Extra Market brings a bit of Paris to Nelson

Saturday, Mar. 2, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the former old Anglican Church Hall, Nelson More than twenty artisans, art- Chartier, AFKO’s Director, all the ists and food vendors will create a employees and volunteers work on Parisian ambiance for the first year this project since the January to hold event French Extra Market host by an amazing market, completely difthe West Kootenays Francophone ferent from what people experienced Association (AFKO). The entry is by before. The Eiffel tower, live buskdonation. ers, kids entertainment will be part “A family event to promote French of the experience. Also featured in culture sounds like a great project. this market, croissant, pastries, coffee, We are happy to support this new French wine and more. The French event.” says Tom Thomson, Executive Extra Market is a part of the Canadian Director of Nelson District Chamber wide week “Les Rendez-vous de la of Commerce. Francophonie” held in March every Under the direction of Lyne year.

A special evening of art improvs will follow from 6:30pm to 8pm. Everyone is welcome to judge the performances of 3 teams comprised of 3 artists going head to head in a battle of paint brushes. It is an opportunity to support local artists while performing live and buy one of the arts at the auction. The admission is $5/person or $15 for families. Keep few toonies to enjoy some goodies at the French bistro open till the end of the evening. submitted by the West Kootenays Francophone Association

Beecham launches The Modern World short story at reading Friday, Mar. 8, 7:30 p.m. Oxygen Art Centre, 320 Vernon St. (alley entrance), Nelson To mark International Women’s Day, Nelson’s Oxygen Art Centre will host the launch of Nelson short story writer Cassie Beecham’s debut collection The Modern World. The launch, part of Oxygen Art Centre’s Presentation Series, is free and open to the public. A review Feb. 15 in the National Post of Beecham’s collection of tales praised her “facility at mixing comedy and drama,” and said her stories

describe “women trying to negotiate the vicissitudes of romance and the nature of home.”. Beecham was born and grew up in Nelson, and earned a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from the University of Guelph. She currently divides her time between the Kootenays and Dublin, Ireland. The Modern World is published by Ottawa’s Oberon Press. submitted by Oxygen Art Centre

Cassie Beecham

submitted

Slocan Valley Youth hosts fundraising dinner and “The Lorax.” Saturday, Mar. 2, 5-9 p.m. at Passmore Hall Slocan Valley youth have organized a fundraising dinner to support the protection of the Slocan Valley, celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday and Read Across America Day. The event will include a presentation of the classic Dr. Seuss’s film “The Lorax.” Admission is by donation There will be dinner, cat in the hat cookies and desserts, a silent auction, an open stage and

the showing of the Lorax. Come and help fundraise for the environment and see this educational film that celebrates the wisdom of Dr. Seuss. The proceeds will go to the Sinixt Nation and the Perry Ridge Water Users Association, two groups the youth feel work really hard to protect the environment and in particular the mountains and the rivers that we all love to play in.

Submit your Fish Heads and Flowers at

www.expressnews.ca/fishflowers.html

“The Lorax,” both book and film, has a message for its young readers. “I think it’s very much there and it really should be,” says Dr. Seuss’s wife. Asked exactly what that message is, she quotes from another Dr. Seuss book, “Horton Hears a Who”: “A person’s a person, no matter how small.” Contact: Haley @250-226-7324 - for silent auction donations: Stella @226-7371 submitted by Marilyn Burgoon

Submit your Letter to the Editor at

www.expressnews.ca/letters.html


theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 7

Arts&Entertainment

Unique dance performance leaps across the Capitol stage Saturday, Mar. 2, 6:30 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre Slava Doval’s FolkFusion ing the joy of dance. Her dance Dance presents a unique eve- is a fusion of old world roots ning of dance performance. and new times sensibility, and This eclectic show will she aims the folk element of include over sixty dancers “for the people, by the peoages four and up, and will ple.” FolkFusion performed feature diverse styles from last year at Salmon Arm the world over, with influence Roots and Blues, Starbelly, from Bollywood, Bhangra, UnityFest, MarketFest, Keep Cumbia, Contemporary, Jazz, the Beat among other venues, HipHop, European Folk and so this is an exciting leap to more. Slava Doval has been take her rootsy style to the dancing and performing stage. Slava is very excitlocally over the last decade, ed to present special guests and teaching the last four, She Nicole Bruce and her HipHop created FolkFusion, which students from Trail’s Steps has been an steady evolution Dance, as well talented Julie , lately gaining great momen- Turgeon. tum, as a way to blend all Doors are at 6pm, show her various dance experiences at 6:30. TicketsDifficulty are $10, from her travels abroad and available online at www. be able to share them with her capitoltheatre.bc.ca or at the community. door. Kids 10 and under are She loves teaching and free. sharing her passion for expresssubmitted by Studio Alive

