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HARTMAN HERITAGE COMMUNITY MARKET, 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, Interstate 70 and Little Blue Parkway. Call 816-252-8860. FARMERS’/CRAFT MARKET, 5 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays, Truman Road and Main Street. “Beans & Greens Match,” for every dollar you charge against your EBT/SNAP card, you receive an extra dollar for local produce. Call 816-252-8860. GALLERY WALK: The Donner Party Goes West, 2 p.m. Thursdays, National Frontier Trails Museum, 318 W. Pacific Ave. Explore stories of women on the trails. Free with regular museum admission, $5 for adults; $4.50 for ages 62 and older; $3 for ages 6 to 17. Call 816-325-7575. INDEPENDENCE ANIMAL SHELTER PET ADOPTIONS, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, The Pavilion at Hartman’s Heritage Center, north of I-70 on Jackson Drive off Little Blue Parkway. Call Jim Tormena, 816-808-1154. PUTTING ON THE PINK – Breast Cancer Awareness event, sponsored by Noland Road Baptist Church, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 8, The Spot, 4420 S. Noland Road (in Noland South Shopping Center). Guest speaker, Marcia Deitrick from Susan G. Komen. Activities: Information on awareness, treatment and ways to help others with breast cancer, plus prize drawings, free massages and bone density tests and more. For reservations, call 3730106 or visit www.nolandroadbaptist.org/women. “THE PLIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS,” presented by the Encore Theater, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 8, 9, 15 and 16; 2 p.m. Oct. 10 and 17, Powerhouse Theater in the Sermon Center, Truman and Noland roads. A musical melodrama about “Humbug Scrooge.” No reservations required, tickets may be purchased at the door. For information, call 816-325-7370. HAUNTED GHOST TOURS ON THE SQUARE, 7, 8 and 9 p.m., Oct. 8, 15, 22, 29, 1859 Jail, Marshal’s Home and Museum. Experience a “ghostly” tour of the jail, plus a covered wagon narrated tour sharing ghost stories and yarns of haunted places on the Square. Cost, $18, $12 for ages 7 to 11, not recommended for children under 7. For reservations, 816-461-0065. ST. ANN’S FAMOUS FISH DINNERS, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 8, 15 and 22, at the church, Cedar and Lexington avenues. Dinner prices range from $7.50 to $9.75. A fish sandwich/fries is available for $4. LEILA’S HAIR MUSEUM exhibits, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 1333 S. Noland Road. Oct. 8-9, oldest brooch (from Sweden); Oct. 15-16, Vermont League of Women Voters wreath, Oct. 22-23, Dr. West’s Museum, Oct. 29-30, funeral jewelry. Museum is open Tuesdays-Saturdays, but receive more information about exhibits on Friday and Saturday. Call 816-833-2955. ANIMALS BEST FRIENDS chili supper/bingo fundraiser, 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 9, St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 600 N. Liberty St. Dinner served from 6 to 7 p.m.; bingo from 7 to 9 p.m. For $7, you’ll receive chili/crackers, drink, dessert and one bingo card. Prizes awarded and raffles held throughout the evening. “TRAILS FROM THE SQUARE,” 2 p.m. Oct. 9, tour meets at the Andrew Jackson statue on the Square. During this 50-minute walking tour, staff of the National  JACKIE

The cast in a scene from ‘Curious George Live!’

{EDITOR’S PICK}

‘Curious George’ Live at the Independence Events Center

SUBMITTED PHOTO

C

urious George, the irrepressible little monkey who has captured children’s hearts for generations, jumps into action when he takes the stage in the inaugural tour of “Curious George Live!” Curious George swings onto the stage Oct. 12 and 13 at the Independence Events Center, just off Interstate 70, U.S. 40 and Missouri 291 in Independence. Starring in his own original live musical stage production, Curious George is on a mission to help Chef Pisghetti save his restaurant by winning a world-famous meatball competition. With guidance from The Man with the Yellow Hat, George’s adventures take him to Rome and The Golden Meatball Contest. Tickets are $15 and $20. A limited number of $25 Gold Circle seats and $50 Monkey Seats are also available. Each Monkey Seat package features front row seats and a pre-show Meet & Greet with Curious George. For more information or to charge tickets by phone, call 866-443-8849, or online at www.gettix.net. Parking is free.

Frontier Trails Museum will discuss early Independence and the role it played in opening the American West. Cost, $5. For reservations, 816-325-7575. VFW POST 1000 AUXILIARY garage sale, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 9, at the post home, 1002 E. U.S. 24. Anyone may rent a table for $10. Food will also be available. Call 816-519-2288. ORGAN DEMONSTRATION RECITALS, 3 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 10 and 24, Community of Christ Temple, 201 S. River Blvd., Oct. 17 and 31, Auditorium, 1001 W. Walnut St. SHEPHERD’S CENTER OF INDEPENDENCE Adventures in Learning, Oct. 15, Christ United Methodist Church, 14506 E. 39th St. Registration is $1 per class/activity. Lunch cost, $4. Call 816-254-0521 for information.

ENGLEWOOD ART WALK, 5 to 9 p.m. Oct. 15, 10900 E. Winner Road. Seven galleries in the Englewood Station Shopping District, Winner Road and Sterling Avenue, open their doors to art lovers. Free. Call 816-252-3372. TABITHA’S CLOSET BENEFIT CONCERTS, 7 p.m. Oct. 16 “Wild Women of Kansas City”; and 5:30 p.m. Oct. 23 Kansas City Men’s Chorus, First Christian Church of Independence, 125 S. Pleasant St. Call 816-252-6100 or visit www.fccindepmo.net. POETRY READ-A-ROUND, 6:30 p.m. Oct. 19, Hidden Valley Christian Union Church, 17500 Hidden Valley Road. Bring poems to share. Call 816-373-3416. ENCHANTED FOREST, 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 22, 23, 29, 30, George Owens Nature Park, 1601 S. Speck Road. This

