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INSIDE Children’s Mercy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Regional transit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Affordable care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Stats/Info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-35

Successful small business

No glass ceilings to worry about at Cornell Roofing

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women owned | 24

Business Review

Volume 1 • Fall 2012

Women at Flextime works for women, employers the helm By Kelly Evenson

kelly.evenson@examiner.net

EJC women have followed dream of leadership By Kelly Evenson kelly.evenson@examiner.net

For the first time in history, women outnumbered men on the U.S. Olympic Team. And every country that sent athletes to the worldwide event had a woman competing. Women are making their mark on everything from sports to business, and with more than 7 million women-owned business in the United States, including more than 50,000 in the Midwest, they are proving to be successful. “The biggest piece of advice I have is to get out there and make friends with the successful female business owners who you want to be the most like,” said Erin Parish, owner of Caring Touch Massage in Blue Springs. “The female entrepreneurs in my life inspire me, support me, teach me, and help me to see clearly when I am trying to make difficult business decisions. You can take classes about how to be successful all day long, but no class or motivational speech will Continued on Page 6

Employers are finding that happier employees means more productive employees. And one way to make employees happier is by offering flexible work options. “My employees would take flexible scheduling more than they would a raise,” said Terry Norwood, CEO of Midwest Public Risk in Independence. “We don’t pay the highest, and we don’t pay the lowest. We offer a fair, reasonable salary, but our flexible schedule has become so meaningful to the employees. No doubt about it, this was a good decision for us.” Flex time options allow employees to vary their normal eight-hour work day: EJC Business Review/KELLY EVENSON n Telecommuting, by working from Theresa Shepard, a Lee’s Summit resident, works four days at Hallmark and home. Continued on Page 5 then a half day at her home.

New publication focused on Eastern Jackson County Welcome to the first edition of the Eastern Jackson County Business Review, a publication of The Examiner, Eastern Jackson County’s daily newspaper. Each quarter, we will bring you news and views on business and economic development exclusively in Eastern Jackson County. This first edition features some of the many women who are in leadership roles in the area’s private and public businesses and economic develop-

ment organizations. We also are bringing you news, data and analysis of the economic development climate and issues in the Independence/Blue Springs/Lee’s Summit area. We welcome you to send us your business news, achievements, promotions, photos and opinions. Email to The Examiner’s Executive Editor Sheila Davis at sheila.davis@examiner.net. Please send photos in .jpg format, between 500kb and 2mg.


The Value of Chamber Membership “The Lee’s Summit Chamber strongly encourages its members to do business with other Chamber members, thus keeping the MONEYĂ›OWINGWITHINTHECOMMUNITYANDMAKETHOSEDOLLARS work for our schools and other community affairs. They want our business to prosper locally, but they also have a sharp eye and attentive ears way beyond our borders as they constantly look for ways to assist our businesses to expand.“

Dr. Emmanuel Ngomsi, Ph.D., President All World Languages & Cultures, Inc. “We are proud to belong to an organization that plays such a key role in our community. Not only does the chamber act as a civic advocate for local businesses on the state and national level, it also provides multiple networking opportunities and helps us remain connected to the community.�

Top Five Reasons to Join the Lee’s Summit Chamber

Dan Rexroth, President John Knox Village

p Publicity & Exposure for Businesses

"ENEÚTFROMFREE listings and links on the Chamber’s website, membership directory, monthly newsletter, ribbon cuttings, open houses and more. The Chamber also receives hundreds of requests each year for goods and services purchased in our area. We refer Chamber members to visitors, newcomers, businesses and residents over the phone. We also distribute the annual Buyers Guide.

p Legislative Input

The Chamber is active on your behalf on business issues at the local, state and national levels. We work to make the business climate better for you.

p Discount Programs

As a member, you might be able to save money on your medical PREMIUMWITHADISCOUNTON(UMANA(EALTHBENEĂšTPLANS4HE Chamber also offers discounted trip packages.

p Free Seminars on Topics of Interest to the Business Community. Recess to Success seminars are held monthly

and include topics on how to successful grow and operate your business. Wake Up to Success seminars are held bi-monthly and feature topics that deal with work/life balance.

p Networking Opportunities

Put your business in motion through networking, networking and more NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES!

Upcoming Networking Opportunities October 2

pAM Missouri Ballot Measures Forum qAM pqPM Recess for Success TOPIC: Local Search is a Growth Opportunity PRESENTERS: Rob Rance & Amy Driver, Turn the Page Online Marketing SPONSOR: Saint Luke’s East - Lee’s Summit LOCATION: John Knox Village - Manhattan Room

October 9

pqAM Wake Up to Success TOPIC: Self Defense - Take Control of Your Personal Protection PRESENTER: Linda Hanson, Tamashii Black Belt Academy ,/#!4)/..%7OODS#HAPEL2OAD

/CTOBER pqPM Chamber After Hours, 53"ANK 3%$OUGLAS

/CTOBER

pqPM State House of Representatives Candidate Forum, Legacy Park Community Center, .%"LUESTEM$RIVE

/CTOBER

pqPM Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event (3-##OMPANIES .% Ralph Powell Road pqPM -EGA#HAMBER/FĂšCE0ARTY +ANSAS#ITY:OO :OO$RIVE

/CTOBER

pAM Monthly Membership Luncheon, PROGRAM: Lee’s Summit - Yours Truly SPONSOR: Lee’s Summit CARES ,/#!4)/.%MALINE"ALLROOM 37RD3TREET

October 23

pqAM Chamber Before Hours, 3OUTHEAST%NTERPRISES "OOTH  +ANSAS#ITY -O

October 24 pPM Ribbon Cutting, Roberts Chevrolet, 945 SE Oldham Parkway

October 25

pPM Dancing with the Chamber Stars, (ILTON'ARDEN)NN)NDEPENDENCE %AST Jackson Drive, Independence, MO.

7ANTTOATTENDANEVENTASAGUEST#ALL



Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Fall 2012


independence economic development council

A TIF project pays off early and well It seems that a lot of attention is given to economic development projects that either underperform or fail to meet expectations when they were originally conceived. That attention is heightened when incentive programs are put in place to support the project. When those failures occur, it is often the state legislature that gets the task of figuring out “what went wrong” and then attempting to adjust programs so it doesn’t happen again. In many cases, the problems aren’t a result of the programs but typically a number of factors that can impact projects that are beyond the control of government. One program that has gotten a fair amount of attention over the years is tax increment financing or what is

tom lesnak referred to more commonly as “TIF.” Currently, there are 16 open TIF project areas in Independence, and four that have been paid off and closed. The latest closed TIF project involved the redevelopment in the early 2000s of the Hy-Vee Plaza area at U.S. 40 and Noland Road. That project took an empty and deteriorating Kmart building and

brought it back to life with a new Hy-Vee grocery store and a Westlake Hardware store. Both helped meet an underserved need in the area and raised the tax base. For the past decade, new property and sales taxes being collected above previous levels before the improvements (the increment) have paid off the development costs involved with upgrading the property. What was projected to be up to a 23-year payoff was paid off 10 years early due to the enhanced economic activity that the project created. Now that the TIF is closed, new enhanced tax revenues are flowing to all the taxing jurisdictions, which is good for all of us and helps continue providing education for our children, high quality libraries,

parks and public safety just to name a few. As we move forward, we will need to continue to utilize the available programs to leverage the redevelopment of older areas of Independence. It has been shown now on several occasions that the outcome is worth the effort. Tom Lesnak is president of the Independence Economic Development Council. The Independence EDC is a nonprofit public/private partnership that provides economic development services within the city of Independence. For more information on its services, contact its office at 816252-5777 or go to the organization’s website at www.inedc.biz.

Business Review Contact Us Phone: 816-350-6365 Fax: 816-254-0211 (news) 816-836-3805 (advertising) Publisher: Stephen Wade stephen.wade@examiner.net Editorial: EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Sheila Davis sheila.davis@examiner.net Advertising: REGIONAL ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: Donna Eye donna.eye@examiner.net Web Site: www.examiner.net FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/examiner.net TWITTER: @EJC_Examiner GateHouse Media Inc., is The Examiner's parent company.

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Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review




lee’s summit chamber of commerce

Lee’s Summit Chamber puts business in motion During the past few years, the Lee’s Summit Chamber membership base has grown to be one of the largest in the metropolitan area. The chamber strives to keep the Lee’s Summit business community at the top by improving and implementing new programs and benefits for our members. As the champion of emerging businesses, the chamber provides an array of programs and events for our nearly 1,000 members to increase the visibility of their business. We provide opportunities to meet and work with the best and brightest leaders in business, government and education. We also strive to multiply the effectiveness of businesses in Lee’s Summit by providing structure, volunteer leadership and informative

NANCY BRUNS programs that meet the needs of the community. We aggressively support education, tourism, legislative issues and economic development – all critical issues for residents and businesses. With more than 50 years of service to our community, the chamber continues to work to strengthen and improve the quality of life in Lee’s Summit. This past year, the chamber has

LAKE CITY BUSINESS CENTER Highways 7 & 78 Contact: Jack Figg Director Commercial Development & Community Affairs 816-796-5220 Jack.Figg@atk.com

Proud Operator of the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant



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successfully added new activities to our already busy calendars. During the spring of 2012, the chamber took its first organized trip to Washington, D.C. Our delegation spent time meeting with senators and representatives and engaging with U.S. Chamber officials. One month later, more than 60 members joined us as we took our annual train trip to Jefferson City to meet with our state elected officials. Still to come in 2012, we look forward to rolling out our entrepreneurial platform to grow and encourage new businesses in Lee’s Summit. Stay tuned for more details. Of course, the chamber continues to provide the services that our members have come to expect. We continue to sponsor the Leadership Lee’s Summit program, which is a nine-month program that begins in September each year. To date, we have graduated more than 400 participants from the program. We continue to coordinate Recess for Success and Wake Up to Success seminars – our programs that inform and educate our members on issues of concern and interest. These seminars provide our members with information and knowledge that can be utilized in their business, as well as in their personal lives. A brochure of upcoming speakers and topics can be found at lschamber.com. Recognizing the need for new leadership in the community, the Chamber formed the Young Pro-

fessionals group five years ago. The Chamber Young Professionals group is for those members between the ages of 21 to 35 who are interested in meeting other businessmen and women starting out in their career and enhancing their professional development. The group meets monthly for networking events and commits time to community service projects. The Lee’s Summit Chamber strives to keep business in motion by creating opportunities for business success through networking, advocacy, and business and professional development. This is just a quick look at what the chamber has been up to this year. To learn more about our organization or to join, visit lschamber. com or call 816-524-2424. I also welcome you to stop by our office at 220 S.E. Main St. You can find us on facebook at facebook.com/ lsummitchamber and on twitter at twitter.com/lsummitchamber. The Chamber also has a YouTube channel and LinkedIn group. Nancy Bruns joined the Chamber as president in 2000. She has worked in the chamber industry since 1986, with nine years at Independence and four years at Raytown. Nancy holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Park University, and in 2005 she earned the title of Certified Chamber Executive from the American Chamber of Commerce Executives.

Every week in The Examiner, local investment adviser Ron Finke offers his outlook on the economy.

Ron Finke Fall 2012


women in business

Flextime is a valuable recruiting tool Continued from Page 1 n Compressed work weeks, which allows employees to work more hours each day, but fewer days of the week. n Job sharing, which allows two people to share the same job, splitting the work week and job responsibilities. n Staggered work hours. Companies that offer staggered work hours allow employees to vary their start and end times anywhere from 15 minutes to two hours. This allows employees the option to avoid rush hour or traffic congestion if they choose. According to the Mid-America Regional Council, flextime has a variety of benefits. Alternative work schedules can reduce the cost of training and recruitment and can also be a deterrent to employee turnover. Approximately 12 to 13 percent of all non-government organizations in the country have some sort of flexible schedule in place. In addition, about 90 federal agencies offer flextime. Midwest Public Risk, a public entity pool in Missouri that offers employee benefits, worker’s compensation and priority and liability programs to local governments, has been using flexible scheduling for the last few years. Norwood acknowledges that he is old-fashioned and was not an immediate convert to the idea of flexible scheduling. But what started off as staggered work days has morphed into two flexible scheduling options. The first is a 9/80 schedule. Employees work four, nine hour days each week and one eight hour day on Fridays. This allows employees to have every other Friday or Monday off. The second is four, 10 hour days with a Friday or Monday off each week. About three-fourths of the company’s employees take advantage of some type of flextime option. “There are challenges,” he said. “You have to be able to pay attention to who is in the office at what time. Everybody cannot have the same day off,” he said. “There are limitations to any kind of flextime schedule because there always has to be coverage (in the office). ATK, which operates the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in Indepen-

‘We started it on a trial basis... The employees showed us that they are happy with the schedule and happy enough to make it work.’ | Patricia Martin, ATK dence, has been offering a 9/80 schedule for salaried employees for the last two years. Patricia Martin, communications manager for ATK, said the results have been “fantastic.” “We started it on a trial basis to see how it was received and to find out if we could still maintain business both internally and externally,” she said. “The employees showed us that they are happy with the schedule and happy enough to make it work.” For women, flextime can be a good option to better balance life at home and at work. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 60 percent of all women with children under the age of 17 either work part-time or fulltime. Theresa Shepard, a Lee’s Summit resident, works four days at Hallmark and then a half day at her home. She said especially when her children were younger, this allowed her to attend activities or schedule other appointments without taking time off work. “It gives me the flexibility to get errands or chores around the house done,” she said. “ I think it gives people the opportunity to do things really well, both at home and at work.” Norwood said offering the flexible scheduling benefits not only those with families, but the entire company. “What we have found is that by offering flextime, we have actually expanded our office hours and availability,” he said. “There are certain times of the year when we have to have everyone in the office, but we just work with that. We have had no complaints about our flextime program.” Hallmark Card’s Inc. has been offering its flexible scheduling since the mid1990s. Kristi Ernsting, who works in the company’s public relations department, said offering a variety of flexible work options provides employees the opportunity to find a “healthy and productive work/life balance.” Hallmark has earned a spot on “Working Mother’s” magazine’s best places to work 17 out of the last 26 years, largely because of its

flexible scheduling program. “The longevity of these programs reinforces that Hallmark believes offering flexibility to employees is a good thing,” Ernsting said. “It’s a two-way street of extending trust to the employee that he/she will perform at the same or a higher level when offered a flexible schedule.” Hallmark offers several flextime options for employees, including alternative work schedules, a compressed work week (four, 10-hour days), telecommuting and job sharing. Flexible work arrangements are evaluated based on the needs of the department and have to be approved by the employee’s manager. “I have a 27-mile, one way commute, so working from home that one day cuts my travel and fuel costs,” Shepard said.

“I think it certainly helps with employee engagement. We are able to do what is needed to support the needs of the business but also have the ability to do some of that work on a more flexible timetable.” Martin said the flexible scheduling has been a great recruiting tool for the ammunitions plant. She said the biggest challenge is making sure that there is still coverage in every department, which means that employees must alternate the Fridays they have off. “It is an attractive benefit, to get a three-day weekend every other week. That means a lot to people,” she said. “What we have to do with this schedule is make sure we continue to have coverage in every department. Someone still needs to be there to help our customers.”

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Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review




WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Women in charge, breaking stereotypes Continued from Page 1 prepare you for the uphill battle you face when you first open your business.” According to the Missouri Women’s Council, an organization that serves as a resource for women who are pursuing their own economic and business goals, as of 2006 in Missouri, there were an estimated 209,949 privately held companies owned at least 50 percent by a woman. These companies generated almost $42 billion in sales and employed more than 297,000 people. In the same year, there were 21,505 companies with a woman holding majority ownership, which is at least 51 percent. Still, another 130,772 companies in the state are solely owned by women. St. Louis County has the most businesses owned by women, followed by Jackson County. According to the United States Census Bureau, more than 27 percent of all businesses in Jackson County have a majority female ownership and the number continues to grow. Nationally, Missouri ranks 19th in the number of companies owned by women.

candid marketing and communications Sara Freetly-Grubb and Becky Freetly-Graber decided in 2005 to start their own marketing/branding/public relations firm in Lee’s Summit. With $15 and no clients, the sisters set off to make Candid Marketing and Communications one of the top choices in the Kansas City area. Since that time, the company has grown to include more than $2 million in annual revenue with about 50 clients and 25 employees. They are also a certified women-owned businesses. According to the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, being a certified women-owned business means that at least 51 percent of the company is owned, controlled, operated and managed by a woman or women. To achieve this recognition, a business must complete formal documentation and go



through a site visit process. Freetly-Grubb said although the process is lengthy, certification is beneficial. “Achieving and maintaining the WBE certification is not a simple process, but one we see value in having,” she said. “Being a certified WBE allows us to receive opportunities to bid on projects and often gives us an advantage over non-certified firms. However, we don’t expect to get projects because of our certification. We still stand on the merits of our work and expertise, which is ultimately why clients hire us.”

Caring Touch Massage, Inc. Started in 2006 by Parish, the Blue Springs business offers a variety of massages, aroma therapies and other services. Some are referred to Caring Touch by physicians and others are looking for alternatives to drugs and surgery. Some come to Caring Touch simply to relive stress and have a little relaxation. Now along with Parish, there are three other women – Mary Stucker, Tiffannie Nelson and Gwendolyn Townsend, who all work together for the success of the business. “I am fortunate to work with some amazing massage therapists. They are knowledgeable, confident, driven women. They care about the success of the company as well as their own success,” she said. “We all work together as a team (we are no drama women), and we make sure to consider what is best for the client over our own self interests. We oftentimes refer to each other or other professionals if we feel someone else can better meet a client’s needs.” Although it took more than two years to turn a profit, the business had revenues of about $51,000 in 2011. This year, Parish is projecting revenues to top the $100,000 mark. “My field is actually dominated by female business owners so it is a good field for women to start and own a business in. I think the challenge for the

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

women in our field is learning to place a higher value on the work they do and charging enough money to properly care for the business and themselves,” Parish said. “Massage therapists are known for their tendency to focus more on their art than on becoming successful entrepreneurs. Like any business, you have to have a solid financial foundation when you start, and you have to have a plan.”

Cornell Roofing and Sheet Metal Company A three-person team, all women and led by Mary McNamara, operate the long-time roofing and construction company in Independence. Although they have only been at the head of Cornell Roofing for five years, the three women have more than 60 years of experience in the roofing and sheet metal industry. “Time will help,” McNamara said of women in the construction industry. “There are many more women in construction today than compared to 20 years ago. Continued acceptance of women in construction trades, and continuation of programs for minority and women that self perform their work will also help.” Cornell Roofing handles between 70 to 80 jobs each year, including those for the Fort Osage School District and the Ennovation Center. They have 45 to 50 employees and revenues of $6 to $7 million each year. They also have WBE and DBE certification from the Kansas City Human Relations Department and WBE certification from the State of Missouri Office of Supplier and Workforce diversity. All three women agree that knowledge is key to starting a business. “Learn as much as you can about the business you are going to open,” McNamara said. “Always be willing to change and look at the new ideas coming out in your industry. Do not be afraid to ask for help, and use the resources in the public sector such as the local economic development offices, Small Business Administration or Small Business

Development Technology Centers. You will make mistakes, but be sure to learn from your mistakes.” McNamara suggests that anyone planning to start their own business be prepared to work hard. She said there is a misconception that “you are the boss, so you can do whatever you want.” But, that is not true. “First, you need to set an example for all of your employees. If you don’t care about the business enough to be there, why would your employees,” she said. “Second, you must pay attention to what your company is doing. Strive to be the best at what you are doing. You will have many successes, but you will still have problems. It is just business.” Parish said she has noticed that many women who choose to become massage therapists do it because they are very caring individuals. She said no matter the business, it is important to put a reasonable value on the time given. “While having your heart in the right place and caring about your clients is an essential part of the business, having enough money to pay your bills is important too,” Parish said. “I started out with the ‘I don’t care about the money mentality.’ Then, one day a brilliant business woman said to me and said ‘Erin, if you don’t charge enough to make ends meet, you’ll end up out of business and no one will get to receive your wonderful massages. By devaluing yourself, you aren’t just hurting yourself, you’re hurting everyone.’ It was at that moment that I realized I needed to shift my mindset about what I was doing.” Freetly-Grubb said she attributes perseverance, grace and a “little good old fashioned blood, sweat and tears” to her business’s success. She said owning a business, no matter as a man or a woman, can be challenging so determination and hard work are essential. “We attribute our success to drive and passion for this business,” she said. “Personal relationships are also a huge part of our success. The recession hit marketing budgets hard, but Candid has continued to grow over the past three years despite the obstacles.”