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theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 8

Arts&Entertainment

Young artists show their work at the Library Thursday, Mar. 7, 6:30 p.m. at the Nelson Public Library This week, the Nelson Library and Cakes, and Lucky Cupcakes. 4Cats Studio celebrate creative minds The Nelson Library regularly with a children’s multimedia art show. shows children’s artwork, but this On Opening Night art-lovers of all spring the Library teams up with the ages can enjoy the work, meet the art- Nelson’s downtown children’s art stuists, and sample refreshments provid- dio for an extra-special display. 4Cats ed by the Kootenay Co-op, Epiphany is an international chain of studios for

young artists with the slogan “Art is Good”. The Library thinks so, too. Young artists interested in displaying their work should contact Melanie Ward at 4CatsArt by calling 354-2287 or emailing nelson@4cats.com. submitted by the Nelson Library

Martha Wainwright – a new force in music at the Capitol Theatre Thursday, March 7, 8 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre The Capitol Theatre presents But I’ve Got Feelings Too. Yuka C. internationally renowned artist Honda production and Martha have Martha Wainwright with opening act created an edgy, multi-instrumental AroarA. Martha just returned from soundscape that showcases Martha’s Berlin a few weeks ago where she raw, confessional poetry with undeniand her brother Rufus performed able style and grace. a moving tribute to their recently Martha states that “This record is deceased mother, Canadian folk sing- a culmination of my life experiences er Kate McGarrigle. The tribute was so far. Everything changed for me a part of the screening of the concert couple of years ago and this record is documentary Sing Me the Songs That a representation of that and a return Say I Love You. Now back in Canada to the reason I started writing songs.” she has embarked on a cross Canada Martha continued, “I’ve made this tour/USA tour. record as a motherless child and as a Undoubtedly her own person, with mother (Martha’s son Arcangelo was her own sense of style, Martha creates born 2010). Two things I had never her own music with an extraordinary been before. For me, it is a new beginversatile and compelling voice. Her ning.” Tickets are $25 Advance and latest recording Come Home To Mama $30 at the Door. Buy online capitoldisplays the passionate angst of her theatre.bc.ca or p. 250.352-6363 Tues. 2005 debut coupled with the twisted – Fri. noon-4:30pm. pop of 2008’s I Know You’re Married submitted by the Capitol Theatre

Martha Wainwright

submitted

Oxygen Art Centre reduces Spring Break Art Camp cost to make accessible After discovering that Oxygen’s “Spring Break Art Camp 2013” was out of the budget for a lot families this year, the organization has decided to reduce the cost of the camps to $120/week. Oxygen would much prefer to run their camps full rather than half empty or not at all. So they took the minimum registration requirements and

divided it by their maximum number of students to come up with a greatly reduced fee. They sincerely hope that will make Art Camp more accessible for everyone. Oxygen Art Centre always values any feedback and desires to produce inspirational and creative programming that is also accessible and responsive to the needs of the community.

They also offer various opportunities to help offset course costs including putting in hours at the Centre that can be used towards tuition, so there is almost always a way to make art happen. Complete Camp info is on their website at http://www.oxygenartcentre.org/classes/youth/

submitted by Oxygen Art Centre

Check out the West Kootenay Roller Derby on the Express YouTube Channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/expressnewsupdate?feature=mhee


theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 9

ROOTS MUSIC SIMMERED IN THE BLUES WITH DASHES OF JAZZ AND HINTS OF COUNTRY

4"3")$"-7&35 -*7& '3*%": ."3  $0/$&35"51. “On this charming debut album, Toronto songstress Sarah Calvert (Que Sarah) delivers a breezy and refreshing blend of folk, jazz and roots stylings.� Kerry Doole, Exclaim Magazine, Toronto

www.sarahcalvert.ca

“Could she be our next big Sarah; in the footsteps of McLachlan, Harmer and Slean? Her songs range from really good to really great and she has won over crowds with her acoustic original music.� Mike Beggs, The Mississauga News