October 2010

non-scary event, designed for ages 3 to 9, is sponsored by the Powerhouse Theater Foundation and Independence Parks & Recreation. Cost, $3 per person. Call 816-325-7115 or 325-7370. MYSTIC PUMPKIN FESTIVAL, 2 p.m. until “the ghosts go home” Oct. 23, Englewood Station Shopping District, Winner Road and Sterling Avenue. Activities: Halloween themed carnival games, costume contests, pumpkin painting, storytelling, concessions, live entertainment and more. Free; fee for concessions. Call, 816-254-9044. DOME AND SPIRE concert, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23, Community of Christ Temple, River Boulevard and Walnut Street. The Metropolitan Chorale of Kansas City and the Heritage Philharmonic will perform. Freewill offering. Visit www.CofChrist.org/dome_spire. CORN HUSK DOLL MAKING workshop, 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 23, National Frontier Trails Museum, 318 W. Pacific Ave. Cost, $10. For reservations, 816-325-7575. “A HALLOWEEN MARIONETTE MUSICAL,” 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Oct. 23, 30, Puppetry Arts Institute, 11025 E. Winner Road. The $5 cost includes seeing the museum and a finger puppet for children. For reservations, 833-9777. “LET YOUR SKELETONS DANCE” planned for Oct. 29, 6 p.m. to midnight, Midwest Genealogy Center, 3440 S. Lee’s Summit Road. The evening includes barbecue, prizes, mini classes and research. Cost, $25. Reservation deadline: Oct. 15. For reservations, 816-252-7228. INTERNATIONAL PEACE AWARD CEREMONY, 7:15 p.m. Oct. 29, Community of Christ Temple, 201 S. River Blvd. Greg Mortenson will talk about his experience of building schools, especially for girls, in remote areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Free and open to the public. Visit www.CofChrist.org/peaceaward. “CHILDREN CRY, WE RESPOND” Peace Colloquy, Oct. 29-31, Community of Christ Temple, 201 S. River Blvd. This event will focus on peace and justice for children. Activities: Workshops, keynote speakers, prayer retreat, children’s program and youth retreat. For details, prices and to register, visit www.CofChrist.org/peacecolloquy. HALLOWEEN PARADE/TRICK OR TREATING Oct. 30, 1 to 3 p.m. trick or treating; 3 p.m. parade begins, around the Independence Square. Participating trick or treating shops will have balloons outside. Free. For details on trick or treating, call 816-461-0065; parade, 252-4745. TRUNK-N-TREAT, 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 30, The Salvation Army parking lot, 14700 E. Truman Road. There’ll be space games, out of this world fun and lots of cosmic candy. DOME AND SPIRE concert – Peace Colloquy led by Jack Ergo, 7 p.m. Oct. 30, Community of Christ Temple, 201 S. River Blvd. This musical presentation will focus on the need for peace and justice in our world. Free. Call 816-833-1000 or www.CofChrist.org/dome-spire. “CHATELAINE JEWELRY” exhibit, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays through October, Vaile Mansion, 1500 N. Liberty St., Independence. Cost, $5 for adults; $4.50 for seniors; $2 for ages 6 to 16. Closed Mother’s Day. Call 816-325-7430. “BEWITCHING GOURDS,” a collection of gourd artwork, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays through October, Bingham-Waggoner Estate,


calendar 313 W. Pacific Ave. Cost, $5 for adults; $4.50 for seniors; $2 for ages 6 to 16. Call 816-461-3491. AMBER GLASSWARE exhibit, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Thursday-Saturday; 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Sundays, through October, Chicago and Alton Depot, 318 W. Pacific Ave. Donations welcome. Call 816-325-7955. TREASURES FROM THE TRUMAN HOME exhibit, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through Nov. 14, Harry S Truman Historic Site Visitor Center, 223 N. Main St., Independence. Free. 254-9929. “MEMORIES OF KOREA” exhibit, through Dec. 31, Harry S. Truman Library & Museum, 500 W. U.S. 24, Independence. Exhibit recalls the region, the war and its legacy through the eyes and memories of people who lived and fought there. Free with museum admission, $8 for adults; $7 for seniors; $3 for ages 6-15; under 6 are free. Call 800-833-1225 or 816-268-8200. “HAZELLE’S COMPETITORS,” through July 31, 2011, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, Puppetry Arts Institute, 11025 E. Winner Road. Exhibit of puppets made by other companies that competed with the Hazelle Rollins Kansas City factory. Cost, $3, $1.50 to age 16. Call 816-833-9777. GEORGE OWENS NATURE PARK, an 86.5-acre community facility located at 1601 S. Speck Road, is open year round. The park provides forest and wildlife habitat, two stocked fishing lakes, hiking trails geocaches and picnicking opportunities. The nature center features

Cover photo by karen Hacker at The Portrait Gallery, 124 S. Main St., Independence, 816-461-5400.

Jackie Contact Us Phone: 816-350-6365 Fax: 816-254-0211 (news) 816-836-3805 (advertising)

Publisher: Steve Curd steve.curd@examiner.net Editorial: EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Sheila Davis sheila.davis@examiner.net MANAGING EDITOR: Karl Zinke karl.zinke@examiner.net Advertising: Director of Advertising: David T. Lammers dave.lammers@examiner.net Director of Marketing: Sharon Dankenbring sharon.dankenbring@examiner.net New media: New Media Manager: Emilee Bilyeu emilee.bilyeu@examiner.net Web Site: www.examiner.net Jackie is created monthly by GateHouse Media Inc., The Examiner's parent company. © 2010 gatehouse media • All rights reserved

changing exhibits, and there is a camping area available by reservation. Call 816-325-7115. MOTHERS AGAINST DRUNK DRIVING has grief survivors meeting second Monday in Independence. Help for bereaved or injured victims, volunteers accepted. For time and location, call Michelle Fordemwalt, call 816-295-1545. LA LECHE LEAGUE, Jackson County A.M. Group, 10 a.m., second Thursday, Trails West Public Library. For breastfeeding mothers and pregnant women interested in breastfeeding. Call Kayl, 816-254-5992. WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT GROUPS, sponsored by the Child Abuse Prevention Association, 6:30 to 8:30 Mondays. For locations, call Karen Costa, 816-252-8388, Ext. 16.

Blue Springs

FARMERS’ MARKET, 7 a.m. to noon Saturdays, 4:30 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Main and 11th streets. Visit www. bluespringsfarmersmarket.com. “NIGHTMARE ON 7” haunted house fundraiser, presented by St. Robert Bellarmine Catholic Church, beginning at 7 p.m. every Thursday through Sunday in October, in the White Oak Plaza, located on Missouri 7. There will also be a friendly boo park for young ones who don’t want to be scared. Call 816-229-5168. ANNIVERSARY OF THE JAMES MORGAN WALKER INCIDENT – for adults, 1 to 5 p.m. Oct. 9, Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center. Walker owned Burr Oak Woods property during the American Civil War. Discover the key role this incident played in shaping the land at Burr Oaks. Drop in anytime between 1 and 5 p.m. Call 816-228-3766. COMPUTER CLASSES, beginning Windows XP, 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 12-13; beginning Microsoft Word, 9 to 11 a.m. Oct. 14-15; navigating the Internet/e-mail, 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 19-20; intermediate Windows XP, 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 19-20; beginning Microsoft Excel, 9 to 11 a.m. Oct. 27-28, Vesper Hall. Cost, $35 per class, or take three different classes for $90. Call 816-228-0181 to register. BALLROOM DANCE CLASSES – for ages 16 and older, American Foxtrot, 6:45 to 7:45 p.m.; and/or Salsa, 8 to 9 p.m., Thursdays Oct. 14-Nov. 18, Vesper Hall. Cost for either class, $39. To register, call 816-228-0181. CHILDREN WITH EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS workshop, 6 p.m. Oct. 14, University of Missouri Extension, 1106 W. Main St. Learn to differentiate mental health problems from behavioral problems and more. Cost, $18. To register, call 816-252-5051. WILD ONES: South and fable – for adults, 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 14, Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center. Savor the bounty of a wild autumn harvest, share a warm and wild native tea and listen to stories around the campfire. Call 816-228-3766 to register. “HERE WE GROW AGAIN” Kids Consignment Sale, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 22, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 23, noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 24, The Cotillion, 1717 Burdett Crossing. Find thousands of quality children’s items under one roof. For information, call 816-223-9052 or visit www.herewegrowagain.biz (selected EJC sale). “BOO” SPRINGS HARVEST FEST, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct.

