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230 Bushy Hill Road Simsbury, CT 06070

NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID SIMSBURY, CT PERMIT NO. 21

SUN DIAL Winter 2011

The Magazine of The Ethel Walker School

Walker’s & Philanthropy

CELEBRATING OUR CENTENNIAL YEAR

Campus News • Alumnae in Philanthropy • Centennial Update • Out & About • Take Note


The Ethel Walker Heritage Society

S AV E T H E D AT E S 2 0 1 1 January 26, 2011 Centennial Cocktail Reception, Newport Beach, CA February 19, 2011 Junior Family Weekend February 19, 2011 EWSPA Walker’s 100 True Colors Anniversary Auction February 21, 2011 Centennial Book Club Head’s Day – It’s a Surprise! March 6-12, 2011 Habitat for Humanity Build, Columbus, GA

June 16 and 17, 2011 Walker’s Environmental Symposium September 8, 2011 Classes Begin September 26, 2011 Centennial Fishers Island Golf Classic September 30 – October 2, 2011 Centennial and Reunion Weekend Reunion Weekend for Classes ending in1 and 6, 2 and 7 will be celebrated during Centennial Weekend October 28-29, 2011 Family Weekend

The Ethel Walker School 230 Bushy Hill Road, Simsbury, CT 06070 860.658.4467 | www.ethelwalker.org HEAD OF SCHOOL

Bessie Speers

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

See page 38 for additional Centennial event dates.

Dogswood Day – It’s a Surprise!

In addition to attendance at almost all of the above events, Bessie Speers has travel planned to the areas below to visit with alumnae and friends.

June 3, 2011 Middle School Promotion Ceremony

February 2011 – Hobe Sound, FL and Charleston, SC

June 4, 2011 – Prize Night

March 2011 – Denver, CO

April 20, 2011 – Shakespeare Festival

PUBLISHED BY

Vivian K. Elba,

March 7-13, 2011 ServCorps Trip, Nashville, TN April 8, 2011 – Grandparents’ Day

Winter 2011

June 5, 2011 – Commencement

April 2011 – Washington, DC

June 5-11, 2011 Alumnae Habitat for Humanity Build, Cape Cod, MA

May 2011 – Philadelphia, PA

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

vivian_elba@ethelwalker.org CONTRIBUTORS

Wendy Allerton, Sandra Baker, Eleanor Barnes, Kathleen Battiston, Kim Blanchard, Pamela Churchill, Kate Coleman-Burns, Abigail Burbank, Margy Foulk, Kitty Friedman, Lee-Ann Harris, Michele Harris, Alyssa Jahn, Courtney King, Genie Lomba, Chris O’Connor, Ken Poppe, Joan Skelley, Tom Speers, Diane Thomas, Laura Whiteman TAKE NOTE

Courtney King COPY EDITOR

John Groff PHOTOGRAPHY

Bethany Altschwager, Richard Bergen Photography, Kim Blanchard, Vivian Elba, Jill Harrington, John Johnson, Genie Lomba, Dr. Sheri Schmidt, Joan Skelley, Tom Speers

2010-2011 BOARD OF TRUSTEES

ADDRESS CLASS NOTES TO:

David J. Castellani P’09

Harriet Blees Dewey ’60, P’86

Gail Shelton P’12

PRESIDENT AVON, CT

RIDGEFIELD, CT

EX-OFFICIO, PRESIDENT, PARENTS ASSOCIATION ENFIELD, CT

The Development Office The Ethel Walker School 230 Bushy Hill Road, Simsbury, CT 06070 Or submit via email to: alumnae@ethelwalker.org

Glenn A. Sieber P’09

SEND ADDRESS AND EMAIL CHANGES TO:

SIMSBURY, CT

alumnae@ethelwalker.org

Margot Campbell Bogert ’60 VICE PRESIDENT BEDFORD HILLS, NY

Richard W. Maine P’09 TREASURER AVON, CT

Christopher L. Brigham, Esq. SECRETARY NEW HAVEN, CT

Elizabeth Rockwell Cesare TRUSTEE EMERITA SOUTH NORWALK, CT

Sarah Gates Colley ’75 CROSS RIVER, NY

E. Kaye Cowan ACTON, MA

Clive DuVal III P’09 SHARON, CT

Kathanne Fowler P’12 WEST HARTFORD, CT

Iain Howard-Sorrell P’09 SECRETARY AVON, CT

Deborah Williams MacKenzie ’55

Emma Simon ’89,

EX-OFFICIO

PRESIDENT, ALUMNAE BOARD AVON, CT

Elizabeth Cromwell Speers P’16

LAKE FOREST, IL

HEAD OF SCHOOL SIMSBURY, CT

Letitia McClure Potter ’55, P’85

Abigail Trafford ’57

TRUSTEE EMERITA GREENWICH, CT

WASHINGTON, DC

Brooke Gaffney Redmond ’90

PLAINVILLE, CT

CONCORD, MA

Donya Nagib Sabet ’90

PRESIDENT

Amanda Pitman ’90 VICE PRESIDENT

Nancy Hathaway Steenburg ’68 SECRETARY

Kelsey Ballard ’11 STUDENT ALUMNAE BOARD REPRESENTATIVE

In 1994, Leslie Newman ’66 and Lane Morrison P’93 chaired our “One Vision, Many Voices” campaign committee. Leslie wanted to support the campaign but was not in a position to make a large gift at the time. The School helped her to structure a charitable remainder trust, where she transferred funds into a trust and received an immediate income tax deduction for a portion of her contribution to the trust. She paid no capital gains tax on appreciated assets she donated. She receives income for a term of years and when the trust ends, the principal passes to The Ethel Walker School. Leslie says, “A charitable remainder trust is a great way to give a significant gift to the School and at the same, benefit Arthur Hailand P’66, Hailand “Hale” Brown, Whittney Brown, yourself. The income I receive from the trust is wonderful and reminds me regularly that I am also helping the School!” Les Brown, Leslie Newman ’66 with Henry Brown.

Lithographics, Inc.

It is important for a donor to consult with his or her personal financial advisor, attorney, or accountant regarding the form, structure, and documentation of a planned gift. Planned gift donors also are asked to notify the school so that their commitments can be appropriately credited and acknowledged.

Abra Prentice Wilkin ’60

Both outright and deferred planned gifts may be used, upon receipt, to create named funds. Or, if the donor prefers, the gifts may be anonymous.

CHICAGO, IL

Molly Love ’64 Celeste Royall Niarchos ’64 Deborah N. Rush ’77 Mary Beth Rettger ’81 Catherine Terry Taylor ’79

PROFILES IN GIVING

PRINTING

NEW YORK, NY

Jennie Abt ’89 Elizabeth Borland Blodgett ’91 Leander Altifois Dolphin ’96 Mary Lotuff Feeny ’83 Nancy W. Flanagan ’93 Katherine Hypolite ’04

s The Ethel Walker School looks forward to its Centennial in 2011, alumnae, parents, and grandparents, committed to the School’s mission and vision, are invited to consult with the development staff to make a planned gift. Through endowment fundraising, Walker’s will honor the ideals that have shaped the School since its founding, and that are necessary to fulfill its promise of an exemplary education today and in future years. A planned gift helps both the donor and the School. The donor increases her or his support and, at the same time, receives tax and other personal financial benefits. The School receives a significant gift. Donors to the Ethel Walker School who make all or a portion of their gifts through their financial or estate plans (bequest, trust, gift of life insurance, real estate, retirement account, or life income agreement) are recognized as members of The Ethel Walker Heritage Society. The Society honors the School’s founder who set the example for philanthropy by naming the School as beneficiary in three separate trusts. Her gifts are truly gifts that continue to support the institution long after her lifetime.

John Johnson Art Direction & Design

Carol Watson, M.D. ’90

ALUMNAE BOARD 2010-2011 Emma Simon ’89

DESIGN

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230 Bushy Hill Road Simsbury, Connecticut 06070 p 860 658 4467 f 860 658 6763 www.ethelwalker.org The Ethel Walker School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origins in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other Schooladministered programs.

If you are interested in making a planned gift to The Ethel Walker School, please contact Kitty Northrop Friedman, Director of Gift Planning at 860-408-4253, or email kitty_friedman@ethelwalker.org.


Art and photography instructor Bethany Altschwager, a frequent contributor to Walker’s photography library, climbed to the roof above Abra’s to take the Centennial Walker’s 100 photo.

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IN THIS ISSUE Message from the Head of School

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On Campus & Beyond

4

Opening Days

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Summer Trips & Exchange Programs

6

Family Weekend

12

Faculty & Staff Update

18

Walker’s & Philanthropy

20

Alumnae & Philanthropy

30

Centennial Day of Service Serves Many

32

A Tribute to Past Chairs of the Walker’s Board

34

Centennial Update

38

Founder’s Day Chapel

39

Alumnae News

44

Walker’s Out and About

44

Take Note Updates and news from your Walker’s classmates and friends

48

Supporting Walker’s

88

12

39

31

48

THE SUNDIAL MAGAZINE IS PRINTED WITH VEGETABLE BASED INKS ON FSC CERTIFIED 10% POST-CONSUMER FIBER CHLORINE FREE PAPER STOCK.