%XPRESSIONS

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theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 10

Arts&Entertainment

Ensemble Caprice plays Gypsy Music Friday, Mar. 8, 8 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre This unique program features pieces taken from Uhrovska Zbierka, a collection from the country now known as Slovakia, and works by composers who were influenced by the gypsy music they heard while travelling throughout Europe. The members of Ensemble Caprice bring together a tremendous depth of experience and education. Capturing the spirit of the times, this lively program will be performed on authentic reproductions of historic instruments, including several sizes of tambourines, instruments that travelled easily with the nomadic gypsy musicians of the period. This program of Gypsy and baroque music has enjoyed extraordinary popularity. As a 2009 Third Coast Digest review states: “Caprice took old tunes, added salsa and chutzpah and served an evening of grand entertainment.”

Wet Plate Collodian Photography Demonstration Thursday, Mar. 7, 7p.m. Shawn Lamb Archives, Touchstones Nelson Join photographer, Lindsay Ross, as she demonstrates the century-old process of wet plate collodian photography. Introduced in the 1850s, collodian photography replaced the first photographic development process – the daguerreotype. During the 1880s, the collodian process, with its cumbersome exposure time, was in turn replaced by dry gelatin processing. Examples of other early photographic processes, drawn from the collection of Touchstones Nelson, will also be on display. Cost is $5 for members, $7 for non-members. Pre-registration recommended. Call 250-352-9813. submitted by Touchstones Nelson

Ensemble Caprice’s CD, Gloria! Vivaldi’s Angels, won Canada’s prestigious 2009 JUNO award. Ensemble Caprice won the 2011 Prix Opus – Performer of the Year and were reviewed in the New York Times: “The group’s arrangements are

imaginative, even powerful, and the playing is topflight” The Montreal based Ensemble Caprice has performed around the world from New York to Germany, and now here in Nelson. submitted by Nelson Overture









 TheEconomicsofHappiness Our understanding of economies is evolving; we now appreciate and understand more about the confluence of financial, social and ecological economies. This presentation and facilitated discussion will explore new lenses through which to understand our role in sustaining our communities and illuminate appropriate practical and theoretical models of sustainability for the well-being of our communities. Facilitated by Roly Russell, PhD. Co-sponsored by Expressions Café and the Social Policy Action Network.

Tuesday, March 5, 7-9 pm

Location: Expressions Café, 554 Ward St.,Nelson. $5 admission (pay at door).

selkirk.ca/mir | 250.365.1234

Shaping our futures through conversations that matter.


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Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 11

InMemory MAGLIO, Dixie June (nee Barrett)

Francesco (Frank) Porco

September 2, 1936 - February 21, 2013

It is with immense sadness that we announce the passing of Dixie Maglio on Thursday February 21, 2013 in Nelson, B.C. Born on September 2, 1936 in Trail, B.C. to Florence and James Barrett, Dixie spent her youth in the Village of Fruitvale, B.C. before relocating to Nelson, B.C. in her late teenage years. It was there she met and later married her husband, Mario, and raised a beautiful, loving family. Dix, as she was affectionately known, lived a full and joyous life, working hard and raising her family. Her happiest times were spent with family and friends, camping, fishing, bocce, gardening and of course a good game of cards. Dixie was a truly remarkable woman, one who was known for her effortless ability to bring out the best in others with her sincere interest and genuine banter, making even complete strangers feel at ease and welcome. She practiced love and generosity by demonstration, possessed a contagious smile and a charming sense of humor. Throughout her life, she maintained a fun loving demeanor that won the trust and hearts of many. She blessed us with her nur-

