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theExpressNewsUpdate building Nelson & area community since 1988

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012 Vol. 2, No. 45

Festivities begin!

NELSON BECKER

Len Crawford, City of Nelson elf, prepares Baker street for Friday’s Festival of Lights, which begins at 5:30 p.m.. (see page 2)


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 2

A Festival of Lights and an Assembly of Elves comes to Baker Friday, Nov. 30, at 5:30 p.m. in the 400 Block of Baker Street Santa returns to Baker inspired by the flash mob Street with new surprises. movement and it is your To make the annual event opportunity to not just more fantastic organizers attend, but to be a part of are inviting people do doth the fun. their helpers attire and join The street will also in the city’s First Annual be more vibrant as a new Elf Walk. This will also be group have started a comthe launch of the Festival mittee to increase Nelson’s of Lights as Santa turns on holiday lighting presthe newly decorated holiday ence. Event co-organizer trees of Baker Street. Maureen Crawford notes For over 40 years Santa that the addition of 10,000 Claus has been coming to lights to the downtown area Baker Street courtesy of will bring more cheer to Nelson Fire-Department to the holiday season. “Our light up the holiday trees goal is to make the streets and personally meet with more festive for the holithe children of Nelson. days and we are working This tradition is getting together with local groups some extra excitement as and organizations to help organizers are encourag- make this a reality, we are ing people to show up on off to an excellent start this 400 block of Baker Street year, you must come out in their best Elf attire to to see,” Quotes Maureen show Santa their spirit of Crawford. the season. This event was This entire event is

7th Annual Reading of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

made possible by everyone in Nelson, in particular local businesses and organizations. Without hesitation people have donated and volunteered to help make this event successful. There will popcorn courtesy of Kal tire, apple cider from the Kootenay Coop, The Bridge is hosting a chili contest, Eddie`s Music is helping with sound, a visit from the Shaw Cable Polar Bear and don`t forget Santa. Also the Chamber of Commerce, the Cultural Alliance, the City of Nelson and the Nelson Business Association are volunteering their time to help make this event another wonderful reason to come to town. ����������������������������� “Nelson is one of my favourite places to visit. I am so impressed at how

well everyone gets together to make my stay so special, especially the children. This is one of my most inspirational stops and I’m very excited about the new additions this year,” Says Santa Claus. “I really look forward to seeing everyone dressed up in their favourite elf outfit.” Come join the fun on Friday November 30th 400 Block of Baker Street, at 5:30pm for the First Annual Elf Walk and lighting of the trees of Baker Street. Santa arrives at 6:30pm and will stay until he sees every child waiting in line. For more information contact our Facebook page facebook. com/ElfWalk?fref=ts or call the Chamber of Commerce at 250.352.3433. submitted by Juggernaut Communications

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Sunday, Dec. 16, 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 7:00) Nelson United Church, 602 Silica St. This dramatic Dickens classic will be performed as a fundraiser for the Nelson Food Cupboard.

Admission is by donation be accepting donations of please contact (donations over $20.00 will non-perishable food items www.foodcupboard.org/ receive a tax receipt). The at that time. submitted by the Nelson Food Cupboard will also For more information, Food Cupboard

Library Holiday programs for kids Wednesday, Dec. 12, 10:15 (for 3 to 5-year-olds) Thursday, Dec. 13, 3:30 pm (for 9 to 12-year-olds) Storytime Sparkle: Put a out the Baker’s Dozen play little sparkle in your 3 to (reader’s Theatre), play 5-year-old’s holiday! The “unwrap the Present” and Nelson Library is offering “Holiday Bingo”, decorate seasonal stories, merry songs, their own mmmmm ginglittery crafts, and yummy gerbread cookie and help treats. whack the Giant Cookie Tween Tweats: It’s Pinata! Pre-register, please: a Baker’s Dozen holiday 250-352-8283 Tween program for ages 9 submitted by the Nelson to 12 years. They can act Public Library

kölmel

459 ward st nelson http://www.kolmel.com


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 3

Five thousand families later, Liz Amaral retires from NCSC by Rita Moir

Liz Amaral retires in December from Nelson Community Services Centre (NCSC) after 16 years of counselling area parents and children. She’s helped 5000 families, held 480 parent group sessions, 100 or more workshops, and baked 1,200 dozen chocolate chip cookies for the sessions and workshops (and grateful co-workers who benefited from the leftovers.) Amaral (or Liz, as everyone calls her) retires while still in love with her work, especially that moment when, after “connecting with a parent and walking with them in their angst, I can feel the relief in their breathing and the smile on their face. When I can add some small steps so they can connect the dots and find a way forward.” Parents will miss her deep understanding of families, a gift that comes from four decades of hands-on work, academic study and training in the area of childcare. Born in Vancouver, Liz was raised partly in Bermuda and received a Bermuda teaching scholarship to UBC. With her B.Ed., she taught elementary at Hume School in Nelson from 1971-75. When she and David had two children, people asked if she could also care for theirs, so she started the Blewett community playgroup, then Amarals’ Family Daycare. She operated her home daycare for 25 years, as their third child arrived and the first two moved through the school system and into their teenage years. During those hectic times, she also earned a Masters degree in

Education with a focus on daycare, looking into the way caregivers organized activities and how the kids used them. After a brief stint at Nelson Home Support, a temporary job at Nelson Community Services became permanent. The years at NCSC have flown by; the satisfaction is not only with counselling individual families, but with the team approach within NCSC and the broader professional community. When she talks about the����������������������������� child’s interests, she doesn’t mean children taking over. She means strong, whole families that can deal with the difficult challenges of the modern SUBMITTED world, and where parents take the reins in a society where Liz Amaral with lamb kids grow up far earlier than in previous decades. ������������ “For a child to be settled, ��������������������� they need a place to ‘land’. ����������������������������������������������������������������� How we create that for a child ������������������������������������������������������������� is really our adults’ work. The ������������������������������������������������������������ adults need to be in charge, to create the anchor and connect our schools and homes and community.” This discussion about society and families goes back to her recent seminar with the school staff and their discussion about connecting families, school and community. She loves this kind of energetic social debate and connection with individual ���������������������� �������������������� parents, and may eventually �������������������� ����������������� rebuild that connection by �������������������������� ����������� teaching continuing education �������������������������� ������������������� ���������������� ���������������� courses. ������������������ �������������� But for her entry-level ��������������������������� ��������������� into retirement, she is learning ��������������������� ������������������ to spin, a natural outgrowth of ������������������� ���������������� raising Babydoll and Shetland �������������� ���������������������� ���������������������� �������������� miniature sheep with her hus��������������� ������������� band, David, on their Blewett �������������������� ������������� farm – Greystone Acres.

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theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 4

Candlelight Vigil to be held in remembrance of women

Thursday, Dec. 6, 4 p.m., on the grounds of Nelson City Hall Dec. 6 is the National Day of all women and children who have been Remembrance and Action for Violence impacted by violence. This day repreAgainst Women, marking the anniver- sents a time to reflect on the issue of sary of the 1989 Montreal Massacre at violence against women in our society Ecole Polytechnique, in which 14 young and to move toward concrete action women were murdered. A Candlelight to eliminate all forms of gender-based Vigil will be held on the grounds of violence. Nelson City Hall at 4 p.m.. There will This event is hosted by The be an exhibit on display throughout the Nelson Violence Against Women in day at City Hall and at 2:00pm a video Relationships Committee (VAWIR), SUBMITTED presentation and discussion of the film which is an interdisciplinary committee 2011 Candlelight Vigil display at Nelson City Hall The Use of Technology to Stalk will be that examines gaps and best practices in held at 518 Lake St, 2nd Floor. response to incidents of violence against Please email coordinator@shawlink.ca In addition to honouring the victims women. The committee is comprised of to register for the video presentation. submitted by the Nelson and District of the Montreal Massacre, December representatives from community organiWomen’s Centre 6th is also an opportunity to remember zations and the criminal justice system.