Fall 2012


INDEPENDENCE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Business. Community. One Voice.

T

he Independence Chamber of Commerce is increasing access to businesses and the community. “The Independence Chamber of Commerce is your Chamber,” Interim President Teresa Freeland said. “If you own a business, are an employee of a business, live in this community or work here, we support you. Our information technology, community events and business programs reflect that. Our involvement in the community creates that.” A new website, social media and two mobile apps were created to incorporate the chamber’s purpose and mission. These tools provide businesses the opportunity to work cohesively with each other and the community. The Independence Chamber of Commerce experienced a busy spring/summer quarter adding several new business programs and community events. In May and June the chamber hosted two successful “Cash Mobs” at local business establishments and conducted several Ribbon Cuttings introducing new businesses to the community. In addition, in June the Independence Chamber hosted an All Star Preview at Metropolitan Community College-Blue River to inform the community about the events surrounding the All Star Game and the impact on the commu-

TERESA FREELAND nity. The speakers for the event included Kevin Uhlich, Kansas City Royals Senior Vice-President of Business Operations, Stacy Bartlett, Kansas City Convention and Visitors Association Vice President of Services, Keli O’Neill Wenzel, O’Neill Marketing & Event Management and introductions by Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders. The Independence Chamber frequently requests feedback from our members on a variety of business related topics. Following are topical subjects and responses received for today’s business climate. 1) The number one attribute employers believe is important for students to acquire before entering the work place is communications skills (listening, verbal and written). 2) The most important issue facing Independence today is No. 1 community image and No. 2

the economy. 3) The businesses believe there will be an increase surrounding investment in building, technology, plant or equipment in the coming months. 4) Finally, the most challenging regulations to their businesses are tax regulations and health care regulations. The Independence Chamber of Commerce has exciting upcoming events in 2012. The Chamber of Commerce presented the 40th annual Santa-Cali-Gon Days® Friday, Aug. 31 through Monday, Sept. 3 on the historic Independence Square. The city of Independence, our long time community partner, and the Missouri Lottery were our major sponsors for this year’s festival. For the past 40 years, the Independence Chamber of Commerce has played a predominant role in bringing Independence one of the largest Labor Day weekend celebrations in the nation. The festival

celebrates Independence as the starting point of the three trails, the Santa Fe, California and Oregon Trail. During the 1800s these trails provided a pathway to opportunity for those having the courage and fortitude to travel them. We celebrate that pioneer spirit by bringing people together for one weekend in September. The festival brings in tourists from throughout the United States and all over the world. Over 225,000 attend annually generating retail sales in the city of Independence at an estimated $3 million. In addition, more than 100 local non-profit organizations benefit from the festival. Teresa Freeland served as interim president of the Independence Chamber of Commerce while the search for a permanent president was under way.

« Upcoming Events While Santa-Cali-Gon Days® Festival is a huge event, the chamber remains focused on bringing its members valuable resources and events such as the following over the next month: n In October the Independence Chamber will host our first Regional Experts in Area Leadership Luncheon (REAL) featuring mayors from the metropolitan area. n As community partners, the chamber hosts the 64th annual Halloween Parade on October 27, 2012. For additional information, visit www.independencechamber. org or contact the Independence Chamber of Commerce at 816-252-4745.

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review




THE LOCAL OUTLOOK

We’re holding our own in EJC areas Summertime figures on home starts and sales suggest the metro area is chugging ahead, and Eastern Jackson appears to be holding its own. Figures from the Kansas City Regional Association of Realtors and Heartland Multiple Listing Service show Jackson County in August had higher selling prices than a year earlier for existing homes, with a better gain than the metro area as a whole. The average existing-home sale price in August was $121,892 in Jackson County, up 14.8 percent from August 2011. That price is considerably shy of the average among the nine counties, which saw a 7 percent bump overall to $161,473. Johnson County led the way, at $241,508. New-home prices were up 2 percent metrowide, though Jackson County fell 4.4 percent to $264,864. The Realtors don’t break down numbers of sales by county, but metro

jeff fox existing-home sales hit 2,491 in August, an eye-popping 17 percent gain from a year earlier. New-homes sales – a far smaller part of the market – hit 236, a gain of 55 percent from August 2011. That should continue to translate to good news for real-estate agents, builders and sellers. In August 2011, there were 15,165 existing homes and 1,312 new homes on the market, and those had fallen to 12,572 and 1,085 in August 2012. Pending sales are up 5

percent. Put another way, in one year a nine-month supply of inventory has been cut to about six and a half – close to what the industry calls a balanced market, favoring neither buyer nor seller. August figures from the Home Builders Association of Greater Kansas City suggest the metro area in 2012 will have its highest number of housing starts in four years. It’s far from the good times of several years ago, but so far the issuance of permits to build single-family homes is up 35 percent metrowide. Eastern Jackson County is roughly in line with that trend. Thirty-four permits were issued last month, bringing the 2012 total to 317. That’s just an 11.6 percent bump, but if you account for a 2011 spike in Independence, then Eastern Jackson County is looking at a 44.6 percent gain. Lee’s Summit leads the way with 158, a gain of 68 percent.

Blue Springs is up 6 percent (38 permits so far). For the first eight months of the year, the metro area is at 2,026 permits. Compare that with 1,502 for the same period in 2011, 1,637 in 2010 and just 1,336 in dreadful 2009, the bottom of the Great Recession. Here’s the broader picture: As recently as 2005, 11,893 single-family home permits were issued for the full year. The economy got a little squishy in 2006, and permits fell to 9,384. The decline continued to 6,385 in 2007. In 2008, as the stock market tanked and a general economic alarm spread, that figure fell to 3,232. The bottom was 2009 – consumers and businesses stopped spending, unemployment jumped – and the metro area fell to 2,155 permits. It’s been modestly better since: 2,471 in all of 2010, then down in 2,301 last year.

Reserve sees reasons for optimism in regional economy The Kansas City Federal Reserve continues to issue upbeat forecasts for the region’s economy. The Federal Reserve in late August released its latest Summary of Commentary on Current Economic Conditions – the Beige Book – and it echoes the report from early July. The U.S. economy is showing gradual gains, and the Midwest is doing a little better. The economy from Kansas City to Tulsa, Denver and Cheyenne “continued to expand at a moderate pace in July and early August,” the Kansas City Fed reports in its part of the new report, adding that things are looking up in the months ahead. Start with the big one, consumer spending, which accounts for twothirds of the economy. It increased in July and early August, says the KC Fed, and is “expected to rise further over the next three months” in this region. Auto sales – especially small and mid-sized crossovers, SUVs and cars – were up sharply, and dealers in the region expect further gains. Consumer spending



was up nationally as well. Some of the other specifics: n “Manufacturing production and hiring rose modestly, though the volume of new orders, volume of shipments, and backlogs declined since the last survey (in the late spring and early summer). Manufacturers expected activity to expand in the coming months,” the KC Fed said. n Home sales are up, and so are prices, and inventory is down – the same thing metro area Realtors have been reporting. “Homes under $300,000 sold particularly well,” the report says. n Wage pressures remain “subdued” – bad news if you’re looking for a raise – but “many firms continued to report some difficulty filled skilled positions including drivers, technicians, engineers, computer programmers, and sales representatives.” n Bankers say loan demand is up and credit is improving. They expect to see farmers and ranchers coming in for more loans, and they have the money

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

to lend. n Manufacturers are absorbing the rising costs of raw materials. Prices of finished goods are stable. The report also holds warnings: n The drought is hammering the ag sector in this part of the country, and a good deal of the metro economy is tied to that one way or another. “Agricultural conditions deteriorated (in July and early August) as crops withered under extreme drought,” the KC Fed notes. Feed costs are up, and ranchers continue to liquidate herds, which is driving down beef prices – for now. n One worry hanging over the region’s housing market is that many in the industry are telling the KC Fed that “a large inventory of homes in foreclosure has been held back and could put downward pressure on prices when the homes come onto the market.” n And here’s one from the Fed at the national level. “Weakness overseas remains a problem for U.S. manufacturing.” That’s a worry. Missouri’s manufacturers have been looking to

exports for faster growth than they see at home. The late August report echoed the early July Beige Book report, which cited stronger home sales and commercial construction, plus an expectation that home starts would pick up over the summer and into the fall. Here’s the most encouraging thing – from the July report – that I’ve seen in a Beige Book in some time: “Consumer spending improved with stronger than expected sales in June and was expected to strengthen further in the coming months. ... retailers reported increased sales, particularly for seasonal items, mid-priced appliances, apparel, and fashion accessories. ... Auto sales climbed sharply and were expected to remain solid for the next few months with more dealers offering sales incentives and discounts. Fuelefficient cars sold well, while demand for large, expensive cars and trucks remained weak. Restaurant sales increased more than expected.

Fall 2012


BLUE SPRINGS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

It’s about time!

A

s president of the chamber, I am often asked about the business climate. People want to know what business owners are expecting this fall and if business is picking up. They want to know if owners are planning to add or cut employees. The answer to that question is as varied and different as the 416 current members of our chamber. Are our members upbeat? In one word – yes! I can answer positively to that question because I am proud to say the business members of our chamber have chosen a positive attitude. They are the leaders of the community and are not victims of the economy. The business members of the chamber are whose voice I hear. They are the ones who have decided

LARA VERMILLION to step forward and say, “I choose to make a difference in both my business and my community.” Membership in the Blue Springs Chamber, or any chamber for that matter, is a business strategy. Anyone in business can attest to the fact that they are doing more right now – with less. Less means fewer resources – less stock on hand, less employees to

Ailin t e D o t Au

do the day to day work of the business and, most of all, less cash in the bank. Here’s the catch to that – our members will persevere. In the three years that I have been involved with this chamber, volunteers are at an all-time high. We continue to attract new members to the chamber – five in the last couple of weeks. Our members are determined. They are figuring out ways to refine their business practices and market their company more effectively. Our members are not just sitting in their businesses waiting for customers to show up. Our members are making time in their demanding schedules to attend meetings and events – and not just chamber ones. Why?

They see the big picture. They are in it for the long haul. Time spent now, cultivating relationships, builds future customers. There is no better way to gain a customer than a one-to-one interaction. They see the bigger picture. They are here to stay. Time spent now, cultivating the community, builds a better Blue Springs. There is no better time than now to build the future we want for Blue Springs. Would it be easier to give up? Probably. It takes spirit and determination to stand even when it’s tough. Ability may get you to the top, but determination will keep you there. I continue to be grateful for the positive attitude our members show and

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Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review




THE LOCAL OUTLOOK

Economist sees positives in K.C. area By Jeff Fox jeff.fox@examiner.net

There is upbeat news in economist Frank Lenk’s latest assessment of the region’s economy: Assuming the nation’s economy stays on its slow but steady course of improvement, the Kansas City area should do better that the U.S. as a whole. “This is welcome news, given a local economy that has struggled to keep up with national growth during the recovery,” Lenk writes in his semi-annual forecast for the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. Lenk also is director of research services at the Mid-America Research Council. Lenk sees two advantages for the

area. One is that sectors expected to do well in 2012 and 2013 – financial services, wholesale trade, professional and technical services, even non-profits – are somewhat concentrated here. The other is that our relatively low cost of living frees consumers’ wallets for shopping, health care, eating out and even looking at buying a house. He sees the growth in Kansas City’s gross regional product growing 3.4 percent this year, compared with 3.1 percent for GDP nationwide. By the end of 2013, the region’s employment growth should be back to the 2 percent a year rate the area enjoyed until around the 2000.

“This return to historical trends marks the culmination of a long struggle,” Lenk writes. The area ended the decade of the 2000s with fewer jobs than it started with. That is slowly coming around. The metro area is expected to add 22,000 jobs this year and 28,0000 in 2013. Most of those will be in the services industry. Government, which has been cutting overall jobs at all levels for a few years, is expected to cut another 1,000 this year but rebound in 2013. This assumes that the U.S. economy keeps growing. Should there be some combination of higher oil prices, a big hit to the dollar or the onset of inflation, then gross domestic product falls notably, Lenk says.

“Like the U.S., it will be until at least 2014 before the region regains all the jobs it lost during the Great Recession, regardless of the scenario,” Lenk writes. “Should the region experience another recession in 2013, however, this achievement would likely be postponed to 2015 or beyond.” Lest anyone forget, Lenk points out that the Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates at historically low levels for at least another couple of years. “The economy is not healthy – that’s what interest rates being held near zero percent signifies,” he writes, adding that once things are good “many economic challenges” can then be addressed.

business bits Arvest Bank closes Union Bank purchase Arvest Bank has completed its purchase of Union Bank, giving it 18 banks and 33 ATMs in the Kansas City area. Those locations include the former Union Bank sites at 4340 S. Noland Road and 8959 East U.S. 40, just west of Blue Ridge Cut-off. Arvest, based in Bentonville, Ark., has more than 230 locations in Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas.

economic growth in the state in the years ahead. The Missouri Bioscience Portal is at www.ded. mo.gov/bio. It touts the state’s third-lowest-in-the-nation cost of doing business, its low energy costs, its skilled workforce and its 21 bioscience centers. It has links to resources for startups, incentive programs and other information.

State Treasurer Clint Zweifel has championed since taking office, the Missouri Linked Deposit Program, designed to aid businesses with up to 99 employees as well as farmers. Zweifel manages the program.

New ideas for U.S. 40? The Mid-America Regional Council is studying development options for a couple of key interHEBCO moving to Independence sections in Eastern Jackson County. An Overland Park plumbing supply sales U.S. 40 is among six corridors in the metro area CVS store moving agency, HEBCO Inc., is moving to a new headbeing studied. Specifically, the idea is to look Susquehanna Center on U.S. 24 in Indepenquarters at 4304 S. Washington Ave. That’s in at redevelopment potential with “conceptual dence is being redeveloped to include a CVS the commercial and light industrial area west of plans” for what are described as three typical store, which currently sits slightly to the east. Noland Road and south of Interstate 70, behind locations: 40 at Adams Dairy Parkway in Blue CPH recently sold the site for $2.35 million, acthe strip center with Harbor Freight Tools, Savers Springs, at Noland Road in Independence and at cording to Kokua Realty Company of Grain Valley. and the MaMa Garden Chinese buffet. Prospect in Kansas City. There’s also supposed The property also includes Blockbuster and Papa HEBCO is bringing five full-time employees and to be “a strategy for redeveloping abandoned Murphy’s Pizza. one-part time employee. The company will have or underperforming strip centers,” according to both offices and its warehouse at the site. It says MARC documents. New online tool it plans to grow and, during the next five years, The Rock Island corridor also is being studied. The Missouri Department of Economic Develop- add five employees. The other corridors being studied are Troost ment has a new website to promote biosciTo buy the facility, the company is getting a Avenue, North Oak Trafficway, State Avenue in ence, which officials say will be a key driver of $210,000 low-interest loan through a program Kansas City, Kan., and Shawnee Mission Parkway

10

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

and Metcalf. Those have existing development plans but also the complications of overlapping jurisdictions, like the Kansas City/Independence line hopscotching across 40. KCP&L adds $1 million to customer assistance fund KCP&L has expanded its Connections programs to help seniors, lower-income customers and families who are struggling to pay electric utility bills during the extremely hot summer. The utility added $1 million to its assistance programs, which include Dollar-Aide, helping residents who struggle to pay utility and water bills; Family Relief Fund, offering up to a $150 credit on KCP&L bills during summer months; and Reconnection Relief, helping those whose utilities were disconnected before the Hot Weather Rule took effect. KCP&L also has asked the Missouri Public Service Commission to extend the Economic Relief Program. For information about the programs, call 1-800-526-3348 or visit www.kcpl.com/connections. Compiled by Jeff Fox Fall 2012


BLUE SPRINGS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Harnessing entrepreneurial energy GROW BLUE SPRINGS AS A GAME CHANGER Conventional wisdom suggests that if a sound business opportunity exists, existing businesses will identify the opportunity, produce the product or service needed, capture the market and reap the eventual rewards. Yet, the most breathtaking commercial achievements in technology, science and innovations in goods and service delivery have not come from well-established corporations but from the humble origins of entrepreneurial ventures. Entrepreneurs are the key and vital link as change agents of our economy and of producing the companies that will create the jobs of our future inside companies and starting new companies. They drive innovation, change and competition, which is healthy and vital to keep the United States globally competitive. All communities have residents with entrepreneurial aspirations, and many are not involved with traditional organizations and therefore remain underground or hidden from easy view. Blue Springs EDC is creating, with the help of local entrepreneurs, a culture in our community that recognizes, encourages and supports the entrepreneurial

brien starner risk taker who thinks “outside the box” and likely needs help understanding all that will be required to be successful. By engaging the entire community with trained business volunteers who lead Grow Blue Springs, www.growbluesprings.com, can support, assist and deliver finance resources for companies, entrepreneurs and startups systematically, one at a time. Blue Springs Economic Development Corporation over the past 18 months developed and began rolling out this entrepreneurial system to provide programing and resources at the local/regional level to support entrepreneurship, startups and small business growth. GBS essentially delivers an affordable

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“franchise-style” model that encourages and supports small business growth and entrepreneurship in Blue Springs and Eastern Jackson County. GBS offers both a web-based and a live “networked community” that educates, guides, trains and encourages individuals and companies in an organized network of support, assistance, coaching and mentoring. Our investing partner in the EDC, EvisThrive, developed the Grow Blue Springs program including a community education component by leveraging the serial entrepreneurial experiences of EvisThrive founders. They believed a systematic and communitynetworked-based approach for educating, preparing and assisting startups and entrepreneurs could be built and executed locally and affordably through local chambers of commerce, economic development organizations, cities and entrepreneur groups.. Candidates register on our website for $95 a yearand immediately start the IntelliStart program to begin or input their business plan, select a business coach to guide and share feedback of their progress and plan. Planned network meetings are part of the platform for the entrepreneurs, which lead to key events allowing them to share experiences, pitch and promote their company

and products, and secure investment, expose their company and land new customers. Local “business resource” providers can promote themselves via promotional videos hosted on the GBS website promoted for $1,500 a year, and their 90-second to two-minute video becomes accessible 24/7 to our network of entrepreneurs, whose work on their new or existing company occurs at night and before sunrise. A wide variety of products and services will be included such as accountants, attorneys, marketing, website services, human resources, etc.. Blue Springs EDC and Grow Blue Springs share the goal of building an “eco-system” that helps entrepreneurs decide when and how to move forward to grow, learn, present and finance their small and early stage businesses, or in some cases to not go forward. Our most recent event, StartFEST+DEMO, was held Aug. 21 and involved 10 entrepreneurs working in the GBS system who demonstrated, then pitched their company to an expected audience of guests and investors of 75 to 100. Brien Starner is president of the Blue Springs Economic Development Corporation. BS EDC is at 1600 NE Coronado Drive, Blue Springs MO 64014; phone 816-228-0208.