turing love and boundless energy. Her signature gift of joy, shown through her constant smiling, laughter, and playfulness, will never be forgotten. Dixie was preceded in death by her beloved husband of 48 years, Mario, her parents, as well as brothers “Short”, Vedder and Mike Barrett. Dixie will be lovingly remembered by her children Murray Maglio (Kelly), Sheila Gambell (Wayne) and Robert Maglio (Kathy), grandchildren Jessica De Lata, Kyle Maglio, Adam Maglio, Benjamin Maglio and Mairen Gambell. She will be dearly missed and fondly remembered by sister Elsie Appel, brothers John Barrett (Hilda) and Dave Barrett (Rita) as well as her sister-inlaws Rosina Lorusso (Tom), Patsy Bredl, brother-in-law Alfredo (Rosetta), numerous nephews and nieces, and the many friends Dixie embraced over the years. A Celebration of Dixie’s Life will be held at CATHEDRAL MARY IMMACULATE, 813 Ward Street, Nelson, B.C. on Saturday, March 2, 2013 at 10am. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Okanagan/Kootenay Area Office, 4-1551 Sutherland Ave, Kelowna, BC, V1Y9M9. Online condolences may be expressed at www.thompsonfs.ca Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Francesco (Frank) Porco, who at the incredible age of 93 passed away peacefully on February 24, 2013 at Kootenay Lake Hospital. He was a dear and cherished husband, father, grandfather, uncle, and friend to many. Frank was born in Aprigliano, Cosenza, Italy on January 1st, 1920. He married his love, Giuseppina on March 20, 1949 and they had two sons, Armando and Ugo. After serving in World War II he made his way to Canada in 1951 where he worked initially in Michel, BC in the mining industry. Nelson became his home in 1957 where he worked as a logger until his retirement. He stayed active in his community as an original member of the ItalianCanadian Society for over 40 years. Above all else, Frank cherished his family; he was happiest during family gatherings, hunting and fishing with his sons, huckleberry and mushroom picking with his grandchildren, or making wine. He also loved working in

the garden and frequently shared his bounty and gardening advice with others. Frank was predeceased by his brother, Domenico and his sister, Marietta. He is survived by his loving wife, Giuseppina, his sons Armando(Heather) and Ugo(Judy), his grandchildren Jessica(Josh), Christina(Devin), Francis, and Joey(Zach); his brother-in-law, Alberto, and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Prayers were recited Thursday, February 28th at 6:30 p.m. and Funeral services held Friday, March 1st 10:30 a.m. from the Cathedral of Mary Immaculate with Father Jim Ratcliffe as celebrant. Entombment will follow in the Nelson Mausoleum. Both will be held under the direction of Thompson Funeral Services As an expression of sympathy, the family welcomes donations to the KLH. Kootenay Lake Hospital, 3 View Street, Nelson, BC V1L 2V1 The family wishes to thank Dr. Malpass, Dr. Edmonds, Dr. McIntyre and the nurses and staff of the KLH for their compassionate care. Online condolences may be expressed at www.thompsonfs.ca Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd. Ciao Pa, you will be loved and missed dearly.

Submit free obituaries or birth announcements to express@expressnews.ca


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Opinion&Editorial Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Amazing Community Of Blewett Comes Together: a call for assistance Dear Editor, I’m wondering if our wonderful community can step up to help in a crisis. On Wednesday February 13, Michelle Benson took her son Max, who has special needs, to Vancouver Children’s Hospital in Vancouver for a four-to-six week assessment and treatment. The next day her rented cabin in Blewett burned to the ground, along with all their possessions. This family urgently needs a home to return to. They are looking

for a 3-bedroom house, or a 2 bedroom house with a 1 bedroom suite or cabin to accommodate their housemate, somewhere within an hour’s drive of Nelson. If you are moved to help in other ways, much-needed money may be donated through Paypal by following the link available on the Facebook site (https://www.facebook.com/groups/461122267275026/)

Their household and personal needs are listed on Facebook at

Commentary: Oral Hearings Set to Begin on Wireless Smart Meters

When it comes to measuring our electricity use for the purposes of billing, is it healthier, more secure, safer and more cost effective to opt for wired smart meters or for the wireless ones? That is the question Fortis BC would prefer you wouldn’t spend much time thinking about, as it is not a choice the company is prepared to give you anyway. The BC Utilities Commission (BCUC) is currently considering a Fortis application to install the wireless version of the technology on every home in its service area. As has already happened with BC Hydro’s roll-out of wireless smart meters, many people are strongly opposed and are organizing to try and stop them. To get a little background on what all the fuss is about, an interesting documentary to view is Resonance: Beings of Frequency, which is freely available on the Internet. The film lays out in an easily digestible format the scientific and other compelling reasons we should better protect ourselves from the growing amount of radiation being emitted through our increased use of modern electrical and wireless technologies. What is made clear in the film is that we are now immersed in an ocean of radiation that is many millions of times higher than what life on earth evolved with. As yet the long-term impact and potential for harm is far from understood. Industry standards are based only on the thermal effects (i.e., if it heats tissue, as in