Mungall to host Annual Holiday Party at Our Daily Bread Thursday, Dec. 6, 11 a.m. at Our Daily Bread, 812 Stanley Street Nelson-Creston MLA Michelle enjoy great food prepared by Our Daily Mungall will be hosting her annual Bread, as well as meet and connect with Community Holiday Party and Open wonderful people in the community.” House at Our Daily Bread. Festivities Mungall has hosted this event every begin at 11am with lunch served at noon, December since being elected in 2009. and all are welcome. Our Daily Bread serves a hot lunch 5 “This is an annual tradition open to days a week to Kootenay residents strugall in the riding, and lunch is on me,” says gling to make ends meet. The Holiday Mungall when speaking about the Open Season is a time for giving, sharing and House. “It is an amazing opportunity to being merry. Nothing says that more than

breaking bread with new people from all walks of life. This annual event is a great way to kick off the Holidays” says Mungall. “I’m looking forward to seeing many returning and new faces.” For more information, please contact Mungall’s community office at 1-877-388-4498. submitted by Michelle Mungall, MLA Nelson-Creston

West Kootenay Transit Open Houses Tuesday, Dec. 4, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Selkirk College, 10th Street Campus, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.: Nelson Museum Wednesday, Dec. 5, 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.: Selkirk College, Silver King Campus, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Castlegar Selkirk College Campus, 2:30 to 5 p.m.: Castlegar Community Complex Thursday, Dec. 6, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Trail Selkirk College Campus BC Transit is hosting a series of West Kootenay Transit Committee and Open House events in person can view Open Houses in December. The public BC Transit shape the kind of public proposed fares, routes and schedules; is invited to take a look at the proposed transportation service that works best and fill out a survey online at www. routes, schedules and maps for the first- for them and the region. The new sys- bctransit.com from November 28 to ever integrated West Kootenay Transit tem takes effect in the spring of 2013. December 13, 2012. System. Participants can help the new Those not able to attend one of the submitted by BC Transit

Submit your Press Release at www.expressnews.ca/pressreleases.php Special Holiday deadline: noon on Wednesday, Dec. 12 All regular press releases for December issues must be received by this time


CommunityNews theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 5

Nelson’s annual Beans and Rice extravaganza returns Friday, Dec. 7, 6 p.m. at the Nelson United Church, 602 Silica St. The 7th Annual Beans community health and and Rice Dinnerin is in well-being is being affectsupport of 3rd year Selkirk ed by Canadian mining College nursing students operations, and also the who will be participating remote north-eastern junin a practice experience to gle region of the country, Guatemala this spring. where government health Ten nursing students services are almost nonwill travel to Guatemala in existent. May 2013 for three weeks This practice experience as part of an International brings to life the incredible Practice Experience. The resilience, capacity, and crestudents have been invit- ativity of the Guatemalan ed to share with and learn people to actively confront from five different grass- the formidable challenges roots organizations whose to health that they face, community work promot- and in doing so, poignantly ing health as a basic human illustrates the benefits of right, has brought about collaboration around health significant positive social between the North and the change. South. Previous groups visitThis event is the first ed urban free-trade zones, major fundraising effort to highland villages where send the group south this

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Nursing student Tessa Munro with Guatemalan children during Selkirk College’s 2011 trip

coming Spring. Abundant Cost is $10 at the door. community support has Children are welcome. For been the foundation in mak- information please call 250ing this international prac- 354-4791. tice experience possible. submitted

Can you give us a list of items we should attend to before the cold weather arrives?

Home Front

by Bill Lynch, Paul Muntak & Steve Cannon

This list won’t be tailored to your home but some of these maintenance tips for winterizing your home and belongings should be helpful. I’ll put them in a list for your fridge door. Drain your outside hosebibs (if they’re not a frost free type) and put hoses away. Drain all water in your lawn irrigation system Clean all the autumn

leaves off your roof and out of your gutters. Caulk all the flashings around your chimney(s) and plumbing vents. Re-secure and caulk the seams of your gutters. Cover any outside storage (like bicycles) with tarps. Re-enforce the roofs of any portable metal storage sheds or temporary structures. Re-install storm windows and install weather-stripping on exterior doors. Close and insulate your crawlspace vents. Get your furnace serviced and clean the filter.

Clean any chimneys that serve wood stoves and fireplaces. Plug your heat tape in if you have exposed water lines and make sure it’s working. Put a new bulb in the well casing if you keep it warm this way. Winterize any gas engines that won’t be in service until spring. Put antifreeze in you car radiator. Disconnect battery terminals from unused engines. Rake up the leaves on your lawn(s) or they will turn to mush in the spring. Dig up and store bulb

flower plants (check with your local garden store for varieties). Harvest the garden, turn the compost, mulch the garden beds, put away garden tools Tie up any ornamental shrubs and bushes that could be damaged by snow. Bring in the firewood. Purchase or bring out your big winter snow shovel, put ice scraper in car. Drain all the sewer / water fluids in your camper or RV. Put another log on the fire and get set to enjoy the slowest, coziest and best season of the year.

Steve, Chris and Bill are Building Consultants with Lynch Building Inspection Services Ltd. of Nelson.


theExpress Update

CommunityNews

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 6

Bear Aware releases report for 2012 season

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A black bear photographed outside a predator electric-fence near Six Mile.

Bears and people: how did we do in 2012? Nelson: There were 15 black bears destroyed due to human-bear conflict in Nelson, and RDCK Areas E and F (as of November 23). Six of those bears were destroyed in the City of Nelson. No grizzly bears were destroyed in Nelson or Areas E and F in 2012. We can do better. We can clean up our communities so that we do not tempt bears into our neighbourhoods and to our homes. Bears that become used to feeding on food near

our homes are destroyed because they can destroy property, may even enter homes or become risks to human safety. Once again, garbage was the major bear attractant noted in all of our communities, accounting for almost half of the calls to the Conservation Officer Service. Fruit Trees accounted for 20% of the calls followed by livestock (chickens, rabbits, a donkey), outdoor freezers, berry bushes, compost, and bird feeders. How do you manage your bear attractants?

Keep garbage indoors or in a secure location (not in the carport, or in the back alley) until the day of collection or until you take it to the landfill. If you do not have a secure location for garbage storage, then you can freeze leftover food and put it in your garbage when you dispose of the garbage. You can also purchase a bear-resistant garbage can. You can become part of a group order of bear-resistant cans ($224.00 taxes and shipping incluced). Contact Tea for more information teapreville@telus.net or call 250-352-0333. Manage your fruit trees. Prune them to increase productivity and to keep the fruit within reach of pickers. Keep the windfall from collecting on the ground and if you cannot pick your fruit, contact Harvest Rescue to help out with picking your fruit. Learn how to compost properly. Well-maintained compost does not smell and so is less likely to attract a bear. Bears have an amazing capacity to find food through scent: outdoor freezers and fridges attract bears. Consider moving

those appliances indoors. Predator electric-fencing is highly effective in keeping bears from gaining access to chicken coops and other livestock enclosures. Check out how to construct a simple predator electric fence at www.bearaware.bc.ca. It is nearing the end of the bear season and Bear Aware is winding up our season. There are, however, still bears out looking for food, even now near the end of November. Please manage your attractants until well into December. Let’s help the bears make it up to the den for hibernation. Learn more about identifying and managing bear attractants near your home by visiting the Bear Aware website: www.bearaware.bc.ca and the Bear Aware facebook page at: www.facebook.com/BearAwareBC

Nelson Area E and F Bear Aware will be in hiatus over the winter and will hopefully return next spring (dependant upon funding). In the meantime, you can still reach the Provincial Bear Aware Program at: bc@bearaware.bc.ca submitted by Nelson, Area E and F Bear Aware

Columbia Power Corporation Open House

Monday, Dec. 3, 4 – 7:30 p.m., Trail Memorial Centre, Red Floor Room, 1051 Victoria Street, Trail Columbia Power Columbia Power and its and let the Columbia Power Corporation has embarked history and role in the com- Corporation know how to on a consultation project to munity, provide feedback communicate most effecgather feedback and insights on their proposed strat- tively going forward from the community. egy as they look to potenFollowing the process, Particpants in the open tial projects beyond the Columbia Power will house can learn about Waneta Expansion Project, develop a report with feed-

back received. The report will be available online. For more information visit www.columbiapower.org submitted by the Columbia Power Corporation


theExpress Update

PoliceNews

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 7

Nelson Police Reports: winter driving means slowing down

The Nelson Police Department responded to 58 calls for service during the last four days. Of note were two motor vehicle collisions that were at least partially attributed to the recent change in weather. On Saturday Nov. 24 at 6:45 p.m. the Nelson Police Department was advised of a single vehicle collision from Lakeview Crescent into a backyard on McHardy St. Upon police arrival a newer model sport utility vehicle was seen in the back yard of the property with the driver still in the seat. The vehicle appeared to have dropped approximately 6 meters from Lakeview Crescent and rolled, coming to rest back on to its wheels. Nelson firefighters had to cut the roof from the vehicle to extract the driver. The driver was transported to Kootenay Lake Hospital where he was treated for nonlife threatening injuries and released. The Nelson Police