Momonthedge www.examiner.net/community/blogs COMMUNITY BLOG

Kate Beem is now part of the community blog network at The Examiner. If you have expertise in an area or an interesting hobby, find out how to join our network. Contact Sheila Davis at sheila.davis@examiner.net

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

11


BUILDING BUSINESS

State injects funding into jobs program By Kelly Evenson kelly.evenson@examiner.net

A program to help bridge the gap between college graduates and the demands of finding a skilled workforce is getting a financial boost. The Innovation Campus in Lee’s Summit, which was initiated by the Lee’s Summit School District, the University of Central Missouri, the Metropolitan Community College system and business partners, recently received a $1 million Community Development Block Grant. Gov. Jay Nixon also announced that $8 million in additional support is being provided for similar projects across the state. The grant application was submitted by UCM and the Johnson County Economic

‘Innovation campuses create a direct connection for Missouri students between the skills they learn in the classroom and the skills that are in demand today.’ | Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon Development Corporation in Warrensburg, Mo. Eight other grants were awarded in Missouri. “Innovation campuses create a direct connection for Missouri students between the skills they learn in the classroom and the skills that are in demand today,” Nixon said about the block grant. “Not only will students be trained for solid careers in growing industries, they’ll be able to earn those degrees in less time with lower debt as a result.” In Lee’s Summit, students enroll in the Innovation Campus at the beginning of their junior year of high

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Eastern Jackson County Business Review

school with a goal of completing their bachelor’s degree within the next four years. At the same time, they are earning course credit from Metropolitan Community College and UCM. By taking the dual credit courses, students will earn an associate’s degree from MCC by the time they graduate high school. MCCBlue River has a similar partnership with the Fort Osage School District called the Trailblazer Academy. Currently, there are 22 students in the first year of the Innovation Campus program. Elaine Metcalf, director of Summit Technology, said students were chosen through enrollment for the Information Technology program at Summit Tech. Those students who had at least a 3.0 grade point average and a 90 percent attendance rate were invited to attend an informational meeting. Students who returned a final set of paperwork were admitted into the program. “It’s awesome because many of these parents had no idea how they were going to pay for college,” she said. “It is pretty darn exciting that this is going to change the lives of a lot of our students.” In addition to an intense classroom program that begins at the Summit Technology Academy, students will participate in apprenticeships, internships and on-thejob education in cooperation with partnering corporations. Although the business partnership aspect of the program is still in its infancy, three large companies have already signed on to the Innovation Campus concept – Cerner, DST and St. Luke’s Hospital. Companies that

enter into participation agreements with the Innovation Campus will receive grant funds and help to underwrite the cost of training provided by the Innovation Campus. Metcalf said the grant the Innovation Campus received will go directly to businesses that partner with the program. Instead of paying the students during the training and internships, the funds will go into an “educational account,” which can then be used to offset college tuition. “This grant makes a huge difference when it comes to getting business to come to the table,” she said. “They will be contributing to the educational accounts of these students who will be working on site for the companies. For us, this is helping to create opportunities for students to go to college.” The goal of this Innovation Campus program is to help bridge the gap between college graduates of the demands of a skilled workforce. Metcalf said in the future, other programs will be added to the Innovation Campus concept including engineering technology and advanced manufacturing. Those careers that are deemed “high demand” or that are in need of skilled workers will be the top priority. “We will use workforce statistics to determine what career fields are most in demand in the metro area. As the program grows, we will continue to add fields for our students,” she said. “The goal is to give these students an edge as they are starting college. They will get an even bigger edge when the graduate and have a job.” Fall 2012


BUILDING BUSINESS

ReStore location opens in Independence By Jeff Fox jeff.fox@examiner.net

The new ReStore near the Independence Square is more than just a retailer Eastern Jackson County hasn’t seen until now, says the head of the Truman Heritage Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. It’s a new wrinkle in Eastern Jackson’s County’s economic development. “I know just in our immediate vicinity it’s going to drive economic growth,” said Executive Director Pat Turner. The store had a soft opening in mid-August and had its grand opening on Sept. 5. It’s the fifth ReStore in the metro area but the first in Eastern Jackson County. The stores sell home furnishings, paint, construction materials and other items – the inventory is constantly changing – that are either salvaged from demolition or remodeling projects or are excess commodities donated by builders, contractors and others. Some of the merchandise is new and still in the original box but discontinued by a major retailer.

More info: The ReStore is at 505 N. Dodgion St., (north and up the hill from the Sermon Center at Noland and Truman roads), Independence. Call the Truman Heritage chapter of Habitat for Humanity, 816-461-6551, for more information.

This is in line with Habitat for Humanity’s national model for how local chapters operate, and the store is meant to advance the chapter’s mission in several ways: It makes money for the chapter, it serves people in the community – especially those of limited means – by offering low prices, it keeps tons of materials out of landfills, and it helps raise Habitat’s local profile. “I’m hoping it will create more awareness ... of what Habitat is doing with housing in the community,” Turner said. In 2010, Truman Heritage built four homes in Independence – generally of 900 to 1,200 square feet – and bumped that up to eight in 2011. This year it’s aiming for 10. Then the group plans to extend those efforts to other Eastern Jackson County cities, and it’s offering programs such as weatherization of existing homes. The group has been focused on Independence because that’s where federal grant money has pointed it, but Turner says one overall aim is to become more selfsufficient in an era of increasingly constrained government resources. The ReStore, officials hope, will cover the group’s administrative costs and bring in enough to build a couple of home every year. “We are building sustainability via the ReStore,” Turner said. The store is at 505 N. Dodgion St., northwest Truman and Noland roads, and just a couple of blocks from the Square. Already, Turner said, people dropping off donations have commented on a well-documented Square phenomenon: The

EJC Business Review/KARL ZINKE

ReStore at 505 N. Dodgion St. in Independence sells items homeowners and remodelers need, from donated and excess products, with the proceeds benefiting the Truman Heritage chapter of Habitat for Humanity.

shops and restaurants that have sprung up in the last 10 to 15 years are quite an attraction but people don’t know they’re there. Drawing more to the area helps, Turner said. The Truman Heritage chapter has been planning the Restore and other new efforts for years. “You can’t jump in,” Turner said. “You have to have a plan.” For example, it eventually plans to have its own team of people to salvage items from demolition or

renovation projects. Still, it’s important for the group not to exceed it capacity. “It is part of the ReStore model, and where we are is in the infancy of the model. ... And for the community is it going to be job creation,” Turner said. Everything the chapter does is about advancing its mission – providing affordable housing. “So we have to link that constantly to our mission,” she said.

‘I’m hoping it will create more awareness .... of what Habitat is doing with housing in the community.’ | Pat Turner

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

13


BUILDING BUSINESS

Children’s Mercy East brings child-centered care to this area

Q/A

with

Dr. Charles RoBerts

By Kelly Evenson kelly.evenson@examiner.net

After breaking ground in June 2011, Children’s Mercy East is on the brink of opening. The hospital, which is on the southeast corner of Interstate 70 and Little Blue Parkway in the Trinity Woods development, will serve children who not only live in Eastern Jackson County, but the surrounding region. Among the variety of services the hospital will provide is a pediatric urgent care center, specialty clinics, laboratory space and radiolo-

14

gy services. The clinics will include cardiology; ear, nose and throat; endocrinology; gastroenterology; hearing and speech; neurology and orthopedics. “It was really important to us to be able to provide pediatric urgent care here, where 11 percent of our total Emergency Room and Urgent Care visits (at the main Children’s Mercy location in Kansas City) were patients from Eastern Jackson County last year,” said Dr. Charles Roberts, Executive Medical Director over Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics. “The Edward G. and Kathryn E. Mader Urgent Care Center will be open seven days a week, from noon to 10 p.m. and staffed by board-certified pediatricians. Urgent care is for non-life-threatening injuries or illnesses, such as allergic reactions, minor cuts and burns, sore throats, stomach aches, eye and ear infections.” Dr. Roberts answered several questions about what led him to the medical field and what CMH-East will offer when it opens this fall.

Why did you enter the medical field? By the time I was 12 I knew I wanted to be a pediatrician. That decision was most influenced by my mom’s love of children and by my own childhood physician. What are you looking forward to most when this facility opens this fall? Improved access to pedi-

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

What makes this facility unique? How is it different from other medical facilities? What do you see as the Children’s Mercy East really comgreatest health concern afpletes the plan to have a presence in fecting children? How can all corners of the Kansas City metparents avoid these issues? ro area. Children’s Mercy East joins In my opinion, for the vast maChildren’s Mercy South (Overland jority of children the greatest health Park, Kan.), Children’s Mercy West/ concerns are preventing childhood The Cordell Meeks Clinic (Kaninfections through immunizations, sas City, Kan.) and Children’s Mercy minimizing injuries using proven in- Northland (Kansas City), along with jury prevention strategies and dethe Hospital Hill location and Chilcreasing childhood obesity. For the dren’s Mercy Clinics on Broadway minority of children who do develop (near downtown). serious acute or chronic illnesses, it This facility is important because is access to quality coordinated priit’s dedicated to serving children. mary and pediatric specialty care. You’ll see that from the minute you walk in. Thanks to our artist-in-resHow will having a faciliidence, Scribe (scribeswalk.com/), ty such as CMH-East benefit the first floor looks like you’re under the families and residents of the sea, and then the third floor is Eastern Jackson County? painted as if you’re a bird in the sky. We are so excited to finally be able That’s what the kids see. What parto offer our clinic services to the East- ents want to know is that the clinics ern Jackson County community. Last and services specialize only in their year, we saw nearly 23,000 patients children, from the child-size, low-rafrom this area. diation radiology equipment to pediThis represents about 12 percent atric cardiologists. It’s important to of all Children’s Mercy outpatient vis- understand that children aren’t just its, where families had to come all small adults, their needs are unique. the way downtown for their clinic visits. Now they can drive just down Where do you see CMH-East the road, which makes life a lot easier heading in the future? We certainly plan to offer on our families. more specialty clinics in the Equally important, as the only refuture as demand and needs grow. gional children’s hospital, Children’s This campus is also scheduled to inMercy is much more accessible to clude a second building that will inthose rural western and central Misclude, among other things, samesouri communities, most of which day surgery. We know the need is don’t have pediatricians and pediatthere, so it is up to us to be very diliric subspecialists. gent and strategic in prioritizing additional clinics and services. atric specialty and urgent care for children and families in Eastern Jackson County.

Fall 2012


MISSOURI MAVERICKS

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Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Fall 2012


THE ROAD AHEAD

Regional transit plan touts a business-friendly mission By Jeff Fox jeff.fox@examiner.net

A

proposed commuter rail system would change the way the Kansas City area develops and does business, proponents say – and Lee’s Summit, Independence and Blue Springs would be the first beneficiaries. “It’s bigger than any company we could land in the area,” says Brien Starner, president of the Blue Springs Economic Development Corp. Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders outlined his plan three years ago, and the first part it is expected to go to county voters in 2013, perhaps in April. Trains could be rolling sometime in 2015. A voter-approved sales tax would pay for the first two lines: one from downtown Kansas City to Independence, Blue Springs, Grain Valley and Oak Grove, and one from downtown to Raytown and Lee’s Summit. Eventually the other four lines would run to Grandview, Kansas City International Airport, and Liberty and Kearney, and the Legends area with Kansas Speedway and CommunityAmerica Ballpark. Those six spokes would meet at Union Station, which is at the south end of a two-mile streetcar line Kansas City plans to build north to the River Market. (Officials have also discussed running the first two lines to the River Market instead, but Sanders says talks with the railroads about getting to Union Station – his clear preference – are going well.) Officials have emphasized from the outset that the focus is not getting to the game or moving tourists around. It’s about moving people to and from work. Jim Terry, the principal at TranSystems in Kansas City who designed the plan – Kansas City Regional Rapid Rail – took care to connect major employment centers, noting for ex-

ample than lots of Independence residents work at GM’s Fairfax plant in Kansas and could benefit from a system offering a quick, dependable commute. “It’s about all that. ... But it’s about workforce development,” says Robbie Makinen, the county’s director of economic development. That aspect – serving employers by serving their employees – will be a major part of the promotion of the plan. “You may not ride it, but you depend on people every day who do,” Makinen says. His boss, Sanders, sees commuter rail as transformational. “Think about the way this changes the way this city thinks, this city moves, this city operates in the years ahead,” he says. “Green” transit, he argues, is crucial to attract what he calls “young intellectual capital” – the bright young people key to an area’s economic vitality, perhaps the entrepreneur who will build the next Hallmark or H&R Block. Starner agrees, adding that it sends a powerful message about the area’s willingness to do something progressive. “I think it’s ... the biggest thing that we could have for

our community as a whole,” he said. “I think it’s as big or bigger than having the airport.” Such a system, he said, will reshape the area’s dialogue and begin to get it past divisions created by the state line and Missouri river. “There’s really not one thing that brings the metro together,” he said. Looking down the road a decade or so, Starner hopes to see Missouri Innovation Park in Blue Springs filling up with high-tech companies in life sciences and renewable energy. That potentially means a new dynamic for the city, using commuter rail to attract the generally younger people drawn to the lofts and nightlife of downtown but also the high-paying jobs at a place like the Innovation Park – quite a change for Blue Springs, where 80 to 85 percent of workers, Starner says, commute elsewhere. Now commuters would be coming in. “This (commuter rail) opens new conversations that we can’t have without it,” Starner says.

‘Level the playing field’ Three of those six lines would be wholly in Jackson County, and that’s where Sanders’s team has focused its efforts for more than a year – first on the Independence/Blue Springs line and the Lee’s Summit line and then, on a somewhat slower track, the Grandview line. Blue Springs Mayor Carson Ross can’t wait. “You’re going to see a revitalization of downtown Blue Springs,” he says. Makinen sees that and more. “It starts to level the playing field between us and Kansas,” he says, referring to the ongoing struggle between cities on both sides of the state line for companies and jobs. Only one of the six KCRRR lines, the one to the Legends, runs to Kansas. Johnson County, for a variety of reasons, isn’t in the plan, though Sanders has conContinued on Page 18

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

17


THE ROAD AHEAD

Officials say $1 invested in rail could be $4 in economy Continued from Page 17

I-70 transi

t corridor

n ro ido nd orr sla il c k I Ra Roc old

sistently said that when the system is up and running, the benefits will be clear and Johnson County will be eager to get onboard. Sanders and other advocates emphasize that, nationwide, such systems have consistently brought a renewal of economic development. Eastern Jackson County mayors have supported the idea because, as Ross says, “it’s also going to spur economic development in my city.” It’s also a path to more economic development without more suburban sprawl. “It facilitates efficient growth from within,” says Starner. Makinen stresses the often-used figure that every dollar invested in rail transit leads to $4 in economic development. The Sanders plan initially came in at just more than $1 billion for all six lines. That’s also with a far lower cost per mile than most major city transit plans, and lower than building a light rail system, because it would use existing tracks. (Commuter rail trains have a more heavyduty design than light rail, having to conform to the standards of major railroads.) The Independence/Blue Springs route would run on a lightly used Kansas City Southern line, and the Lee’s Summit route would put an old Rock Island line back into service. Having those routes in place saves money and saves years of environmental review. Even the rails on the old Rock Island line would be pulled out, X-rayed to

Envisioned rail route

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make sure they’re still in good shape and put back into use. That kind of approach, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood told The Examiner, would be a major advantage in winning federal funding. Officials also anticipate spinoff services to the benefit of businesses. For example, one of the three planned stops in Independence is near Centerpoint Medical Center. The city might build a bus loop tying into that, taking people to Centerpoint and the soon-to-open Children’s Mercy East Hospital as well as the Independence Events Center and shopping areas such as Bass Pro Shops and Independence Center. Such a system also makes it easier to get a fan in Gladstone or Grandview to a Mavericks game at the Events Center, proponents argue. Eventually, Sanders said, he’s confident the entire six spokes will be built. Terry once said that would mean a ride from the Blue Springs to the terminal of your choice at KCI – in 40 minutes and for about $3.50. For now, the focus is on the first two lines. “Things are moving along very, very well,” Sanders said.

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

THE DATA $264,864 Average sales price of a new home in Jackson County in August, down 4.4 percent from August 2011. The metro average was $311,262. The three metro area counties with the highest averages were Cass County ($388,898), Johnson County ($371,111) and Platte County ($273,575). The average sales price of an existing home in Jackson County was $121,892 up 14.8 percent in a year. That’s the next-to-lowest among metro counties. Source: Kansas City Regional Association of Realtors and Heartland Multiple Listing Service

6.6 percent Missouri’s growth in general revenues in July and August, the first two months of fiscal year 2013 for the state. General revenues rose to $1.16 billion. For fiscal year 2012, which ended June 30, general revenues rose 3.2 percent compared with 2011. General revenues rose to $7.34 billion. Sales taxes were up 3.5 percent, to $1.87 billion. The state’s overall budget is approximately $23 billion, with the rest coming from the federal government and from fees and related sources. Source: Missouri Office of Administration

0 percent Missouri’s 2011 growth in gross domestic product. That ties Missouri with Montana for 44th in GDP growth among the states. (Several states actually lost ground.) The seven Plains states together – Missouri and Kansas north to Minnesota and North Dakota – showed growth of 1 percent overall, a number aided by North Dakota’s oil-driven 7.6 percent gain, the best in the county. Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

22 Missouri’s ranking among the 50 states’ economies in June, according to BMO Capital Markets, which noted the state’s unemployment rate of 7.3 percent in April, the lowest since the end of 2008. Exports from the state, mostly agriculture related, jumped 15.4 percent in the first quarter. BMO suggests Missouri’s gross state product will grow about 1.5 percent this year. Source: BMO Capital Markets

296,000 Number of real estate parcels in Jackson County Source: Jackson County Assessment Departments

Fall 2012


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Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

19


RIBBON CUTTINGS

Hill Pro-Motion Physical Therapy, May 16

Peachwave, May 23

Hillcrest Thrift Store, May 2

Lee’s Summit Chamber Ribbon Cuttings Green Stem LLC, May 8

Hungry Sub, May 17

Americare at SummitView Terrace, July 11

Midwest Vacuums, June 27

Primary Care Plus/Sports Med Plus, May 31

20

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Chartroose Caboose, June 6

Tamashii Black Belt Academy, May 15

Trinity Tack and Feed, July 17

Benton House of Lee’ Summit, May 3

Papa John’s, July 12

Medicine Shoppe, June 8 Fall 2012


RIBBON CUTTINGS

Welcome to new businesses Blue Springs Chamber Ribbon Cuttings

Red Button Clothing Exchange, June 7

Bank Midwest

Share your ribbon cutting photos with Examiner readers. Email your ribboncutting photos to business writer Jeff Fox at jeff.fox@examiner.net U.S. Munitions Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

21


AFFORDABLE CARE ACT

Business owners anxious over health law By Kelly Evenson kelly.evenson@examiner.net

Although the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will not be fully implemented until 2014, it is creating discussion among business owners. Some say it is their job to provide health care for their employees, even if it means hurting their bottom line. Others say it will do more harm than good, potentially forcing small businesses to close because of the cost of providing insurance. “I don’t think in theory or in practice, it is a bad idea to do what we can to ensure more people have health care. I think fundamentally, that is a good idea,” said Fort Osage Superintendent Mark Enderle. “But in practice, it is going to be a very, very, very costly item.” The bill, signed into law by President Barack Obama two years ago, begins the push to give more people health insurance. The U.S. Supreme Court mostly upheld the act in June, saying that despite arguments in opposition, the act – particularly the individual mandate to have health insurance – is constitutional. The intention is to make it easier and more affordable for people without employer-offered health care to purchase insurance in the marketplace. The act requires everyone by 2014 to have health insurance. The thought is that having more people paying into the insurance system will keep costs down. It was estimated that in 2010 in Missouri, 14 percent of people had no health insurance and little access to affordable health care, according to statehealthfacts.org. If individuals do not have insurance by 2014, they will be required to pay a fee. In addition, large employers who do not provide minimal coverage will have to pay a fee. T.J. Nigro, owner of Village Gardens in Blue Springs, said he is concerned about what this means for the future of small businesses. While he is not required to provide health insurance at this time, he said that could change in the future. Only businesses with 50 or more employees will be required to provide health insurance. Nigro has only about 20 employees, although that fluctuates depending on the time of year.