Alex Atamanenko, MP BC Southern Interior a microwave oven) and do not consider the long-term non-thermal effects, which are more difficult to establish. Although this is not an exhaustive list, radiation emitting equipment can include: radar (military, marine, aviation and weather), cellphone towers, radio and TV broadcast antennas, WiFi hotspots, and citywide WiFi and Wi-Max antennas. Inside buildings and homes we might have cellphones, cordless phones, wireless alarm systems, wireless baby monitors, wireless video games, wireless computers, iPads and now Smart Phones that can connect to wireless internet or WiFi. Ultimately, the plan is for wireless smart meters to monitor the use of electricity, gas and water. As part of this system, smart appliances like fridges, stoves, washers, dryers and toasters are now being designed to communicate wirelessly with smart meters. It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to realize how much more radiation we will be adding

including books and toys for Max, who will “celebrate” his 10th birthday while at the hospital. If you can help with accommodation or in any other way contact Nicole at Ph. 551-4609 or by e-mail at leblanccharlwood@ gmail.com Thank you in advance. Sincerely, Margaret Stegman to our living environment once all this technology is rolled out. Easier to imagine, perhaps, is the amount of money that stands to be made and the business interests involved. There is plenty of fodder to fuel the many allegations of conflict of interest by industry and regulating bodies over the last 60 years, not least of which by the BC government, but that is perhaps the subject for a future column. Two weeks, beginning on March 04, have been set aside by the BCUC for the oral hearing part of the process that will allow both sides in the controversial debate to cross examine each other. These hearings will take place in Kelowna and are open to the public. Fortis has invited experts from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) as well as the Committee on Man and Radiation (COMAR) to represent their arguments on privacy and health issues. Interveners have put forward several independent scientists who will challenge those arguments. Considering that BC Hydro was exempted by the BC government from having to apply to the BC Utilities Commission for permission to install wireless meters in its service area, it will be very interesting to see whether the Commission gives Fortis the go ahead with its application, especially in the face of so much controversy.

The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


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Opinion&Editorial RE: column by Morgan Dehnel in February 1, 2013 issue Dear Editor, It shocks me that someone writing a science column could be so behind the times as to miss out by far the most ubiquitous source of radiation in our modern environment: microwave transmissions produced by cell phones and other wireless technologies. Despite the assurances of the telecommunications industry that these frequencies used are safe, independent studies

the world over are showing negative biological effects. Contrary to Health Canada’s outdated Safety Code 6, the risk is not merely from radiofrequency’s potential for heating tissue, which it can only do at high power levels. According to Columbia University professor Dr. Martin Blank, “There is now sufficient scientific data about the biological effects of EMF (electromagnetic fields), and

in particular about radiofrequency (RF) radiation, to argue for adoption of precautionary measures.” Among the biological effects cited in the scientific data are single and double-strand DNA breaks and a marked increase in the incidence of cancers, particularly brain tumours amongst heavy cell phone users. I could back this up with any number of peer-reviewed studies from creditable uni-

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

versities. For the first time in human history we are living in an environment that has radiation levels thousands or millions of times higher than normal background radiation. The implications for public health are deadly serious. Mr. Dehnel, please do your homework, we need more public awareness of this major modern pollutant. Sincerely, Arthur Joyce