30, Dillingham-Lewis House Museum and the downtown merchants. The Historical Society will hand out trinkets and sweets on the lawn, and merchants will have games, kids crafts, face painting, treats and haunted maze. TRICK OR TREAT STREET, 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 31, Vesper Hall, 400 N.W. Vesper St. Participating families will have the opportunity to do quick crafts, visit two mini ghoul rooms and receive treats from business vendors. Wear your costumes and bring a sack for goodies. Contact Rachel Brown at 228-0181 if you would like free booth space. FEED THE CRITTERS on exhibit at Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center at 3 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays. Call 816-228-3766. TOUGH LOVE Blue Springs/Lee’s Summit support group, for families dealing with unacceptable adolescent behavior, 7:30 to 9:40 p.m. Tuesdays, First Christian Church. 913-492-1200. MOM TO MOM LUNCH CLUB, a support group for new moms, 1 to 2 p.m., first and third Tuesday of each month, St. Mary’s Medical Center Professional Building, 300 Mock Ave. Call 655-5585. LA LECHE LEAGUE of Blue Springs, 7 p.m., third Tuesday of each month, Parkview Church. For breastfeeding mothers and pregnant women interested in breastfeeding. Call Kayl, 254-5992 or Stephanie, 833-0250.

Kansas City

5K RUN AND 1 MILE FAMILY WALK FUNDRAISER,

October 2010

8:30 a.m. Oct. 8, Penguin Park. Proceeds will benefit Rachel House Pregnancy Resource Center. To register, visit www.runforachild.org. FALL HANGAR DANCE fundraiser, doors open at 6 p.m. Oct. 9, Airline History Museum, Hangar 9, 201 N.W. Lou Holland Drive. Cost, $20 in advance; $25 at the door. Call 816-421-3401 or visit www.ahmhangar.com.

Lake Lotawana

LOTAWANA COMMUNITY CLUB HOMES TOUR 2010, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 9. Tickets are $10 in advance, $15 the day of the tour. Free pontoon rides will be given at the Marina Grog and Galley at Gate 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For tour tickets, call 816-272-5048.

Lake Tapawingo

LAKE TAPAWINGO WOMEN’S CLUB craft and bake sale, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 16, at the clubhouse on Woods Chapel Road. Booths are still available. Call Pat Towles at 816-224-9962.

North Kansas City

FOX 4 LOVE FUND FOR CHILDREN “Disco Fever” fundraiser, doors open at 6 p.m.; entertainment begins at 7 p.m., Oct. 9, Finnegan’s Hall, 503 E. 18th Ave. Evening includes a mini auction, dancing after the show, cash bar, and prizes for 70’s costumes and dance contests. Tickets are $15 in advance; $20 at the door. For tickets, call Phyllis at 816-483-5879. – Jillayne Ritchie

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JACKIE




column

The myth of the multitasking mama “H

ow are you?” “Busy.” “What have you been up to?” “Oh my gosh! Just going crazy!” “How’s your family?” “Running in a million directions!”

If these dialogues sound familiar, don’t you wonder what has happened to us? As wives, mothers, daughters, career women and homemakers we all seem to be overwhelmed by a hectic lifestyle. Our responses to polite conversation starters reveal that we are radically overscheduled and not handling it well. We have accepted that exhaustion and exasperation are the norm, and perhaps even the goal. Society and mass media have told us that to be a supportive wife, a caring mother, a reliable daughter, a respected professional and an effective homemaker we need to be

 JACKIE

written by

Jackie

perceived as phenomenal multi-taskers. Just like jeans that make you look like a supermodel, multi-tasking is a myth. According to mental health professionals and experts in cognitive science, the human brain simply is not designed for multi-tasking. We think of this skill as an ability to do a variety of tasks simultaneously, but in fact our minds are only capable of focusing on one thing at a time. No matter how sharp we are, our brains can only operate so quickly, and transitioning from one task to another takes time. We believe our minds work like light switches – turn off one thought and instantly turn on another – but the truth is that when we shift gears we take the leftovers with us. This mental carryover causes us to become

less efficient, which contributes to forgetfulness, stress and inattention to details. It was not always this way. When I was growing up in the 1970s and ’80s my mother could often be found reading a book on the patio when I arrived home from school. Reading a book! Can you imagine? In fact this kind of leisurely behavior was common among her friends and the other mothers in the neighborhood. Today we would consider that kind of indulgence slovenly bordering on immoral. Somewhere along the line we bought into the notion that R and R is reserved exclusively for special occasions. Before you presume my mom led a privileged life, she didn’t. She and my dad worked hard, volunteered and were involved with their kids’ school activities, sports, scouting and social events. Even though my mom was the proverbial stay-at-home-mother, she did it under circumstances we would consider impossible today.

October 2010

Our family owned one car that my parents shared. If Dad had the wheels, Mom stayed home. On the days when she was car-less, she never complained about feeling “stuck.” It is fashionable to wax nostalgic about a simpler time, but life is easier now than it has ever been. The access we have to information, products and services is at an all-time high and showing no signs of slowing down. It is we who have become more complicated, succeeding in over-populating our lives with obligations. The mother of my childhood made time for herself even if it was just a few minutes with a good book on a sunny afternoon, but something has happened to her, too. When I call to see how she’s doing, she says, “Busy.”

Jackie


Fright time Spooky stories are in season title/ author­

cost

“The Wolves in the Walls” By Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Dave McKean

“The House With A Clock In Its Walls”

$6.99

$5.99

$25

$9.99

By Kelley Armstrong

“The Descent” By Jeff Long

$7.99

Nighttime has eclipsed the days in length, and what better way to celebrate than settling down for some scary tales.