22

“I would really like to provide health insurance for my employees. But economically, I can’t make it work. I can’t charge my customers enough to do it,” he said. “I think something like this will take a lot of small, retail businesses and make them unviable. They are already fighting with big box retailers, and by forcing them to offer health insurance, they will have to raise their prices to adjust. It is going to tilt the playing field even more.” Conversely, Rob Andrew, owner of MAC Construction in Blue Springs, said he is not opposed to the requirements that employers begin offering health care benefits. In fact, he said as an employer, it is his responsibility to provide a livable wage as well as to keep his employees healthy. That means offering insurance coverage. “Yes it will cost me and my business as well as other businesses to provide health care (benefits), but I think it is a necessity,” he said. “People should not want for access to health care. It is awful that some people feel like they can’t afford health care. They don’t get preventative care, and then have to go to the emergency room when they are too sick to function. By that time, they are usually seriously ill and fear they will go bankrupt from the bill.” A major portion of the law took effect Aug. 1 offering a variety of free, preventive services to women. This includes wellwoman visits, Human papillomavirus (HPV) Virus testing for women who are 30 or older, HIV screenings and counseling, gestational diabetes screenings, domestic and interpersonal violence screenings and counseling, mammograms, contraception and breast-feeding support and supplies. Insurance companies, in general, will be required to offer these services without a copay, co-insurance or out-of-pocket expense. The only exceptions are group health plans that have been given grandfather status and certain nonprofit, religious organizations, such as churches and schools. Other covered preventative care services that are included in the new law include screenings for blood pressure and cholesterol, colonoscopies, osteoporosis screenings and vaccinations for both children and adults. By the time the law is fully implemented, health insurance companies will no longer be able to turn away those with pre-existing conditions, and insur-

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

‘I think fundamentally, that is a good idea. But in practice, it is going to be a very, very, very costly item.’ | Fort Osage School Superintendent Mark Enderle ance companies will be prohibited from dropping a person’s coverage because of a medical condition or serious illness. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the addition of free, preventative services will allow people to make decisions regarding their own health care that will keep them healthy. This will also help individuals and their families avoid expensive medical bills further down the road. A provision that was put into place in 2010 allows dependents to be covered on their parents insurance up to the age of 26. The federal government is also providing small business tax credits and grants for small businesses that establish wellness programs and for businesses with fewer than 25 employees who choose to provide health coverage. The Fort Osage School District has about 750 employees. Currently, approximately 600 employees and family members are on the district’s health insurance plans. Enderle said when the 2014 mandate hits, the district will be required to add between 120 to 130 new employees to the insurance plans – at a projected cost of more than $800,000. “It seems unlikely that we will see an increase in revenue from the local, state or federal level that will help to offset that cost,” he said. “The greatest possibility we have is finding money within the existing budget. It could mean more cuts. It could mean the board decides to spend down the districts (fund) balances. Or, it could mean a combination of the two.” Enderle admits that when he came to the district four years ago, he was surprised by the number of employees who did not have health insurance. “It was explained to me that in past

salary discussions, in lieu of health insurance, the support staff preferred additional salary enhancements. That is where the emphasis was placed. Given the particulars of the Affordable Healthcare Act, that will not longer be an option,” he said. “It will be a significant amount of money to us (to add employees to the district’s health insurance).” While the new preventative services requirements went into effect Aug. 1, because most health care plans operate on a calendar year, so they will not actually go into affect for many Americans until Jan. 1, 2013. Andrew said up until 18 months ago, health insurance was a benefit that he offered to all of his employees, which fluctuates between 20 and 30. However, like many businesses, the downturn in the economy hit him hard, and he was forced to drop coverage on not only his employees, but on himself. But the Affordable Care Act, Andrew said, will give him the opportunity to once again offer insurance coverage. The Affordable Insurance Exchanges, which are part of the new law, will begin in 2014. These state-based exchanges will allow individuals as well as small businesses to compare health plans and prices, and also get answers to questions and find out if they are eligible for tax credits for private insurance programs. Businesses and individuals can then enroll in a health plan that fits their needs. According to healthcare.gov, the exchanges will offer benefits to both the individual family and to businesses. For individuals, the exchange will serve as a “one stop shop” where individuals can enroll in either private or public insurance plans. For businesses, the exchanges will offer a level playing field, offering better choices in plans and reasonable insurance costs. Andrew said he will probably start by talking to local insurance companies about rates and plans, but if prices are not competitive, he will turn to the exchange. “The only place that the law really allows for competition is through the insurance exchanges,” he said. “Insurance providers have to advertise their rates and describe their plans. I think that will be the most competitive way to purchase insurance.”

Fall 2012


HEALTH CARE LEADERS

Q/A

with

annette small & Carolyn Caldwell

By Kelly Evenson kelly.evenson@examiner.net

Annette Small is the chief executive officer for St. Mary’s Medical Center and Carolyn Caldwell was the chief executive officer for Centerpoint Medical Center in Independence. Her last day at Centerpoint was Sept. 30. Small says her primary responsibility is to make sure patients receive

the highest quality of care possible. She also partners with the physicians, staff and volunteers at St. Mary’s Medical Center as well as with community and business leaders to meet the health care needs of the residents in Eastern Jackson County. Caldwell says she was responsible for all administrative and regulatory responsibilities of the 221-bed acute care hospital. This includes a Level II Trauma Center, more than 1,200 employees and more than 420 physicians. Why did you initially want to enter the medical field? Small: My dad might have influenced that decision. He worked in the pharmaceutical industry when I was growing up. When I was 14, I worked as a candy striper, and I absolutely fell in love with nursing. I later became a Certified Nurse Assistant in a skilled nursing facility and just had so much fun caring for the residents. I loved listening to their stories and providing the respect and attention they deserved. Caldwell: I’ve always had a passion for science, which led to me to the health care field. How do you balance work and family obligations? Small: That is a challenge, not just for me, but for working mothers everywhere. I guess the key is flexibility. Sometimes things come up, either with your family or with your work, that will move one to the forefront. I think the key is not letting one area of your life take over. I am fortunate to have very understanding families – both at home and at work. It also helps to keep a sense of humor. Caldwell: I’m very fortunate that my husband has always supported me and provided that much needed balance when our kids were younger.

How have you worked to make your hospital the No. 1 choice for your patients? Caldwell: Creating a culture of engaged employees and physicians that are committed to providing quality health care in a compassionate environment has led to Centerpoint Medical Center becoming a market leader. Strategically exploring and addressing the growing health care needs of the community and responding by adding additional providers and services has enhanced health care in Eastern Jackson County. Small: Patient safety is our No. 1 priority – it is something we work on every day. I think we’ve built a reputation for providing safe, compassionate care. And, we have to provide the services residents need. We’ve invested a lot into developing our cardiac program, stroke program our Joint and Spine Institute and Breast Center. We opened the first birthing center in the state of Missouri, but we don’t rest. We continue to look for ways to improve care. And we have expanded services to meet the needs of our community. What new programs or services has the hospital added in the past few years to make it a desirable choice for a medical facility? Small: Keeping patient safety always foremost in our strategic planning, we seek out those accreditations that help us improve. In the past year, St. Mary’s earned Chest Pain Accreditation, and the Breast Center was named a Center of Excellence. Going through the accreditation forces organizations to examine their processes and improve patient care. I believe we have a responsibility to care for the health of our whole community and obesity continues to be a major health threat. St. Mary’s recently began providing Bariatric Services to help care for those who

are severely obese. Caldwell: Opening the region’s first Senior Emergency Department in order to better care for the growing number of seniors in our community; the only Maternal Fetal Medicine provider in Eastern Jackson County; 3T MRI imaging technology; expanded surgical and cardiology services; Urgent Care Center in Blue Springs; 271 new physicians in four years and a Sports Medicine program including a concussion management program. Where to you see St. Mary’s and Centerpoint heading in the future? Caldwell: As a designation and regional referral facility for the greater Kansas City region. Small: St. Mary’s Medical Center has a long tradition of providing compassionate care to the community. It started with The Franciscan Sisters of Mary opening St. Mary’s Hospital in Kansas City in 1909. I believe I have an obligation to carry on that tradition, despite the challenge changes in health care might bring. I anticipate St. Mary’s will continue to build niche programs to help address major health care concerns. In your opinion, what can people do to implement a healthier lifestyle? Caldwell: I think it is going to be important in the future that health care organizations work in conjunction with communities to promote healthy lifestyles by providing wellness programs. Small: In my opinion, I think we need to live more simply. Some people make a healthier lifestyle seem so complicated. I have become an advocate for eating clean – that means avoiding processed foods. Fruits and vegetables are perfect, just the way they are. Your heart can benefit from a simple 30-minute walk.

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

23


WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES

No glass ceilings around here about one other since the 1980s. They actually met when Beach left Sellers & Marquis Roofing and began working at Performance Roof Systems/Derbigum. sk Mary McNamara why her Independence McNamara joined Cornell in May 2006 when she company, Cornell Roofing and Sheet Metheard the owner was considering selling the compaal Company, is prospering in economicalny. To solidify a team, she asked Beach and Engelly challenging times and she doesn’t hesitate for a man, who had been working at Cornell since 1994, second. to join her. They bought the company in July 2007. “Our biggest accomplishment is that we’ve been They also attribute their success to adopting new able to survive in a bad economy,” McNamara emtechnologies such as blogging and conducting semiphasizes. “Why, because we’re good. It’s all about be- nars to promote their business. ing on a team and working well together. Everyone McNamara said they blog and maintain an up-toknows what they need to accomplish.” date website because young project managers like to As president/owner of Cornell, McNamara is the get their information from the Internet. “If I want leader of a team of three 50-something women who to get to a young project manager who doesn’t know have not only learned how to survive in the maleanything about us, you have to blog,” she said. dominated construction industry, but who have subEngelman said several customers have come to stantially increased the company’s business in the Cornell because of information on the website and blog. Since 2007, the company’s number of employees has grown from 33 to 45. They build 70 to 80 roofing jobs a year for local school districts and a wide range of businesses including the Ennovation Center, Independence; the Career and Technology Center at Fort Osage High School; the National Nuclear Security Administration, Belton; Bayer Corporation, Kansas City; and The women of Cornell Roofing & Sheet Metal Co., in front of one of several projects with general contractors including their trucks. They are, from left, Joyce Beach, executive vice presiJE Dunn, McCownGordon dent; Mary McNamara, president; and Cindy Engelman, secretary/ and Weitz. treasurer. | Photo by Irene Baltrusaitis That success is due in five years they have been at the helm. part, McNamara said, to the fact that as women they Executive Vice President/Owner Joyce Beach and are eligible for consideration when bids are let. Secretary-Treasurer/Owner Cindy Engelman round But, Cornell must still pay attention to traditional out the team. The three have a combined 60 years business concerns. Extra attention, Engelman said, in the roofing and sheet metal industry. has been given to safety training and equipment for McNamara started her roofing industry career in all employees. Another factor contributing to success 1988 as vice president at Performance Roof Systems, is better field supervision. Inc. (now Derbigum) in Kansas City. Beach began “Mary says our best asset are the men who work her roofing industry career in 1985 at Sellers & Mar- for Cornell,” Beach said. “Without them we won’t quis Roofing in Kansas City. As two of the few wom- have anything. en in the industry, McNamara and Beach had heard Community service has also become part of the By Irene Baltrusaitis Special to The Examiner

A

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Eastern Jackson County Business Review

culture at Cornell. McNamara said each of the women personally support causes in their communities. In addition, the company has made donations to Drumm Farm, the Northwest Community Development Center, Habitat for Humanity and others. “For the first six months after the Independence School District took over the schools in northwest Independence, we did not bill them for roof repairs made at those schools,” McNamara said. “The biggest challenge of being a woman in this industry is just that... being a woman in this industry,” Beach said. “The male idea of what should show up on the job site to look at a job is still a man. We hope that eventually there won’t be a consideration of the fact that the company is run by three strong, dedicated women.” “The team at Cornell has shown that while they may be viewed as a traditional blue collar type of company with non-traditional female ownership, they aren’t afraid to pursue new ideas and use 21st century technology to grow their business and increase their market share,” Tom Lesnak, Independence Economic Development president, said. “We’ve gone through the worst economic times ever, the worst banking times ever and now we’ve had a drought,” McNamara said. “It’s the fourth hottest summer in history and we’re busy.” “We decided early we were going to take the high road,” Engelman said. “That we would install a good product with good quality workmanship, and build a reputation of doing it right.” “Our main focus has been to make sure that if they are going to think about a good roofing contractor, they are going to think about Cornell Roofing,” McNamara said. “Eventually our work will speak for itself... we’re good at what we do,” McNamara added. “The one thing we want for the future is rain! Roofs won’t leak without rain!” Cornell, at 901 S. Northern Blvd., is a member of Independence Economic Development, Independence Chamber of Commerce, Blue Springs Chamber of Commerce, National Roofing Contractors Association, Midwest Roofing Contractors Association, National Association of Women in Construction, National Association of Women Business Owners, Women Construction Owners and Executives, Kansas City Roofing Contractors Association, Roofers Local 20, Sheet Metal Workers Local 2, Teamster Local 541 and Equipment Operators 101.

Fall 2012


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25


WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES

candid marketing makes major move By Jeff Fox jeff.fox@examiner.net

Submitted

Becky Freetly-Graber and Sara Freetly-Grubb of candid marketing and communications.

Let’s say you’re that certain business owner. Your main headaches are getting product out the door, keeping customers happy and making payroll. You’re working hard, with fewer people, like everyone else. You try to pay attention to the right trends, whatever they might be. And you can’t help that nagging worry. All anyone talks about is social media. It’s the way – the only way – to reach young people. It’s the next now thing, and it’s here. Hold on. The folks at candid marketing & communications in Lee’s Summit have heard that one. “If they just had a Facebook page, everything would be better,” says company Vice President Sara Freetly-Grubb. Not necessarily so. “Don’t just do it because everybody’s doing it,” she says. Candid pitches itself as a nontradition ad agency, a boutique marketing and communications company. The company started seven years ago and has powered its way to steady growth right through the Great Recession. “We’ve chosen not to participate in that,” says President Becky Freetly-Graber. That growth pushed FreetlyGraber and Freetly-Grubb to make a big decision for the business and

‘I believe to the core of my core: We do great work.’ | Becky Freetly-Graber, candid president

26

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

‘Everything we do for clients is in brand marketing.’ | Sara FreetlyGrubb, candid vice president earlier this year move to a larger space – at 400 S.W. Longview Blvd., Suite 200, near the community college – and leave downtown Lee’s Summit. “We love downtown Lee’s Summit. It was a great place for us to start,” Freetly-Grubb said. The two leaders – Freetly-Graber owns 51 percent of the company, Freetly-Grubb owns 49 percent – talk about “real roll-up-your sleeves, innovative marketing” including a lot of work in business-to-business efforts. The company works with economic development corporations on both sides of the state line as well as banks and retailers. “I believe to the core of my core: We do great work,” says FreetlyGraber. And it’s about focus. “Everything we do for clients is in brand marketing,” said FreetlyGrubb. The not-participating-in-therecession idea carries on, too. Despite worries about economic uncertainty, some of it related to this year’s elections – “I often think people use that as an excuse,” Freetly-Graber says – successful businesses are executing now and planning to grow and prosper in 2013 and beyond, the two owners say. The steady focus helps the company hang on to clients. “We still have clients who have been with us almost since day one,” said Freetly-Graber, “and have had the privilege of growing with them as they have grown with us.”

Fall 2012


FALL FESTIVALS

Chambers rely on festivals

Blue Springs Fall Fun Festival Sept. 14-16 was the 43rd annual Blue Springs Fall Fun Festival in downtown Blue Springs. The festival is a large, regional, community celebration that attracts more than 130,000 attendees each year to downtown Blue Springs. The festival is a free admission street festival, geared toward families, featuring a carnival midway, concerts, community performers, and more than 280 vendors that are a mix of market and commercial vendors, arts and crafts vendors, game vendors and plenty of tasty, traditional and not so traditional, festival food vendors. It’s a great time to shop the downtown Main Street merchants. The festival is also host to one of the largest parades in Eastern Jackson County. This year’s parade theme was “Peace, Love and Rock ‘N Roll.” Not only is the Fall Fun Festival a great community event, but it is the largest non-dues fundraiser for the Blue Springs Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber of Commerce is a 501-C-6, a not-for profit business organization. By doing non-dues fundraisers like the festival, we are able to keep members’ dues lower without impacting services. Hundreds of people volunteer not only for the chamber but for the many community organizations that have booths and consider this one of their major fundraisers for the year. For more information regarding the festival, purchasing booth spaces for next year or entering the parade contact the Blue Springs Chamber of Commerce at 816-229-8558 or visit www.bluespringsfallfestival.com.

Lee’s Summit Chamber Oktoberfest

Santa-Cali-Gon Days® The Independence Chamber of Commerce presented the 40th annual Santa-Cali-Gon Days® Friday, Aug. 31 through Monday, Sept. 3, on the historic Independence Square in Independence. The city of Independence, our longtime community partner, and the Missouri Lottery are our major sponsors for this year’s festival. For the past 40 years, the Independence Chamber of Commerce has played a predominant role in bringing Independence one of the largest Labor Day weekend celebrations in the nation. The festival celebrates Independence as the starting point of the three trails, the Santa Fe, California and Oregon Trail. During the 1800s, these trails provided a pathway to opportunity for those having the courage and fortitude to travel them. We celebrate that pioneer spirit by bringing people together for one weekend in September. The festival brings in tourists from throughout the United States and all over the world. More than 225,000 attend annually, generating retail sales in the city of Independence at an estimated $3 million. In addition, more than 100 local nonprofit organizations benefit from the festival.

This year’s Lee’s Summit Chamber Oktoberfest is set for Sept. 28 and 29 in the streets of Downtown Lee’s Summit. Features of the festival include the Biergarten (which includes German meals, bands and dancers), three stages, arts and crafts booths, free kids street, sports tent, carnival, baby and wiener dog contests and much more. For more details about Oktoberfest visit lsoktoberfest.com. Oktoberfest is an important event for the Lee’s Summit Chamber, and for the Lee’s Summit Community. As the largest fundraiser of the year for the chamber, Oktoberfest profits are applied to the chamber’s general operating budget, providing necessary funding for a multitude of events and opportunities for members throughout the year. The event also provides the community with free and safe entertainment, in addition to drawing people to our historic downtown area where many local merchants will see increased traffic and revenue throughout the festival weekend.

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Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

27


BY THE NUMBERS Permits issued to build single-family homes • Blue Springs – 38 in the first eight months of 2012, compared with 36 in the same period of 2011, a gain of 6 percent. • Lee’s Summit (including the Cass County portion of the city) – 170, compared with 102, an increase of 67 percent. • Independence – 48, compared with 98, a drop of 51 percent. • Eastern Jackson County – 317, compared wth 284, an increase of 11.6 percent. • Metro area (Jackson, Cass, Clay, Platte, Leavenworth, Wyandotte, Johnson and Miami counties) – 2,026, compared with 1,502, up 35 percent. Source: Home Builders Association of Greater Kansas City

Office space in Eastern Jackson County There are 683 office buildings in Lee’s Summit, Blue Springs and Independence, with a total of 7.87 million square feet, 14.3 percent of which is vacant as of July 20. The industry breaks down office space into three categories: Class A, the highest quality buildings in their market, usually newer and in better-looking buildings, generally with good locations and good access; Class B, generally a little older, but still well run and with good tenants; and Class C, older buildings (usually 20 years old or more), need extensive renovation and often technologically outdated. These have the lowest rental rates and take the longest to lease. • Independence – 3.1 million square feet overall, with nine Class A sites (340,901 square feet), 121 Class B sites (1.77 million square feet), 145 Class C sites (976,210 square feet) and an overall vacancy rate of 18 percent. • Blue Springs – 1.17 million square feet overall, with 52 Class B sites (650,784 million square feet), 89 Class C sites (504,782 square feet) and an overall vacancy rate of 9.1 percent. • Lee’s Summit – 3.5 million square feet overall, with four Class A sites (74,601 square feet), 184 Class B sites (3.13 million square feet), 71 Class C (343,515 square feet) and an overall vacancy rate of 12.8 percent. Source: Independence Economic Development

Commercial space in Eastern Jackson County • The region has one commercial space big enough to be defined as a regional center, the 1.12-millionsquare-foot Independence Center. • Four “power centers” (two in Independence, one each in Lee’s Summit and Blue Springs), which generally are anchored by warehouse clubs and large stores that are dominant in their categories. • 35 neighborhood centers (17 in Lee’s Summit, 11

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2012 top 10 metro cities in issuance of single-family home building permits, through JULY: 0 | |

50 | |

100 | |

200 | |

300 | |

400 |

1. Kansas City – 350

Source: Independence Economic Development

Top 10 occupations

2. Olathe – 249 3. Overland Park – 196 4. Lee’s Summit – 145 5. unincorp. Platte Co. – 90 6. Shawnee – 81 7. Lenexa – 61 8. Independence – 43 9. Blue Springs – 38 10. Leawood– 38 Source: Home Builders Association of Greater Kansas City

Area unemployment rates • Independence – 7.5 percent in July. (In June, it was 6.9 percent, the first time it’s been below 7 percent since November 2008.) July labor force: 58,904. Employed: 54,473. Unemployed: 4,431. • Blue Springs – 6.1 percent in July. (In June, it was 5.7 percent, the first time it’s been below 6 percent since December 2008.) July labor force: 29,196. Employed: 27,405. Unemployed: 1,791. • Lee’s Summit – 5.8 percent in July. Labor force: 48,816. Employed: 45,986. Unemployed: 2,830. • Jackson County – 8.3 percent in July. Labor force: 340,515. Employed: 312,345. Unemployed: 28,170. • Metro area – 6.8 percent in July. Labor force: 1.06 million. Employed: 981,546. Unemployed: 79,854. in Independence, seven in Blue Springs), which are generally anchored by a grocery store, such as the site with PriceChopper and several other stores on Noland Road near Interstate 70. • 20 community centers (14 in Independence, four in Blue Springs, two in Lee’s Summit), with discount department stores, home improvement and large speciality or discount apparel stores. An example would be Bolger Square in Independence. Standards set by the International Council of Shopping Centers. Source: Independence Economic Development

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

ing, 31 warehouse, 52 research and development and flex space, 4 other) with 7.25 million square feet of space, 6.3 percent of which (433,449 square feet) was available.