Radiation: Response to Letter to Editor Morgan Dehnel D-Pace, Inc. Dear Arthur Joyce, Thank you for your letter regarding the Febraury 1 2013 Science and Technology column about radiation. I share your concerns about our increasing exposure to human produced radiation sources, and I agree that more public awareness is essential. With regards to the various assertions made in your letter, I have the following comments: (1) The annual dose equivalent radiation associated with cell phones, and other wireless technologies is included in the 0.04 mSv from the Consumer and Office Products portion of the graphic shown in the column. So this form of radiation was not forgotten in the column. (2) In terms of “radio-frequency” radiation’s potential for heating (mentioned in your letter), it is true that there is a potential for heating, but it should be noted that absorbed

radiation dose is measured in terms of energy deposited per unit mass, and since the energy of radio-frequency waves are over a thousand times less energetic than visible light, for example, it is far less dangerous per unit of eletromagnetic radiation than visible light. In terms of mitigating risk due to heating, the same pre-cautions should be taken as one would take for standing in sunlight (i.e. avoid overlong exposure so your body doesn’t overheat). (3) Another point mentioned is “among scientific effects cited in the scientific data are single and double-strand DNA breaks…”, this is, of course, true for ionizing radiation, because a molecular strand break by definition involves ionization of the molecule. Since the topic of the column was ionizing radiation, this is exactly what occurs. However, what is important to note is that the “radiofrequency (RF) radiation” that you refer to is far less energetic than most of the other radiations we are exposed to in the electromagnetic range. As already mentioned it is far less energetic than visible light, and

also less so than infra-red, ultra-violet, gamma etc.. Per unit of electromagnetic radiation I would be far more worried about exposure to x-ray’s in a doctor’s office for a given length of time, as compared to exposure to an RF source for the same length of time in terms of the damaging ionization effects such as DNA strand breaks. (4) On your point that “For the first time in human history we are living in an environment that has radiation levels thousands or millions of times higher than normal background radiation.”, this is completely incorrect, since we would all be dead more or less instantly if we were exposed to radiation levels millions of times greater than the background radiation levels quoted in my article. What you may be refering to is that the amount of radiofrequency radiation that we are exposed to is thousands or millions of times higher than the levels of radiofrequency radiation that humans were exposed to before we started using electricity. This may be true, but since this type of radiation is not particularly energetic, it does not con-

tribute much to our annual dose equivalent of ionizing radiation. I agree with your general theme that public awareness of the increased levels of human produced radiation that we are exposed to should be increased. Though, the “radiofrequency” radiation is much less energetic than visible light, or x-rays, for example, the main problem to me is that the total dose that one receives is not only related to the energy of the radiation, but also to the length of the exposure, and to the intensity of exposure. With modern devices that emit electromagentic radiation such as cell phones and other wireless technologies, there is the opportunity to be exposed to the radiation from the devices for very long periods of time, and this could in certain cases lead to exposures that are much greater than the 0.04 mSv annual dose equivalent listed in my previous column for consumer and office products. Our message to the public should be for everyone to avoid exposure to electromagnetic radiation as much as possible!

Science and Technology is sponsored by Dehnel - Particle Accelerator Components and Engineering, Inc. To learn more about this locally owned company, please visit www.d-pace.com The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

What’sHappening

Page 14

Nelson & Area: Fri. Mar. 01 - Sun. 10 lll Live Music

Fri. Mar 1l Request DJ. Finl lllSarah Calvert at Expressions 554 Ward St. 8 p.m. Tickets $12, advance sales call 250-354-3910 lllLazy Poker Blues Band at the Royal 8 p.m llblue night Art Walk various downtown Nelson locations: at Craft Connection, John Ward Fine Coffee, Ourglass, Touchstones. Dancing Bear Inn and Kutenai Clothing . llArt For People show / benefit. Support Marie-Paule Brisson and Sebastien du Marre’s work in Haiti. Drop by KATI, 191 Baker 5-8 p.m. lWomen of all ages get together to knit, crochet lace, make rugs & more. Women’s Centre 10-1 p.m. lGender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Mar 2 lllBuckman Coe w/ Brian Rosen and the WhatNow and Thorwind at the Royal 8 p.m lllPaul Prapppas, Sally T & Rob Hay, special guest Jacques Mindreau - Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged llFrench Extra Market hosted by the West Kootenays Francophone Association (AFKO) in the old Anglican Church Hall 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. entry by donation. llFree 3 hour workshop on International Development 312 Silica St, 1 -4 p.m or 4.30 -7.30. Learn about the pros and cons of International Volunteerism and what you can do to contribute to International development if you don’t have time to volunteer. Light meal provided. Space limited. Preregistration required call Isabelle 250 352 6678 ext 226 or isabelleh@ kootenaykids.com