Department’s investigation concluded that speed was a factor in the collision. The driver was charges under the Motor Vehicle Act for driving without due care. On Monday Nov. 26 at 12:20 p.m. a single vehicle rollover on Government Rd was reported to Nelson Police. Upon arrival Nelson Police members found a small pickup on its roof and the two occupants outside, unharmed. The road was extremely slippery with black ice. Nelson Police and Nelson Fire Department members directed traffic safely through the slippery section while city crews were called out to sand the road to prevent any further accidents at that location. No charges were laid as the accident was attributed solely to the conditions of the road. As we head into the winter season, the Nelson Police Department is advis-

ing residents of Nelson to ensure they have their vehicles equipped with winter tires, and that their vehicles are maintained in a proper manner in order to run in the cold weather. Winter tires are identified by the mountain and snowflake symbol on the sidewall of the tire. The Province of BC has not yet mandated the use of winter tires during the winter months on all highways but winter tires or chains are required on posted highways. The City of Nelson has posted signs at all entrances that winter tires are required for the snowy hills in the City. Also, before heading out, please clear the snow from vehicles including the hood, trunk, lights and mirrors, and wait for the interior to defog in order to increase visibility all around. The weather here in Nelson can be unpredictable in the winter, and, while City work crews will be out

clearing the snow and sanding the streets, NPD advises people to be aware of the emergency routes and transit routes around the City. These routes are a priority for City crews, along with the downtown core, and should be used for access in and around the City. The downtown core has the priority for snow clear up but residential streets will be cleared, time and snowfall amount permitting. Vehicles towed to allow street clearance will be towed by the City and can be found usually around the corner. The City of Nelson website (www.nelson.ca) gives the details of the City’s snow management plan to provide safe routes for both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. This information can be located under City Services> Operations> Winter Snow and Ice Management. submitted by the Nelson Police Department

Armed robbery in Silverton believed to be drug related On Sunday November 25, 2012, at approximately 11:30 a.m. Slocan Lake Det. and Nakusp Det. RCMP members responded to a report of an Armed Robbery in Silverton involving two suspects with guns. Two male subjects reportedly entered the Red Mountain Road residence pointing firearms and got into a physical altercation with two residents. One of the residents was stabbed and one of the suspects was also stabbed. Following the altercation the 2 victims were able to flee the

scene and the occurrence was reported to police. The suspects departed the residence and their vehicle description was passed along to neighbouring detachments and Nelson P.D. Road checks were then strategically set up and patrols of the area made. At approximately 2:30 p.m. Midway and South Okanagan RCMP stopped the suspect vehicle on Hwy 3 near Bridesville, B.C. 4 male occupants/suspects were taken in custody without incident. A subsequent search of the suspect vehi-

cle revealed a handgun and pellet gun. Upon further investigation, this incident is believed to be a targeted, not a random, attack. It involved illegal drugs, specifically a marihuana grow operation. The victims, both adult males, received only minor injuries. They have confirmed that they know one of the suspects. Two of the suspects arrested in this occurrence have been remanded until Thursday, November 29, 2012, where they will appear in Provincial Court in

Nakusp, B.C. The specific charges have not yet been approved and the names of the individuals have not yet been released. It has been confirmed that one of the suspects was stabbed in the altercation. He was taken to hospital, treated and released back to RCMP. The other two suspects arrested in this occurrence have been released from custody with no charges pending. submitted by the Slocan Lake RCMP


theExpress Update

assic

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

ScienceNews

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which are commonly used 2 4 9 for wool and cotton.8 Aniline 1 9 3 6 2 3 inhalation 6 2 itself 1is9 toxic by Aromatic amines, 8 1 9 of or 8swallowing and,1 because 9 which7 aniline4 is5the sim- it is lipid-soluble, 4 5can also 7 plest kind, are a class of be absorbed through the skin chemicals derived from and cause skin irritations. aromatic hydrocarbons. However, aniline is only used These compounds are as an intermediate in the reacextensively used as inter- tion to produce azo dyes; it is Š 2005 www.puzzle.tv www.valusoft.com Generated by Ultimate you need to create BILLIONS Sudoku itself. puzzles mediates inSudoku the - allmanufacnot inof unique the dye ture of dyes and pigments I contacted Dr. Charles for pharmaceutical, fur, Morton, a Vancouver derhairdressing, photography matologist that specializes and textile products. in reactions to textiles, to ask Aniline is used in a reac- him if there is any evidence tion to produce azo dyes that azo dyes on clothing 2

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categories. They will also be offering Arduino Boot Camps early in the New Year, (the Arduino is the computer brain of the robots used in the RoboGames competition) as well as a host of robotics, programming and elec-

tronics courses. The Nelson Tech Club offers a drop-in, public hackerspace every Wednesday 6-8pm at Selkirk College Annex Building. http://www.nelson-tech-club.info/

submitted by the Nelson Tech Club

6 8 2 9 4 I have heard analine compounds, used as dyes, are 2 1 7 4 3 carcinogenic and see that red can migrate into the whites in 1 7 3 1 the washing machine. What about into us via sweaty t-shirts? 5 3 4 5 3 2 4

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NELSON BECKER

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can cause a toxic reaction. He told me that there is circumstantial evidence that dye molecules from textiles do cross the skin barrier. However, the use of dyes on clothing is regulated and any dyes used to colour clothing are deemed to be safe. Dr. Morton went on to explain that the type of reactions to dyes in clothing are allergic, such as skin irritations like eczema, and not toxic. The most common cause of a textile allergy is not to azo dyes but to a class

Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a molecular biologist

of insoluble dyes called disperse dyes. The reported incidence of reactions to disperse dyes ranges from < 1 percent to almost 16 percent of the population and may be due to the fact that these dyes rub off more easily than other dyes from textile fibres. If you want to avoid disperse dyes, avoid clothes with acetate and polyester linings because these are frequently coloured with disperse dyes.


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

NonProfitNews

Page 9

Community Connect Day reports record results The 5th Annual Community Connect Day was bustling with activities, smiling faces and helpful people. A record 268 community members turned out to take in the marketplace of free resources for those struggling to make ends meet. Organizers report that attendance has topped at 80 guests in previous years. Commenting on this year’s turnout, organizers note that promotional strategies did increase. However, there is a clear need that the event is meeting as word gets out. “Struggling to make ends meet is a common experience”, notes Katie Tabor with the Nelson Committee on Homelessness. “The event recognizes this reality and takes a positive community approach to making a difference”.

“It was a great experience”, says City Councillor Paula Kiss who volunteered this year. “I was impressed by the people I met, spoke to and heard from. They were a fantastic mix of people who were easy to respect and appreciate”. Kiss assisted with haircuts, one of over 20 different services on-site which also included social service agencies, massage and wellness appointments, dental exams, vision care, outreach nursing, art activities, a kid’s booth and much more. Each year Community Connect Day is made possible by tremendous community support through volunteers, donations and contributions. Local businesses donated generously. Heartfelt appreciation goes out to all involved including this year’s sponsors: Nelson

Once again this holiday season, the Nelson Food Cupboard is raising funds to create 170 hampers for people who do not have the resources to purchase their own holiday foods. “The hampers we offer provide enough healthy food for people to prepare a nice holiday feast, as well as meals and treats for the rest of the week,” said Marya Skrypiczajko, Nelson Food

Cupboard Coordinator. “The holiday season is an expensive time for families trying to buy gifts and warm clothes for their children thus helping them out with food hampers is essential,” she added. People wishing to contribute can send donations to the Nelson Food Cupboard at 602 Silica Street, Nelson, V1L 4N1 or visit Paypal through their website at

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Firefighters were on hand to give children tours of the fire truck Saturday Nov. 17

Community Services Centre, Rotary Daybreak, Salvation Army, Kootenay Kids, Nelson Food Cupboard, Nelson Cares Society, 1035 The Bridge, ANKORS and Stuff Professional Organizing. Community Connect

Day is an annual event organized by the Nelson Committee on Homelessness. To get involved in next year’s event, contact Katie at ncoh@nelsoncares.ca or 250.352.6011 ext. 19 submitted by Nelson Cares

Nelson Food Cupboard kicks off Holiday Hamper campaign

Click here for

www.foodcupboard.org. For guidelines, contact Charity receipts will be marya@shawbiz.ca. issued. submitted by the Nelson People are encouraged Food Cupboard to get together with a group of friends or family members to create a hamper.