For readers in grades 2-4

Young teens

description In a sort of reverse telling of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” the wolves Lucy hears crawling in the walls of her family’s home aren’t just figments of her imagination, as her parents keep insisting. Fans of Gaiman and of the unexpected — no matter their age — will enjoy this modern classic.

Moving in with a fun uncle who’s actually a wizard and whose house is full of secret passages and undiscovered curiosities sounds like a dream come true for young Lewis Barnavelt. And it is, but the house holds an evil secret as well in this adventure that Booklist called “perfect for the pre-Stephen King set.”

Older teens and adults

Though told in graphic novel format, this is no comic book. Rather, it’s a 300-plus page look at the ravages of World War I and subsequent influenza plague as told by friends of the title character, who, as it happens, is also battling a plague of vampires. The tale culminates in a final showdown that could decide the fate of humanity.

Older teens and adults

Readers who may be suffering vampire fatigue after working their way through Charlaine Harris and Stephenie Meyer can shift gears with this tale of the only female werewolf in the world, who must not only contend with leading a double life in both of her forms, but she’s got to help her friends against a pack of vicious “mutts.”

Adults

Really bad things are happening to people all over the world. It’s because, as it turns out, humanity is not alone. Rather than aliens from space, however, the evil is creeping up from far below, and once the source is discovered, it suddenly looks quite familiar, as the horned “devils” enter combat with the surface dwellers. Packed with gory descriptions, it’s not for the faint of heart.

By Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden

“Bitten”

By Paul Eisenberg

audience

By John Bellairs

“Baltimore: Or, The Steadfast Tin Soldier and the Vampire”

good reads

Find deals at Amazon.com and Borders at RadarFrog.com. Sign up for a free account today. October 2010

JACKIE




expert answers

Halloween

safety tips and more simple solutions

Q

Family issues At what age do you think it’s appropriate for kids to go trick-or-treating in a group without adult supervision?

The National Safety Council recommends adult supervision for children younger than 12. If your child will be trick-or-treating without an adult, go over the following safety tips:

›› Stay in a safe, well-lighted neighborhood.

›› Stay with the group and walk to each

›› Stay on the sidewalk and out of the street.

Finally, set up a designated place to meet your child if he becomes separated. Make sure he has a cell phone with any contacts he may need so he can call you if necessary.

house together.

From the experts at FamilyEducation.com

›› Do not enter any houses.

Q

Fashion matters

I love leggings! Any tips on what to wear them with, solids vs. prints and how tight should they be? What about “jeggings”? Leggings continue to be a wardrobe staple this year, and it’s no wonder, as they add warmth and style under nearly anything. However, “under” is the key word: sporting leggings without something covering your backside would be like wearing tights by themselves, and that is definitely not a good idea. They can be as tight as is comfortable, as long as they don’t dig into your skin. Try pat-

terned leggings under a differently patterned dress in the same color palette, or neutral-hued leggings under a sweater dress or textured tunic for a look that’s very cozy and trendy. “Jeggings,” or jean leggings, are fun under a long, Oxfordstyle boyfriend shirt. By Dannielle Kyrillos, editor-at-large of DailyCandy.com

Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccines Now Available at Fifty Plus Pharmacy (While Supplies Last)

Influenza Vaccine for cash paying customer - $33.90

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• We bill most insurance companies for immunizations. • Able to immunize ages 12 and over. Children under 12 or pregnant women require a prescrition from your physician, we will gladly call your doctor for you.

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Call for details or appointment 816.461.6546

50 PLUS PHARMACY 211 W. Lexington • Independence, MO 64050

 JACKIE

October 2010


Q

Life lessons

My annual review is approaching at work. I really want it to go well. Any tips to answering questions or even some questions I can ask my boss? Here are three keys you can use to make sure your next review at works is a knockout. 1. Be yourself It is normal to want to make a good im-

pression, but you always want to be genuine. Whoever is going to be conducting your review is going to want to see the real you.

Q

Wine & dine

expert answers

I’m having a fall family dinner serving pancetta-wrapped pork, sautéed green beans and potatoes au gratin. Do you have any wine-pairing suggestions?

For a pork dish such as this, I recommend a light red such as a pinot noir. Specifically, find a bottle of Freeman Pinot Noir. At approximately $45 a bottle, it’s a bit pricey but worth every penny. Pinot won’t overwhelm the dish, nor will the dish overwhelm the wine. By Brad Prescott, Owner, IntoWine.com

2. Be open to criticism Your ego may see criticism as

a negative thing, but the truth is called “constructive criticism” for a reason. See it as something you can use to help you reach the next level rather than an attack. 3. Contribute Before you go into your review, think

about your performance. Think about how you can contribute to this review. Your reviewer will love the fact that you have prepared thoughts and ideas for the occasion. Some ideas include discussing your work skills and your desire to receive more training, talking about your accomplishments and the profit you’ve generated for the company, and mentioning future work goals.

Compiled by Melissa Erickson

October 2010

JACKIE




cover story

Jo Reimal First lady of Independence

SPECTRUM/ Jo Reimal Highest high: Meeting Madeleine Albright and Bill Clinton. I guess I never thought that two kids from the west side of Independence would ever get that opportunity.

Lowest low: The death of both our parents. My mother and Don’s mother were very good friend. They had been PTA moms together.

Most important mentor: Toni Spradling (wife of Maywood Baptist Church pastor Bob Spradling). I think she demonstrates a strong woman behind a strong man. She is the epitome of a lady.

Achille’s heel: Temper. I have a quick temper and my mouth overloads my brain. I try not to embarrass the citizens of Independence and I think how it is going to reflect on Don.

Moment of epiphany: Celebrating our 45th anniversary in Shanghai. We’ve had lots of exciting things happen. We’ve had so many wonderful things have, and we’ve been so fortunate. That was just one moment in our life.

Smartest thing I ever did: Marry Don Reimal. He’s my best friend.

Dumbest thing I ever did: I have done a lot of them. I do a a lot of dumb things. I can’t think of one.

What I thought I’d be doing at this point in life: Not being a mayor’s wife. Traveling and just being an empty nester, retired couple.

What I still really want to do: Travel.