ll Special Events

llAward Winning Canadian Documentary - Hicks on Sticks - Kootenay Premiere 6:30 & 9 p.m. at the Old Castlegar Theatre 185 Columbia Ave. $10 llFans of the romance genre are invited to join author Dani Collins at the Seed Studio 607 Front St. 1-3pm llSlocan Valley Youth Host Fundraising Dinner and presentation of the classic Dr. Seuss’s film “The Lorax.” at Passmore Hall 5-9 p.m. lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates 1st & 3rd Saturdays 12-1 lMeat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. lThe Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Mar 3 lllNiko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. lllNelson Acoustic Jam Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 2-5 p.m. llThe Capitol Theatre Kids Series presents FIGURA Theatre of Iceland with Metamorphosis - a collection of 12 origibal stories told with the metaphorical grace of puppetry on Sunday, March 3 at 2:00pm. Bernd Ogrodnik serves as Master of Puppetry in Iceland’s National Theatre.Tickets are $12.50. Buy tickets online at capitoltheatre. bc.ca or phone250.352.6363 TueFri 12-4:30pm. lSt. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. lNelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month in The SelfDesign High Commons, upstairs in the Legion Bldg. at 7PM on Sunday. Bring a story to

l Ongoing Events

Halifax violinist Jacques Mindreau to play locally Saturday, Mar. 2, p.m. at Ellisons The last act at this week’s Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions features a special touring musician from Halifax who’s just finished a tour performing with Tequila Mockingbird Orchestra on violin, Jacques Mindreau. He combines a haunting and resonant violin with a European folk like twist and vocals in an ethereal language that he describes as operatic folklore. submitted by Ellisons Jacques Mindreau

tell. a friend and your open ears.

lNelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. lCribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727.

lAscension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515. Mon. Mar 4 lllSarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m.

lllSarah Slean at the Royal 7:30 p.m.

llBrain Fitness Classes for beginners Five sessions, 4 - 5 p.m. family rates, ages 8 and older. sagebh@gmail.com or 250-5059402 lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates, Mon & Thurs 9:30-10:30 lHeritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-352-

submitted

6892 Tues. Mar 5l

lllCliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge

llPeace Cafe: The Economics of Happiness. Hosted by the Mir Centre for Peace at Expressions, 554 Ward St. Nelson, 7 p.m. $5 Wed. Mar 6

lll Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. lNelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free. http://www.nelson-tech-club.info/ email info@nelson-tech-club.info lLearn to make a QUILT with Susan Foot at the Women’s Centre 9-11.45 call 551-4951

lOvereaters Anonymous Education Room Community First Medical Clinic 518 Lake Street Nelson noon


theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

What’sHappening

lNelson Women’s Centre DropllWet Plate Collodian in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and Photography Demonstration Shawn food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. Lamb Archives 7 p.m. $5 members, non-members Pre-registration lDarts at the Nelson Legion. $7 recommended Call 250-352-9813 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727. lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle lGirls’ Night with Margaret- walk’ - Lakeside Gates, Mon & Ann at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. Thurs 9:30-10:30 - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-3525656. lNelson Women’s Centre. Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and lNelson & Area Elder Abuse food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 lAcupuncture for Addictions. Vernon St. Phone 250-352-6008. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org Located at 333 Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-505-7248. Thurs. Mar 7 Fri. Mar 8 Request DJ. Finl lllKiyo & Guests at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m. llLaunch of Nelson author Cassie Beecham’s short story colleclllCapitol Theatre presents tion at Oxygen Art Centre, 7:30 p.m. Martha Wainwright & Her Band on Thursday, March 7 at 8pm. lWomen of all ages get together Martha’s song ‘Proserpina’ has to knit, crochet lace, make rugs & been selected by Ann Powers as more. Women’s Centre 10-1 p.m. one of the best songs of 2012! lGender Outlaws, a support and “A hugely expressive voice and an arsenal of powerful songs, social group for trans and gender Martha is a new force in music� diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Buy tickets NOW online at Sat. Mar 9 capitoltheatre.bc.ca $25 Adult/ lllMiss Quincy & The Student/Senior in advance $30 Showdown w/ Tofu Stravinskyat the at door. In person 12-4:30pm Royal 8 p.m Tue-Fri or charge by phone Sudoku Difficulty Level - MediumSeason 250.352.6363. u Classic Difficulty Level - EasyClassic sk9E000041 llCapitol Theatre lllBrasstronaut w/ Vortex at presents an Evening of Standup Comedy at 8pm with THREE the Royal 8 p.m llYoung artists show opening performers: Opening the show is Nelson’s own Lucas Myers, Nelson’s at the Nelson Library 6:30 p.m. Cultural Ambassador for 2013!