Answers to Crossword

Nelson Weather theExpressNewsUpdate

see puzzle on page 21


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 10

Arts&Entertainment It’s Panto time at the Capitol Theatre for the 25th year

Thursday to Sunday, Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 1 and 2, matinees at 2 p.m. The Capitol Theatre Forst, know exactly what they ens of volunteers backstage. “It’s a Nelson tradition. proudly presents the 25th think of her evil antics. “Lisa Lowther, Tom Lavis There’s no better way to kick Annual Christmas Pantomime “I wrote this year’s script and Janine Keeling-Hemphill start the holiday season than this year featuring Sherlock with Nelson in mind,” says anchor an incredible team of to come out to the Panto with Holmes and the Hound of Jarvis. “We poke fun at a very talented painters,” says your family and boo, cheer Buskerville. The story is very few local issues for sure.” Jarvis. “June Spearman and and laugh along with your loosely based on the origi- Pantomimes are designed MaryLou Anctil have moved fellow Nelsonites onstage. I nal Sherlock Holmes and the for a multi-age audience, so from being onstage partici- love it.” Hound of the Baskerville, there’s something for every- pants to helping put together Tickets are $15 Adult $10 one of the most famous and one to enjoy, from physical props and costumes. In fact, Youth/Senior and $45 Family admired detective stories ever comedy and one-liners, to all I think Mary Defeo has been of four. Buy online at capitolwritten. Published in 1901 the singing and dancing that involved in more Pantos than theatre.bc.ca or 250-352-6363 and 1902, it appeared in nine are traditionally seen in this I have. And that’s a lot!” Tuesday thru Friday noonmonthly installments in The type of show. This is the Capitol 4:30 p.m. Strand magazine. Not only is there a large Theatre’s 25th Christmas submitted by the The Capitol Theatre cast onstage, but there are doz- Pantomime. Jarvis explains: Capitol Theatre Christmas Pantomime is a Nelson tradition that features a cast comprised of local community players ranging in age from 6 – 60. This year’s chorus features experienced Panto actors like Kendall McPherson, Liz and Soleil Babcock and Mary Anderson, plus first-timers like Kaj, Created by the Dylan and Oliver Gyr. “One Halcyon Culinary Team. of the things that makes this project so much fun is the combination of actors from all ages and levels of experience,” says director, Laurie Jarvis. “We’ve had entire for families in the cast together.” Book two nights and receive the third Once again gracing the Panto stage are Bruce night FREE. Call or visit online for details. Ormond, who brings his own keen intellect to the role of the amazing Sherlock Holmes, Dustin Cantwell as the bumbling but warm-hearted Dr. Watson, and Craig Korth playing Mrs. Hudson, the very hairy housekeeper. Panto audiences are always invited to participate in the show LUNCH & DIP DINNER & DIP 1.8 88. 689 . 46 99 and this year is no exception. PER PER PERSON PERSON HAL C YON -HOTSP RI NGS. C O M Children and adults alike will delight in singing along, talking back and letting Professor http://www.halcyon-hotsprings.com/ Mariarty, played by Lisel

Taste the New

WINTER MENU 3 2 SPA SPECIAL!

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theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

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Arts&Entertainment

Oxygen Art Centre celebrates 10 years

Wednesday, Dec. 5, 7 p.m. at Oxygen Art Centre 320 Vernon St (Alley Entrance) The community is invited to Oxygen Art Centre’s Annual General Meeting where they will be celebrating a decade of Oxygen Art Centre and welcoming 5 new members to the board of directors. And yes there will be cake! As well as music and song by Bessie Wapp, 16mm film screening by Jason Asbell and a guest appearance from Cromoli! There will also be a “Memory Wall” with a 10 year timeline drawn on it and the Centre invites you all to help us fill in the blanks! Copies of images and memorabilia are most welcome. Oxygen Art Centre memberships are $2 and will be available at the door. People wishing to give Oxygen a gift please consider a donation through the Centre’s Canada Helps website and you will be issued a Charitable Tax receipt. The Centre wouldn’t be here without everyone who has donated over the years and volunteered their time and energy. submitted by Oxygen Art Centre

Canadian folk legend, Valdy to give Yule concert in Nelson Friday, Dec. 14, 8 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre The Royal presents An Evening with Valdy: The Seasonal Show Yule Love - Live At The Capitol. Valdy is one of Canada’s most loved performers take the stage at the Capitol Theatre.He is one of our country’s purest and most credible storytellers capable of generating a unique energy on stage that very few other performers can achieve. Tickets are $30 and are available now at the Capitol Theatre Box Office, or online at CapitolTheatre.bc.ca or by phone at 250-352-6363. submitted by the Royal

Listen to Vadly on CBC Radio West at

http://www.cbc.ca/radiowest/2012/11/05/valdy-demonstrates-how-folkies-make-great-rappers/


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 12

Arts&Entertainment

Selkirk Pro-Musica presents the Lizzy Hoyt Trio

Thursday, Dec. 6, at 8 p.m., Shambhala Music and Performance Hall at Selkirk College Lizzy Hoyt is known rial as well as some for her lively and energet- material from her new ic performances that bring holiday album called, “A audiences to their feet. Her Christmas Song”. This music has been recognized album is a collection of on both the national and ancient Christmas carols international level. She and features the Celtic won “Best Female Artist” influences in her music. at the 8th International As usual, Hoyt will blend Acoustic Music Awards together her talents as a (a contest that saw over vocalist, songwriter, fid11 000 applicants), was dler, multi-instrumentala 2011 Canadian Folk ist (fiddle, guitar, harp, Music Award Nominee for mandolin) and step-dancer Traditional Singer of the to ensure the audience is Year and has been named touched and entertained! a finalist in both the John Travelling with her are her Lennon Songwriting regular musicians: upright Contest and the USA bassist and harmony singer Songwriting Competition. Keith Rempel, and guitarHer performance in ist and mandolin player Nelson will feature her Chris Tabbert. regular Celtic-folk matesubmitted by Alex Nichol

NELSON BECKER

Tuba players at the 2011 Nelson Community Band holiday concert

Nelson Community Band celebrates the season Tuesday, Dec. 11, 7 p.m., at First Baptist Church, 611 Fifth St. The Nelson Community Children’s Choir. The band Band will perform a vari- usually plays to a packed ety of music at their annu- house, so come early to get al holiday concert. They your seat. Admission is by will once again be joined donation. by special guest VoixVive submitted by NCB

Kootenay Christmas Faire Guide 5th annual Holiday Pop up shop

4th Annual Fair Trade for Peace Holiday Market

Tuesday, Nov. 27 to Saturday, Dec.1 at Lilikoi, (formerly at Bijou) local artisans ceramics, jewellery, pillows, terrariums cards, prints, ornaments and purses. Reception on Thursday evening from 6-9 p.m., during which a portion of sales will be donated to the Nelson Women’s Centre. Friday, baked goods as well.