Winter 2011

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MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL

The word philanthropy comes from the Greek word, “philanthropia,” which means “loving humankind or humanity.” I would venture to say that Walker’s is long on humanity, at least today, as I have heard stories of perhaps a “stricter or more austere” type of humanity in eras gone by! The Ethel Walker School mission states that we prepare girls to lead with integrity, confidence, courage, and conviction” — surely all qualities necessary for meaningful philanthropy. Each student at The Ethel Walker School is already a philanthropist, caring about her School community, academics, service projects, family, friends, and team members; generations of Walker’s alumnae across the world are philanthropists as well. Walker’s not only prepares girls for the academic rigors of college; a Walker’s education teaches girls that caring for one’s community, contributing time, talent, and resources to make the world a better place, is indeed noble and the right thing to do. As Kathy LeMay writes in her book, The Generosity Plan, when we think of philanthropy, “for many, there is an immediate mental picture of people who are older, richer, and have lots of free time on their hands. We may think of people who spend afternoons at charitable board meetings and evenings at black-tie fundraising galas.” There is much good accomplished from philanthropists at this level; however, LeMay goes on to borrow President Roosevelt’s refrain that philanthropy is “doing what we can, with what we have, where we are and taking action for the greater good.” At Walker’s we witness this spirit every day — in our students, faculty, alumnae, past and present trustees, parents, and friends. Family Weekend included Walker’s choir of 80 students singing “Throw Open Your Shutters!”

in Chapel. Our students’ voices and music are an important contribution to our School community. Walker’s parents helped provide a 100th birthday cake after the kickoff Centennial Chapel earlier this year. Our faculty pick up our students at airports and train stations near and far after Fall Long Weekend. Housefaculty open their homes to our students regularly to bake, relax, or just chat. There are many other examples of members of the Walker’s community “doing what they can, with what they have, where they are,” and making us a stronger community in doing so. As we celebrate the unique rhythms of this Centennial year, we are focused on matters both fiscal and familial, while our School continues its strong legacy for girls and the women leaders of tomorrow. With this in mind, it is especially important for all our constituencies to understand the degree to which the Board, the Head of School, the administrative team, faculty, and staff are in alignment about one thing — fiscal responsibility and creating a business model for Walker’s that promises a break-even budget each year, each decade, and for

the next century. To this end, I am pleased to share with you some milestones and accomplishments in which we should take pride: • In 2008, we responded to financial crisis by right-sizing the School while protecting its core. Operating expenses have reduced by 13.42% since 2007. • We established strict budget and cost controls and have focused our resources on core programs. • Amidst the headwinds of an unfriendly credit market, we replaced variable-rate short-term financing with a 30-year low fixed-rate bond for the renovation of Beaver Brook, which was completed ten years ago. • The School received a credit rating from Standard & Poor’s; only sixty independent schools in the nation have an S&P rating. • We are actively managing our investment portfolio which has protected our small endowment. • We are engaged in strategic plans to increase our alternative revenue streams via our Summer Academy, Chapel rentals for weddings, our equestrian program and other initiatives.

philanthropia

Bessie Speers with Connecticut Governor M. Jodi Rell and students following The Founder’s Day Chapel on October 6. 2

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES • We have successfully created a culture of financial discipline whereby the Board passed a policy that no building work will begin at Walker's on any project without having full payment in cash and/or pledges in hand. • We have increased revenue per student by $2,272 in the past year despite the sluggish economy. • We have raised $13,723,153 in total support during the last four years. Please enjoy the contents of this Sundial Magazine and take pride knowing that Walker’s proud history and the care and dedication of so many of you are now paying off. Walker’s is once again becoming recognized as one of the strongest girls schools in the country. I ask that you help us celebrate the 100th year of The Ethel Walker School by contributing “what you can, with what you have, where you are.” One hundred percent of the trustees, the Alumnae Board, and the administrative team join you, and faculty and staff are well on their way to 100% participation, as they were last year. Walker’s sails are lifted and the breeze is blowing; we need your support to ensure full sails and chart the course ahead. It is time to believe 100% in this great School and its impact on the world.

Elizabeth C. Speers HEAD OF SCHOOL

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have always admired Winston Churchill as a great leader and am reminded on this occasion of a statement he once made: “We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.” As he spoke as a public servant to Great Britain, I infer from his words that he was referring to both monetary gifts and those of personal involvement. To the many donors to The Ethel Walker School, who have given in a multitude of ways, the Trustees of the School offer their heartfelt gratitude for your support. To our faculty and administrative staff, we are grateful that you have answered a high calling to guide our young women to become the next generation of caring leaders. Like most non-profit institutions, we require David J. Castellani your continued engagement. But asking for support requires that we are worthy of such. For the many who have supported our School or are contemplating doing so, it is fair to ask, “Is Walker’s deserving of my investment?” This is the very question that The Board of Trustees has used as a way to guide its collective actions. By way of example, we have worked hard over the last few years to balance our budget to make certain that the School is financially sustainable. To that end, we expect that for this fiscal year we will operate the School with a surplus, the first time in many years that this result has been achieved. Another indicator is the strength of our enrollment; are we an attractive school for talented young women? Thankfully, our dorms are full, our financial aid is coming in line with that of other top schools, and our matriculation to top colleges has improved and continues to improve each and every year. Finally, what is the result of our efforts? Are we giving young women the right foundation to conquer the challenges of the world outside of Walker’s? A privilege of the office affords me the opportunity to meet alumnae from many walks of life and as well to associate frequently with current students. The “output” of Walker’s is truly unique. To the greatest extent, our women are independent and empowered to explore possibilities, care deeply for others, value collaboration, and be engaged in a lifetime of learning. In other words, Walker’s creates leaders with a soul. Bessie and her team have high but achievable aspirations when it comes to Walker’s. We hope that we have met or exceeded expectations from our loyal supporters. Be assured that we will continue to work hard on the key elements that will make Walker’s even more vibrant and strong. We invite you to give to Walker’s with the knowledge that your return is immeasurable. For the ancient Greeks, “philanthropia” was the loving of what it is to be human and was thought to be the key to civilization. When I am on our beautiful campus, I can think of no more civilized place in the world to create and develop the next generation of leaders. Thank you for your support.

David J. Castellani, P’09 PRESIDENT, THE ETHEL WALKER SCHOOL BOARD OF TRUSTEES Winter 2011

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

he slow pace of summer was T replaced by a gradual increase in energy on campus as the 2010-11 school year began at Walker’s in September. Athletes arrived for pre-season training; international students participated in orientation programs; Cicerones and the Big 7 attended workshops and retreats. Middle Schoolers departed for their Camp Jewell retreat. New Girls arrived on campus with their parents and attended New Girl Chapel, after which their Old Girls took them off on a campus-wide scavenger hunt. The first day of classes was September 10, when students from 16 states and 13 nations, including Afghanistan, Germany, Lithuania, Barbados, Taiwan and Canada together commenced the 100th year of learning at The Ethel Walker School.

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Opening Days THE SUNDIAL


ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Year 100! Winter 2011

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Summer vacation is a time for learning, outreach and exploration among Walker's students and faculty, on campus and around the world. Faculty members often attend summer seminars to delve further into their areas of expertise; students travel near and far for their Junior/Senior projects and exchange programs in addition to enjoying family vacations. The Simsbury campus itself is a hub of activity. The Admissions Office receives visitors throughout the summer; Development plans and hosts events; administrators and staff actively prepare for the coming year. At every opportunity, learning and building upon Ethel Walker’s legacy is pursued.

Students and faculty traveled the globe during the summer of 2010 for learning and leisure or a combination of the two. Destinations included Africa, Australia, Austria, China, Costa Rica, France, Germany, Ghana, Honduras, Italy, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. Among the trips were two Walker’s-sponsored exchange programs.

Exchange Programs Summer Down Under in Australia and New Zealand

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alker’s exchange program with sister school St. Catherine’s in Melbourne, Australia, is in its tenth year. Walker’s students visit Australia for a three-week experience that includes attending classes, staying with host families and much sightseeing and learning about the Australian culture. The coordinator of this program, Science Chair Jill Harrington, says, “The girls get the big picture that people are the same all around the world, and they make life-long friends.” The program is open to our 8th and 9th grade students, this past summer nine Walker’s girls participated (Hannah Callahan, Abigail Reynolds, Vicki Daguerre-Bradford, Chelsea Regan, Emilee O’Brien, Jill O’Brien, Emily Kirby, Jacinta Lomba and Nicole Gregory, all members of the Class of 2013). They were accompanied by faculty chaperones Sarah Edson and Kristen Weldon. Like the girls, both Edson and Weldon had meaningful experiences. Edson said she was “grateful, enriched and so proud of how our girls embraced the experience,” while Weldon commented on how “poised, polite, generous and friendly our girls were to everyone they met—they were excellent ambassadors for Walker’s.” In October, the Australian students who hosted our girls came to Simsbury to experience similar adventures. They attended classes and visited, among many destinations, Boston, Old Sturbridge Village, the Connecticut State Capitol, The Big E, and The Mark Twain House. Foreshadowing the studyabroad programs that our graduates may experience in college, exchange programs are a wonderful educational endeavor. The next Australian exchange will be in 2012. 6

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Walker’s and St. Catherine’s students visit historic Collinsville, CT.


ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Another summer exchange “Down Under” involved two girls going to New Zealand for six weeks. Deborah Place ’12 and Abigail Demke ’11 visited with students and their families at the Nga Tawa Girls School in Marton. Brooke Sheldon was the faculty chaperone for this adventure. This program is relatively new for Walker’s; two Nga Tawa girls visited us last winter, and we hope to continue with and expand upon this program. Both Deb and Abigail were delighted with their experiences. Deb said how happy she was to see so much and to meet such nice people and that “New Zealand is truly beautiful.” Likewise, Abigail greatly appreciated her time there. “There are many reasons it is good to travel, and everyone will take something different away from their experience, but having the experience and being able to draw one’s own conclusion (about other cultures) is the most important part.” As with the girls who went to Australia, Deb and Abigail are keeping in touch with their new friends online, thus maintaining the connection for a long time to come. The exchange programs, junior/senior projects, and service opportunities demonstrate the depth and breadth of the options Walker’s girls have access to as extensions of their education.

Jacinta Lomba, left, with friends in Sydney, Australia

Deb Place, right, with her Nga Tawa French class.

Deb Place, Nga Tawa’s Jessy Moeller, and Abby Demke enjoy a gondola ride in Rotorua.