Business space in Eastern Jackson County • Blue Springs – 145 buildings (115 manufacturing, 17 warehouse, 12 research and development and flex space, 1 other) with 2.01 million square feet of space, 12.9 percent of which (258,008 square feet) was available as of July 20. • Independence – 213 buildings (149 manufacturing, 40 warehouse, 20 research and development and flex space, 4 other) with 15.89 million square feet of space, 7.3 percent of which (1.1 million square feet) was available. • Lee’s Summit – 318 buildings (231 manufactur-

by projected growth through 2018 in Jackson, Platte, Clay, Ray and Cass counties: 1. Medical scientists (except epidemiologists), 34.7 percent growth, 2008-18. 2. Environmental engineers, 31.9 percent. 3. Self-enrichment education teachers, 28.8 percent. 4. Environmental scientists and specialists, 28.2 percent 5. Veterinarians, 26.1 percent 6. Employment recruitment and placement specialists, 25.9 percent 7. Heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration mechanics, 24.3 percent 8. Medical equipment repairers, 22.1 percent 9. Cost estimators, 22.1 percent 10. Private detectives and investigators, 21.2 percent. Source: Missouri Economic Research and Information Center

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CHANGES Jackson County

Sales of commercial property Recorded July 3, Grantee: Dearborn Street Holdings LLC, 11301 Nall Ave., Leawood, Kan. $4 million, 26 properties generally south and west of Interstate 470 and Woods Chapel Road in Lee’s Summit, including 600 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, 690 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, 711 N.E. Lone Hill Drive, 721 N.E. Meadowview Drive, 780 N.E. Meadowview Drive, 3210 N.E. Carnegie Road, 3100 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3101 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3320 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3330 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3430 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3620 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3660 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3700 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 3301 N.E. Akin Drive, 3501 N.E. Akin Drive, 3620 N.E. Akin Drive, 3621 N.E. Akin Drive, 3700 N.E. Akin Drive.

Lee’s Summit

New businesses, May 1 through July 31 JCRM, Inc., 606 S.W. Third St., catering, 816-935-0791 The Dogg House, downtown Lee’s Summit, mobile food vendor, 816-215-8675 Amer Massage, 1332 N.E. Windsor Drive, massage therapy, 816-786-2345 Raintree Chiropractic, 931 S.W. Lemans Lane, chiropractic office, 816-623-3020 Mustard Seed Community Learning Environment, 9 S.E. Third St., Suite 109, education, 816-716-4907 Little Voices Pediatric Therapy, 226 S.E. Douglas St., Suite 205, speech therapy clinic, 816-392-4561 Bachler Chiropractic, 601-A N.W. O’Brien Road, chiropractor, 816-269-0251 Life Tree Rolfing & Massage, 410-C S.E. Third St., rolfing and massage, 913-481-3013 Body-n-Spa, 100 N.E. Tudor Road, Suite 106, massage therapy, 816-509-0190 Hair by Jen, 524 S.W. Third St., hair salon, 816-810-4843 The Haggerty Law Firm, 816 N.W. Park Lane, law office, 816-246-1113 Benton House of Lee’s Summit, 2160 S.E. Blue Parkway, assisted living community, 816-554-0101 The Cutting Corner, 524 S.W. Third St., hair salon, 816-554-9977 Pepper Jax Grill, 1720 N.W. Chipman Road, restaurant, 402-905-2702 King Building, Inc., 1550 S.W. Market St. No. 210, residential construction, 816-5542555 K Kwo Development, LLC, 1830 N.W. Chipman Road, retail sales, 913-579-6893 Impress Your World, Inc., 4120 N.E. Port Drive, Internet services, 816-213-5865 Sport Clips, 1041 N.E. Sam Walton Lane,

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men/boys haircuts, 816-525-5545 Pinnacle Investments, LLC, 401 S.E. Oldham Parkway, Internet sales, 816-213-3181 Xing Yu, Inc., 601 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, restaurant, 816-524-8188 BDC Inc., 1318 S.W. Market St., sales and service office Comforting Faith Counseling Services Inc., 306 S.E. Missouri 291, counseling therapy, 816-581-3730 ODO Management Group LLC, 923 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, construction management, 913-660-9581 Mrs. Golf, 625 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, retail golf apparel, 816-820-7337 Bluebird Network, LLC, 800 N.W. Chipman Road, telecommunications, 573777-4211 Atlas Holistic Health, LLC, 200 N.E. Chipman Road, chiropractic service, 816352-4851 First State Bank of St. Charles, 1639 N.E. Douglas St., bank/mortgage lender, 636-940-5555 Law Office of Jennifer J. Mickelson, 208 S.E. Third St., law firm, 816-554-7500 Highline Autosport, 501 S.E. Oldham Parkway, car dealership, 816-524-5480 Boulevard Bank Outdoor Amusement Division, 211 N.W. Executive Way, Suite C, equipment finance, 816-554-3863 Little Blue Farm, 1760 S.W. Jefferson St., construction storage/retail, 816-805-2244 Ulta Salon Cosmetics & Fragrance, 1664 N.W. Chipman Road, beauty retail/salon, 630-410-4814 Chick-fil-A, 690 N.W. Blue Parkway, restaurant, 816-246-2948 High Tech Tool LLC, 1216A S.E. Broadway, service-mold repair, 816-347-0739 Illume Med Spa, 817 N.E. Anderson Lane, medical spa, 816-214-5260 Once Upon A Child, 1131 N.E. Rice Road, kids clothing resale, 816-350-2064 Top Elite Financial, 4025 N.E. Lakewood Way, Suite 110, mortgage, 816-795-5656 Macek Surveying, LLC, 912 S.E. Sevebth Terrace, land surveying, 816-500-5066

Lee’s Summit

Address changes, May 1 through July 31 Candid, LLC, 400 S.W. Longview Blvd. Suite 200, marketing & communications, 816-765-3608 Dave Goerke & Associates, Inc., 1316 S.W. Market St., data center consulting/design, 913-859-0177 Union National Mortgage Co., 110 S.W. Second St., Suite A, B, C, mortgage lending, 816-256-5090 Lee’s Landing Properties, LLC, 410 S.E. Third St., office space, 816-718-6601

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Terracon Consultants, Inc., 1312 S.W. Market St., engineering consulting, 816525-6826 Hometown Mortgage Group, 555 N.W. Blue Parkway, Suite B, mortgage company, 816-525-7700 Plato’s Closet, 1170 N.E. Douglas St., retail used clothes, 816-554-6888 Hughes Organization LLC, 923 N.W. Woods Chapel Road, consulting firm, 913486-2524 Dr. Vinyl & Associates, LTD, 1350 S.E. Hamblen Road, training facility, 816-5256060 Julia E. Hampton, CPA, PC, 16 S.E. Third St., CPA accounting firm, 816-554-0394 Senior Helpers, 517 S.E. Second St. Suite B, health home care, 816-272-5741 Galaxy I Marketing, Inc., 1021 B N.E. Jib Court, satellite TV installation, 816-795-3304 Dana R. Arth, CPA, LLC, 1308 N.E. Windsor Drive, CPA Firm, 816-434-7310 Alexander & Julian Inc., 200 N.E. Missouri Road. Ste. 200, computer consulting, 816525-3548 Lee’s Summit Roofing, 115 S.E. Green St., roofing office, 816-554-8585 Jimmy Mac, LLC, 820 N.W. Commerce Drive, general contractor, 816-863-3276 The Promotional Pear, 400 S.W. Longview Blvd. Ste. 200, promotional products resale, 816-765-3608 Spectrum Consulting Group, LLC, 338 S.W. Main St., consulting services Pycior Co, LLC, 338 S.W. Main St., real estate/property management/construction, 816-554-0375 H&H Roofing, 1035 N.E. Jib Court, Ste. B, roofing contractor, 816-795-7700 Pit Stop Auto Detailing, 1000 S.E. Blue Parkway, detail business, 816-524-3442 The Cleaning Authority, 2 S.W. Second St., office/warehouse, 816-896-4648 Chartwell Realty LLC, 701 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, real estate, 816-877-8700 Ambassador Travel, 1217 N.E. Rice Road, travel agency, 816-554-2300 MC Contracting LLC, 923 N.E. Woods Chapel Road, No. 365, general contractor, 816-365-7834 Countryside Scapes LLC, 221 N.W. Chipman Road, landscaping, 816-525-1157 Onin Staffing, 208 N.W. McNary Court, staffing services, 816-272-3555

Name changes, May 1 through July 31 Summit Hill Insurance, LLC, 1550 S.W. Market St., No. 120, insurance agency, 816-554-7655 Dynasty Financial, Inc., 202 S.W. Market St., insurance agency, 816-525-0900 Truck Works, 93 S.E. Oldham Parkway, retail truck accessories, 816-525-7455 Bike Café KC, 1000 N.E. St. Luke’s Blvd., coffee service, 816-550-0639 Rejuvenate Mind-Body Wellness Center, 400 S.W. Longview Blvd., Ste. 160, chiropractic, 816-761-3944 Xtreme Family Fitness, 725 N.W. Commerce Drive, fitness center, 816-347-8008 Gomer’s Fine Wines & Spirits, 201 S.E. Missouri 291, retail liquor store, 816-5259137 Secured Title of Kansas City, 1465 N.E. Douglas St., escrow closing office, 816-5250050 Lytmos Group, Inc., 400 S.W. Longview Blvd. Suite 290, management consulting, 816-347-9449 Summit Ridge Credit Union, 3485 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, credit union, 816-2726160 America’s Best Value Inn & Suites, 1020 S.E. Blue Parkway, hotel, 816-554-7600 @Work Personnel Services, 630 S.E. Fourth St., general staffing/temp help, 816-272-5760

Lee’s Summit

Independence

Ownership changes, May 1 through July 31 Comfort Inn, 607 S.E. Oldham Parkway, motel, 816-524-8181 Smallcakes, 880 N.W. Blue Parkway, bakery, 816-769-5798 Mint Asian Café, 1209 N.E. Rice Road,

restaurant, 816-554-0678 Back to Basics Day Care, 809 S.E. Douglas St., day care, 816-509-1655 Get in Shape for Women, 407 S.W. Ward Road, retail fitness service, 704-365-6444 Bullseye Bar, 1169 N.E. Rice Road, sports bar, 816-525-4641 Flucke & Suchman DDS, 209 N.W. Blue Parkway, dental office, 816-525-7373 Arvest Bank, 1150 N.E. Douglas St., bank, 913-261-2265 @Work Personnel Services, 630 S.E. Fourth St., general staffing/temp help, 816-272-5760 Sakura, 860 N.W. Blue Parkway, restaurant, 816-525-2111 Osborne & Williams Orthodontics, 915 S.W. Lemans Lane, orthodontist office, 816-537-5665

Lee’s Summit

building permits June 11, commercial addition, 865 S. Vista Ave., Pyramid Network Services June 11, commercial retail store, 17005 East U.S. 24, Bradford Building Co. July 10, commercial remodel, 14520 E. 39th St., Adalink Tower Co.

July 10, commercial remodel, 1717 S. Dodgion Ave., Adalink Tower Co. July 19, commercial remodel, 18801 E. 39th St., Meyer Complete July 24, commercial remodel, 16701 East U.S. 40, KDC Wireless Inc. July 24, commercial remodel, 2341 S. Woodland Ave., KDC Wireless Inc. Aug. 8, commercial detached building, 18200 E. Missouri 78, Midwest Underground Technology Aug. 13, commercial retail store, 201 E. 23rd St., CSI Construction Aug. 17, commercial remodel, 19200 E. 39th St., Prosser Wilbert Construction Aug. 17, commercial remodel, 4328 S. Noland Road, Ganaway Contracting Co. Aug. 22, commercial remodel, 17610 E. 39th St., Whiting-Turner Contracting Co.

Independence new business licenses June 1, 311 N. Cogan Lane, Charlotte E. Hulmes (roofing and/or guttering) June 3, 1600 S. Noland Road, Pro Dent (auto detail, clean, dent removal) June 4, 220 W. Maple Ave., The Mermaid Merchant (jewelry design, repair) June 4, 9616 E. 25th Terrace S., Convenient Mobile Signing Services (notary services) June 4, 17705 E. 28th St. S., Masonry Transformations (masonry, stone setting, stucco) June 6, 201 N. Forest Ave., Cakeology LLC (retail bakery products) June 6, 17305 E. 50th St. Court, A+ Remodeling (construction specialty services) June 7, 701 E. 23rd St., The Dog Spa (pet grooming, classes) June 11, 1117 S. Fuller Ave., Grow Your Own Hydroponics (sales) June 11, 201 N. Forest Ave., Murbels Jelly (specialized retail food) June 11, 9323 E. 35th St, Wild Marsh Enterprises (photography, crafts) June 12, 205 S. Gary Court, Twisted Metal Mobile Welding (welding, steel fabrication) June 12, 1030 W. 23rd St., Allstate Fire Equipment (fire sprinklers/protection equipment) June 12, 615 N. Spring St., Sinamel Music (music consulting, publishing, marketing) June 12, 2400 S. Missouri 291, Dunkin’ Donuts (restaurant) June 12, 16523 East U.S. 40, Ecopro Cleaning (cleaning, maintenance) June 12, 4201 S. Noland Road, General Nutrition Corp (vitamin/nutritional/oils sales) June 12, 3712 S. Greenwich Lane, MT Contracting LLC (residential remodeling and repair) June 13, 534 N. Dover Drive, LED Lighting

Fall 2012


CHANGES Shop LLC (lighting sales and service) June 13, 10912 E. Winner Road, Effortless Fitness K.C. LLC (fitness/health facility) June 13, 16503 E. Third St, Parker Mead Press (book sales, retail or wholesale) June 13, 1204 N. Jones Road, Twin Peaks Roofing (roofing, guttering) June 13, 16501 E. 42nd St., J.R. Water Conditioning & Salt LLC (water treatment system/conditioning) June 14, 13710 E. 42nd St., America’s Best Value Inn (hotel/motel) June 18, 2866 S. Missouri 291, Beyond Vending (vending) June 18, 13665 E. 42nd Terrace S., The Hockey Center KC (training facility, service) June 19, 18777 E. 39th St. S., Stanley Hearing & Audiology (audiology and hearing aids) June 20, 4510 S. Noland Road, Game On (electronic sales, service, installation) June 20, 18925 E. Geronimo Court, Vision Stucco LLC (construction specialty services) June 20, 15200 E. 42nd St. S., JNI Software Inc. (computer software, consulting) June 20, 13901 E. 42nd Terrace S., On Second Though Consignment (retail consignment) June 21, 625 W. 23rd St., Divine By Design Salon, (hair/nail salon) June 22, 1942 S. Ash Ave., Critter Eliminator (wildlife trapping) June 22, 1202 W. 26th St., More Than Words (mail order, catalogue, pre-ordered items) June 27, 16650 East U.S. 40, Birdsong’s New & Vintage Shop (variety store) July 1, 3501 S. Sterling Ave., Rewired (band, musical entertainers) July 2, 4309 S. Grennwich Lane, LJS Stucco (construction specialty services) July 2, 1101 W. U.S. 24, A Little Bar-B-Q Joint (restaurant/bar) July 2, 1122 S. Emery St., High School Sports Programs (producer or publisher) July 5, 12500 East U.S. 40, JD’s Audio LLC (audio/video installation and servicing) July 6, 3617 S. Noland Court, Stylex Inc. (wholesale beauty supplies, equipment) July 6, 20120 E. Jackson Drive, Jimmie John’s (food sales – carryout and delivery) July 9, 18905 E. 12th St., Game Godz LLC (distribution) July 9, 21201 e. 35th Terrace Court, Shedigs It LLC (general contractor) June 9, 3617 S. Noland Court, Apollo Products (wholesale beauty supplies, equipment) July 10, 1600 S. Noland Road, Advanced Engineered Solutions (consulting engineer) July 16, 407 S. Liberty St., Precision

Electric Motor Sales (wholesale industrial machinery, equipment servicing) July 16, 1408 W. 28th St., Mama Cita (gift, novelty, specialty, herbs) July 16, 1515 W. 27th St., AAA Engineering Contracting (electrical contractor) July 17, 1839 S. Maywood Ave., Jeremy Hinken Home Repair (handyman services) July 17, 1625 Dickinson Road, A+ Janitorial Services (janitorial/cleaning supplies and equipment) July 17, 16500 East T.C. Lea Road, United Rec Ind Auto Salvage (salvage yard and auto repair) July 17, 15808 E. 35th St., KC Party Makers (party/event planner) July 17, 16709 E. 41st St., KC Public Health Media Network (advertising agency, promotions, consulting) July 18, 342 N. Jennings Road, Two Weeks From Everywhere Productions (video/ film taping, music production) July 18, 4200 S. Little Blue Parkway, HEARUSA (audiology, hearing aids) July 19, 106 W. Maple Ave, El Pico (restaurant) July 23, 19310 E. 50th Terrace, Protype Sports Academy (sports facility equipment assembly and installation) July 24, 1709 S. Northern Blvd., Gary the Artist (art/painting sales) July 24, 3617 S. Noland Court, Bevron Labs Inc. (wholesale beauty supplies and equipment) July 25, 18910 E. 39th St., Ross Dress for Less (retail clothing sales) July 25, 12203 E. 43rd St., The Solewtion (barber shop) July 26, 4401 S. Noland Road, It’s a Great Day LLC (therapy) July 26, 9154 East U.S. 24, S&S Auto (light auto repairs) July 29, 1306 N. Spring St., Color Rays Printing (painting and/or papering contractor) July 30, 505 N. Dodgion Ave., Truman Heritage Habitat ReStore (used merchandise sales) July 30, 813 N. Kiger Road, KC 8-Man Football (sports teams, promotions) July 30, 3107 S. Noland Road, Cable-Dahmer Buick GMC (new and used auto sales) July 30, 1330 S. Noland Road, Erica’s Beauty Studio (beauty and skin services and products) July 30, 17000 East U.S. 24, The Gold Rush Exchange (gold/precious metals, purchase only) July 31, 17906 East 24th Terrace Court, Zee & Company LLC (consulting) July 31, 11911 East U.S. 40, Cable-Dahmer Chevrolet (auto body shop and auto sales) Aug. 1, 3302 Blue Ridge Cut-off, Stadium

Cuts (barber shop) Aug. 2, 17304 E. Susquehanna Drive, Delta Infinity LLC (electrical/HVAC contractor) Aug. 6, 2501 N. Liberty St., Vance & Associates (construction specialty services) Aug. 6, 1416 N. Broadway St, City Box LLC (construction cleaning, debris removal) Aug. 7, 709 N. Frandsen Road, Ray’s Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning (carpet and upholstery cleaning) Aug. 8, 10800 E. Winner Road, Big Dick Services (auto repair, tire sales) Aug. 14, 714 N. Missouri 291, Shear “Purr” Fection Pet Spa (pet grooming, classes) Aug. 14, 2312 S. Missouri 291, ReMAX Premeir Properties LLC (real estate agents and managers) Aug. 15, 201 N. Forest Ave., Yana’s Specialty Foods LLC (specialized food retail) Aug. 16, 10725 E. Truman Road, Imperial Automotive (automotive repair and storage, personal use only) Aug. 16, 117 W. Ruby Ave., Wirt Floral Company Second Time (flower arrangements) Aug. 17, 728 S. Crane St., A Time to Travel, (travel agency) Aug. 17, 2854 S. Missouri 291, New School Tattoo (tattoo parlor) Aug. 17, 10237 East U.S. 24, It’s All Good Fairmount Family Thrift (used merchandise sales) Aug. 19, 18404 E. Arrowhead Lane, Lefman IT Services (computer repair, consulting) Aug. 20, 1414 S. Woodbury St, Blue Mills Plumbing & Wrecking (demolition, wrecking, excavation) Aug. 21, 3824 S. Delaware Ave, James Bradley (general contractor) Aug. 23, 2323 S. Sterling Ave., Advance Auto Parts (retail auto accessories)

Blue Springs

business construction licenses issued Category: Stores/customer service

June 18, Hy-Vee Weitz Construction, 629 S.W. Westbound U.S. 40, 3,105 square feet. Construction cost: $600,000. July 19, U.S. Beef Corporation (Arby’s), 1225 N.E. Coronado Drive (Adams Dairy Landing), 2,812 square feet. Construction cost: $375,000. Category: Other nonresidential

July 13, Solar Link US Inc, 509 N.W. Fifth St., 2,300 square feet. Construction cost: $119,875. Category: Commercial – add, alt. conv

June 1, Reubenite LLC, 850 N.W. Pink Hill Road, 2,500 square feet. Construction cost: $58,700.