 JACKIE

October 2010


cover story

Mayor’s wife relishes her supporting role By Stephanie L. Boothe | special to The Examiner

Jo Reimal sits in a light-colored chair, her foot gently tucked under one leg. Her eyes shining as tears threaten to fall. Quickly, the first lady of Independence stands up and searches for a tissue. She’s not ashamed of her emotions because it’s a topic that always makes her emotional – her husband, Independence Mayor Don Reimal. “I admire his integrity and his patience and his spirituality and his all-in-all outlook on life,” Jo says.  Jo and Don have been married for 47 years, but their longtime romance started some six years before their wedding. Their mothers were on the Van Horn High School PTA together and were attending a meeting. Don was talking about his job at Stephenson’s restaurant when Jo made a friendly inquiry. “When are you going to take me to Stephenson’s?” Jo asked the teen she’d known for several years. The next weekend, Don took her out to eat at Stephenson’s. And the rest, as they say is history. A history strong in love and friendship – one that includes family and politics centered in the hometown of Harry Truman – a politician greatly admired by Mayor Reimal. A few years older than his girlfriend at the time, Don Reimal picked Jo up for school every day of his senior year in his Jaguar with red leather interior. She loved that car. “I thought I was special,” Jo joked “My mother would let me go anywhere if I went with Don. My mother loved him. He was a nice guy. Just a really nice guy – polite.” Neither of the Reimals remember a moment in their more than 40-year romance in which they knew they met “the one.” It was a feeling of being comfortable, knowing they had met someone with whom to have a conversation, a laugh. It is more than just a romance – it is a friendship, which Jo says is the secret to a successful marriage. “I’m very proud of him,” Jo says. “He was this shy guy, and he’s matured into a fantastic individual.”

“It gave me the opportunity to be back in touch with the ladies I graduated high school with. We need exercise, and it’s fun. We have become so close.” –Jo Reimal on her line-dancing group

Jo Reimal, third from left, laughs with friends while having lunch at The Courthouse Exchange before going line dancing at the Palmer Center. The longtime friends, many of whom grew up together, regularly meet for lunch and dancing. THE EXAMINER/Adam Vogler

But if someone had told Jo all those years ago that she would some day be the wife of a mayor, she probably would have laughed. She never thought her husband would one day be the mayor of the town where they’d lived their whole lives, nor did she imagine the man she loved would be instrumental in helping that same city make historic strides. ––– Being the wife of a politician takes a delicate balance – a constant awareness of her actions and her words. While she has opinions on issues and her own hopes and dreams for the city, she’s careful not to influence her husband’s opinions on issues affecting taxpayers. And she’s learned a few things along the way. “I’ve learned to keep my mouth shut a little more often,” Jo says. “You don’t want to embarrass Don and the city. Nobody elected me.” That’s not to say she and the mayor don’t discuss the issues, because they do. She just wants to make sure she does what she can so her husband can shine, and she strives not to detract from the good happenings in the city. This consciousness, this desire to be

somewhat “seen and not heard” is something the mayor appreciates. “You can’t do what you have to do as an elected official without support of your family,” Don says. “She’s very conscious in what she says and what she does, that it doesn’t reflect badly on anyone she’s dealing with.” Don, who just began his second term as mayor, started in politics when he ran for the City Council in 1994. He won and served in District 1, covering northwestern Independence, before being elected mayor in 2006. Seeing the progress in western Independence during Don’s tenure with the city has been rewarding for Jo, who has lived in that part of the city most of her life. “We were preservationists before preservation was popular,” Jo says. “Quality of life is very important to him.” One of the most significant events in the redevelopment in western Independence was the annexation of seven Kansas City schools into the Independence School District – including the Reimals’ alma matter, Van Horn High School. “Don and I worked on that the whole 40 years it wasn’t (in the Independence

October 2010

School District),” Jo says. “It was unbelievable. It was truly a gift from God. Those children were going to have a new lease on life. It can bring back to life the western end of Independence, which is very dear to our hearts – mostly the opportunity for the children.” The schools’ transition started a trend in Independence. New businesses have opened, and new and younger families have moved in. The development in Independence hasn’t be restricted to the western portion, though. During the Reimals’ involvement with the city, Independence has seen a lot of development – including acquiring Bass Pro Shops, building Hartman Heritage and the Eastland shopping district. Independence is, also, now the home of a professional hockey team – the Missouri Mavericks. “The economic development in Independence has been phenomenal,” Jo says. As a public official with more than 15 years of service, the Reimals have made many friends over the years – including those he served with. Recently, the couple suffered a sad loss with the death of former Mayor Ron Stewart. Don and Stewart served together on the council for several years. They and their wives became friends. “It was a very sad time,” Jo recalls. “We had a lot of good times with Ron and (his wife) Marilyn. Don respected Ron and his opinions. They had worked together very closely on many of these projects. Any time you spend a lot of time with somebody it puts a large hole in your life.” ––– As a young mother – Don and Jo have two daughters, Kathleen and Amy – Jo did whatever she could to meet the needs of her daughters. She has held many jobs over the years, all catering to what her CONTINUED ON PAGE 23 JACKIE




lessons in life

Life as you know it will never be the same

I

knew I was pregnant before I ever took the first test, but the confirmation on May 6, 2009, still left me shaky and apprehensive. Was I ready? Would my baby ever look up to me as much as I look up to my mom? I’d been around plenty of babies before, but could I handle being totally responsible for another person’s livelihood? I had no choice but to find out – and I couldn’t wait to be a mommy. I promised my husband our darling little bundle of joy (which I’d hoped would be a little girl from about the time I was 12) wouldn’t change our lives too drastically. It’s a good thing my days growing up on the farm taught me to enjoy a wide variety of wild game, because I sure am eating a lot of crow. Seriously, there’s nothing like an 8pound, crying, screaming, spitting up all the time little one to tell you how wrong you were. We tried to keep the status quo and managed successfully during the nine

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written by

STEPHANIE BOOTHE months of my pregnancy. But January came (with the blizzards and bitter temperatures) and life as we knew it stopped dead in its tracks. We left the hospital in a daze with our daughter, Baby J, utterly confused at how the hospital would actually let us leave with this living, breathing tiny person in our back seat when we were clearly so ill-prepared to be parents. We begged our nurse (the one who didn’t act like a drill sergeant) to come home with us, but she politely refused. We begged our friends and family to come and see us often, as we were terrified to be alone with her. Those first six weeks of our happy family life went by in a fast daze before it was back to work. And sometime between having the baby

and going back to work, we realized how wrong I had been. Just getting ready for our first night out sans Baby J nearly required a sitter just so I could get ready. It’s hard to hard to find an hour to do your hair and makeup when your newborn is going through her first growth spurt. I quickly learned there is little time in the first few months to do the things you used to love doing. Those relaxing things that help you escape the stressful day at work. I hadn’t scrapbooked, read, made jewelry or played on the computer in months. And then there was the job situation itself. My husband and I thought ourselves lucky to work together every day – even if it was a night schedule – and felt even more blessed to have family nearby to help us care for Baby J while we worked. But, what we learned – about the time our daughter started crawling – was a 12-hour night shift, five days a week prevented us from being the kind of parents we wanted to be. We were stuck in a rut of maybe five

October 2010

hours of sleep (if we were lucky) and our time with our daughter was spent with us too tired or too busy to really enjoy the amazing blessing we’d been given. So I made a decision. I gave it all up. I gave up the hours, the long days at work, the company I thought I’d work for until I retired, the title I’d worked up to and my dream job. But what I got in return is nothing short of a miracle. I get to kiss my baby goodnight every day and say her bedtime prayers with her. I get to give my daughter a bath at night and greet her with a smile every morning. I get a new, much more important title – Mommy. So I was wrong about our lives not changing too drastically. Lesson learned – just don’t tell my husband I lied to him.