Friday Dec. 7th to Dec. 14, at 402 Victoria Street (the second floor of the Nelson Legion Building). There will be a wide variety of crafts including home décor, textiles, and many gifts. All ages are welcome. There will be children’s activities and a cafe. https://www.facebook.com/events/297545370350255/

First Ever! Blewett Elementary Craft Fair

Nelson Waldorf School Winter Faire

Friday, Nov. 30, 2-9 p.m. at Blewett Elementary School

Saturday, Dec. 8 children’s activities 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; artisan market 10 a.m.-4p.m. Admission children 4yrs +younger $5, 5yrs+ $7. Snowflake Theatre performance $3/person, 11a.m., 12 p.m., 1:30 p.m.. 250-352-6919. (Rescheduled from November due to power outage)

EcoSociety’s Winter Craft Fair

Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Central School Gym 811 Stanley St For ONE DAY ONLY, find the region’s finest crafts all under one roof, at Central School in Nelson. The Winter Craft Fair is a great place to shop and support our local economy.

Kaslo Christmas Craft Faire

Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m at the Kaslo Legion Hall. Filled with local artisans. Enjoy baked goods, comradery.

2012 Kootenay Artisan Craft Fair

Friday, Dec. 7, 1- 9 p.m., Saturday Dec. 8, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Sunday Dec. 9, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. at the Prestige Lakeside Resort. 46 High End Artisan Vendors. Live Music. Find them on Facebook for a sneak peek at the vendors.

Winlaw Hall Christmas Craft Fair

Saturday, Dec. 8 at Winlaw Hall, Winlaw Still accepting indoor/outdoor vendors. Call Carey, 250-226-7702 or email winlawhall@live.com

The Last Chance Christmas Craft Faire

Saturday, Dec. 22, 10 a.m - 4 p.m. Harrop Hall 6066 McConnell Rd. Harrop. Great gifts, yummy treats, and a visit from Santa Claus. Donations to the “Our Daily Bread” food hamper accepted at the door. Info? (250) 229-5370.


theExpress Update

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Opinion&Editorial Fish Heads and Flowers Fish heads to the BC Government for attempting to circumscribe Jumbo Wild by making it a municipality Signed: gonnagetu Fish heads to the persons who left there shivering little puppy, tied up in the box of their truck for over an hour while they shopped. People like you should never own a dog! Signed: Unhappy dog owner :(

Fish Heads To the group who decided that some people were not welcome to their meetings, despite believing that they are a ‘loving’ circle. Signed: still a friend Flowers to musicians of all ages and abilities who rehearse and perform to bring extra holiday cheer to our community. Thank you for sharing the gift of music. Signed: music lover

Submit your Fish Heads and Flowers at

www.expressnews.ca/fishflowers.html

My Opinion

by Spencer Pollard

Will the World End on December 21st?

No, no it won’t. That would be the end of the article but I need another 190 words to fill in so I suppose i’ll explain why that whole theory is hogwash. First of all basing your belief of this on a calendar is silly, the calendar ends on that date because there’s no proof of it. If the world was ending you’d think there would be mass hysteria but there isn’t. Granted we still have almost a month before that date rolls by but like I previously stated, basing

your belief on the apocalypse on a calendar is ridiculous. Various historians have stated that the end of the calendar is no cause of alarm and a complete fabrication. Maybe I didn’t provide a valid argument for your suspicions but then again if you choose to believe in it then I don’t think anyone will get you to believe otherwise. I’m confident when December 21st does roll around we will all be alive..... but broke thanks to Christmas. Maybe the mayans thought it would be the end of our wallets?

Spencer Pollard is an young man living in Nelson BC with an interest in digital arts and writing. His ideas are of benefit to all of Nelson, and to stroke his abnormally large ego

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Telephone surveys are not a substitute for referen-

Publisher’s note

Every week, we receive unsolicited By Nelson Becker r e q u e s t s from various political and commercial interests about how we feel about certain people or products. Leaving the commercial end of telephone surveys for another discussion, the interest of the government or political parties to find out how we feel about certain issues seems responsible. Maybe at one time telephone surveys were appropriate. Today the valid-

ity of telephone surveys can be called more into question. A great number of people now have cell phones as their only service. Their opinions don’t get counted. Not everybody feels comfortable to voice their opinion on the phone. And how do you tell the difference between a money phishing scam and a valid request for political opinion? We need a new way of measuring the winds of opinion in our communities. Less telephone surveys and more referendum.

How is the Express doing? Fill out our ongoing reader survey! Click here or visit the link below http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/express_2012

Letters to the Editor Policy and Guidelines

We encourage our readers to write to us. Please address letters meant for publication to the editor and send via email to express@expressnews.bc.ca or submit through our website at www.expressnews.ca We do not accept open letters. Letters must be short (200 words maximum) and to the point. We reserve the right to edit letters for taste and clarity, and the decision to publish

or not to publish is completely at the discretion of the editor and publisher. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. Only your name and the community where you live will be published. We will not print “name withheld” letters. Opinions in the paper are not necessarily those of the Express Update or its advertisers.

Submit your Letter to the Editor at www.expressnews.ca/letters.html

The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

TheSurvey

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Page 14

How do you deal with unsolicited and unwanted telephone calls? Do you have a particular technique or creative solution that works for you?

Click here or visit the link below

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/unwanted_calls

Last week’s survey responses:

Are you in favour of the Jumbo Valley Resort?

7% of our survey reponses say yes, 3% say yes, but with reservations 88% say no and 2% say they don’t care

Reader thoughts on Jumbo

MY thoughts are that tourists come to the Kootenays to experience the resorts we already have and/or the many winter backcountry operations (heli, cat, self guided) that our region has to offer. Putting a year round resort ruins our special niche for the winter recreation. IT’S bad economics given the changing demographics and it would permanently harm a wilderness area for what seems very dubious, very short term benefits. EXTREMELY undemocratic and manipulative to create a municipality with no one home! WE have plenty of ski resorts already. It’s only catering more to the most wealthy individuals in the world, and the jobs it will provide will only be short term well paying jobs, and the rest will be low paying service jobs for the most part. And worst of all, it’s being planned on land that harbours endangered wildlife and land that has immense First Nations significance. A municipality ? with no human residents ?? just grizzley bears and other wildlife ? The shame of catering to mega developers ! ! Well they’ve waited 20+ years, let them wait another 100. It will NOT happen !!

TO appreciate the great beauty of this area a resort is not needed. And those that need a resort to see the beauty we don’t need. THIS project is completely alien to the surrounding pristine wilderness! THERE are enough playgrounds already; no more are needed for the sake of profiteering developers... I saw my first grizzly bear on the Glacier Creek road on the way to Jumbo. Why do we have to destroy grizzly habitat when there are already plenty of ski resorts? And the existing resorts are far from overcrowded. IT will disrupt First nation’s sacred ground, ruin grizzly habitat, destroy a pristine glacier wilderness, and add to the number of ski resorts which do not have enough customers as is. OUR glaciers are melting fast enough without putting year-round skiers on them. Really the whole idea of a ski hill in the middle of wildlife habitat just doesn’t make any sense whatsoever! Just leave jumbo wild for all citizens, but just for the foreign skiing elite! Where is the common sense of it all! BECAUSE people have the right to live where they want to live. Jumbo should be no exception. Everywhere the readers live was once wild.

WE need to keep all the land we can for wild animals like the grizzly. THE development without a doubt has a negative impact on what is left of our wilderness and establishing it as a ‘municipality’ is nothing but a smoke screen to get the developers a political voice where none should exist. This is not a ‘municipality’, it’s a corporation. THIS high-end development appears to have a very small footprint on a vast geographical area., which, if approved, should be a condition. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see the economic benefits to BC as to Construction, spinoff $’s and a long-term job base. WE do not need another playground in what should remain safe habitat for wildlife. There are far too many inroads being made on prime wild lands. NO No no Jumbo’s got to go. Wildlife impact is too high. See bear reports. We have many excellent ski resorts already. The wealthy also have heli-skiing. Is this not already contributing to the areas economic health? IT is a pristine place that adds value to our lives and gives us an opportunity to connect with the natural world. We need to keep places like Jumbo wild in order for future generations to benefit from the natural beauty that feeds our souls.