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

ADVENTURES IN ASIA

A Trip Recap by Ken Poppe, History Faculty

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y wife and I were fortunate to visit two Asian nations this summer: Thailand, which is infrequently in the news (although there were major disturbances in the area last spring), and China seemingly always in the news, an economic superpower that is a major player on the world scene in the 21st century. Our trip included ten separate plane rides, many thousands of miles and six different hotels in four weeks, but it was indeed a trip of a lifetime. We spent over two weeks in Thailand, “the land of smiles,” first in Bangkok and then in Chiang Mai in the north. Our focus was to visit with our son, David, who is living and working there. In addition to working for a mailKen Poppe and his son David enjoy the sights in Thailand. order company, he is developing a service program for Americans and Europeans to come to Thailand for several government and industry try to meet the needs of huge months to teach English. He is already hosting several numbers of people flocking in from rural provinces. volunteers. Both in Thailand and Chiang Mai, he served as Highlights of the trip included the Great Wall, the our tour guide. We visited many beautiful Wats (Buddhist Forbidden City and Mao’s mausoleum, a rickshaw ride, and monastery and temple complexes), numerous open-air the Summer Palace in Beijing. In Xi’an, the major attraction markets and night bazaars, some of the so-called “hill tribes,” is the thousands of terra cotta soldiers that were discovered and floating markets. We also taught English at a monastery over thirty years ago. We were also fortunate to meet up with school to several classes of novice monks. Many Thai families Qi Yang, Walker’s Chinese language teacher, who was visiting send their sons to monasteries for religious and academic his family there. training. Most eventually leave to go on to jobs or Shanghai has changed a great deal and was full of universities, but some do stay on and become life-long international as well as domestic tourists. Another treat for us monks. It was interesting to note that while there were was visiting with Xinyun Zhu ’11 and her father in beautiful temples and many Buddhas and new experiences Shanghai. Hong Kong is as I remembered it — a modern, for us, there were also many Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, crowded city with a beautiful McDonald’s, and 7-11s harbor and a reputation as the throughout the country. London or the New York of Asia. We then joined a tour group It goes without saying that in China. I had been to China travel abroad is often the best back in 1993, so I was interested education one can have. It can be to note the changes since then. an eye opening, exhilarating and Clearly, the Chinese have wonderful learning experience, improved their tourist and I know that many members accommodations, and their cities of the Walker’s community, both have been transformed into large, students and teachers, continue to modern examples of impressive find opportunities to see the world. metropolitan areas. Some of the growth has been due to the Olympics and the World Expo, Young monks receive an English lesson. but the size and scope of the cities are significant as the Chinese

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

ADVENTURES IN ASIA

Qi Yang, Language Faculty Returns to His Homeland

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hinese teacher Qi Yang attended the Summer Chinese Workshop in Beijing in June and July. An extensive curriculum, including Chinese grammar, characters and culture, along with field trips to sites including The Great Wall, The Forbidden City and Tian’anmen Square were features of this intensive course of study for high school Chinese teachers. Following the workshop, Mr. Yang traveled via train for 30 hours to Chengdu, Sichuan Province, where he visited the famous 2,500-year old Dujiang Dam, as well as his home town of Xi’an, where he visited with his family. Qi Yang and Ken Poppe connect in Xi’an, China.

Walker’s Language Teacher Studies Language Abroad

In June and July, language teacher Rich Prager spent six

weeks in Seoul, South Korea, studying Korean language and culture at the Korean Language Institute at Yonsei University. He met up with about 15 Walker's students and alumnae and their families throughout his stay, during which he visited palaces, museums, and some excellent restaurants.

Jaye Kim ’05, Rich Prager, and Ye Eun Kim ’10 in Seoul.

On weekends, he hiked to Buddhist temples, biked along the Han River, visited the demilitarized zone, and did some whitewater kayaking. It was an enriching experience, and he hopes to return to Korea. He was most struck by how kind, considerate, and generous all the Walker’s families were in welcoming him to their country. Rich continues his Korean studies with the help of some of our students, as well as his study of Mandarin with Qi Yang.

At the 63 Building in Seoul.

Winter 2011

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Summer Academy at Walker’s A typical scenario, summer 2010: Abra’s is

filled with chatter and laughter; young artists rehash their experiences at the potters’ wheel; actors rehearse their skit; paintings are stacked on a table in preparation for a display. Meanwhile, young scientists consider the chemistry of making jam. As campers head to activities after lunch, they wave to the girls attending Summer Riding Experience, who walk as a group, arm-in-arm, usually laughing. In 1993, The Ethel Walker School hosted its first Summer Riding Experience (SRE), a residential equestrian camp with two-week sessions attended by young women from across the nation. SRE has since expanded to include a week-long day camp program for local riders and an Elite Program for more experienced riders. Since 1999, The Farmington Valley Arts Center had leased space at Walker’s for its Summer Arts Camp. Walker’s and the Arts Center enjoyed this partnership until late Summer 2009, when the Arts Center abruptly closed (the organization has since reopened on a limited basis). Recognizing the importance of this program to the community’s youth and families, Walker’s brought long-time Summer Arts Camp Director Chris O’Connor on board to continue the program on campus. Summer Arts Camp continues to be happy in the only home it has ever known. A Summer Science Camp was added, alongside programs with the Community Farm of Simsbury and others designed by Walker’s athletics coaches, resulting in a multi-faceted

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summer program which allows students of all ages to benefit from Walker’s campus year-round. The 2010 Walker’s Summer Academy served over 500 children, an impressive number for a first-year program. Nearly ten percent of these campers paid a reduced tuition rate through the generosity of local sponsors and Walker’s Summer Academy scholarship program. Day camp spots were donated to the School’s 2010 True Colors silent auction, as well as to philanthropic agencies in Hartford County. New for 2011 will be a gardening camp, a halfday program for younger children, more athletics opportunities and a specially funded tennis camp for kids who live with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Plans for Walker’s faculty to host programs as we move toward summer academia are moving forward. Walker’s students may fulfill their service requirement by producing flyers, volunteering as counselors and staffing camp fairs.

Walker’s Summer Academy has its own name and logo, but the guidelines of the program are deeply embedded within the School’s mission. The referral power from summer programs on campus has always been fruitful for Walker’s; bringing the community, campus resources, and potential Walker’s girls together all summer long in a beautiful environment makes perfect sense.


ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Each year, the Old Girl Show and Ba-Na-Na are traditions celebrated to welcome everyone back to campus in the first few weeks of school.

BANANA!

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Welcoming Walker’s Families In October, Walker’s once again welcomed the families of current students onto campus and into classrooms. Over 220 Walker’s family members from across the country and around the world came to campus on Family Weekend to experience “a day in the life” of a Walker’s girl. Parents, grandparents and siblings attended Morning Meeting and classes, had individual conferences with faculty, enjoyed a Halloween expo by Walker’s riders, and joined their daughters in making bowls for the Empty Bowls Project in the School’s pottery studio. The ever-popular Walker’s Student Bazaar was a highlight of the weekend, where student clubs and organizations offered services and products to raise money in support of their clubs’ activities. The Common Room and Abra’s Atrium were abuzz with parent support and student enthusiasm. The weekend culminated in varsity field hockey and soccer wins against rival Miss Porter’s School — a festive way bring a close to this special event. Hooray Sunray!

FAMILY WEEKEND 2 0 1 0

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ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Winter 2011 13


ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Mountain Day 2011 As tradition continues, Walker’s students and faculty were Heublein Tower bound on October 7, in accordance with the gubernatorial proclamation delivered by Governor M. Jodi Rell at Founder’s Day Chapel (see page 39). While the weather was not the best, spirits were high as buses headed out from campus towards Talcott Mountain, sustaining a tradition much loved by the Walker’s community.

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The 2010-11 school year at Walker’s

Academy Hill, Springfield, MA • Applewild, Fitchburg, MA • Bement, Deerfield, MA • Brookwood, Manchester, MA • Cobb, Simsbury, CT • Country, Madison, CT • Dutchess Day, Millbrook, NY • Foote, New Haven, CT • Fraser Woods, Newtown, CT • Grammar, Somersville, CT • Greenwich Country Day, Greenwich, CT • High Meadow, Stone Ridge, NY • Housatonic Valley Waldorf, Newtown, CT • Independent Day, Middlefield, CT • Indian Mountain, Lakeville, CT • Litchfield Montessori, Northfield, CT • Melrose, Brewster, NY • Mizzentop, Pawling, NY • Montessori of Greater Hartford, Hartford, CT • Mooreland Hills, Kensington, CT • Nashoba Brooks, Concord, MA • New Canaan Country Day, New Canaan, CT • Pine Cobble, Williamstown, MA • Pine Point, Stonington, CT • Rectory, Pomfret, CT • Ridgefield, Ridgefield, CT • Rippowan Cisqua, Bedford, NY • Rumsey, Washington, CT • Solomon Schechter, W. Hartford, CT • St. Brigid, West Hartford, CT • St. Bridget’s, Cheshire, CT • St. Bridget’s, Machester, CT • St. Mary’s, Simsbury, CT • St. Thomas’s Day, New Haven, CT • Tuxedo Park, Tuxedo Park, NY • Unquowa, Fairfield, CT • Washington Montessori, New Preston, CT • Whitby, Greenwich, CT • Windward, White Plains, NY

Visit our new Admissions page on Facebook: The Ethel Walker School Winter 2011 15

ADMISSIONS

The Admissions Office is working to visit all feeder schools important to Walker’s. It takes some time to cover this territory and we have made some great headway to date, which includes the following schools. We will be adding more to our itinerary and if there is a feeder school you recommend we plan to visit, please be in touch with us in admissions.

Admissions Update

opened with 253 students from 13 countries and 16 states. There are 214 students in the Upper School (117 boarders and 97 day students) and 37 students in the Middle School. Overall, 47% of the student body receives some amount of financial aid. Word of mouth remains one of the most frequently cited sources of how a family learns about Walker’s. The Admissions Office encourages all current and past families and alumnae to continue spreading the word about what an amazing institution this is. We look forward to meeting your daughters, nieces, granddaughters, grandnieces, neighbors and other acquaintances. Please share the word about the benefits of this life-changing experience with any and all who will listen, or just send us their contact information and we’ll make the connection (with or without mentioning your name — just tell us your preference). The Admissions Office has attended 33 secondary-school fairs since September, and visited with an equal number of secondary school placement counselors, guidance counselors and independent educational consultants. These efforts have significantly increased our domestic and international travel and strategic outreach, building the top of the admissions funnel (inquiry, application, acceptance and enrollment) with qualified candidates from all over the country and the world.


ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Athletics U P D A T E

Fall sports have come to a close at Walker’s, and the winter season is upon us. Congratulations to Coaches Mimi Duran and Ian Nicholson for coaching the Varsity FIELD HOCKEY team into the New England Tournament. Ranked #2 going into the tournament, the team fell to Brewster Academy in a well-played contest. Walker’s plays with finesse and team unity, and this teamwork led them to their seventh consecutive CISAC Championship and a bid into the New England Tournament.