Stephanie


how to

talkin’ turkey­ 1

Let your turkey stand first. After you take your turkey out of the oven, let it sit in the roasting pan for 15 to 30 minutes so it reabsorbs its juices. Place it on a large, warm platter before starting to carve.

2

Remove drumstick and thigh. Your first step should be to cut off the leg of the turkey. To do this, pull the drumstick away from the turkey’s body and slice through the skin between the thigh and body. Press the leg away from the body with the flat side of the knife, then cut through the joint to fully remove. You can then separate the drumstick from the thigh by cutting through the joint, and either serve these pieces whole or slice the meat.

3

Slice the white meat. To slice the main part of the turkey, first make a cut parallel to the wing as close to the wing as possible. Then, starting at the front of the turkey, make thin slices down to the parallel cut you had made before. The slices should fall off and be ready to serve.

Carve just like a pro By Kathryn Sucich

T

he holidays are just around the corner, and if you’re like most families, you’ll be serving turkey this Thanksgiving. If you’re in charge of carving the bird, take time to learn how to do it correctly to avoid accidentally cutting yourself and landing in the emergency room. Here are some simple tips, courtesy of Cooks. com:

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Cut enough meat. You don’t need to carve the entire bird at one time, but you should cut enough meat at first so that each guest has a full serving. Then you can go back and cut more meat as your guests want more servings.

The right tools for carving You don’t need very many tools for carving, but you do need the right ones. Most important is a thin, sharp knife. If you have a dull knife, you may need to “force” the slice, which is more likely to result in injury. Also, keep your knife handles dry so your hand doesn’t slip, and always cut away from your body.

4

Remove the stuffing. Cut a hole into the side of the turkey where you had removed the legs. You can then scoop out individual servings of stuffing.

You should also have a pair of kitchen scissors to help cut any turkey skin, bones or joints, as well as a carving fork to prevent the turkey from slipping around on your cutting surface. You can also consider an electric knife to make the cutting process easier.

Save on Thanksgiving at Radar Frog

TM October 2010

JACKIE

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Ideas for

Game

­­By Molly Logan Anderson

etting aside family time to play a game is the perfect way to reconnect and leave the week’s cares behind. Practicing taking turns, cooperating and placing an importance on togetherness are direct benefits to this fun affair, which also carries with it an endless supply of educational and life-skill benefits.

S

night Make time together count with an old-fashioned board or card game

Are you game?­ Keep these old and new favorites on your shelf and in your game-night lineup:

HOME

Save at eToys, Target at RadarFrog.com

TM

12 JACKIE

October 2010

• Apples to Apples

• Clue

• Monopoly

• Chess

• Gin Rummy

• Memory

• War

• Pretty Pretty Princess

• Old Maid

• Don’t Wake Daddy

• Sorry

• Life

• Trivial Pursuit

• Checkers

• Pictionary

• Boggle

• Cranium

• Taboo

• Karaoke

• Battleship

• Chutes and Ladders

• Backgammon

• Candy Land

• Uno


Let’s learn a little Known as America’s favorite board game, Scrabble is the perfect educational game, easily able to be tailored to the age of the players. Practice letter recognition or spelling, and keep a dictionary handy to boost vocabulary by learning definitions of new words. As the age of participants increases, words are sure to get more interesting, proving that Scrabble is a learning opportunity for all. The number of card games that can be played with just one simple and inexpensive deck are endless. From sorting to adding to comparing, card games teach little ones important skills and keep older folks on their toes.

The more the merrier Today’s family-friendly neighborhoods are sure to rouse some competitive rivalry. Whether battling it out over the city’s best sports team or debating who boasts the best barbecued ribs, there’s always room for some good-spirited competition among friends. Gather multiple families on your block for game night. Young and old alike will enjoy a time-tested favorite: charades. For some great bonding, break into family teams and compete against each other for a neighborhood trophy and of course, bragging rights.

“Our family played cards often, specifically Gin Rummy, while growing up,” says Jennie Marienthal, an Illinois resident who hails from the tiny village of Skelmorlie, Scotland. “We didn’t see our grandparents often, but when we did, they’d bring a bag of dolly mixtures, delicious candies that we’d bet with. We played every time they visited.” Candies, toothpicks or pennies add a competitive element.

Board games like Cranium also provide endless fun opportunities, with activities like sculpting or humming suitable for all ages.

“It was a great bonding experience for our family,” Marienthal says. “And there was a good bit of cheating going on with my grandmother. She really wanted those candies!”

the benefits of family time A 2002 study looked at more than 50 years of compiled information regarding family routines and rituals. Here are some of the benefits you might expect to see from giving family time a regular slot in your schedule.

The youngest players

• Predictable routines are associated with parental competence, child health, parent-child harmony and academic achievement.

Being mindful of age-appropriate games is important. “The games have evolved over the years from Peanut Butter and Jelly and Hi Ho Cherry-O to Sorry, Guess Who and Clue,” says Joan Kanatas, mother of two and game night participator from Riverside, Ill. “Interestingly, Ana (5 years old) has managed to step up quickly.”

• Family traditions provide times for togetherness and strengthening of relationships. • Rituals are associated with marital satisfaction and adolescents’ sense of personal identity.

Kanatas urges the importance of older kids practicing patience while appreciating the simplicity of games made for younger kids, too.

• Regular and predictable routines ease stress in single-parent families and promote better adjustment in children postdivorce.

While learning to strategize is an important part of growing up, bigger (and the biggest) kids love to test their abilities, too. The game Blokus challenges players of all ages to fit varied shapes onto a board with a few special restrictions. Think “Tetris in real life” to get an idea of how this game works. Younger kids quickly pick up on strategies necessary and feel a part of the game.