June 8, Rose & Associates Engineering, 2103 N.W. Vesper St, 0 square feet. Construction cost: $211,000. June 13, 706 N.W. Missouri 7, Timothy D. Harris LLC, 1,027 square feet. Construction cost: $4,250. June 13, 804 N.W. Missouri 7, Timothy D. Harris LLC, 1,893 square feet. Construction cost: $7,500. June 20, 1401 S.W. Missouri 7, H2B Architects Inc., 1,848 square feet. Construction cost: $210,000. July 13, 100 S.E. Magellan Drive, Meyer Brothers Building Co., 4,906 square feet. Construction cost: $199,057. July 16, 301 S.W. Woods Chapel Road, First Methodist Church, 0 square feet. Construction cost: $2,000. July 23, 1236 N.W. Woods Chapel Road, LEH Consultants LLC, 3223 square feet. Construction cost: $45,000. July 23, 1322 N.W. Missouri 7, Cannestellas Builders Corp., 8,372 square feet. Construction cost: $71,000. July 25, 601 Westbound U.S. 40, Tholen Wolfe Contractors Inc., 8,372 square feet. Construction cost: $454,000. July 31, 1334 N.E. Coronado Drive, Soup Studios, 4,582 square feet. Construction cost: $148,915. July 31, 1342 N.E. Coronado Drive, Soup Studios, 7.128 square feet. Construction cost: $231,660.

Blue Springs

new-business licenses issued June 1, Sleep Disorders Institute, 104 Missouri 7 June 3, Pit Stop Auto Detailing, 3004 West U.S. 40 June 4, All About Home Services (carpet cleaning), 1005 18th St. June 4, Natural Path Massage LLC (massage therapy), 1900 South Outer Road. June 6, High School E-Sports League LLC (video movies), 5205 Havover Court. June 6, Home Effects LLC (construction), 309 22nd St. June 13, Impact Electrical Solutions (electrical contractor), 915 Richwood Drive June 14, American Family Insurance, 625 Mock Ave. June 14, Kristens In Home Child Learning (day care), 208 Shamrock Lane June 15, Screen King Creative LLC (screen printing), 1717 Cardinal Drive June 19, Blue Springs Lanes LLC, 1225 U.S. 40 June 22, Cold Fire Publishing LLC, 1479 Yankee Drive June 25, Midwest Comfort Homes LLC (electrical contractor), 401 Sherwood Drive.

June 26, H&R Construction, 5403 West U.S. 40 June 27, Subway (restaurant), 1112 Coronado Drive June 27, Full Effect Salon (hair solon), 1308 West U.S. 40 July 3, K Raye Mobile Printing LLC (clothing sales), 600 Mount Vernon Drive July 3, Maa Krupa Hospitality LLC (hotel), 701 South Outer Road July 5, Citywide Overhead Door of Kansas City (garage doors), 702 South Ave. July 11, Home Solutions Group LLC (construction), 800 Hillcrest Lane July 11, All American Fitness, 2410 South Outer Road July 17, Preferred Restoration & Cleaning (furniture repair), 327 12th St. July 23, Bank Midwest, 1100 South Outer Road July 23, Idol Nails & Spa, 1855 Missouri 7 July 23, Zubeck Flooring, 4513 Wallingford Drive July 24, A&M Contract Services Solutions (janitorial), 1851 Timbercreek Court Aug. 1, Mid-American Signal Inc. (equipment wholesaler), 2429 Mill St., Kansas City Aug. 1, Hollingsworth Wall and Flood (retailer), 2525 Locust, Davenport, Iowa Aug. 1, O’Herron Properties (real estate), 3634 Beechwood Drive, Lee’s Summit Aug. 1, Alpha Fire Protection, 1510 Geospace Drive, Independence Aug. 2, Bella Bronze Tanning (tanning salon), 1348 Missouri 7 Aug. 2, JCOR Inc. (general contractor), 10510 142nd St. Overland Park Aug. 6, Lawn Pro Sprinkler Systems, 1009 99th St., Kansas City Aug. 6, Mike Marra Enterprises (backflow testing), 5431 Marion Drive, Kansas City Aug. 6, Citadel Electruc Group (electrical contractor), 31710 Colbern Road, Oak Grove Aug. 8, Santa Fe Glass Co., 145 Lexington, Independence Aug. 9, Protocal Services, (electrical contractor), 309 Phillips St., Odessa Aug. 9, Williams Plumbing Sewer & Drain, 16400 Gudgell Road, Independence Aug. 9, LRG Consulting & Development (real estate), 1405 Cedar Drive, Grain Valley Aug. 10, William Clary (electrical contractor), 5201 Seventh St., Kansas City Aug. 10, Big Lots Stores (retailer), 601 Westbound U.S. 40 Aug. 10, Water-A-Way Guttering, 5900 Hidden Valley Drive, Lee’s Summit Aug. 10, Thomas Interests Inc. (general contractor), 10756 Liberty Ave., Beach Park, Ill. Aug. 15, Arning Companies (manufacturing), 201 Industrial Park, Cassville, Mo. Aug. 16, Shangri La Rehab and Living

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

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COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS AVAILABLE Crysler Building, 25,000 square feet, office, 12401 E. 43rd St. S. Sale price: $700,000. Lake City Business Center Building 65, 25,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution, southeast of Missouri 78 and Missouri 7. Lease price (per square foot): $3. Noland South, 22,523 square feet, retail, 4354-4486 S. Noland Road. Lease price (per square foot): $10 to $15. 10701 E. Winner Road, 20,530 square feet, office. Sale price: $499,000 Colonnade Shopping Center, 20,080 square feet, retail, 17601 East U.S. 40. Lease price (per square foot): $7 to $12. Independence Eastland Medical Building, 19,239 square feet, office, Available buildings, 10,000 or more square feet 1900 E. Eastland Center Court. Sale price: $5,150,000. As listed at www.inedc.biz 19201 E Valley View Parkway, 19,200 square feet, The Falls, 500,000 square feet, retail, 4300-18001 S. office. Sale price: $3,168,000. Lease price (per square Bass Pro Drive, retail. Lease price (per square foot): $25. foot): $22.50. ACIP, 287,475 square feet, warehouse and distribution, Terrace Office Building, 18,262 square feet, office, 604 W. Linden Ave. Lease price (per square foot): $1.50 18600 E. 37th Terrace S. Sale price: $995,000. to $2.50. Blue Ridge Annex, 17,052 square feet, retail, 12500 East Carefree Industrial Park, 228,500 square feet, industrial, U.S. 40. Lease price (per square foot): $7 to $12. 1600 N, Missouri 291. Lease price (per square foot): $2.35. 10529-10531 East U.S. 40, 17,000 square feet, retail. Space Center Underground, 226,000 square feet, Sale price: $529,000. industrial, 601 S. Missouri 291. Lease price (per square Fun Town Factory, 16,000 square feet, retail, 18106 E. foot): $2.00 to $2.15. Bundschu Road. Sale price: $799,000. Quality Inn and Motel 6, 200,000 square feet, 4142Noland Plaza Office Building, 16,000 square feet, of4200 S. Noland Road. Sale price: $6,450,000. fice, 3675 S. Noland Road. Lease price (per square foot): Truman Forest Professional Building, 143,000 $10 to $13.50. square feet, office, 1515 W. Truman Road. Lease price (per Scottsdale Center, 15,700 square feet, retail, 17000square foot): $5. 17020 East U.S. 40. Lease price (per square foot): $11.50. Truman Forest Professional Building, 143,000 square 4801 Cliff Ave, 15,660 square feet, office. Lease price feet, office, 1515 W. Truman Road. Sale price: $2,150,000. (per square foot): $16 to $19.95. Landmark Building, 68,000 square feet, office, 20201 23rd Street Station II, 15,563 square feet, retail, 2407E. Jackson Drive. Lease price (per square foot): $19.50. 2421 S. Missouri 291. Lease price (per square foot): $8. The Pavilions at Hartman Heritage Center, 65,733 14914 E. Truman Road, 15,000 square feet, industrial. square feet, retail, 19700-20140 E. Jackson Drive. Lease Lease price (per square foot): $4. Sale price: $544,000. price (per square foot): $12 to $21. 18100 E. Truman Road, 15,000 square feet, warehouse Noland Fashion Square, 62,397 square feet, retail, and distribution. Sale price: $260,000. 13500-13920 East U.S. 40. Lease price (per square foot): Southern Hills II, 15,000 square feet, office, 3737 S. $8 to $12. Elizabeth St. Sale price: $1,500,000. Marketplace Shopping Center, 50,393 square feet, Interstate Plaza II, 14,674 square feet, office, 13720 E. retail, 14100-14330 E. 42nd St. Lease price: Negotiable. 42nd Terrace S. Sale price: $800,000. Gaslight Square Shopping Center, 46,022 square feet, Blue Ridge Bank Financial Center, 14,619 square retail, 3411-3443 S. Noland Road. Lease price (per square feet, office, 4200 S. Little Blue Parkway. Lease price (per foot): $7 to $24.49. square foot): $20.50 to $21.50. Noland Plaza Office Building, 42,000 square feet, 12780 East U.S. 40, 14,400 square feet, warehouse and office, 3675 S. Noland Road. Sale Price: $1,500,000. distribution. Lease price (per square foot): $6. Sale price: 4801 Cliff Ave, 36,200 square feet, office. Sale price: $792,000. $3,600,000. North Noland Shops, 14,400 square feet, retail, 815 N. Lake City Business Center Building 10, 35,000 square Noland Road. Sale price: $1,200,000. feet, flex tech space, southest of Missouri 78 and Mis1318-1406 W. South Ave., 14,000 square feet, flex-tech souri 7. Lease price (per square foot): $5. space. Sale price: $149,000. Lake City Business Center Building 6, 33,000 square 14400 E. 42nd St. S., 13,540 square feet, office. Sale feet, flex tech space, southest of Missouri 78 and Misprice: negotiable. souri 7. Lease price (per square foot): $5. 3520 S. Noland Road, 13,500 square feet, retail. Lease Independence Plaza, 28,616 square feet, retail, price (per square foot): $12. 18675 E. 39th St. S. Sale price: $3,210,000. 4240 S. Lee’s Summit Road, 13,002 square feet, office. 10901 E. Winner Road, 28,562 square feet, office. Sale Lease price (per square foot): $15. Sale price: $1,100,000. price: $350,000. 17801 E. 39th St. S., 12,940 square feet, retail. Sale Williams Plaza Shopping Center, 26,003 square feet, price: $1,700,000. retail, 12501-12521 East U.S. 40. Lease price (per square Executive Suites Building, 12,730 square feet, office, foot): $8. 11000 East U.S. 40. Sale price: negotiable. The Falls is home to Bass Pro Shops.

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Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Trail Ridge Retail & Office Center, 12,617 square feet, retail, 15808-15904 E. 23rd St. Sale price: $1,400,000. Lease price (per square foot): $8. Independence Commons, 12,064 square feet, retail, 18800-19120 E. 39th St. Lease price: negotiable. 11320 E. Truman Road, 12,000 square feet, retail. Sale price: $190,000. 13801 E. 35th St., 12,000 square feet, retail. Sale price: $360,000. Lease price (per square foot): $1. 9903 East U.S. 40, 12,000 square feet, retail. Lease price (per square foot): $5. Sale price: $350,000. Hidden Creek Building 13, 11,538 square feet, office, 4231 S. Hocker Drive. Lease price (per square foot): $11.50. Sale price: $389,000. Hub Shopping Center, 11,400 square feet, retail, 1661116703 E. 23rd St. Lease price: negotiable. Terrace Office Building, 11,277 square feet, office, 18600 E. 37th Terrace. Lease price (per square foot): $14. 4541 South Noland Road, 11,000 square feet, retail. Lease price (per square foot): $10.50. Sale price: negotiable. Southern Hills II, 10,982 square feet, office, 3737 S. Elizabeth St. Lease price (per square foot): $15. 718 N. Missouri 291, 10,800 square feet, flex-tech space. Lease price (per square foot): $8. 14500 E. 42nd St., 10,736 square feet, retail. Lease price (per square foot): $16.50. 4230 S. Phelps Road, 10,298 square feet, office. Sale price: $375,000. 227-229 E. College St., 10,000 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $350,000. 301 N. Kiger Road, 10,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Sale price: $259,000. The Mall at Fall Creek in Blue Springs.

Blue Springs

available buildings, 10,000 or more square feet as listed at www.bluespringsedc.com, the website of the Blue Springs Economic Development Corp. The Mall at Fall Creek, 87,624 square feet, retail, 12091257 S. Missouri 7. Sale price: Negotiable. 705 S.W. 10th St., 78,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Lease price: $2.95 to $3.95 per square foot. 601-621 Southwest US 40, 69,000 square feet, retail. Lease price: $6 to $15 per square foot. 425 N.E. Mock Ave., 62,500 square feet. Sale price: $3,450,000. 4715 West U.S., 56,500 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $1,290,000. South Seven Plaza, 52,864 square feet, retail, 1501-1715 S. Missouri 7. Sale price: $4,900,000. 101 Main St., 50,000 square feet. Sale and lease prices unlisted. 2301 Southwest U.S. 40, 45,932 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Sale price: $2,500,000.

101-105 S.E. Magellan Drive, Building A, 45,560 square feet, flex tech space. Sale price: $3,900,000. 705 S. 10th St., 38,000 square feet. Sale price: $2.95 per square foot. R.D. Mize Road and Adams Dairy Parkway, 38,000 square feet, no sale price listed. 900 N.W. Hunter Drive, 37,583 square feet, commercial. Sale Price: 1,350,000. 1400 East U.S. 40, 33,276 square feet, commercial/industrial. Sale Price: 800,000. Southridge Shopping Center, 33,180 square feet, retail, 1803-1871 S.W. Missouri 7. Lease Price: $14 to $15 per square foot. 101-105 S.E. Magellan Drive, Building A, 30,600 square feet, flex-tech space. Lease Price: $6.45 per square foot. Richards at Duncan Road, 30,000 square feet, 1700 N. Missouri 7. No price listed. Blue Springs Xtreme Power Sports, 28,431 square feet, retail, 2501 N.W. South Outer Road. Sale Price: negotiable. Sunset Plaza, 23,240 square feet, retail, 746-802 Southwest U.S. 40. Lease price: $8 per square foot. Barett Park, 22,155 square feet, flex-tech space, 12021224 N.W. Knox St. Sale Price: $1,125,000. 801 N.W. St. Mary’s Drive, 21,933 square feet, office. Sale Price: $3,600,000. 2800 N.W. South Outer Road, 18,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Sale Price: $275,000. Lease Price: $4.50 per square foot. Palo Shopping Center, 18,000 square feet, commercial, 3100 S.W. Missouri 7. Lease Price: $14 per square foot. Country Club Shops, 17,437 square feet, retail, 13121342 N. Missouri 7. Lease Price: $8 per square foot. 1900 Corporate Centre, 16,648 square feet, office, 1900 N.W. South Outer Road. Sale Price: $880,000. Plaza Center Palace, 16,333 square feet, retail, 2400 S. Missouri 7. No sale or lease price listed. 2900 N.W. South Outer Road, 15,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Sale Price: $550,000. Lease Price: $6 per square foot. Barett Park, 14,770 square feet, flex-tech space, 12021224 N.W. Knox St. Lease Price: $0.81 per square foot. 1900 Corporate Centre, 12,491 square feet, office, 1900 N.W. South Outer Road. Lease Price: $12 to $14 per square foot. 2200 N.W. South Outer Road, 12,210 square feet, retail. Sale Price: $1,350,000. Lease Price: $7.86 per square foot. South Seven Plaza, 11,743 square feet, retail, 1501-1715 S. Missouri 7. Lease Price: $9 to $10 per square foot. Mill Springs Business Park, 11,653 square feet, industrial, 2749 N.W. Hunter Drive. Sale Price: $650,000. 101 N.E. R.D. Mize Road, 11,322 square feet, office. Sale Price: $560,000. Mill Springs Business Park, 11,250 square feet, industrial, 2749 N.W. Hunter Drive. Lease Price: $6.50 per square foot. 1104-1110 W. Main St., 10,500 square feet, office. Sale Price: $700,000. 1203 S.W. Missouri 7, 10,330 square feet, retail. Lease Price: $20 per square foot. Weatherstone Village, 10,220 square feet, office, 13511353 N.W. Jefferson St. Sale Price: $1,200,000.

Fall 2012


COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS AVAILABLE 1110 S.W. 28th St., 10,000 square feet, industrial. Lease Price: negotiable. 1600 Southwest U.S. 40, 10,000 square feet, office. Lease Price: $0.96 per square foot. 1700 Southwest U.S. 40, 10,000 square feet, office. Lease Price: $0.96 per square foot.

Shamrock HIlls

Lee’s summit

Available buildings, 10,000 or more square feet As listed by at www.leessummit.org, the Lee’s Summit Economic Development Council Lakewood Business Park I, 177,353 square feet, flex-tech space, 2632-2880 N.E. Hagan Road. Sale price: $26,600,000. 1001 S.E. Missouri 291, 120,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Sale price: $4,300,000. Lease price: $4.50 per square foot. Summit Technology Campus 2, 115,936 square feet, office, 777 N.W. Blue Parkway. Lease price: $16 per square foot. Lee’s Summit United Methodist Church, 50,000 square feet, 114 S.E. Douglas St. Sale price: $5,500,000. 2525 N.E. Douglas St., 44,000 square feet Sale price: $2,000,000 Raintree Village Retail Center, 33,000 square feet, retail, 833-899 S.W. Lemans Lane. Sale price: $7,200,000. 5 S.W. Industrial Drive, 30,000 square feet Sale price: $3,600,000.

624 N.E. Jones Industrial Drive, 30,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Lease price: $4.85 per square foot. Douglas Station Shopping Center 5, 28,923 square feet, retail, 1160-1198 N.E. Douglas St. Sale price: $7,470,000. 255 N.W. Blue Parkway, 28,500 square feet, office. Sale price: $3,700,000. Summit Point Plaza, 28,038 square feet, office, 200256 N.E. Chipman Road. Sale price: $1,995,000. 807 N.W. Commerce Drive, 27,160 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $1,750,000. Business Exchange Building, 26,211 square feet, office, 200 N.E. Missouri Road. Lease price: $20.50 per square foot. Summit Shopping Center, 23,708 square feet, retail, 172-260 N.W. Oldham Parkway. Lease price: $9 to $17 per square foot. Bayberry Crossing Shopping Center, 22,052 square feet, retail, 507-579 S.E. Melody Lane. Lease price: $11 per square foot. Chapel Ridge Shopping Center, 21,265 square feet, retail, 3680 N.E. Akin Drive. Lease price: $12.50 per square foot. Ralph Powell Executive Center, 21,000 square feet, office, 3370 N.E. Ralph Powell Road. Sale price: $2,595,000. 4251 N.E. Sun Court, 20,900 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $1,500,000. 211 S.E. Missouri 150, 20,640 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $2,000,000. Raintree Shopping Center, 20,080 square feet, retail, 3735-3757 S.W. Raintree Drive. Sale price: $240,960. 1460 S.E. Hamblen Road, 20,067 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $1,495,000. 1170 S.E. Century Drive, 20,020 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Sale price: negotiable.