Thanks to all our coaches: Field Hockey Mimi Duran, Ian Nicholson, Kristen Weldon, Abby Burbank, Bethany Altschwager Soccer Matt Harrington, Kelly Blanchard ’06, Matt Bavone, John Monagan Volleyball Jill Harrington, Ali Puffer Outdoor Adventure John Groff, Rich Prager Dance Cheri Soule, Brittany Gauthier, Kristen Kimmelbacker

VOLLEYBALL, playing with a young team, was consistent throughout the season with key players serving high if not with 100% accuracy and key digs and kills to lead the team to exciting five-set matches. The team finished as runners up in the CISAC tournament, falling just shy of Master’s, whom they had beaten earlier in the day. SOCCER also found themselves CISAC champions thanks to their 1-0 victory over Westover. The team played a tough schedule and played well against the top-ranked schools in New England. The emphasis for them this year was on fitness and solid defense. All seniors leave a legacy of hard work and commitment to their sport and to the School. The MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCCER team graduates eight 8th graders, and all leave behind a tremendous legacy: an undefeated season. The team finished the season 10-0, giving up only 3 goals all season. In fact, the team

16 THE SUNDIAL

outscored their opponents 41-3. Coach John Monagan said, “This past season was one of my most memorable as a coach. The Middle School girls worked together as a team, providing support for one another and leadership throughout the season. They truly proved that a team, and not an individual, wins games.” MIDDLE SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY had many close games and developed great stick skills and team tactics. Our DANCERS worked hard throughout the fall honing their technical skills in ballet, modern, and jazz. As we enter the winter season the dancers will be preparing for the Upper School Dance Concert in February.

In addition to the interscholastic sports, the fall includes our OUTDOOR ADVENTURE PROGRAM, where the focus is placed on experiencing the outdoors to its fullest. The group hiked, biked, canoed, rock climbed and performed trail maintenance in our own Walker’s Woods. WINTER SPORTS have started, and new this year, Walker’s has added a Swim Team. The girls practice at Westminster School at 6 a.m. and then head back to campus for classes. Squash and Ski Team continue their prowess and are developing strong, competitive programs. Basketball returns many of its key players. Students are also enrolled in Yoga and Personal Fitness, along with Dance and Riding.


U P D A T E

Hillary Rheinheimer joined Walker’s in the summer of 2010 as Head Riding Coach and Trainer. She is an accomplished rider in hunter jumper and hunter seat equitation with extensive showing and training experience, and is a wellknown name in the equestrian world. She has qualified for and competed in the prestigious ASPCA Maclay, USET and USEF Medal Finals, placing in the top 15 in all. She has won the CHJA Medal Finals and was reserve champion at the New England Equitation Finals, Reserve Champion at the Cacchione Cup Finals, and in college, winner of the International Intercollegiate Show Jumping and Team Dressage Competitions. Walker’s is delighted to welcome Hillary as a member of its faculty. Walker’s riding team had an exciting fall season under Hillary Rheinheimer’s leadership. Horse shows, IEA competitions, events, clinics, trail rides, ground school and an extensive lesson schedule brought about an exceptional show of teamwork. The Walker’s Fall Equestrian Event, held on an Indian summer’s day in October, brought almost 60 competitors to the Equestrian Center. Walker’s competitors included Samantha Eley ’11 competing on her horse Linwin, Charlotte Gardiner ’14 on the School’s Dear Abby, Haley Glofka ’14 on School-owned On a Roll, and Heather Carey ’13 on School-owned Equador. Each girl completed the three phases of the event successfully (some for the first time), while members of the team worked at the event all day and cheered on their teammates. Inspired by the event, members of the team, with trainers Hillary Rheinheimer, Kit Gustafson and McKenzie Rollins, took advantage of Walker’s beautiful outside course and schooled the jumps for weeks after. Those that could not jump took scenic trail rides into Walker’s Woods.

A Message from Head er Trainer Hillary Rheinheim

How thrilled I am to have been selected ! to join The Ethel Walker equestrian team ol Scho a of part a I feel honored to be with such an impressive group of influential alumnae. The entire staff and administration have been incredibly n and McKenzie supportive. Kathleen Battiston, Kit Gustafso transition from my e Rollins welcomed me warmly and mad Virginia to Connecticut very comfortable. life. They are Horses have always been my compasses in learn compassion, the greatest teachers. From horses one can care if you are pretty or responsibility and humility. Horses don’t s and educated and popular. If you are attentive to their need hundred percent. one give will thoughtful in your riding, they a subtle, quiet, in e hors For a rider, communicating with the ience is a virtue,” “Pat g, concise way is imperative. The old sayin es. hors is never more true than when dealing with bright young women I embrace the challenge of working with and connect with these and helping them learn to communicate find their true selves phenomenal creatures. Horses will help them generation of leaders. and guide them as they emerge as our next ence them in a As their riding instructor, my goal is to influ responsible citizens. l, ghtfu positive way to become successful, thou

Clinics run by Ann Guptil continue to be well attended by riders and spectators alike. The team is looking forward to extending their equestrian experience and commitment to service by working at a therapeutic riding center and at a local rescue horse organization this year.

The New England Equitation Finals had four Walker’s students competing for the first time. It was a tremendous learning experience for Katherine Bilgore ’12, Casey Brottman ’12, Heather Carey ’13 and Emily Fearey ’12 to study, practice and complete the challenging courses over the two days while their teammates supported them by attending in full force.

Winter 2011 17

ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

Equestrian


FACULTY & STAFF UPDATE

Putting Our Own Masks on First Anyone who has ever flown will find the following words familiar: “In the event of a loss in cabin pressure, oxygen masks will drop from the console above. Those traveling with young children should put their own masks on first before assisting their children.” Parents of young children will always have the impulse to save their children first, but if they are incapacitated due to lack of oxygen, they are of no use to those children. Educators are the same way, especially here at Walker’s. Our faculty and staff are passionately dedicated to educating young women, and will regularly sacrifice their free time to ensure a job well done. This year, embracing the School-wide focus on wellness as detailed in the Summer 2010 Sundial, members of our adult community are modeling good, healthy habits of caring for themselves so that they can give to others most effectively. Here are some highlights:

• At opening meetings this year, faculty members signed up for one of a series of workshops on topics relating to wellness. Some participated in a dance class with Cheri Soule. Others went for a hike in Walker’s Woods with John Groff and Rich Prager. Others participated in a workshop on self-awareness and the Johari Window with Joan Skelley and MaryBeth Conley, instructors of wellness in the 9th grade seminar. That same day, some faculty went on a field trip to a local food distributor that specializes in fresh, local produce. Taking time out of our days to focus on different ways wellness can intersect with our daily routines was a great way to start the new school year. • Several faculty members recently trained for and participated in the Hartford Marathon, completing the half-marathon in fine fashion. Special

Road e h t n o ’s r e Walk As a host school as well as participant:

Walker’s faculty and administration share their knowledge about teaching and independent school practices at conferences throughout the year. These conferences also offer professional development opportunities, thereby functioning as both learning and sharing opportunities.

18 THE SUNDIAL

Walker’s has recently hosted the Founders League; the New England Independent Schools Spiritual Council (NISSC), which provides leading resources, expert voices, and an active forum for ethical growth and spiritual development in schools; and the board of the National Coalition of Girls’ Schools.

Off campus: The past several months have seen the following presentations by members of Walker’s team: • The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) Annual Conference: Bessie Speers, “So You Want to be Head of a Boarding School?” • National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) Annual Conference: Bessie Speers facilitated a discussion entitled “From Grey to Green: Concrete


FACULTY & STAFF UPDATE

congratulations to Math Teacher/Centennial Coordinator Lee-Ann Harris, Middle School Program Coordinator Alyssa Jahn, Development’s Eleanor Barnes and Learning Specialist Alison Puffer! • Administrative Council took a break from their weekly meeting recently to learn more about the equestrian program and to get some fresh air by taking a trail ride led by Kathleen Battiston and McKenzie Rollins. • Carol Clark-Flanagan and Grace Epstein continue to row for a local adult women’s team which took a trip to the national championships recently.

Abra’s is an opportunity for faculty to re-connect.

All of these efforts, and a myriad of others by which our faculty are modeling the need for balance, for physical activity, and for a healthy approach to life, help our girls see that learning is not just about books and pencils, but rather, it is about tackling challenges and about making connections in all kinds of healthy ways — including caring for one’s own self.

Schoolyard to Garden of Hope at the Edible Schoolyard in New Orleans,” and Kim Blanchard, Student Services Coordinator and Habitat Advisor, on how to start and maintain service clubs on campus, specifically, Habitat for Humanity and ServCorps. • Jill Harrington and Carol Clark-Flanagan shared their development of Walker’s inter-disciplinary Environmental Science class with attendees at the on-campus NISSC conference. • Secondary Schools Admission Testing Board (SSATB) Annual Conference: Vivian Elba, Director of Marketing & Communications, shared information on the function of marketing resources in admissions relative to staffing infrastructure. • Athletic Director Abby Burbank travels regularly to conduct certification training for lacrosse coaches

for US Lacrosse. In November, she presented to the Los Angeles chapter of the organization on teaching fundamentals. • Chief Financial Officer Tom Schneider was on a panel in December for Professional Women in Construction, addressing sustainability and facilities planning and management on the independent school campus.