The Express Survey is not a scientific survey but is intended to promote discussion in our community. The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

TheSurvey Reader thoughts on Jumbo (cont.) GREAT skiing to stay fit and shoot bears for fun.... grizzly bears - supposed to be lots of them. This will allow a privileged few to make lots of carbon emissions to get to the resort area and will keep the unclean poor out by high priced housing and expensive lift tickets. Really great for Albertans who have to live in that place of wonderfully rich tar sands but getting a bit polluted. WE need to protect our future, forest,water,wild life and many more. THERE are places that need to be left alone and this is one of them. THIS is not democracy. This is capitalism. The government of BC was not elected to appoint a municipal government where no people live and where the creatures that live there have no voice to speak for their lives. THE elite and rich skiers from Canada and Europe will call this their new home, money is no object to this group. NO and I think it is reprehensible that the common consensus has always been to leave it wild and now powers that be don’t want to hear that so they try this new jiggerypokery to mask their greed. GRIZZLIES, bears and wildlife need space to be themselves without us killing them because we rich people want to ski on native land. WE do not need another Mega ski hill which will destroy pristine wilderness and habitat enjoyed by local and visitors from afar. Environment destruction and economic impact on exiting local ski areas. NO NO NO!!! I support the decision of the people of East Kootenay. They want the opportunity for economic growth that Jumbo offers. It’s only too bad that the process dragged on so long that people against the plan gained hope that they’d win out in the end. IT’S greed gone wild. We need preservation of wilderness more than anything. The costs far outweighs the benefits. Its a prime example of corruption.

WHITEBARK Pine is the only federally-listed endangered tree in the West. High-mountain wildlife depend on this tree. The development will jeopardize these remarkably valuable trees. ENVIROMENTAL, economic, political, on and on , this project makes NO sense to me at any level WE should not be ruining the last wild places on the planet for yet another ski hill. ANOTHER ski hill in the Columbia Valley is there not enough? It is in a cultural and environmental sensitive area. IT encroaches too far into the wilderness. There is simply not a large enough skier market to justify another major resort when established resorts are struggling to be profitable. IT’S about time. 20 years of studies, no wonder nothing gets done in BC. Lead, follow or get out of the way. THE negative environmental impact on this pristine area would be too great to justify it’s existence of course, but I thought this fact was established years ago, and that this project was abandoned as unfeasible. What happened? And are the new mayor, council and city manager drawing a salary out of the public trough? Nasty business. ENOUGH ski resorts in B.C. already. Highly opposed to how this was done. Government ignores citizens and obvious concerns over key issues, such as risk to species, etc. IT’S a real estate grab that will profit a few. It makes better economic sense to leave it alone as that is what will draw visitors and residents. More importantly, it is a vital hub for the grizzly bears and a sacred space for the First Nations peoples. DO we really need another ski destination? Shouldn’t the support be for existing resorts, which there are a number of in the region? Sounds like a political payoff to foreign investment. Shame on our government for not supporting the wishes of the people who elected them...you will be replaced!

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

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WE have enough ski resorts in the province which are struggling or rarely at capacity. Revelstoke is not booming. Panorama is not booming. Red is not booming. The Jumbo resort proposal is just one big land grab/sell proposal. The developers may get rich, but the rest of us as well as the environment will not benefit one bit. Read the book “Downhill Slide” if you want to learn more about what the ski hill development industry is all about. Smoke and mirrors. I’M not against well planned development and progress “just because”, like so many nay-sayers who should just go back to their caves. ONCE developed, there is no going back, no balanced recovery of delicate ecosystems, no removal of invasive plants, just another wild place spoiled by humans. Haven’t we done enough damage? Leave it alone. THIS is just another step backwards to when the public land was a play ground for the elite. Democracy is dead. I say leave it for the wildlife and backcountry enthusiasts. We have a number of great resorts in the province already in a declining market. Not much has been said about the maintenance costs for the 55 kms road. Some believe the cost of maintaining it will be more than Kootenay Pass and I don’t think tax payers should be responsible to pay for that. IT encroaches on the wild life in the area and will destroy a pristine part of the east kootenays, it will cater to a diminishing number of people who can afford it (ski hills are struggling with a reduction in users as it is). I believe the majority of locals are opposed, panarama is right next door, and finally I am tired of living in a country as wealthy as Canada that would rather cater to the wealthy as it ignores their own citizens needs. Both provincially and federally. I don’t believe the power lines will kill grizzlies and cariboo, Let’s get Calgary dollars flowing into BC and keep taxes lower.

The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

TheSurvey

Reader thoughts on Jumbo (cont.)

DESTROYING yet another area of wildlife habitat for yet another soley recreational play area is unethical. The human benefit (jobs+money) is dubious due to economic downturns and a warming climate. If built, the environmental damage will be permanent. Damage is already done through logging and road building, but could still be recovered if the construction stops now. RIDICULOUS waste of the beauty of the kootenays, who do you think will really benefit? we won’t! JUMBO should remain wild. We don’t need another resort for the 1%, and that’s what this “development” is all about. Why do these developers always seem to get what they want, while we have to live with the consequences? NEEDING another ski resort. It is about real estate profit for investors from sale of Canadian public lands. It is unethical to push this through despite the resistance of local residents, and to create a municipality with appointed officers in an unoccupied backcountry location.

Sudoku Classic

THIS is a case of government warping democracy in favor of a private business interest. The technical name for this process is “corporate fascism”. People are not here to serve business interests. Rather, the government is here to serve the people’s interests! The people in this area have made it abundantly clear that they oppose the proposed Jumbo Resort for numerous environmental and cultural reasons, and that they will go to any length to stop it. When the people’s government is no longer responsive to the will of the people, it must and will be replaced by the people. I believe the developers are just out to get investor’s money and will begin the project destroy the natural ecosystem and then abandon it when it is no longer financially viable. We have plenty of ski resorts in BC and they are all struggling to survive in a global economy which it teetering on the brink Difficulty of collapse. Level We do- not need Easy another ski resort and the economics of the project do not appear to be based in reality. Jumbo is such a beautiful pristine Alpine area it is bordering on criminal to allow this development.

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IT is a criminal land grab by developers - we pay with our taxes for their infrastructure. WE need to save our world for those who come after us. Once desecrated, Jumbo will be gone for ever. IT is terrible environmental proposal, and now an outrageous appointment of a mayor and council to a municipality that does not exist. And, how can it possibly be good REAL economics, when infrastructure cost will be paid from government funds, at same time as world economics have reduced tourism revenues. THIS project is another example of creeping recreational development that will be a blight on in a pristine mountain location. If people want to visit and use this area let them walk or snow shoe on the land and enjoy it’s beauty and solitude. If people want to ski and mountain bike let them use sk9E000458 Difficulty Level already existing facilities. If they want a nice hotel and an excellent restaurant we already have plenty of those. WE don’t need to manufacture towns in wilderness.

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Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

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TO WIN : EVERY ROW, COLUMN AND 3 BY 3 SQUARE MUST EACH CONTAIN THE DIGITS 1 TO 9. SOLUTION ON PAGE 8 The opinions presented on this page are the opinions of the author and do not represent the opinions of the publisher or staff of the Express News Update


theExpress Update

This week’s

ExpressNewsUpdate was produced by:

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

InMemory

Page 17

Julia Mabel Saliken March 12, 1930 – November 24, 2012 Nelson Becker Owner/Publisher

Robin Murray Accounts/Sales/Layout

How to contact us Classifieds, Event Listings, Press Releases, Fish Heads and Flowers and Letters to the Editor can all be submitted via the Express website: www.expressnews.ca You can also reach us by phone at 250-354-3910, e-mail, express@expressnews. bc.ca or by post at: P.O. Box 922, Nelson, B.C., V1L 6A5. Please note that the Express Update and all its contents are copyrighted by Kootenay Express Communications Corp. and may not be used without expressed permission. Copyright 2012 The Kootenay Express News Update 554 Ward Street Nelson, B.C. V1L1S9 Nelson Becker, Publisher