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Appearing as one (or more) of his alter ego’s including Steven the Art Star and Randy From Creston, sharing various insights about the absurdity of these, our modern times. Ivan Decker who is one of the most enjoyable comedians in the country and has appeared at the Montreal Just for Laughs Festival. The headliner of the evening is Patrick Maliha, who holds the world record for most impressions in one minute beating out the previous record holder, Dana Carvey. His act has been described as Ray Romano meets a 21st Century Don Rickles and appears regularly on the popular CBC program The Debaters. Tickets are $25 Adult $20 Student. Buy tickets online at www.capitoltheatre.bc.ca or phone 250.352.6363 Tue-Fri 12-4:30pm. llKootenay Rhythm Dragons Membership Drive Community for women interested in dragon boat paddling First Health Co-op Building in Nelson 518 Lake Street (lower lever – CCRR office) Coffee & muffins served! 10 a.m.-noon lWalk In Peace Silent ‘circle walk’ - Lakeside Gates 1st & 3rd Saturdays 12-1 sk9M000054

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lMeat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. lThe Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. Sun. Mar 10 lllNiko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. lllNelson Acoustic Jam Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 2-5 p.m. llThe False Controversy: Evolution vs. Creationism by Royal Tyrell Museum Paleontologist, March 10,7:30pm, Capitol Theatre, Nelson lSt. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. lNelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. lCribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727. lAscension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

Coming up at

Expressions PRESENTS Jazz5Folk5Classical5Film5Workshops5Meetings

Folk Music

Friday, Mar. 1, 8 p.m.- Sarah Calvert in concert Singer-songwriter, former Selkirk student

Mir Centre Peace CafĂŠ: Tuesday, Mar. 5, 7 p.m.The Economics of Happiness Tuesday, Mar. 12, 7 p.m.Money that Loves You Back

Tickets at 554 Ward St. or call 250-354-3910


theExpress Update

theClassifieds Rentals

FREE

Private party ads are CASA DEL SOUL Bed & Breakfast always free for the first 15 words in the Express News Update. www. expressnews.ca

House Sitting

EXPERIENCED HOUSESITTER ANYWHERE in Kootenays.

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Misc. for Sale

NEW SKI BOX: Rhino-Rack

RMFZ85 is 500L and worth $700 new, asking $450 call 250-3521806

Misc. Wanted

CANISTER VACUUM IN good

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Rentals Wanted

F/45 W/CAT SEEKS home.

Quiet, I am artist/writer/computer. low income, low impact, recycle and clean/organized responsible w/references. phone/text 5512367

Services

Commercial ads cost as little as $2.50/week for a 13-

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 16

Click here to submit your free classifieds https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/classified.php

week contract. Reg $5/week in the Express News Update. For more details call 250-354-3910

Shared Accom.

CHEERFUL ROOM FOR rent, light filled shared house, woman preferred, uphill, walk to downtown, ns/np, utilities included, $400/month, 250-551-1667 theexpressNewsUpdate

Answers to Crossword

Click here for

working order. Please call 250 2205406

Real Estate

LOFT FOR SALE, NEWLY renovated in the heart of Nelson. Asking $210,000. Phone:819-218-0617

Nelson Weather

This week’s expressNewsUpdate was produced by:

Nelson Becker Owner/Publisher

Robin Murray Accounts/Sales/ Layout

Rory Case Administrative Assistant

http://www.uniserve.com/

see puzzle on page 17

How to contact us

Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, by e-mail at express@expressnews.bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5.

Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher

Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser


theExpress Update

Friday, Mar. 01, 2013

Page 17

16

For more crosswords by Barbara Olson and Dave Macleod, check out their books, O Canada Crosswords, vols. 8, 9 and 10, available at Otter Books and Coles.


The Express News Update