Accreditation Visits: Independent schools here in New England depend on volunteers among our peers to ensure that the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) accreditation process runs smoothly. Carol ClarkFlanagan, Rich Prager and Wendy Allerton each served on committees to determine the re-accreditation for, respectively, Dana Hall School, Winsor School, and Ridgefield Academy. Winter 2011 19


PHILANTHROPY

Walker’s

& Philanthropy 20 THE SUNDIAL


he Summer 2010 edition of The Sundial highlighted the role Martin Seligman’s Positive Psychology can play in the achievement of overall wellness. A major component of this framework is “the meaningful life,” whereby we use our signature strengths in the service of something larger than ourselves. At Walker’s, whether on campus or beyond, service to others is a commitment that faculty and families instill in students to last a lifetime. There is no greater evidence of this than in the actions of Walker’s women — current students and alumnae. The extent of the philanthropy, defined as the “altruistic concern for human welfare and advancement, usually manifested by donations of money, property, or work to needy persons, by endowment of institutions of learning and hospitals, and by generosity to other socially useful purposes,” need not be far-reaching — the simple gesture of helping neighbors with yard work for a few hours is a philanthropic act that a young woman can easily accomplish. The resulting satisfaction can become a platform for future acts of philanthropy that reach even further. Through Walker’s stated commitment to service learning, a teaching approach that combines service to the community with classroom curriculum, Walker’s girls learn that they can make an impact. By way of the many service opportunities offered by the School, such as caring for the School’s organic garden and donating its bounty to a local food bank, or participating in the local and far-reaching programs the School offers via ServCorps and Habitat for Humanity, Walker’s students see over and over how meaningful their acts of giving can be. For nearly a century, Walker’s women have been giving through myriads of vehicles. Just a few of these inspirational acts of philanthropy, both large and small, are highlighted in the following pages. Current students, families, faculty and alumnae come together in a worldwide community of giving. Our coverage cannot be all-encompassing, but indeed, can demonstrate “the meaningful life” as lived by a century of Walker’s women and their families.

Winter 2011 21

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PHILANTHROPY

Habitat and ServCorps News Habitat for Humanity and ServCorps are two of the largest

outreach programs Walker’s students participate in. In fall 2010, Habitat advisor Kim Blanchard accompanied Habitat Club co-heads, Melody Altschuler ’12 and Lauren Mamuszka ’11, to the Habitat Youth Leadership Conference in Columbus, OH. Over 300 Habitat volunteers, most of them college students, attended workshops to learn about programs they can implement at their schools upon their return, such as a Cardboard City and the Welcome Home Housing Simulation, both of which teach students about the devastating effects of substandard housing. This year, more than 45 students are members of Walker’s Habitat Club. The Club offers advocacy programs to educate Walker’s community about Habitat’s mission, and performs service at the School and in the community. The highlight of the Club experience is being selected to participate in one of the build trips during Spring Break: Collegiate Challenge, Columbus, GA, March 6-12: Students will return to Columbus to help construct new homes, and are excited to visit with homeowners they worked with last year. The group will arrive in Columbus a day early to build a swing set for the threeyear-old child of one of the homeowners and a porch swing for the grandmother and granddaughter of the other homeowner. ServCorps, Nashville, TN, March 7-13: Alumnae Ruth Grobe ’69 and her husband Rich, co-founders of ServCorps, have once again invited Walker’s and Avon Old Farms School to join them as ServCorps rehabilitates homes destroyed by last year’s flooding. The Habitat Club is also organizing an Alumnae Build on Cape Cod in June, 2011 – see opposite page for more information.

22 THE SUNDIAL

Lauren Mamuska, Kim Blanchard, and Melody Altschuler visit the American Mural Project display at the Habitat conference. Scrap materials from Habitat builds will be incorporated into this 120-foot mural (below), highlighting service in America; it is located in Winsted, CT. For more information on this fascinating project, visit wallofamerica.org.

All trips are chaperoned by Walker’s faculty, and students must meet specific criteria for selection to participate in the builds. For more information on Walker’s Habitat and ServCorps programs, please contact Kim Blanchard, Student Services Coordinator, at 860.408.4238, or at kim_blanchard@ethelwalker.org.


The Power of the Press Thanks to all who read The Sundial as a way to stay connected with Walker’s and fellow alumnae. We are delighted when students, parents, alumnae, and friends send us news, suggestions, and positive feedback on what they’ve read. One alumna contacted Walker’s shortly after reading the Summer 2010 Sundial. Not only did she enjoy the article on student trips with Habitat for Humanity, but also, this alumna was inspired by the coverage to support those efforts. How fitting that this issue of the Sundial is about Walker’s women and philanthropy as this alumna describes what moved her to give a gift to the School, underwriting two trips for a total of two dozen students this year. While she does not want her name to be shared, she does want to share her enthusiasm:

Summer 2010

The Magazine of The Ethel Walker

School

“Going into a different area of this country is crucial. It opens their [students’] eyes to a different view of life and the ability to make friends with these people and work with them is essential. That’s what’s key about Habitat for Humanity: people working together. “Accomplishing that at a young age with the assistance of qualified people is a tremendous personal success for each member of the group. It amounts to something significant, especially if they go back, reflect on the experience, and encourage others to do the same. “That’s why I’m happy to underwrite this experience.” We at Walker’s thank this alumna donor, and we thank all Walker’s women who give whatever they can, wherever they can.

Wellness at Walker’s

Campus News 21st Century Learning

Reunion 2010 Commencement 2010

Grandparents’ Day

Take Note

ALUMNAE HABITAT OPPORTUNITY

Walker’s Habitat Club is organizing a trip to Cape Cod, MA to renovate 100-year-old homes with Habitat for Humanity. Fourteen alumnae are invited to participate in this service project from June 5 – 11 in Craigsville, MA. It will be quite meaningful to rehabilitate these 100-year old homes as Walker’s turns 100! If you are interested in participating, please contact Kim Blanchard at Kim_blanchard@ethelwalker.org, or at 860.408.4238.

Winter 2011 23

PHILANTHROPY

A Walker’s Alumna Gives Back


JUNIOR-SENIOR PROJECTS IN PHILANTHROPY

PHILANTHROPY

Giving and Learning Abroad Among the students who planned their junior-senior projects around service in

Allison Margolis

other countries, Walker’s Allison Margolis ’11 and Cassandra Brignole ’11 went to Ghana to work with children in an orphanage and at a summer camp. For both girls, it was an eye-opening and life-changing experience. Allison said, “The experience removed me from my comfort zone and gave me an improved global perspective.” “I went into this trip expecting to help people, but as my adventure unfolded it was clear that I, too, was benefitting from this experience,” shared Cassandra. How can traditional learning compare with this indepth opportunity to work with children in a developing country? Their time in Ghana made Cassandra and Allison all the more aware of the issues facing the world, and gave them the meaningful opportunity to help in an impoverished area.

Cassandra Brignole

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ikewise, Melody Altschuler ’11 went to Las Mesas, Costa Rica, where she participated in a series of projects that included building stone walls, planting gardens, building a greenhouse, repairing roads, and painting schools. She lived with a local family for a week, getting to know the children and learning the culture first-hand. An obvious and important by-product of her time in Central America was a great improvement in Melody’s Spanish. She said, “Following through on my pledge to speak only Spanish allowed me to become comfortable with the language. I stayed committed to my intentions, and I am now comfortable speaking and understanding Spanish.” Muy bien, Melody!

24 THE SUNDIAL

Melody at work, above, and with new friends in Costa Rica, left.


Learning Philanthropy at Summer Camp PHILANTHROPY

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acinta Lomba ’13, Kayla Monroe ’12, and Monica Cortazar ’11, attended a week-long philanthropy camp in Pomfret, CT this summer, “Grab the Torch.” Founded by David Aldrich (and inspired by actor and philanthropist Paul Newman), this program exposes young people to the world of non-governmental and charitable organizations and the opportunities to effect change from what lies within them. On his website (grabthetorch.org), Aldrich says that we must recognize “the importance of preparing the next generation for their upcoming role and responsibility as volunteers, board and committee members and visionaries for the nonprofit world.” Walker’s Student Services Coordinator and Habitat advisor Kim Blanchard accompanied the girls to the camp. She knows how young people can learn to influence change and perform service for others: “They learned that it is not just money that helps their community, neighbors and strangers; they must also give of themselves and look beyond the barriers.” Speakers at the camp included representatives from Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Camp and Google, along with these from several other foundations and non-governmental organizations. At the end of the week, Blanchard said that our girls “poured their hearts out and spoke with conviction about how they want to reach out to others and help them.

Monica Cortazar, Jacinta Lomba, David Aldrich, Kayla Monroe, and Kim Blanchard

They spoke about how they were inspired to give back to their communities, schools and families.” Jacinta said she had a feeling that “I wouldn’t be signing up for your typical summer camp. I was correct.” Now, she said, “I feel strong enough to ‘grab the torch’ and run with it. I am ready to make a difference in the world.”

WALKER’S & BAWA – THE COMMITMENT CONTINUES

Kate Richardson

The Middle School Service Club effort to raise funds to build a health clinic in Bawa, Cameroon continues. This past summer, the Richardson family, who brought the dire need of the region to the attention of the Walker’s community, traveled with the Bawa Health Initiative (BHI) to work to improve conditions in this impoverished area. Kate ’14, Maggie ’15 and Emma, along with their parents Dennis and Kristen, measured and weighed Bawa residents, collected data, and played with the children of the region despite the language barrier. The School’s first Centennial Chapel on September 22 featured the Richardson family. The girls spoke about their five-week adventure and their sadness at seeing that children in Bawa did not have the most basic of necessities, that they were always hungry, and that they had little clothing and no toys. Back stateside, this year the Middle School Service and Bawa Clubs have raised $1,500 for BHI via an event at Flatbread Company in nearby Canton. Both clubs continue to plan events to support Bawa, and to educate the community about the critical need on the other side of the world. Emma, Kate, Maggie and Kristen Richardson in Bawa

Winter 2011 25


PHILANTHROPY

Grace Academy and Walker’s: A Partnership in Education and Service On August 30, 2010, a new school

for girls opened its doors on Main Street in Hartford, CT. Designed for girls from low-income families and affiliated with the Nativity Miguel Network of schools, Grace Academy is an independent school dedicated to providing a quality, tuition-free education to girls of all faiths from Hartford’s inner city neighborhoods. Very much like Walker's, Grace focuses on a strong academic program and instills a sense of responsibility to the community and the world through a curriculum and school culture that emphasize service to others. As Head of School Matt Fitzsimons says, “We work to inspire in students a love of learning, an awareness of their own interests and ideas, a fundamental understanding of culture, and an abiding sense of responsibility to their community.” Grace Academy is the result of fourteen months of planning by Fitzsimons, a former principal of Northwest Catholic School in West Hartford, his wife Sarah, a member of the Capital Region Education Council (CREC), and a team of educators, local business people, and others who are dedicated to improving the quality of life in inner-city Hartford by educating girls to make a difference. Serving as chair of this Board of Directors is Walker’s Dean Wendy

Walker’s girls spent time with Grace Academy students on the Centennial Day of Service. For more on this special Centennial year event, please see page 32.