Heaven Drafted a Good One! Born to Sam & Dora Soukoroff in Pass Creek; predeceased by her father before birth then she lost her mother at the age of 9 months. Julia was raised by Uncle Fred and Aunt Anastasia Voykin in Southern Alberta. Thus she had 2 brothers, Sam & Alec Soukoroff and 5 cousins that she came to call brothers – Fred, Bill, John, Peter and Jim Voykin. Julia first met Alex Saliken at a cousin’s birthday in 1948. They met again the following year; sparks flew and on September 30th, 1949, they were married in Lethbridge. They left the Crowsnest Pass for the Kootenays in 1952 with son Bill in tow. They eventually settled in Thrums in 1953. Daughters Lorna & Verna were born during the Thrums years. In 1966, the family moved to Nelson’s North Shore where they have lived since. An extremely talented lady, Julia could knit, tat, crochet, embroider and sew clothing rather than buy it ready-made. Her Russian quilted blankets are more works of art than bed ware. There was also her gardening, and her green thumb became legendary. Plants simply responded to her touch and there are unconfirmed reports of her forcing blossoms from artificial plants. A terrific cook & host, she could stretch a dinner for 5 into a full meal for 12 if the need arose. Generous to a tee, she made everyone who visited her home feel welcome. Julia, being raised in trying times and circumstances, embraced frugality and repurposing with vigor

and relished being a stay-at-home mother. Above all else, she loved and valued her family. She was predeceased by parents Sam & Dora Soukoroff, adopted parents Fred and Anastasia Voykin, brothers Sam and Alex Soukoroff, “brothers” Fred, Bill, Jim and John Voykin and nieces Katherine Moll, Elaine Zaitsoff and Sharon Voykin. Also by her parents-in-law, Tom and Mary Metelski, brother-in-law Fred Saliken, sister-in-law Polly Lebedoff and son-in-law Angelo Mastrobuono (2005). Julia is survived by & assigned the task of carrying forward her excellent example to husband Alex Saliken, son Bill (Lori Brodie), daughters Lorna & Verna and grandchildren Francesca (Derek Wilkie), John, Maria (Mike Masztalar) & Ashley Mastrobuono. Also sister-inlaw Mary Chernoff, adopted brother Pete (Zita) Voykin and step brotherin-law Stan (Rita) Metelski along with an extended family network of cousins, nieces and nephews that spans as far away as Georgia in the southern USA and New Zealand. Saddened by the loss of Julia, family and friends are heartened by the fact that they got to share her qualities and attributes. Like a ship that has sailed beyond the horizon, she is still present, just beyond the constraints of direct sight. “Save some chairs for the family Have respect for the grieving Julia was one of the best So sorry to hear of her leaving” A Funeral Service will be held at the Chapel of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd., 613 Ward Street, Nelson on Monday, December 3rd, 2012 at 11:00 AM with a reception to follow. A public visitation will be held before the service at 9:30 AM. Online condolences may be expressed at www.thompsonfs.ca Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Thompson Funeral Service Ltd.


theExpress Update

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

What’sHappening

Page 18

Nelson & Area: Fri. Nov. 30 - Sun. Dec 9 ●●● Live Music

Fri. Nov 30All Request DJ.

●●●Movember Gala Event at The Royal 8 p.m

●●Women’s Centre’s - “Song, Slam, and Sass” November 30th at Eagles Hall. Tickets Otter Books $20 ●●Opening Reception of the “Painters’ Retreat at Mount Carlyle Art Exhibition and Sale” at the Rouge Gallery in Rossland. ●●Trash Art Show at the Kutenai Art Therapy Institute, 191 Baker Street, 2nd floor, 5 - 8 p.m.

●●Jumbo Rally in Cranbrook BC, noon at the Ktunaxa Government Building. ●●Capitol Theatre 25th Christmas Pantomime Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of Buskerville 7:30 p.m. ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-354-5362. Sat. Dec 1 ●●●Hornography w/ Rafferty Funksmith at The Royal 8 p.m

●●●Sarah Graeme & Brynn Forsey, Marty Carter, Chrissy V & Friends at Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions(fb), 12-3

●●Aliens Family Fun Day at Touchstones Nelson. This free event will include alien crafts as well as activities led by Ken Marr of the Royal BC Museum, and Jen Vogel of the Central Kootenay Invasive Plant Committee. 1-4 p.m.

●●Kaslo 26th Light Up Celebration, Bonfire, Carolling, Santa, parade. Family fun and more! ●●EcoSociety’s Winter Craft Fair 10 am to 4 pm Central School Gym 811 Stanley St. Nelson

●● Special Events

●●Capitol Theatre 25th Christmas Pantomime Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of Buskerville 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

● Ongoing Events

●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727.

●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-3526936. Sun. Dec 2 ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m.

●●●Nelson Acoustic Jam Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 2-5 p.m. ●●●Poor Young Things & Tim Chaisson Funksmith at The Royal 6 p.m ●●Capitol Theatre 25th Christmas Pantomime Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of Buskerville 2 p.m.

●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308.

●Nelson Storytelling Guild meets the first Sunday of every month at the Commons of SelfDesign High, 2nd floor of the Legion Building at 402 Victoria Street and Stanley at 7 p.m. Bring a story to tell. a friend and your open ears. ●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail.com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727.

●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

SUBMITTED

Chrissy V and Roger Luscombe will be performing at Ellison’s Cafe Acoustic Unplugged Sessions on Saturday, Dec. 1 at 2 p.m. 523 Front St. Opening at noon will be Sarah Graeme & Brynn Forsey followed by Marty Carter

Mon. Dec 3 ●●●Sarah & Rich at the Library Lounge. 6 p.m. to 10p.m. ●Scottish Country Dancing at the Central School Gym. Your first class is free! ●Pool Table Nights, Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill ●Heritage Harmony Barbershop Chorus. Welcoming anyone! Tim 250-825-9694 or John 250-352-6892 Tues. Dec 4 ●●●Cliff Maddix and friends 6p.m. The Library Lounge ●●●Foxy Pelvis Fundraiser for Lindsay Ann at The Royal 6 p.m Wed. Dec 5 ●●● Paul Landsberg at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ●●Introduction to Brain

Fitness classes for ages 7-90+ at the Self Design Legion Building, 402 Victoria St. ●Alzheimers/ Dementia Caregiver support group meetings. 2nd Wednesday Monthly. 7 p.m. Call 250-352-6788 or email Jleffelaar@alzheimerbc.org for more info. ●Nelson Tech Club: for electronic hobbyists and Arduino enthusiasts to meet and work on projects. Every Wednesday 6pm Ste 207-601 Front St, old Jam Factory upstairs. New members welcome. Small facility fee, first visit free. http://www.nelson-tech-club.info/ email info@nelson-tech-club.info ●Nelson Women’s Centre Dropin. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250-352-9916. ●Darts at the Nelson Legion. 7:30p.m. 250-352-7727.


theExpress Update

Friday, July 13, 2012

What’sHappening

●●● Live Music

Wed. Dec 5 cont. ●Girls’ Night with Margaret-Ann at the Youth Centre. 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. 608 Lake St. ph. 250-352-5656. ●Nelson & Area Elder Abuse Prevention Resource Centre. Wednesdays from 12 - 2pm 719 Vernon St. Phone 250-352-6008. www.nelsonelderabuseprevention.org Thurs. Dec 6 ●●●Selkirk Pro-Musica presents the Lizzy Hoyt Trio Shambhalla Music and Performance Hall at Selkirk College 8 p.m. ●●●Rob Johnson & Guests at the Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10 p.m. ●●●Glennn Mitchell’s Psychedelic Holidaze at The Royal 7 p.m ●●National Day of Remembrance and Action for Violence Against Women. Candlelight Vigil 4 p.m. at City Hall and video presentation at 2 p.m. at 518 Lake St. Email coordinator@shawlink.ca to register for the video presentation. ●●MLA Michelle Mungall’s Annual Holiday Party at Our Daily Bread 812 Stanley St. 11 a.m., lunch served at noon. ●Toastmasters: Improve your public speaking, communication and leadership skills. 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month. www. toastmasters.or. ●Nelson Women’s Centre. Drop-in. Noon - 4p.m. Free clothing and food. 420 Mill St. 250352-9916. ●Acupuncture for Addictions. Free drop-in clinic. 9:30a.m. Located at 333 Victoria St., 2nd Floor. 250-505-7248.