Sources: American Psychological Association, Inc., 2002, Journal of Family Psychology; “A Review of 50 Years of Research on Naturally Occurring Family Routines and Rituals: Cause for Celebration?” Fiese, Barbara H., Tomcho, Thomas J., Douglas, Michael, Josephs, Kimberly, Poltrock, Scott, and Baker, Tim, Syracuse University

October 2010

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easy meals

Eatcute Create a U.S.-style Japanese bento box RECIPE AND PHOTOS BY MARGARET MAPLES

P

acking lunches for your kids can be one more hasty chore on busy mornings. Instead of letting that happen, take a cue from the Japanese bento box. It’s a way to turn lunch into a labor of love that your children can pass along eventually to their own families. Everyday bento includes rice, meat or fish, prepared as a single meal. More elaborate styles make food resemble flowers, cartoon characters and animals. It’s small, portable, culinary art. What? You don’t have time to be so fancy? It’s easier than you think to put together an American-style bento box. Think nutritious and cute. Plan lunch as a main course with a few side dishes and a dessert, all in bright colors. The main course could be a simple peanut butter and jelly sandwich, but make it shine by using a cookie cutter to reshape the bread. We chose a heart, but a truck sandwich delivers PB&J or turkey and cheese with tasty flair. The truck’s cab is a small square, and the trailer is a bigger square. We used olives for tires, but round crackers would work, too. Side dishes come in all colors and sizes. Scoop the flesh from half of a roasted red potato, and fill the pocket with chicken or tuna salad. Make a tomato cup by hollowing out half of a Roma, then fill it with corn kernels and green peas. Cups and contents are edible. Flowers? Sure. We arranged broccoli with carrot sticks and baby asparagus in a tiny bouquet wrapped in cheese. You might decide to add celery sticks or green beans. Another green possibility is cheese 14 JACKIE

Make side dishes small and bright. Keep fat on the low side by offering a few bites of chicken or tuna salad made with mayonnaise. Or try substituting plain low-fat yogurt.

American bento box Whether you use our menu or create one of your own, it’s a good idea to prepare as many ingredients as possible the night before you pack this lunch. • Peanut butter and jelly sandwich on heart-shaped white bread • Corn and peas (we used canned) in a Roma tomato cup • Chicken or tuna salad in a potato cup • Bouquet of baby asparagus, broccoli and carrot sticks wrapped in cheese

and thin-sliced turkey rolled in a spinach tortilla. Accent these with dabs of your child’s favorite condiments. Or try spearing a few sweet pickles. As a change from veggies, honeydew and cantaloupe balls arrive on fancy toothpicks. If your child prefers grapes, combine green and red seedless varieties. For dessert, a mix of strawberries, blueberries and Mandarin oranges look very tempting beside a bite of fudgecake shaped like a butterfly. This lunchtime treat is sure to tickle your offspring. And a private note would be a perfect finishing touch.

A peanut butter and jelly sandwich is especially appealing on heart-shaped bread.

Plastic single-serving containers and cupcake cups work well for fruit side dishes and desserts.

Sweeten your child’s afternoon with a little love note at lunchtime. October 2010

Make a mini wrap by layering turkey, cheese and a small section of spinach tortilla. Add a favorite condiment, then roll it and pin with a toothpick.

If your child loves trucks, use one to deliver his turkey and cheese (or PB&J).


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The Missouri Mavericks Hockey team is hitting the ice for their second season at the Independence Events Center—and your whole family is going to love it!

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Professional sports has never been this Affordable and Entertaining! Tickets start at just $14 and parking is always FREE!

MISSOURI MAVERICKS HOCKEY October 2010

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FEBRUARY

Don’t miss a new tradition of WINNING Hockey in Kansas City— Join us for opening weekend October 15th and 16th Order Tickets Today at 816-252-PUCK (7825) or visit us online at www.MissouriMavericks.com

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* Exhibition Game

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Affordable Fun for the WHOLE Family!

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October 2010


the cutting edge

Join us for Ladies Night Out

W

elcome to fall. It’s official. Time to put away the flip flops and think about getting the boots out. As the fall and winter season usher in all the beautiful colors and textures in our wardrobe, so they should in our hair and makeup style. Remember that for many of us, our summer glow fades a bit during the fall and winter months and so our summer hair color and our makeup (particularly foundation) should be adjusted to look fresh, renewed and appropriate for the seasons. In our salon we are having a blast helping our guests with these changes that need to occur, at the same time adding a few suggestions for the holiday season as well. As a matter of fact, we are getting ready for a really great event on the Square this week that will do just that. It’s

written by

Mary costanzoschwaller our annual Girls Night Out event. It’s this Thursday Oct. 7! As always there will be a reusable bag for sale. It will include a T-shirt this year and all kinds of info and stuff that will lead you all around the square that night! We are doing something a little different this year than we have done in the past. We will have four beauty stations set up for you to visit, and for a mere donation, per station, you can enjoy a chair massage, eyebrow shaping, smoky eye or luscious lip makeup application or you can

sit in one of our styling chairs where we will transform your present hair style right into to party hair! This event has always been a popular one. So please grab a gal pal (or more) and consider coming out to the Independence Square. There you will find great places to eat, shop and play and a swag bag to boot! For more, call us, check out our face book page: salon 208 or go to the Web at www.newindependencesquare.com. Please stop in to say hello, we look forward to meeting you!

October 2010

Mary

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kids’ craft

Lovely leaves

Learn about trees with this easy placemat craft

By Heather Kempskie & Lisa Hanson

Autumn leaves will make beautiful place settings for the whole family.

Materials Paper grocery bags • Scissors Decorative paper (optional) • Glue sticks Paintbrush Paint • Leaves • Contact paper

3

Lightly paint one side of a leaf and press the imprint onto the mat.

1

4

Cut paper grocery bags into 8-inch-by-11-inch rectangles.

Glue leaves onto the placemats.

Book: Source: “The Busy Siblings’ Busy ent 200 Fun Activities for Kids of Differ by Ages” (2008) Used with permission Meadowbrook Press.

2

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Decorate the bag using stickers, paper or crayons.

When dry, cover placemats with clear contact paper and trim the excess.

Leaf observations Curious what types of trees are in your neighborhood? You can start by examining the leaves you find. Here are some ways to get started

›› Smooth-edge leaves, as the name suggests, have a smooth contour with no particular projections on the edges. Willow-tree leaves are a perfect example.

›› Lobed leaves have a contour that is divided by empty spaces called sinuses that separate two lobes. The oak leaf is an example of a lobed leaf. ›› Leaves with pointed teeth of the same size are called toothed-edge leaves. Take a look at a Balsam poplar; it has leaves with toothed edges. ›› Some leaves have two sizes of teeth on their contour, large teeth that contain smaller pointed teeth. These are called double-toothed leaves. You’ll see the small teeth more clearly with a magnifying glass with a white birch leaf.

6 18 JACKIE

Some fall reading “Why Do Leaves Change Color?” By Betsy Maestro $5.99

FINISHED! October 2010

“Leaf Man “ By Lois Ehlert $16


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October 2010

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JACKIE

19


by the numbers

All about our grandparents The facts about grandpa and grandma

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median income for families with grandparent caregivers was $44,469 in 2007.

9 percent According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 9 percent of all U.S. children lived with a grandparent in 2008.