26 THE SUNDIAL

Grace Academy students celebrate the school’s opening. Allerton, who says, “Walker’s has, for 100 years, known the value and importance of educating girls, and many current thinkers and leaders are recognizing that the way to truly change the situation in developing areas — in our own country — is to educate the girls and women who will then become the nurturers of the future. Greg Mortensen is doing this in Central Asia, Nicholas Kristof promotes this idea in Africa, Asia, and in developing areas. Grace Academy is doing this just 10 miles away from Simsbury. It is a wonderful thing to see.” Grace Academy currently serves grades 5 and 6, and ultimately will serve grades 5 through 8. Academy graduates will be supported as they search for a good high school program (70% of all Nativity Miguel Network graduates enroll in private high schools and 100% of them graduate from high school) and then a college. The school day is long and the school year runs for eleven months. Local organizations provide meals for the girls and their AmeriCorps volunteer teachers, and each Friday, a backpack full of healthy food is sent home for each girl and her family. Parents at Grace

volunteer their time to help clean the building and to cook meals for the teachers. In short, girls at Grace are supported and cared for, but work hard and have a strong sense of responsibility. This foundation of hard work and personal responsibility nicely complements the Walker’s Middle School program, and we are pleased to be working along-side Grace in developing partnerships between our two schools. On Walker’s Centennial Day of Service, students in Walker’s grades 6 and 7 partnered with the girls from Grace and Hands On Hartford, learning about food sources and how we can help families in Hartford make sure they get enough healthy food to eat. The following day, Matt Fitzsimons and the teachers and students from Grace Academy joined the Walker’s community for Thanksgiving Chapel to talk about the subject of gratitude. We are very grateful for our growing partnership with Grace Academy and look forward to watching our sister school in Hartford grow. For more information about Grace Academy and our partnership, please visit graceacademyhartford.org or contact Wendy Allerton at 860.408.4239 or wendy_allerton@ethelwalker.org.


Car Racing for a Cause

Deborah Place ’12 Awarded for Service Deborah Place ’12 was honored for her commitment as a volunteer for ServCorps, a Hartford-based organization founded by Walker’s alumna Ruth Grobe ’69 and her husband, Richard. ServCorps works in the Hartford area and throughout the nation to rehabilitate homes for those in need. Above, Ruth and Richard Grobe flank Deborah at the October recognition ceremony in Hartford.

PHILANTHROPY

In November, Samantha Sorbaro ’11 and her father Stephen formed a team to compete in the first annual Stamford Charity Go Kart Street Race to benefit Hedge Funds Care, which works to prevent and treat child abuse. Racing enthusiast Samantha was one of only two women who competed in the race. She, her father, and another team member raced against 30 other carts on a street circuit in a three-hour endurance race. “Before the race began, we walked the track and strategically planned the lines and the breaking locations, turning spots, and even certain areas where we should drift,” said Samantha. The event raised nearly ten thousand dollars for the charity. Mr. Sorbaro shared, “One of the driving instructors believes that it is all her years of horseback riding that have enabled her to see a fast and efficient line through the turns. So…becoming proficient in one thing may enable you to excel in something else that you would not think is all that related.” Samantha will be attending the Skip Barber Car Racing Program this summer.

Student Recognized by State Legislature In October, the Connecticut State Legislature recognized Wyntergrace Williams ’13 for her outstanding health initiative work. Wyntergrace has been active for several years working to improve nutrition in school lunches across the nation, working with government representatives to move legislation towards this goal. Congratulations, Wyntergrace!

Cape Verdeans United Genie Lomba, a member of Walker’s Development team, and her daughter Jacinta ’13, give back to residents of The Republic of Cape Verde, an archipelago of ten islands located in the central Atlantic Ocean, 350 miles off the coast of Western Africa. Both of Jacinta’s parents hail from Cape Verde; Genie founded the non-profit organization Cape Verdeans United (CVU) in the 1990s. The mission of the organization is to raise funds for playgrounds in Cape Verde so its children grow strong through play. Since the organization’s founding, the economy of the island nation has improved, but 30% of its inhabitants still live below the poverty line. Jacinta has assisted with fundraising for CVU, and has even helped install a playground on the nation’s island of Brava. Prior to her arrival at Walker’s, Jacinta organized an aid project in elementary school, “Kits for Cape Verde,” where the school’s families and faculty donated school and health supplies that were distributed by the Lomba family on the islands. Installation of a CVU playscape by John Lomba P’13 Winter 2011 27


PHILANTHROPY

Walker’s Community, Current and Past, Reaches out to Support Afghan Students W

est Hartford dentist Peter S. Katz has never been the type of person who expected to change the world. But he just might be, one tooth at a time. The opportunity to make what he hopes might be a small contribution to world peace came one day in late September when he received a phone call from The Ethel Walker School. His daughter Jessica’s experience (Class of 1999) at Walker’s had left him with “a soft spot” for the School, so he listened to the inquiry. The request from Walker’s was somewhat daunting. A new student had arrived from Afghanistan needing significant dental work, though she had received regular dental care at home. Walker’s inquired as to whether Dr. Katz would consider helping Sahra, pro bono. Katz was sympathetic, but cautious. “I thought about it, the lab work, the money, the time, the staff, the materials…” At first he said no. Then, he reconsidered. “Wouldn’t it be cool if this Afghan girl is treated by an American, number one, and by a Jewish American, number two?” When she arrived for her first appointment at Katz’s office on LaSalle Road in West Hartford, Sahra Ibrahimi had a toothache that was keeping her awake at night and was distracting her from her schoolwork. She had arrived in Connecticut in early September, one of two girls from Afghanistan who joined Walker’s community this year. Sahra is a sophomore who aspires to be a doctor and to return to her country to prove that girls have as much value as boys. In her native Kabul, Sahra attended a girls’ school, but she and her parents believed that studying in the United States would be the only way she could achieve her dream of becoming a professional woman. Sahra and Sajia Darwish attend Walker’s through a program supported by the

Dr. Katz, Sahra, and Jessica Katz ’99.

organization Seeds of Peace, which is dedicated to empowering young leaders from regions of conflict with the leadership skills required to advance reconciliation and coexistence. Katz said he has been amazed at Sahra’s courage and her command of English. He said he tries to explain every procedure and apologizes every time he has to give her an injection of novocaine — of which she has had many. She never complains. Recently, Katz started rebuilding a broken front tooth that Sahra hides with her hand when she talks. Although he was reluctant at first, Katz said he has “enjoyed every minute’’ of his time with Sahra, which will ultimately total at least 10 office visits. Then, this 62-yearold dentist whose practice now includes both of his daughters — Jessica, a hygienist, and Stephanie, a newly minted dentist — got a bit philosophical. “I hope she’ll have a nice smile and have a nice experience and go home and say those Americans are nice people. They treated me well. “It’s not on a worldwide scale, but if one person can make a difference, maybe we can make the world a better place.” Hilary Waldman is the mother of Jill O’Brien ’13 and host parent to Sahra Ibrahimi ’13. She kindly contributed this story to The Sundial.

Walker’s students from Afghanistan, Sajia and Sahra, flank Awista Ayub, who spoke at Walker’s in September. Ayub, author of Kabul Girls Soccer Club, is actively involved in assisting girls from Afghanistan as they pursue their dreams and ambitions. Sajia and Sahra’s attendance at Walker’s is made possible by a generous donor.

28 THE SUNDIAL


Walker’s Students Create Algebra Guide also to help alleviate math fears through fun and helpful hints. Each girl is responsible for five separate topics of her choosing — each topic is allocated two pages, which will include rules, tips, and illustrations. “So often my students have really helpful and creative ideas to help each other learn concepts — this book will be a compilation of all that peer expertise,” says Harris. Sales of the book to other schools and learning organizations will benefit Walker’s math program, and the process is inspiring the students’ creativity, confidence, and understanding of service.

PHILANTHROPY & SOCIAL NETWORKING

The Advent of Online GIVING Social networks and digital communications have already and continue to change how money flows in this country. What makes this topic so interesting is that it is changing right now, today, as the web continues to evolve as a tool for philanthropy and change. Consider these facts: • The power of people: An article in The Wall Street Journal in 2008 pointed out that “People are 100 times more likely to donate when asked by a friend or family member than an anonymous solicitation.” This explains why social networks, representing hundreds of millions of interpersonal connections, hold such vast potential. • Immediate action: Contributors are just a few clicks away from the information they need to support a cause, and other content such as video can be used to provide storytelling and emotional context. The urge to give can be gratified almost instantly. • Trending upward: Online giving currently represents 2% to 3% of giving in the U.S., but it is increasing by roughly 50% per year.

• Trending younger: Many people use social networks, but younger people use them more often and more extensively. This continually unlocks new generations of donors in their 20s, 30s, and 40s. • Strength in numbers: Kevin Bacon, who founded SixDegrees.org in 2007, said it well. The goal isn’t to raise $10 million through a small group of angel donors. It’s to “reach out to a million people and have them each put $10 on their credit cards.” It’s worth remembering that the bulk of President Obama’s campaign contributions were raised online in small dollar amounts. • Behavioral tracking: The developments in behavioral tracking online — the practice of advertisers “following” you across the web and presenting ads based on your online viewing habits — may be unsettling to some; but it may lead the way to the next phase of online philanthropy. This is one online trend that’s not going away. Winter 2011 29

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The students in Michele Harris’s math class aren’t just number crunchers, they’re budding authors and philanthropists. Seven Algebra 1 students are putting their mathematical minds together to create a helpful guide for other algebra students as part of a classroom project. The Magical & Magnificent Survival Guide of Fun Tips, Tricks & Flips for Pre-Algebra Whizzes (Not Dummies) is the intentionally quirky title of the book the girls hope to publish by the end of the academic year. It is intended as a guide for other students, particularly girls, not only to help them with basic math skills, but


PHILANTHROPY

Alumnae & Philanthropy Scores of Walker’s alumnae are dedicated benefactors of organizations that serve those in need, patrons of the arts, supporters of medical research; the ways in which generations of Walker’s women “give” are many. As the first of a recurring series on Walker’s Alumnae in Philanthropy, we profile just a few members of our remarkable community and the causes to which they are committed.