●● Special Events

Fri. Dec 7All Request DJ. ●●●Blackberry Wood w Bottoms Down at The Royal 8p.m ●●“The Change Agents” local feature length movie HELDOVER!! Capitol Theatre 7 p.m. Tickets $10 and $8 students/seniors ●Gender Outlaws, a support and social group for trans and gender diverse folks. 250-3545362. Sat. Dec 8 ●●●The 60-voice Nelson Choral Society, accompanied by the Selkirk Chamber Orchestra, will be performing Mozart’s magnificent and uplifting Coronation Mass. Soloists for this choral masterpiece are Noemi Kiss, Audrey Bisset, David Herbison and Kevin Armstrong. The concert, directed by Kathleen Neudorf, also includes works by Handel, Bach and Corelli. Two performances only, at the Capitol Theatre: Saturday December 8th at 7:30 pm and Sunday December 9th at 2 pm. Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and students. ●●●Brian Rosen & The WhatNow w/ Prince Edward and the Islands at The Royal 8p.m ●Meat Draws at Nelson Legion. 3:30p.m., in beverage room with Karaoke after. 250-352-7727. ●The Nelson Scrabble Club meets at 1p.m. For further information, please call 250-352-6936. ●●Dying In Good Hands safe massage & hydrotherapy workshop East Shore Hospice, Crawford Bay. Cost: $50 Email: hospice@theeastshore.net

Sun. Dec 9 ●●●The Nelson Choral Society concert at the Capitol Theatre 2 pm. (see Saturday listing for details) ●●●Niko at the Hume Library Lounge. 6p.m. to 10p.m. ●●●Nelson Acoustic Jam Finley’s Irish Bar and Grill. 2-5 p.m.. ●●Amnesty International Writeathon. Oso Negro Café 11-3. Will you join us? Inspiration and details writeathon.ca ●Cribbage at the Legion beverage room, 12:45p.m. 250-352-7727

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● Ongoing Events

●St. John’s Lutheran Church Service. Everyone welcome to 4p.m. worship. 321 Silica St. 250354-3308. ●RC electric 1/10 dirt track racing, every Sunday 10am at 5 Mile tracks. Contact jdnelsonrc@gmail. com ●Nelson United Church Service. 10 a.m. All are welcome. Sunday school for teens this week. 602 Silica St. 250-352-2822. ●Ascension Lutheran Church Service 10:15a.m. Rosemont Elementary. All are welcome. 250352-2515.

SUBMITTED

Actresses Lucy Carver Brennan and Susannah Rebar in The Change Agents

The Change Agents local film showing Friday, Dec. 7. 7 p.m. at the Capitol Theatre Due to popular response of young people who have after the sold out premiere, something to say about it. “The Change Agents” local View the trailer for this feature length movie has compelling story of what been heldover. one generation will do to The Change Agents is speak up for a planet in a timely piece which deals peril: with the impacts of the www.thechangeagents.net tar sands development and submitted by The Change with a growing movement Agents Film

Submit your event listing at https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/calendar.html Special Holiday deadline: noon on Wednesday, Dec. 12 All listings for December issues must be received by this time


theExpress Update

theClassifieds

Automotive-Cars

2010 FORD FOCUS SE Very low

kms. Excellent condition. Sports Appearance. Manual. $13,2500obo 250-551-1844/825-3427 2008 PEARL WHITE Subaru Sport Imprezza Hatchback Auto AWD 42,000km one owner. $15,500. Bob 352-6317 2007 SUBARU IMPREZA wagon - 77,000km Manual. Perfect condition. Brand new snow tires w/rims. $15,500 250-354-3861

2001 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER,

151,000K, new brakes, winter tires, wheels, tuneup. Great shape. Asking $8900/obo. 825-9320

Automotive-Sleds/ Bikes

SCOOTER: PLATINUM KEEWAY 50-F-Act. Very low kms, like new. Black shorty helmet. $1990.00 (OBO) 250-505-2555

CAR/TRUCK CARRIER FOR motorcycle/scooter. Fits into 2” hitch, drive on loading, barely used. $450.00 250-505-2555

Children

BOGS SIZE 13 kids, Brand new with tags on. Black with Spiderwebs. $60obo 357 2758

Christmas Craft Faires

2012 KOOTENAY ARTISAN Fair

at the Prestige Lakeside Resort. High-end Vendors & live Music December 7-9 Find us on Facebook for a Sneak Peak of the Vendors.

MOUNTAIN SKY SOAP Seconds

Sale, Great deals on bulk soaps. Saturday December 8th, 9-4pm, 2276 Hwy#6, Crescent Valley,3596850 ROTARY INTERACT IS having a Bake sale on Sat. Dec 1st Trading Centre, Baker St. 8:30-noon. Get all your cookies and squares for Christmas.

Health & Fitness

Music & Dance

GUITAR: TACOMA CIC Chief Acoustic/Electric. Cedar top, mahogany back/sides,2 cases & accessories. $990.00 (OBO) 250505-2555

HERCULES HANGING GUITAR

stand. $35.00 Hercules music stand. $25.00 Like new - in original boxes. 250-505-2555

Pets & Livestock

CERAGEM AUTO-MASSAGE BED. JADE rollers, Radiant Infared WEEKLY HORSEBACK RIDING heat. Professional quality, excellent condition. $2200.00 OBO 250-5052555

Home & Garden

FREEZER - KENMORE 8.8 cubic/ft chest freezer (34Ωî H x 42î W x 21æî D) white $100. Call 250 352-9288.

lessons. Certified/insured/patient/ experienced instructor. All levels welcome! Diane: (250)229-5467 & (250)354-9074,

Rentals

LARGE BRIGHT 2-BEDROOM

Friday, July 13, 2012

Page 20

NEW FURNISHED SUITE, upper

Fairview, on busroute, quiet household, n/s, n/p, extras, ref, $850/mo 354-3444 BRIGHT 1 BRM. apt. in Bonnington. w/s,w&d,view, cat friendly. $675.00 p/m wkasseck@hotmail.com

Sports Equipment

EMORY ENERGY TOURING

bindings on 180 cm Kneissl Ergo skiis with skins. $100.00 250-8259282. 4FRNT CRJ 172CM MARKER Barrons Clip skins great condition 2 years old, 112cm underfoot $550 354-2097

RAZOR AGGRESSIVE ROLLER

Blades, mens size 7, FOR SALE, like new, asking $120 obo. 250359-2946 SKIS, TUA EXCALIBUR Alpine Touring, 170cm, Fritschi Diamir bindings. Great condition. Light weight. $125. 250-505-5098. SKIS, K2 HELISTINX Telemark, 170cm, G3 Targa telemark ski bindings. Includes climbing skins. 250505-5098. $150 SKI BOOTS, WOMEN’S Scarpa T3 Telemark, size 36, excellent condition. 250-551-5287. $125

lower duplex, private entrance, carport, deck. Near hospital. Available Dec. 15. Being renovated: new paint, Lost & Found molding, laminate flooring. $975 + FOUND WALKING STICK, utilities. Mike 403-763-8338 approximately two weeks ago in COZY FURNISHED COTTAGE for Overwaitea parking lot. Call 250- one/couple. Utilities/internet includ229-5282 to claim ed, pets negotiable. $800/month n/s n/d kootenaycottage@gmail.com Misc. for Sale TWO BEDROOM HOME for PANASONIC PV-GS320 MINIDV rent. Natural light, wood, character, Camcorder. Lightly used. Includes shared land/garden, no pet/smokaccessories, case, tapes! Great ing $1050/month Jan.1 250-354Work Wanted Christmas present! $250 ~ 250- 4884 353-2072 QUEENS BAY SUITE, near EVERY KIND OF work for Nov/ Misc. Wanted Balfour 1 bdrm,n/s,n/p/ w/d. suit- Dec 2012 from cabinetmaker/interior for 1. utilities included $600. decorator, waitress, computer skills. WANTED: BUNK BED or loft bed able 15-20 hours/week 250-899-4572 Heather 250-229-4682 with desk in excellent condition. 250-352-0920 Special Holiday deadline:

Submit your classifieds @ https://secure.awe-hosting.com/express-secure/classified.php

All classified listings for December issues must be received by

noon on Wednesday, Dec. 12

Travis T. in the Kootenays, Wish You Were Here by Chris Rohrmoser


theExpress Update

Friday, July 13, 2012

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FOR MORE CROSSWORDS BY BARBARA OLSON AND DAVE MACLEOD, CHECK OUT THEIR BOOKS, O CANADA CROSSWORDS, VOLS. 8, 9 AND 10, AVAILABLE AT OTTER BOOKS AND COLES.


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