Chapel Ridge Corporate Center, 18,540 square feet, office, 3600 N.E. Ralph Powell Road. Sale price: $3,595,000. 2225 N.E. Independence Ave., 18,500 square feet, flex-tech space. Sale price: $1,600,000. 500 N.E. Colbern Road, 18,000 square feet, office. Sale price: $3,200,000. Former Xtreme Aquatic Center, 17,993 square feet, retail, 751 N.W. Commerce Drive. Sale price: $545,000. 2401 N.E. Douglas St., 17,600 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $1,000,000. Southside Plaza Shopping Center, 17,447 square feet, retail, 800-862 S.W. Blue Parkway. Lease price: $8 to $13 per square foot. 600 N.W. Libby Lane, 16,000 square feet, industrial. Lease price: $5 per square foot. Commerce Plaza, 15,500 square feet, flex-tech space, 800 N.W. Commerce Drive. Sale price: $1,399,000. 2451 N.E. Douglas St., 15,200 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $1,000,000. Lease price: $6 per square foot. 1331-1347 N.W. Main St., 15,000 square feet, flex-tech space. Sale price: $1,290,000. Carnegie Corporate Center, 15,000 square feet, office, 3171 N.E. Carnegie Drive. Sale price: $1,700,000. Eastport Office Park Building 3, 14,800 square feet, office, 4031 N.E. Lakewood Way. Sale price: $880,000. 4001 N.E. Lakewood Way, 14,000 square feet, office. Lease price: $12 per square foot. Sale price: $1,250,000. 4224 N.E. Port Drive, 14,000 square feet, office. Lease price: $5 per square foot. 3751 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 13,500 square feet, retail. Sale price: $1,700,000. 4215 N.E. Port Drive, 13,200 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $695,000. 3540 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 12,965 square feet, office. Sale price: negotiable. 600 N.W. Murray Road, 12,896 square feet, office. Lease price: $17.50 per square foot.

611 S.W. Third St., 12,000 square feet, office. Lease price: $15 per square foot. Sale price: negotiable. Summit Technology Campus 2, 11,402 square feet, office, 777 N.W. Blue Parkway. Lease price: $16 per square foot. Chapel Ridge Corporate Center, 11,122 square feet, office, 3600 N.E. Ralph Powell Road. Lease price: $19 per square foot. 1850 Southwest U.S. 40, 11,085 square feet, office. Sale price: $990,000. Lease price: $16 per square foot. 255 N.W. Blue Parkway, 11,000 square feet, office. Lease price: $18 per square foot. Douglas Square Shopping Center, 10,954 square feet, retail, 1543-1667 N.E. Douglas St. Lease price: $16 to $20 per square foot. Westbrook Business Center, 10,550 square feet, office, 521 S.E. Second St. Sale price: $1,213,250. Chapel Ridge Shopping Center, 10,490 square feet, retail, 901-937 N.E. Woods Chapel Road. Lease price: $8 per square foot. Raintree Village Retail Center, 10,314 square feet, retail, 833-899 S.W. Lemans Lane. Lease price: $10 per square foot. 3640 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 10,284 square feet Sale price: $1,250,000. Lease price: $14 per square foot. 3401-3411 N.E. Ralph Powell Road, 10,250 square feet, flex tech space. Lease price: $7.95 per square foot. 2305 N.E. Douglas St., 10,210 square feet Sale price: $1,490,000. 1695 N.E .Rice Road, 10,140 square feet, retail. Sale price: $1,150,000. 1190 S.E. Century Drive, 10,000 square feet, warehouse and distribution. Lease price: $6.50 per square foot. 250 N.W. Commerce Court, 10,000 square feet, industrial. Sale price: $600,000. Lease price: $6 per square foot. 520 N.E. Colbern Road, 10,000 square feet, office. Sale price: $3,200,000.

MAJOR RETAIL CENTERS Major retail centers in Independence

Independence Center, 18813 E. 39th St., 1,041,644 square feet. Stores: Abercrombie & Fitch, Dillards, The Jones Store, Sears, Chico’s, Coldwater Creek Independence Commons, 39th Street and Arrowhead Avenue, 399,930 square feet. Stores: Barnes & Noble, AMC Theaters, Commerce Bank, Kohl’s, Marshall’s Hartman Heritage Center, Jackson Drive, 383,500 square feet. Stores: Hereford House, Hilton Garden Inn, Joe’s Crab Shack, Hartman Conference Center, On the Border, Pavilions Shopping Plaza Crossroads, 39th Street and Crackerneck, 357,800 square feet. Stores: NTW Store, Pets Mart, Sam’s Club, Wal-Mart Bolger Square, 39th Street and Crackerneck, 356,100 square feet. Stores: Dick’s Clothing & Sporting Goods, JoAnn Stores., Target, JC Penney 24 Hour Fitness, Bank 10. Eastland Business Park, Valley View Parkway, 340,000 square feet. Stores: Costco Wholesale, M&I Bank, Lowe’s

Bass Pro Shops, Interstate 70 and Interstate 470, 160,000 square feet. Stores: Bass Pro Shops, Islamorada restaurant, Mardel, Hobby Lobby Trinity Woods, Little Blue Parkway and Valley View Parkway. Stores: Corner Café, Children’s Mercy, Drury Inn, Arby’s

Major retail centers in Lee’s Summit

Summit Woods Crossing, 800,000 square feet. Stores: Lowe’s, Kohl’s, Best Buy, Target, Eddie Bauer Summit Fair, 655,000 square feet. Stores: Macy’s, JC Penney Summit Shopping Center, 260,000 square feet. Stores: Eckerd Drug, Summit Fitness Cedar Creek Mall, 155,000 square feet. Stores: Hy-Vee Food Store, Osco Drug Pinetree Plaza, 133,137 square feet. Stores: Price Chopper Foods Home Depot, 132,500 square feet.

Summit Springs Shopping Center, 121,674 square feet. Stores: Hobby Lobby, Westlake Hardware Douglas Square Shops, 119,585 square feet. Business: East Glen 16 Theaters Hen House Market Place, 108,000 square feet. Stores: Hobby Lobby. Chapel Ridge, 110,000 square feet. Stores: Price Chopper Foods Raintree North, 105,960 square feet. Stores: Price Chopper Foods

Major retail centers in Blue Springs

Adams Dairy Landing, Interstate 70 and Adams Dairy Parkway, 600,000 square feet. Stores: Target, Gap, Maurices, Chipotle, Olive Garden, Kohl’s and Gordmans White Oak Plaza, U.S. 40 and Missouri 7, 190,000 square feet. Stores: Beauty Brands, Radio Shack Oaks at Woods Chapel, Woods Chapel Road and Valley View, 150,000 square feet. Under construction

Mall at Fall Creek, S.W. Missouri 7 and Victor Drive, 150,000 square feet. Stores: Golden Corral, 54th Street Bar and Grill, Side Pockets, Culvers, Mirro Image Carwash Adams Dairy Crossing, Interstate 70 and Adams Dairy Parkway, 135,000 square feet. Stores: Home Depot, Wal-Mart Sunset Plaza Shopping Center, 746-798 W. U.S. 40, 68,000 square feet. Stores: Tanners, Mailboxes Etc., Joker’s Pizza, Fazoli’s Southridge Center, Southwest Missouri 7, 57,000 square feet. Stores: Legends of Asia HayMarket Center, U.S. 40 and Missouri 7, 55,000 square feet. Stores: Laundromat, Clark Tools Parkway Place, Adams Dairy Parkway and R.D. Mize Road, 54,200 square feet. Under construction. Coronado Place, Interstate 70 and Adams Dairy Parkway, 52,687 square feet. Stores: Texas Roadhouse, Sonic, Taco Bell, Panda Express, NTB, Panera, AT&T, Adams Dairy Bank Continued on Page 34

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

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MAJOR RETAIL CENTERS Continued from Page 33 South Seven Plaza, 1501-1715 S. Missouri 7, 53,184 square feet. Stores: Asian Tiger, Phillips 66 King’s Ridge Shopping Center, Woods Chapel Road and Missouri 7, 52,518 square feet. Stores: QuikTrip, World Gym, Two Men and A Truck Copperleaf Village Shopping Center, 701-705 N.W. Missouri 7, 45,300 square feet. Stores: Fosters Cleaners, Godfather’s Pizza, Sprint, Taco Bueno 40 West Commercial Center, 1901-1924 S.W. U.S. 40, 34,500 square feet. Stores: House of Signs, Excessive Motorsports, USA Rentals, Rhonda’s Dance Studio Park Plaza, 710-804 N.W. Missouri 7, 32,000 square feet. Stores: Lamar’s, Medicine Shoppe, Encore Staffing, Thai Place, Dominos, Parker Construction Park Plaza II, Northwest Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Rent-a-Center

Country Club Shops, 1312-1342 N. Missouri 7, 28,087 square feet. Stores: Mr. Goodcents, Blue Springs Fitness, Sterling National Bank Mock Plaza Shopping Center, 621-629 N.W. Mock Ave., 23,511 square feet. Stores: Trouser Mouse, Russell Stover, Hair Shapers, Merle Norman Feldman’s Plaza, 305 S. Missouri 7, 20,000 square feet. Stores: Feldman’s, Advanced Auto Plaza Center Place, 2404-2422 S. Missouri 7, 16,332 square feet. Stores: Betty’s Fried Chicken, Molly Maid, Safari Computers Keystone Plaza, 1606-1730 S. Missouri 7, 12,000 square feet. Stores: Wonder Bread, Cute Stuff, GNC, Pizza Hut, Mr. Goodcents Blue Springs Market, U.S. 40 and Missouri 7, square footage not available. Under construction Moreland Ridge Center, 3111-3121 S.E. Seventh St.,

square footage not available. Stores: Commercial Federal Prestige Plaza, 1401 S.W. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Pride Cleaners, Great Clips Keystone Shops, 1416-1424 S. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Funhouse, Fosters Cleaners, Creative Images Plaza Center West, 1400-1428 W. U.S. 40, square footage not available. Stores: Meyer Music, Texaco HyVee Complex, 601-625 W. U.S. 40, square footage not available. Stores: Hy-Vee, Hallmark, Sally’s Beauty Supply Price Chopper Complex, 1305 N. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Price Chopper, Bank of America Westlake Complex, 918 S. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Westlake Hardware, Goodwill, Deals, Blockbuster, Taco Bell, Kennedy’s Jewelers Price Chopper North Complex, 1305 N.W. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Price Chopper

Spring Commons, 1601-1701 N.W. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Walgreens, Blockbuster Maenza Plaza, 2402-2420 S.E. Seventh St., square footage not available. Stores: Blockbuster, Papa Murphy’s, Pickermans, Dollar Zone, Celsius Tanning Hobby Lobby Center, 500 N.W. Missouri 7, square footage not available. Stores: Hobby Lobby, Office Depot, Payless Shoes, Enterprise Rent A Center Village Square, 1701 W. U.S. 40, square footage not available. Stores: Blue Springs Carpet and Tile, Kare N Hair, Scrapbook Addicts Coronado Plaza, 1001-1005 N.E. Coronado Drive, square footage not available. Stores: Burger King, Breakplace Source: “Eastern Jackson County By the Numbers 2012,” published by Jackson County and the Eastern Jackson County Development Alliance

MAJOR EMPLOYERS Major employers in Blue Springs

(50 or more employees) Blue Springs School District, 1801 N.W. Vesper St. – 1,613 employees. St. Mary’s Medical Center, 201 R.D. Mize Road – 615 employees. Price Chopper, 1100 S Missouri 7 – 402 employees. Walmart, 918 S.W. Missouri 7 – 400 employees. Fike Corporation (safety valve release manufacturer, world headquarters), 704 S. 10th St. – 380 employees. Hy-Vee Food Store, 601 S.W. U.S. 40 – 340 employees. Target , 1040 N.E. Coronado Drive – 300 employees. City of Blue Springs, 903 W. Main St. – 256 employees. Haldex (brake manufacturer), 2400 N.E. Coronado Drive – 233 employees. Kohl’s Distribution Center, 2310 N.E. Duncan Road – 225 employees. Gemaco, Inc. (playing card manufacturer), 2925 N. Missouri 7 – 190 employees. Blue Springs Ford, 3200 South Outer Road – 163 employees. Stone Container (fiberboard container manufacturer), 100 South Ave. – 125 employees. Meyer Laboratory (industrial cleaning products), 2401 N.W. Jefferson – 85 employees. Blue Springs Care Center, 930 N.E. Duncan Road – 85 employees. Baker Smith Sheet Metal (metal products manufacturer), 604 S 10th St. – 75 employees. Go Fluent – iTi Solutions (training), 710 Main St., Suite N – 70 employees. Guier Fence Company, 2501 N.W. Jefferson St. – 60 employees.

Major employers in Lee’s Summit

(50 or more employees) Lee’s Summit School District, 301 N.E. Tudor Road – 2,603 employees. National Benefits Center (federal government) no address listed – 1,325 employees. Truman Medical Center Lakewood, 7900 Lee’s Summit Road – 1,300 employees.

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AT&T, 777 Blue Parkway/202 S.E. Third St. – 1,146 employees. John Knox Village (retirement community), 400 N.W. Murray Road – 1,035 employees. City of Lee’s Summit, 220 S.E. Green St. – 645 employees. National Records Center (federal government) no address listed – 625 employees. CVS/Caremark, Inc. (pharmaceutical customer service), 800 N.W. Chipman Road – 559 employees. Unity Practical School of Christianity (seminary), 1901 N.W. Blue Parkway – 550 employees. Metropolitan Community College – Longview, 500 S.W. Longview Road – 532 employees. ExamOne/Quest Diagnostics (pharmaceutical customer service), 800 N.W. Chipman Road – 500 employees. Saint Luke’s East – Lee’s Summit, 100 N.E. Saint Luke’s Blvd. – 368 employees. Toys R’ Us (distribution center), 420 S.E. Thompson Road – 350 employees. HCA – Lee’s Summit Medical Center, 2100 S.E. Blue Parkway – 332 employees. Diodes – FabTech (electronic component manufacturing), 777 N.W. Blue Parkway – 250 employees. Polytainers, Inc. (plastic container manufacturing), 1400 N.W. Douglas Ave. – 250 employees. R & D Leverage (tools design, parts and distribution), 1009 Browning – 250 employees. Plastic Enterprises Co. (plastic container manufacturing), 401 S.E. Thompson Drive – 215 employees. Government Employees Health Association (thirdparty administration of insurance and pension funds), 310 N.E. Mulberry St. – 176 employees. Heartland Tanning (tanning bed manufacturing), 4251 N.E. Port Drive – 130 employees. ViraCor – IBT Laboratories (clinical and diagnostic testing), 1001 N.W. Technology Drive – 112 employees. Saint Luke’s Health System Information Systems (data center), no address listed – 102 employees. American Food Service (wholesale groceries), 290 S.E. Thompson Drive – 100 employees. ReDiscover (mental health services) – 901 N.E. Indepen-

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

dence Ave. – 100 employees. Bennett Packaging (corrugated and solid-fiber box manufacturing), 220 N.W. Space Center Circle – 99 employees. CK Enterprises, Inc. (soap and other detergent manufacturing), 1204 S.W. Jefferson St. – 96 employees. Billy Goat Industries (lawn equipment manufacturing), 1803 S.W. Jefferson – 94 employees. JCI Industries, Inc. (pumps and motors, sales and service), 1161 S.E. Hamblen – 85 employees. Progress Instruments (engineering services), 807 N.W. Commerce Drive – 80 employees. Cerner Corporation (software publishing), no address listed – 75 employees. Progressive Insurance (insurance claims investigation), 777 N.W. Blue Parkway – 75 employees. ABI Inc. (foundation contractors), 1271 NE Delta School Road – 70 employees. W.C. Tingle Company (flooring distributor), 2615 N.E. Hagen Road – 65 employees. HDR – Archer (engineering services), 3741 N.E. Troon – 60 employees. Pavestone (concrete block and brick manufacturing), 601 N.E. Pavestone – 60 employees. Venture Industrial Products (sheet metal fabrication), 525 S.E. Oldham Parkway – 60 employees. Dow KoKam (lithium battery manufacturing), 2901 N.E. Hagan Road – 55 employees. High Tech Laser & Polishing (electroplating, plating, polishing, anodizing, coloring), 1220 S.E. Broadway – 50 employees.

Major employers in Independence

(50 or more employees) Alliant Tech Systems (small-arms ammunition manufacturing for the U.S. Army and NATO at the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant), Lake City Buckner Road – 2,500 employees. Independence School District, 218 N. Pleasant – 2,000 employees. Centerpoint Medical Center, 19600 E. 39th St. – 1,600 employees.

City of Independence, 111 E. Maple St. – 1,176 employees. Government Employee Hospital Association (customer service and claims office), East U.S. 24 – 650 employees. Burd & Fletcher (folding paperboard box manufacturing), 601 S. Missouri 291 – 350 employees. Jackson County Circuit Court, 308 W. Kansas Ave. – 274 employees. Mid-Continent Public Library, Spring and U.S. 24 – 248 employees. Unilever (food manufacturing), 13000 E. 35th St. – 220 employees. Independence Power & Light, 21500 E. Truman Road – 220 employees. Sprint Relay Center (telemarketing bureau), 3445 S. Missouri 291 – 200 employees. Independence Events Center (CHL Hockey and event arena), 19100 E. Valley View Parkway – 198 employees. Love Box Company (corrugated box manufacturing), 1600 N. Missouri 291 – 175 employees. AT&T, 215 N. Spring St. – 174 employees. Comcast Cable Communications, 4700 Little Blue Parkway – 166 employees. Space Center Kansas City Inc. (warehousing and storage), 1500 W. Geospace Drive – 150 employees. Comprehensive Mental Health Services, 10901 E. Winner Road, No. 10 – 100 employees. IBS Industries (vocational rehabilitation services), 1085 S. Yuma Ave. – 100 employees. Regency Care Center (nursing care), 1800 S. Swope Drive – 100 employees. Ronson Machine and Manufacturing (fabricated metal products), 3400 Little Blue Expressway – 100 employees. Post Press (paper products), 151 W. Geospace Drive – 95 employees. Barbour Concrete, 21421 E. Truman Road – 60 employees. The Examiner, 410 S. Liberty St. – 57 employees.

Source: “Eastern Jackson County By the Numbers 2012,” published by Jackson County and the Eastern Jackson County Development Alliance

Fall 2012


COMMERCIAL LAND AVAILABLE Independence Available land,

five or more acres As listed at www.inedc.biz Independence Business Park, 363 acres, northwest of Truman Road and Missouri 7. Sale price: $500,000 to $15,812,280. Hardy Ave and Westport Road, 91.13 acres. Sale price: $900,000. Northwest of R.D. Mize Road and Necessary Road, 90.9 acres. Sale price: $2,700,000. Southwest of Bundschu Road and Powell Road, 80 acres. Sale price: $1,400,000. Carefree Commons, 60 acres, northeast of Kentucky Road and Missouri 291. Sale price: negotiable. Northwest of Truman Road and Powell Road, 52 acres. Sale price: $488,000. Southwest of U.S. 40 and Breckenridge Avenue, 47.6 acres. Sale price: $1,326,000. Trinity Woods Lot 29, 23.84 acres, southeast of Interstate 70 and Little Blue Parkway. Sale price: $12,461,645. Northwest of Interstate 70 and Woods Chapel Road, 18 acres. Sale price: $2,750,000. Northeast of U.S. 40 and S Lee’s Summit Road, 16.6 acres. Sale price: $350,000. 16000 W. Truman Road, 16.5 acres. Sale price: $1,200,000. Kidwell Business Park, 14.16 acres, northwest of 39th Street and Selsa Road. Sale price: $850,000. 21000 E Truman Road, 13.13 acres. Sale price: $571,942. 1904-1920 S. Missouri 291, 12 acres. Sale price: $300,000. Independence Crossing Land Outparcel 2, 10.48 acres, southwest of Interstate 70 and Lee’s Summit Road. Sale price: $500,940. Independence Crossing Outparcel 1, 10.48 acres, southwest of Interstate 70 and Lee’s Summit Road. Sale price: $1,369,527. Northeast of 32nd Street and Missouri 291, 10 acres. Sale price: negotiable. 16606 East U.S. 24, 9.44 acres. Sale price: $295,000. 3600 Arrowhead Ave, 8.82 acres. Sale price: $7,700. Northeast of Pink Hill Road and Missouri 7, 8.8 acres. Sale price: $158,400. 8620 East U.S. 24, 7.36 acres. Sale price: $300,000. 16523 East U.S. 40, 7 acres. Sale price: $740,000. Glendale Station, 6.64 acres, southeast of Jackson Drive and 39th Street. U.S. 40 and Little Blue Parkway, 6.36 acres. Sale price: $1,250,000. Glendale Station – Portfolio, 6.24 acres, southeast of 39th Street and Jackson Drive. Sale price: $800,000. 21000-21200 N.W. Valley View Road, 6.1 acres. Sale price: $1,328,580. Trinity Woods Lot 31, 5.48 acres, southeast of Interstate 70 and Little Blue Parkway. Sale price: $1,074,190.