The Magpie Giving Circle A shared milestone and celebration ultimately prompted one group of Walker’s women to look together toward helping others. Fourteen classmates from the Class of 1967 gathered in the spring of 2008 to mark their 60th birthdays. The discussion began surrounding their work and private lives, but led to conversation about education. “As members of a class graduating in the late sixties, quite a few of us had experienced difficulties [at Walker’s], but over time we had come to appreciate the quality of the education we were fortunate enough to receive from some extraordinary teachers,” says Bobbie Bristol Kinnell. This appreciation soon evolved into a desire to help others, particularly young women without the same opportunities this group had been afforded. These Walker’s women soon named themselves the “Magpie Giving Circle.” The name was chosen with humor and respect for the bird’s representation in folklore. “We wanted a name that would celebrate the spirit, creativity, and diverse talents of our group, but wouldn’t be self-congratulatory,” says Bobbie. In various folklore traditions, the magpie is often mischievous, but can also be the bearer of good news and help. Before their first gathering, the classmates each read Greg Mortensen’s Three Cups of Tea; the following year, they read Half the Sky by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn. These books, in addition to work interests abroad, travel, and an awareness of the role the United States plays globally, inspired the group to fund projects in the developing world. The Magpies are now in their third year as a philanthropic group and seem to have found the right balance between structure and flexibility. They don’t have official officers or titles, except for treasurer. While there is no required amount each member is expected to contribute, the group did come up with a total amount needed to accomplish their goals (only the discreet treasurer knows how much each person donates). In its first official year (2009), The Magpie Giving Circle helped fund a women’s dormitory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, along with a network of investors contributing to The Harpswell Foundation Leadership Center for University Women. There are a number of well-regarded universities in Phnom Penh, but no housing for female students (men can stay in Buddhist temples). The dormitory the Magpies helped fund is the second built by The Harpswell Foundation: it houses 48 young women students. The mission of both the dorms in Phnom Penh is “to empower a new generation of women leaders in Cambodia.” Several members of the Magpies are personally involved in enhancing the welfare of women and bringing their knowledge and experience to conversations about this topic. For example, Docey Baldwin Lewis brought a proposal to the group to fund an educational program and weaving facilities for young women in Nepal. Through her career as a weaver, designer and international development consultant, Docey has seen women’s lives transformed 30 THE SUNDIAL

Front row: Julie Lange Peyton, Catherine Nimick; Middle row: Bobbie Bristol Kinnell, Docey Baldwin Lewis, Cynthia Johnston Alexander, Kate Crichton Gubelmann; Back Row: Judith Scott Larsen, Frances Beinecke Elston, Lucie Sides Bourdon, Holly Hulburd, Dia Wasley Chigas. Not Pictured: Leslie Acoca, Betsy Sivage Clark, Jesseca Ferguson, Elizabeth Schlosser, and Sigourney Weaver

by job opportunities and educational opportunities. In 2010, The Magpies helped fund Docey’s proposed work/study program at the Phaplu Monastery Center in Nepal. The Magpies made contributions to two additional organizations in 2010. One beneficiary was Hope House, a residential school for 100 girls in Calcutta’s red light district. (Hope House is funded by the Kids with Cameras Foundation, an organization founded by filmmakers of the Oscar-winning documentary Born into Brothels.) A Magpie grant also went to The Initiative to Educate Afghan Women, a program that provides four-year scholarships for young Afghan women to attend American universities, as well as leadership and job training. The three 2010 grants ranged from $5,000 to $10,000. In 2011, the Magpies will meet in Docey’s hometown, New Harmony, IN. While these get-togethers are an opportunity to enjoy one another’s company, their primary business is reviewing proposals, discussing and voting on them. Cynthia Alexander says, “It feels so great to be taking the best part of the EWS experience — the lifelong friendships it fostered — and doing something so positive with it.” And Docey says, “So many young women in other parts of the world simply never get the chance for an education. If we are able to reach dozens or maybe even hundreds of girls, it could inspire our daughters and friends and former classmates to do something similar — to send a significant number of girls to school. Whether it is supporting a dorm, the cost of uniforms, books, or leadership centers, doing this together has an impact that will, we hope, be contagious.”


Ariana Rockefeller Bucklin ’01 BRAND AMBASSADOR, HANDS UP NOT HANDOUTS NEW YORK, NY

Karen Polcer Bdera ‘79 GOD’S LOVE WE DELIVER NEW YORK, NY

Karen Polcer Bdera ’79 had an epiphany in 2007. Then she quit her job. Her corporate, for-profit job in the New York fashion world was not the footprint she wanted to leave as a legacy. “Selling fashionable widgets wasn’t the karmic outcome I wanted.” A dedicated volunteer for the Avon Walk since the late ’90s, Karen had been very successful at helping the organizers drum up both revenue and enthusiasm. When in 2008 she resigned from her corporate job without a ‘next move,’ a friend at Avon Walk told her about a 10-week consulting job at God’s Love We Deliver. Karen’s karma had been delivered. God’s Love We Deliver was founded in 1985 when Ganga Stone, a hospice volunteer, was asked by a minister what she was doing as she delivered a meal to an HIV/AIDS patient. The minister, on hearing her response to an obvious need, told her “You’re not delivering food…you’re delivering God’s love.” Today, volunteers at God’s Love We Deliver, a non-sectarian, non-profit organization, deliver over 16,000 meals a week to clients in all five boroughs of New York, as well as New Jersey. Initially, their clients were the shunned and terminally ill HIV/AIDS patients, but today GLWD’s

mission includes all patients with life-altering diseases who are too ill to cook for themselves. Each meal is nutritionally tailored to the health needs of the individual, and no one has ever been turned away for any reason. “It’s not glamorous and it’s not well paid,” says Karen. “But it is so deeply satisfying to be able to have an immediate impact on saving lives every day. This isn’t about widgets.” Karen’s daily contribution is in event production, managing every detail of the organization’s four signature events: a Hamptons cocktail party, a literary luncheon, a gala awards ball, and the Race to Deliver in Central Park. Karen says, “My experience at Walker’s as the Ferguson stage manager, of never being on the stage but running the whole show, was the perfect training.” In fact, Bdera credits all of her experience at Walker’s as leading her to her work with God’s Love We Deliver. “Approaching and solving tough problems was something I learned at Walker’s, and I use that knowledge every day in my work to change how others view sick people.” God’s Love We Deliver has more than 1,400 volunteers working five shifts a day, every day. Corporations often volunteer their employees to get them out of the office and into the kitchen; colleges send students for an alternative spring break; and even young children will create birthday cards and holiday decorations to be delivered to each client. “We deliver much more than a meal,” says Karen. “We are a community and our clients are people who need respect, dignity, friendship, and sometimes a lifeline.” For more information on God’s Love We Deliver, go to www.glwd.org or contact Karen Bdera at (212) 294-8182.

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Ariana Rockefeller Bucklin ’01 volunteers as a Brand Ambassador for Hands Up Not Handouts (HUNHO), an initiative spearheaded by the Sager Family Foundation, which partners with women of the world in the design, production, and marketing of unique, one-of-a-kind goods using handicraft techniques. Their motto is: Charity can cripple, we help people help themselves. Introduced to HUNHO by a friend who knew that she was very interested in women’s issues, Ariana had interned at the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) when she studied at Columbia University, so she had experience advocating for women in developing countries. HUNHO helps women develop skills to produce crafts to sell at 100% profit. Ariana became a Brand Ambassador for HUNHO because she believes that women have the capacity to bond communities together, and that educating and empowering women facilitates positive growth. Ariana appreciates that HUNHO is a direct impact organization, and she believes in their effective and simple philosophy. She also very much enjoys the other dynamic and wonderful women who are affiliated with HUNHO; she says, “They are smart, cool ladies who believe in this great cause.

They put their hearts behind it all the way. These dynamic and wonderful girls really care; they are not just donating money in order to get their names on a plaque.” Ariana credits her time at Walker’s for her desire to support women. “Women supporting women is an amazingly powerful thing. Walker’s taught me the importance of supporting and taking care of my [friends]. With this organization, I can help, indirectly, to empower other women to become leaders of their communities and countries. When women are empowered, the world does change for the better.” Ariana also cites her family’s history of philanthropy as a reason for her involvement with HUNHO. Ariana is on the board of The David Rockefeller Fund, which her grandfather started for his grandchildren. Ariana’s grandfather, as did her great-grandfather, John D. Rockefeller Jr., encourages his children and grandchildren to find philanthropic causes which inspire them. Ariana was raised by the mantra, “To whom much is given, much is expected.” “It is so rewarding to help organizations and causes which resonate with me as an individual. Knowing I can carry on my family legacy is empowering.” Ariana is pleased, too, that the organizations that she supports are, in turn, empowered by her financial and volunteer contributions.


PHILANTHROPY

Centennial Day of Service Serves Many As the kindergarteners at the Burr School smiled at me when I taught them how to spell “family,” I could not help but smile back. MELODY ALTSCHULER ’12

Even though we are not in Africa directly helping the people of Bawa, we did help them by creating cards for others to buy so that we can raise money for them. JACLYN REIS ’11

I really felt proud and accomplished because of the small yet meaningful difference we made in the world. NELLIE SPEERS ’16

GIFTS OF LOVE, AVON, CT: ASSEMBLING THANKSGIVING CARE PACKAGES • BURR SCHOOL, HARTFORD: CLASSROOM ASSISTANCE • AVON SENIOR CENTER, AVON, CT: WII BOWLING TOURNAMENT • BAWA INITIATIVE: GREETING CARD PRODUCTION FOR FUNDRAISING • GRACE ACADEMY, HARTFORD: RIVERFRONT CLEANUP • EBONY HORSEWOMEN, HARTFORD: HORSE AND BARN CARE • BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, HARTFORD: ACTIVITIES ASSISTANCE • SERVCORPS, HARTFORD: HOME CONSTRUCTION • COMMUNITY FARM OF SIMSBURY: FALL CLEANUP • SIMSBURY PUBLIC

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before, service learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. Meticulously organized by Big 7 Head of Service Katie Pellon ’11, with the assistance of faculty members Wendy Allerton, Bethany Altschwager, Lee-Ann Harris, and Rich Prager, over 300 members of the community spent time at almost 20 locations. Faculty and parents served as drivers and chaperones and members of the work force.