70 million According to grandparents.com, there are about 70 million grandparents in the U.S., and there are an average of 1.7 new grandparents added to the ranks every year.

30 About 30 percent of children younger than 5 whose mother worked outside the home were cared for by a grandparent during their mother’s work hours, the largest source of child care aside from fathers, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

6.2 million According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 6.2 million grandparents had grandchildren younger than 18 living with them in 2007, the latest year for which data is available.

48

The average age of grandparents is 48, according to statistics compiled by grandparents.com. About 43 percent become grandparents in their 50s, and 37 percent in their 40s.

1.5 million There were about 1.5 million grandparents who were responsible for their grandchildren’s basic needs who were still in the labor force in 2007, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Find deals for the whole family at RadarFrog.com Sign up for free today. 20 JACKIE

$44,469

October 2010

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A survey of grandparents taken by grandparents.com found that 63 percent say they can do a better job taking care of grandchildren than they did with their own kids. — Compiled by Paul Eisenberg


October 2010

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in the know

Facts about the family Compiled by Danielle Braff

Family units American family units are anything but standard. There were 12 million single parents living with their children in 2009, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Out of those, 10 million were single mothers, and 2 million were single fathers.

Best place to raise children According to the 2010 roundup by Family Circle, the top three towns for families are Edmond, Okla., where the student/teacher ratio is 18 to 1; Hampton Township, Pa., where the median income is $76,000 and the median home price is $185,000; and La Verne, Calif., where 36 percent of households have children and the great schools rating is 9.

Forget the Joneses On average, families are very happy with their housing situations, according to a study released in August by the U.S. Census Bureau. About 70 percent of the people surveyed rated their housing situation an 8, 9 or 10, with 28 percent giving their homes a perfect 10. Sixty-eight percent of people rated their neighborhood highly, with 25 percent giving it the best rating.

Best colleges

Compiled by Danielle Braff

U.S. News & World Report released its 2011 college rankings. The top three national universities are Harvard, Princeton and Yale. The top national liberal arts colleges are Williams, Amherst and Swarthmore.

Class of 2014 If you have a child entering college this fall, he’ll be in the class of 2014. Few of the students actually know how to write in cursive, and they prefer e-mail to anything else, according to the Beloit College Mindset List for the Class of 2014. For them, DNA fingerprinting and maps of the human genome have always exited – and Ruth Bader Ginsburg has always had a seat on the Supreme Court.

When kids dream Girls and boys ages 10-15 have big dreams for their future careers, says a 2009 study by Raytheon. Twenty-three percent of girls want to be a singer or musician, 22 percent want to be an actress, 13 percent want to be a doctor and 10 percent want to be a teacher. Thirty-three percent of boys want to be a video game creator, 26 percent want to be a professional athlete, 13 percent want to be a computer programmer and 11 percent want to be a singer or musician. 22 JACKIE

October 2010


cover story

Reimals are partners in life CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

children needed at the time. She worked for the Independence School District for a while so she could have the same days off as her children. She also worked in real estate and for the Missouri Water Company, among others. “I don’t know that they benefited from it,” Jo says. “I benefited from it.” It was important for Jo to raise daughters who were Independent and could do things on their own. “I want them close, but I want them to have their own lives and be able to stand on their own feet,” Jo says. “To be a benefit to their communities.” Both her daughters, now are grown and married.  In their retirement years, the Reimals are enjoying spending time with their children and grandchildren at the lake. And their time at the lake is one of their favorite things to do together. “We can enjoy each other but not smother each other,” Jo says. “Everyone has a good time.” But it wasn’t just their children who made up the close Reimal family. Their mothers were both influential members of the Reimal family. Jo and her mom transferred to the church, Maywood Baptist, that Don and his mother attended, and the family lived across the street from Jo’s mom when the girls were young. Jo’s mom enjoyed having the Reimal girls around when they were growing up, yet Jo was very close to Don’s mother, too. She has fond memories of shopping with her mother-in-law and helping her husband’s mother get ready for trips.  The death of their parents was a difficult time for Jo, whose father died when Jo was 12. “It was quite an adjustment,” Jo recalls of her father’s death. “He’d had heart trouble.” But Jo’s mother still did everything she could to ensure her only child’s life wasn’t interrupted too much. She was fortunate to still be a stay-at-home mom while raising Jo after her husbands death. “I still had a good family background with values,” Jo says. –––

“She’s been supportive of the times I’ve had to be gone from the house early in the morning to late at night. We’ve supported each other in everything we have done.” –Don Reimal on his wife and best friend, Jo

While Jo puts a lot of thought into how to be the best wife of a politician, it’s important that people know she has her own life outside of the political realm. She’s involved in her community and her church – something she learned from her father. By the way, her husband isn’t a politician, she says. “He’s an elected official,” Jo says. She’s found a way to make her own life that doesn’t center on City Hall or City Council. Make no mistake, Jo enjoys attending the city functions with her husband – but only the ones she’s invited to. She doesn’t want to impose. So in her spare time she has developed a new hobby – line dancing. She goes line dancing with her girlfriends two, sometimes three, time a week at local community centers.  “It gave me the opportunity to be back in touch with the ladies I graduated high school with,” Jo says. “We need exercise, and it’s fun. We have become so close.” She’s also had the opportunity to meet some new friends through this new hobby.

The group has lunch together once a week before going dancing. Jo is also on the Vaile Mansion board and the Chicago and Alton Depot board.  –––  A town with more than 120,000 people and deeply historic roots is one Jo loves calling home. The small-town feel of Independence has ensured the Reimals have never considered living anywhere else. “Independence is a special place,” Jo says.  For Jo it has been a blessing living and serving in Independence, even if it’s not the path she thought her life would take. “He was so shy,” Jo says. “I had no idea Don Reimal would lead me on this life he has led me on. We have been so fortunate.” No only fortunate in leading a growing city, but successful in 47 years of happy marriage. For Don having a strong marriage filled with love, friendship and encouragement gave him the confidence to run for office. “She’s been supportive of the times I’ve had to be gone from the house early in the morning to late at night,” Don says. “We have supported each other in everything we have done.” Even before Don was mayor, Jo supported him for 18 years when he managed a Pop Warner football team – she helped with a lot of the behind-the-scenes organizational tasks, so Don knew before he even asked that his wife would support his

October 2010

Jo and Don Reimal

| THE PORTRAIT GALLERY/Karen Hacker

aspirations to join the political realm. “We have worked on projects together all our lives, and I knew I could count on her,” Don says.  But at the end of the day, there is one thing about the Reimals’ relationship that stands out. They are partners in life who enjoy spending time together and doing activities together. They are best friends. “We grew up together, and we’re each other’s best friends,” Don says. “It makes life a whole lot easier.”

JACKIE

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jackie