Trinity Woods Lot 17, 5.3 acres, southeast of Interstate 70 and Little Blue Parkway. Sale price: $2,077,812.

Blue Springs available land,

five or more acres posted at www.bluespringsedc.com/ Missouri Innovation Park at Blue Springs, 117 acres, Adams Dairy Parkway and R.D. Mize Road. Sale or Lease price: Contact Brien Starner, Blue Springs EDC. Adams Dairy Parkway and Duncan Road, 104.2 acres. Sale price: $4,900,000. Southeast of Duncan Road and Adams Dairy Parkway, 104.2 acres. Sale price: $595,000. 29606 E. Jefferson Road, 80 acres. Sale price: $10,454,400. Southeast of Roanoke Road and northeast Porter Road, 30.02 acres. Sale price: $600,000. Southeast of U.S. 40 and Industrial Drive, 30 acres. Sale price: $1,633,500. The Oaks at Woods Chapel, 25.84 acres, southwest of Interstate 70 and Woods Chapel Road. Sale price: Negotiable. 29000 R.D. Mize Road, 20 acres. Sale price: $1,299,000. Southwest of R.D. Mize Road and Adams Dairy Parkway, 14.98 acres. Sale price: $2,935,000. West Gateway Plaza, 12 acres, northeast of Interstate 70 and Woods Chapel Road. Sale price: $4,181,760 to $6,272,640. NEC/SEC Davenport Drive and Missouri 7, 11.44 acres. Sale Price: $996,652. 2850 Southwest U.S. 40, 8 acres. Lease Price: $6.31 per square foot. Sale Price: $1,000,000. 28612 E. Ryan Road, 7 acres. Sale Price: negotiable. 7901 Southwest Missouri 7, 6.32 acres. Sale Price: $1,651,891. Southwest of Duncan Road and Adams Dairy Parkway, 6.06 acres. Sale Price: $989,901. Northeast of Mason School Road and Missouri 7, 5.57 acres. Sale Price: $728,124. Northeast of Jefferson and North Ridge Drive, 5 acres. Sale Price: $550,000. Northwest of Jefferson and Adams Dairy Road, 5 acres. Sale Price: $792,792.

Lee’s Summit Available land,

five or more acres As listed at www.leessummit.org/locationone Southeast of Raytown Road and Scherer Parkway, 247 acres. Sale price: $1,976,000. LeMone-Smith Business & Retail Cnt, 200 acres, southeast of Thompson Drive and Missouri 291. Sale price: $500,000.

Shamrock Hills Golf Course, 177 acres, 3161 S. Missouri 291. Sale price: $11,195,000. Southwest of Scherer Parkway and Sampson Road, 123 acres. Sale price: $2,152,500. 1215 N.E. Bowlin Road, 104.3 acres. Sale price: $4,810,000. Southeast of S.W. Stuart Road and Missouri 291, 80 acres. Sale price: $6,900,000. Northeast of Haines Road and Smart Road, 74 acres. Sale price: $1,000,000. Northeast of Third Street and View High Drive, 70 acres. Sale price: negotiable. ADESA Auto Auction Site A, 40 acres, 101 S.W. Oldham Parkway. Sale price: $5,227,200. Southeast of U.S. 50 and Todd George Parkway, 37.78 acres. Sale price: $4,854,817. Southwest of Missouri 150 and Pryor Road, 35.67 acres. Sale price: $3,900,000. ADESA Auto Auction Site B, 26 acres, 1121 S.E. Browning Ave. Sale price: $2,548,260 Captains Wharf, 25 acres, northeast of Interstate 470 and Lakewood Boulevard. Sale price: $4,356,000 to $13,068,000. Hamblen Road Lots 301-315, 25 acres, southeast of Bailey Road and Hamblen Road. Northwest of Anderson Drive and Interstate 470, 24.09 acres. Sale price: $1,500,000. Northeast of Colbern Road and Rice Road, 24 acres. Sale price: $3,121,300. Northwest of Colbern Road and Town Centre Boulevard, 23.5 acres. Sale price: $4,087,672. 2409 S.W. Hook Road, 22 acres. Sale price: $550,000. Northeast of Stuart Road and Missouri 291, 20 acres. Sale price: $2,000,000. Clifford Road and Pryor Road, 20 acres. Sale price: $300,000. 13501 S.E. Hamblen Road, 19 acres. Sale price: $450,000. Summit Executive Plaza, 15.18 acres, northwest of U.S. 50 and Todd George Road. Sale price: $3,250,000. Colbern Road and Missouri 291, 13.06 acres. Sale price: $2,844,925. Northeast of U.S. 50 and Todd George Road, 13 acres. Sale price: $2,850,000. 4101 N.E. Lakewood Way, 12.8 acres. Sale price: $2,090,880. 2403 S.E. Missouri 291, 12.71 acres. Sale price: $1,100,000. Kingspoint Drive and Hamblem Road, 12.53 acres. Sale price: $1,637,421. Hamblen Road Lot 292-298, 11.73 acres, southeast of Bailey Road and Hamblen Road. Sale price: $1,532,400. Chapel Ridge Development Lot 15, 11.06 acres, southwest of Akin Drive and Ralph Powell Road. Sale price: $3,855,624. Lease price: $8 per square foot. Cabra Land, 10.8 acres, southwest of Missouri 150 and Missouri 291. Sale price: $1,370,000. 210 S.W. Missouri 291, 10.7 acres. Sale price: $3,262,644.

1350 N.E. Colbern Road, 10 acres. Sale price: $1,093,356. 5150 N.E. Lakewood Way, 9.5 acres. Sale price: $1,300,000. Summit Point Plaza Land, 9.5 acres, northeast of Chipman Road and Douglas Road. Sale price: $990,000. 1200 S.E. Hamblen Road, 9 acres. Sale price: $1,156,518. Lakewood Business Park V, Lot 23, 7.69 acres, 2900 N.E. Independence Ave. Sale price: $2,008,620. Chapel Ridge Development, Lot 16, 7.59 acres, northwest of Akin Drive and Ralph Powell Road. Lease price: $6 per square foot. Sale price: $1,983,222. Lakewood Business Center, Lot 22, 7.52 acres, northeast of Hagan Road and Independence Avenue. Sale price: $1,146,411 Northwest of Interstate 470 and U.S. 50 Hwy, 7.52 acres. Sale price: $1,200,000. Colbern Road , 7.5 acres, northeast of Colbern Road and Rice Road. Sale price: $963,700 1511 N.E. Colbern Road, 7.3 acres. Sale price: $1,300,000 Cheddington Commons, 7.07 acres, southwest of Missouri 150 and Cheddington Drive. Sale price: $2,463,752 to $3,695,628. 930 S.W. Pryor Road, 6.96 acres. Sale price: $2,425,420. Lakewood Business Center, Lot 20, 6.74 acres, Hagan Road and Independence Avenue. Sale price: $1,100,411. Southwest of Mulberry and Missouri 291, 6.4 acres. Sale price: $1,950,000. Chapel Ridge Development, Lot 20, 6.36 acres, northwest of Meadowview Drive and Ralph Powell Road. Sale price: $1,386,265. Chapel Ridge Development, Lot 20, 6.36 acres, northwest of Meadowview Drive and Ralph Powell Road. Lease price: $5 per square foot. Northeast of Sycamore Street and Sloan Street, 6.33 acres. Sale price: $1,378,675. Lakewood Business Center, Lot 21, 6.3 acres, Hagan Road and Independence Avenue. Sale price: $960,551. Langsford Plaza, 6 acres, southwest of Langsford Road and Todd George Road. Sale price: $850,000. Southwest of Langsford Road and Todd George Road, 6 acres. Sale price: $850,000. Douglas Coperate Center, 5.89 acres, northeast of Lee’s Summit Road and Douglas Street. Sale price: $1,276,310 to $1,531,572. Missouri 150 and Windemere Drive, 5.5 acres. Sale price: $958,320. Lakewood Business Park IV, Lot 19, 5.31 acres, 2810 N.E. Independence Ave. Sale price: $10,200,000. Chapel Ridge Development, Lot 9-B, 5.16 acres, Strother Road and Ralph Powell Road. Lease price: $15 per square foot. Sale price: $1,254,525. Northeast of U.S. 50 Hwy and Todd George Road, 5 acres. Sale price: $1,089,000. – Information compiled by Jeff Fox

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

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Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Fall 2012


WHAT’S HAPPENING October

What: “Recess for Success” professional development series When & where: 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 2 in the Manhattan Room at John Knox Village at Chipman Road and Jacob Drive, Lee’s Summit Tell me more: The topic is online marketing, and the presenters are Rob Rance and Amy Driver of Turn the Page Online Marketing Cost: Free Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Lee’s Summit Economic Development Council quarterly investor meeting When & where: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 3 at Paradise Park, 1021 N.E. Colbern Road Sign me up: Call 816-525-6617 What: “Winning Government Contracts: The First Steps” When & where: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 4 at the UMKC building at 4747 Troost Ave., Kansas City Tell me more: An overview, with the Missouri Procurement Technical Assistance Center, of winning government contracts, including local, state and federal registrations and certifications. Cost: $50 Sign me up: Call Michelle Cunningham at 816-235-2891, ext. 2 What: Blue Springs Planning Commission When & where: 6:30 p.m. Oct. 8, in the council chambers at the Public Safety Building, 1100 S.W. Smith St. What: “Wake Up to Success” When & where: 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Oct. 9 in Courtyard B at John Knox Village, 508 N.W. Peace Parkway, Lee’s Summit Tell me more: The topic is “Selfdefense – Take Control of Your Personal Freedom,” and the instructor is Linda Hanson of Tamashii Black Belt Academy

Cost: Free Sign me up: Call the Lee’s Summit chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Lee’s Summit Chamber 101: Get Plugged In When & where: 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 9 at Paradise Park, 1021 N.E. Colbern Road Tell me more: It’s for new chamber members but also older members who want to get more deeply plugged in to chamber activities. There is a 45-orientation and then a 45-minute member showcase. Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Lee’s Summit Planning Commission When & where: 5 p.m. Oct. 9 in the council chamber at City Hall, 220 S.E. Green St., downtown Lee’s Summit. What: Independence Planning Commission When & where: 6 p.m. Oct. 9, council chambers on the ground floor of City Hall, 111 E. Maple St. What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce After Hours When & where: 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 11 at US Bank, 1599 S.E. Douglas Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Lee’s Summit Business Development Council meeting When & where: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Chamber of Commerce office (in the depot), 220 S.E. Main St. Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Technology Entrepreneur Speakers Program When & where: 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16 at the offices of Polsinelli Shughart PC, 700 W. 47th St., Suite 1000, Kansas City Cost: $25 ($30 at the door)

Sign me up: Contact facilitator Carmen DeHart of the UMKC Small Business & Technology Development Center at 816-235-6428 or dehartc@ umkc.edu What: Independence Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon When & where: 11:30 a.m. Oct. 17 at the Tower East Club at Arrowhead Stadium Tell me more: Panel discussion of transit issues with the Jackson County executive, the mayor Kansas City and several Eastern Jackson County mayors Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-252-4745 What: “The Basics of Writing a Business Plan” When & where: 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 17 in the UMKC building at 4747 Troost Ave., Kansas City. Tell me more: This is designed for business owners and managers who need to know how to create a business plan as a useful management tool. There also are tips on writing style to make the business plan easier to understand and more professional in appearance. Cost: $35 Sign me up: Contact facilitator Carmen DeHart of the UMKC Small Business & Technology Development Center at 816235-6428 or dehartc@umkc.edu What: “Winning Government Contracts: The First Steps” When & where: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 18 at the Mizzou Center, 1600 N.E. Coronado Drive, Blue Springs Tell me more: An overview, with the Missouri Procurement Technical Assistance Center, of winning government contracts, including local, state and federal registrations and certifications. Cost: $50 Sign me up: Contact Donna Leonard at 816-655-6229 or leonardd@ umsystem.edu

What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce young professionals networking event When & where: 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 18 at HSMC Companies/Certified Public Accountants, 3550 N.E. Ralph Powell Road Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424

When & where: 6:30 p.m. Oct. 22, in the council chambers at the Public Safety Building, 1100 S.W. Smith St.

What: 8th Annual MEGA Chamber Office Party When & where: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 18 at the Kansas City Zoo in Swope Park Tell me more: Meet members of the chambers of commerce in Independence, Lee’s Summit, Blue Springs, Belton, Grandview, South Kansas City, Raytown, Peculiar, Raymore and Harrisonville Sign me up: Contact a chamber. Independence – 816-252-4745, http://independencechamber.org/ Blue Springs – 816-229-8558, www. bluespringschamber.com/ Lee’s Summit – 816-524-2424, www. lschamber.com/

What: Independence Planning Commission When & where: 6 p.m. Oct. 23, council chambers on the ground floor of City Hall, 111 E. Maple St.

What: Jackson County Plan Commission When & where: 8:30 a.m. Oct. 18 in conference room D on the ground floor of Independence City Hall, 111 E. Maple St. What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon When & where: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 19 at Longview Mansion, 1200 S.W. Longview Park Drive Cost: $15 for member, $20 for nonmembers Tell me more: University of Central Missouri President Chuck Ambrose and Don Nissanka of Exergonics will discuss the Missouri Innovation Campus in Lee’s Summit Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 or go to www.lschamber.com What: Blue Springs Planning Commission

What: Lee’s Summit Planning Commission When & where: 5 p.m. Oct. 23 in the council chamber at City Hall, 220 S.E. Green St., downtown Lee’s Summit.

What: Blue Springs Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon When & where: Oct. 25 at the Adams Pointe Conference Center, 1400 N.E. Coronado Drive (at the Courtyard by Marriott). Networking at 11:30 a.m., buffet opens at 11:45, program at noon Cost: $18 for members, $23 for nonmembers Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-229-8558 or go to http://business.bluespringschamber.com/ events/ What: Dancing with the (Lee’s Summit) Chamber Stars When & where: Oct. 25 at the Hilton Garden Inn, 19677 E. Jackson Drive, Independence. Cocktail reception at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 6:15, program at 7 Sign me up: Reservations required. Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: “Starting and Managing a Business” When & where: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 26 at the University of Central Missouri Summit Center, 850 N.W. Chipman Road, Lee’s Summit. Tell me more: An eight-hour seminar on the basics of starting and managing a small business in Missouri. It is facilitated by Kelly Dyer of the UCM Small Business and Continued on Page 38

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

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WHAT’S HAPPENING Continued from Page 37

Technology Development Center. Cost: $79, then $39.50 for each additional person Sign me up: Call the SBTDC at 660-543-4402, or send an email to sbtdc@ucmo.edu, or go to www. ucmo.edu/sbtdc/

November

What: “Winning Government Contracts: The First Steps” When & where: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 1 at the UMKC building at 4747 Troost Ave., Kansas City Tell me more: An overview, with the Missouri Procurement Technical Assistance Center, of winning government contracts, including local, state and federal registrations and certifications. Cost: $50 Sign me up: Call Michelle Cunningham at 816-235-2891, ext. 2 What: “Recess for Success” professional development series When & where: 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 6 in the Manhattan Room at John Knox Village at Chipman Road and Jacob Drive, Lee’s Summit Tell me more: The topic is “Creating a Culture of Collaboration,” and the presenter is Todd Long of Leadership Innovation Cost: Free Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: “Enabling the Successful Leader” When & where: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 7 at the UMKC building at 4747 Troost Ave., Kansas City Tell me more: A focus on all aspects of leadership. Taught by Mike Saxton of Business Transition Specialists. Cost: $35 (includes lunch) Sign me up: Contact facilitator Carmen DeHart of the UMKC Small Business & Technology Development

38

Center at 816-235-6428 or dehartc@ umkc.edu What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce After Hours When & where: 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 8 at Four Seasons Sunrooms, 821 S.W. Oldham Parkway Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Blue Springs Planning Commission When & where: 6:30 p.m. Nov. 12, in the council chambers at the Public Safety Building, 1100 S.W. Smith St. What: Lee’s Summit Planning Commission When & where: 5 p.m. Nov. 13 in the council chamber at City Hall, 220 S.E. Green St., downtown Lee’s Summit. What: Independence Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon When & where: noon to 1 p.m. Nov. 14 at Ophelia’s restaurant, 201 N. Main St. (Main and Maple on the Square) Cost: $23 Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-252-4745

ment tool. There also are tips on writing style to make the business plan easier to understand and more professional in appearance. Cost: $35 Sign me up: Contact facilitator Carmen DeHart of the UMKC Small Business & Technology Development Center at 816-235-6428 or dehartc@ umkc.edu What: “Winning Government Contracts: The First Steps” When & where: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 15 at the Mizzou Center, 1600 N.E. Coronado Drive, Blue Springs Tell me more: An overview, with the Missouri Procurement Technical Assistance Center, of winning government contracts, including local, state and federal registrations and certifications. Cost: $50 Sign me up: Contact Donna Leonard at 816-655-6229 or leonardd@ umsystem.edu What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce young professionals

networking event When & where: 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 15 at Equity Bank, 909 N.E. Rice Road Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Jackson County Plan Commission When & where: 8:30 a.m. Nov. 15 in conference room D on the ground floor of Independence City Hall, 111 E. Maple St. What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon When & where: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Lone Summit Ranch, 28708 E. Lone Jack Lee’s Summit Road Tell me more: Speaker is local resident Harold Finch, whose life as an Air Force intelligence officer, Apollo Project director, missionary and author is to be profiled in the 2013 movie “Unlimited.” Cost: $15 for members, $20 for nonmembers, reservations required Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424

What: Independence Planning Commission When & where: 6 p.m. Nov. 20, council chambers on the ground floor of City Hall, 111 E. Maple St. What: Blue Springs Planning Commission When & where: 6:30 p.m. Nov. 26, in the council chambers at the Public Safety Building, 1100 S.W. Smith St. What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce Before Hours When & where: 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Nov. 27 at Cartridge World, 412 S.W. Ward Road Sign me up: Call the chamber at 816-524-2424 What: Lee’s Summit Planning Commission When & where: 5 p.m. Nov. 27 in the council chamber at City Hall, 220 S.E. Green St., downtown Lee’s Summit. – Compiled by Jeff Fox

What: Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce Annual Ethics Award Dinner When & where: 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 14 at the Gamber Center, 4 S.E. Independence Ave. Sign me up: Call the Susan Coffman at 816-347-3248 What: “The Basics of Writing a Business Plan” When & where: 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 14 at the Clay County Extension office, 1901 N.W. 48th St., Kansas City. Tell me more: This is designed for business owners and managers who need to know how to create a business plan as a useful manage-

Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Fall 2012


Buy Local… Buy Chamber Buying locally and from members of the Chamber: • keeps dollars in the local economy which helps fund city and county services through sales tax. • helps Blue Springs businesses provide jobs for residents. • helps to build strong neighborhoods by sustaining communities, linking neighbors and encouraging contributions to local causes.

Buy Blue Springs Because Next Door Means More

• shows businesses that you support them and want them to stay in Blue Springs.

“Peace, Love & Rock ‘n Roll”!

Thank You! To all those who helped make the 2012 Fall Fun Fest a great success.

1000 W Main Street Blue Springs, MO 64015

816.229.8558

Fax: 816.229.1244 is available to iPhone, iPod, Android and Blackberry users for FREE! The Blue Springs Chamber of Commerce is now providing a mobile app (MyChamberApp) that helps consumers find discounts, events, and services offered by chamber of commerce members. MyChamberApp provides maps, locations, phone numbers, websites, images, and even videos to help consumers make shopping decisions.

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Visit our websites for a list of businesses, products and services available in Blue Springs. If you have family and friends visiting the Blue Springs area, encourage them to shop, dine, stay and play in Blue Springs. BlueSpringsChamber.com BuyBlueSprings.com DiscoverBlueSprings.com BlueSpringsFallFestival.com

Fall 2012 Eastern Jackson County Business Review

39


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Business. Community. One Voice.

Independence Chamber of Commerce | 210 W. Truman Rd | Independence| MO |816.252.4745 | info@independencechamber.org | independencechamber.org

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Eastern Jackson County Business Review

Fall 2012


EJC Business Review Fall 2012