The Day of Service was amazing. I realized how much I truly love working with kids and I hope to visit the Boys & Girls Club again. CHEVAUGHN WELLINGTON ’11

Even though it was cold out, I was warmed by the idea that I was helping someone. CHARLOTTE HUGHES ’11

The seniors had [Wii Bowling] down to a science. We eventually copied their technique but by then it was too late! We were defeated; never underestimate your opponents! LOALES CRUZ ’12

LIBRARY: PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES • LUTZ CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: PROPERTY CLEANUP • WALKER’S OWN EMPTY BOWLS PROJECT: BOWL THROWING • CHEERING ON THE VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY TEAM AT AN AWAY GAME • AVON HEALTH CENTER: GAMES WITH ELDERLY RESIDENTS • THE CHILDREN’S CENTER: PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES • A BETTER CHANCE HOUSE: YARD CLEANUP • MAPLE VILLAGE RESIDENCE: FOOD PREP AND DELIVERY • FIDELCO: TACTILE TEMPLATE DESIGN FOR GUIDE DOG/HUMAN COMMUNICATIONS • MERCY HOUSING: FOOD PREPARATION

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n November 17, the entire Walker’s community of faculty and students, as well as many staff members and parents, spent much of their day out in the field performing service at locations in the Greater Hartford area, organizations that were happy to be the beneficiaries of helping hands. While all students are required to perform a set number of service hours per school year, and many choose to do more than the minimum, this day was significant as part of the School’s Centennial celebration in that it demonstrated en masse a community-wide commitment to service learning. As we’ve mentioned in The Sundial


A TRIBUTE TO PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE ETHEL WALKER SCHOOL BOARD OF TRUSTEES TRIBUTE

We are grateful to the following people, who, as past Presidents of the Board of Trustees, offered their extraordinary commitment and dedication, shared their wise counsel and leadership, and have ensured the advancement of The Ethel Walker School through the years. We recently spoke to many of these outstanding individuals as well as to some of their Board associates, about their experiences as President. Paul M. Butterworth (†) President of the Board 1954 –1957 Frank O. H. Williams (†) President of the Board 1957 –1959 Thomas R. Rudel P’59 (†) President of the Board 1959 –1972

!

Amey Amory DeFriez ’45, P’67, ‘69 President of the Board 1972 –1975 Every school, like every organization, has its ups and downs. At The Ethel Walker School a crossroad came when, in 1972, the Head took sick leave in the winter term, with resignation effective at the end of the school year. Another administrative person stepped up as Acting Head, but asked to be relieved of that position as soon as possible. The tentative budget indicated, after anticipated gifts, a six-figure operating loss. The current President asked not to be re-nominated. As the Chinese have often told us “With crisis comes opportunity.” First, I was a current Board member, and, at this point, was asked to take over the Presidency. Hoping that this was the proper kind of crisis, and tremendously pleased with the offer, and basically, I think, an optimist, I gladly

34 THE SUNDIAL

accepted. I now began weekly trips to Simsbury from Boston, concerned with faculty and staff morale. Second, Ogden Miller, Yale alumnus, retired head of The Gunnery School, and another optimist, agreed to take over as Interim Head. His positive attitude and energetic presence was of enormous help. And third, an energetic Search Committee nominated a younger male head, Richard Peirce, from a California School. On a subsequent trip to the School, with his bright and charming wife, both Richard and Dorothy were well-received by all. Their energetic and warm presence pleased faculty, staff, students, and parents equally. Our crisis had indeed become opportunity, and Richard was appointed after a most enthusiastic vote of thanks to Ogden Miller. My term as Board President ended in 1975. I was truly delighted that Deborah Flagg Scott succeeded me, proving that education for leadership was truly an effective part of our EWS education. She and I had become close friends through our joint trustee terms, and I couldn’t imagine a better successor. My Walker’s leadership helped me to be nominated as a Radcliffe Trustee, and I also had the privilege of chairing that Board. That led me into many other ventures, but it all began at EWS! How fortunate I have been. Thank you, Walker’s! “I so enjoyed serving on the board with Amey. She was a great leader and she accomplished a lot.” –Constance Lavino Bell ’48, P’72, ’75


Deborah Flagg Scott ’48, P’74 President of the Board 1975 –1980

“I was the Chair of the Nominating Committee at the time and Amey Amory DeFriez ’45 and I reached out to Debbie to ask her to be the President of the Board. She immediately did not think she could do the job, when in fact she turned out to be the best person for it and was a great President! –Robert “Stretch” Gardiner P’67, ’74

Beverly “Bea” Vander Poel Banker ’60, P’82 President of the Board 1980 –1982 Walker’s gave me a fine education. When I returned to serve on the Board (19741984) my education was continued. I learned so much and what I learned from Walker’s I was able to take with me as a basis for future service. As Board Chair (19801982) I was most fortunate in having a fantastic board comprised of talented and generous alumnae and competent men who gave large amounts of their time to their wives’ or daughters’ school. Even though the administrative leadership was not what we had hoped to find, the Board members’ leadership was unfailing. We learn our best lessons during our most trying moments. I believe that this Board held a steady course, held expenses and began a program of increased annual and capital giving. I was truly indebted to Austin Buck P’79, my treasurer. He recognized how much I hated red ink! I thank Debbie Scott ’48, P’74, my mentor who gave so generously of herself to me and to our School. I remember each and every board member and am still grateful to this day for their service and loyalty to Walker’s. I hold them in tremendous esteem. You know who you are. Thank you.

Claudia Ramsland Burch ‘68 President of the Board 1982 –1985 During the period of my tenure, I served alongside three different Heads of School as Walker’s navigated its way toward a vision for its future. Fortunately, the Board of Trustees was both patient and wise, and its members were a source of encouragement and inspired guidance to me and to the school. We began work on a Long-Range Plan and mission statement for EWS that included a commitment to remaining an all-girls school. We grappled with formulating an admissions policy that balanced admitting students within a narrowed range of talent and academic ability and developing a curriculum providing rigor and interdisciplinary learning to those students. We identified the need for a new and more comprehensive library and began planning for a future capital campaign to create such a building. All in all, I was blessed and enriched by the experience of working with an extraordinarily gifted and dedicated Board, and I would like to express my gratitude particularly to Trustees Leslie Hailand Newman ‘66, Austin Buck P’79 and Katie O’Brian P’82, ‘84, without whose support my job would have been impossible. “Claudia was a strong, intelligent and effective leader of the EWS Board. I remember her as gracious and positive.” –Lucy Rosenberry Jones ’59, P’80

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“Debbie was an extraordinary leader. She grasped situations quickly. She never failed to meet a challenge. She knew when to take the road that would be best for Walker’s and not necessarily the easy road. Debbie was fun to be with, a good friend to all who served with her and a shrewd observer of human nature. We shared laughter and late night phone calls and met many difficult situations head on. Debbie was a fabulous mentor to me.” –Beverly “Bea” Vander Poel Banker ’60, P’82

“Although Bea’s unquestionable loyalty and fondness for Walker’s is partially family born (mom Beverly Sartorius Vander Poel ’37 and her daughter, Billings Day Cay ’82 and two sisters are alumnae) there are many other qualities that cannot be garnered from family alone. Bea had a young family at the time she was Board Chair but her determination and drive to do the best for Walker’s never suffered. She spent endless hours as the School’s first annual fund chair only to be followed by the even more extensive and consuming job as Board Chair. Her tenure on the Board was 10 years! Her devotion was total. I was always amazed at her energy level. With this, she accomplished much and thank goodness for her natural charm, grace and wit which held her and the School in good stead during some difficult times. I admire her still for that guidance, her ever-present thoughtfulness, fortitude and steel-trap mind.” –Elizabeth “Liz” Nash Muench ’55


TRIBUTE

Elizabeth “Betsy” Rauch Rainoff ‘53 President of the Board 1985 –1987 Having the privilege of being Walker’s Board President was both an honor and a challenge. Solving the problems that faced the School required teamwork and coordination among all of the School’s constituencies. I was fortunate to serve on a Board filled with experience and wisdom, and with two Heads of School, Michael Cornog and Margaret Bonz, as well as Business Manager Gordon Clarke. In sum, the respect of the team, the progress of the School, and the lifelong friendships made during my tenure were the lasting rewards of the position. “Betsy was an absolutely fantastic and professional Chair of the Board. She brought joy and fun to our meetings, and I respected her immensely.” –Katherine S. O’Brien P’82, ’84

Suzanne “Suzi” Chapin Berl ‘64 President of the Board 1987 –1993 During my tenure on the Board, the School was ably guided by Head Margaret Bonz. At Dartmouth (prior to coming to Walker’s), she had seen the need for young women to develop their own voices. At EWS, she was passionately committed to this end. She worked quietly and tirelessly to make our School a better and more viable institution that would stand the test of time. Based on the School’s long-standing tradition and the writings of Harvard professor Carol Gilligan and others, we reaffirmed the need for independent education for young women. During this period, we introduced the Middle School to guide and help shape young women at that critical period in their lives. To increase the School’s endowment and to address some critical “bricks and mortar” needs, we undertook a successful $12 million capital campaign. Several generous alumnae stepped up to help meet the challenge.

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“Suzi Chapin Berl took command of the board at a very challenging time economically for the School, but also an exciting time with the arrival of Margaret Huling Bonz. With a calm, analytical manner, Suzi kept the board focused on the important matter of moving the School she loved forward. Her concern for Walker’s and her determination made her a fine leader for the times.” –Letitia McClure Potter ’55, P’85

Aileen “Missy” Turnbull Geddes ‘56 President of the Board 1993 –1996 Working with Margaret Bonz and an enormously talented, hardworking Board was a special honor for me. I viewed my job as promoting in any way I could Margaret’s vision for Walker’s. With the help and support of dedicated Board members and a loyal faculty that had to make some tough sacrifices, we were able to meet the challenges that confronted us. It was privilege indeed to be surrounded by so many able people, all sharing the same hopes and aspirations for our School. I remember each one fondly and am extremely grateful for their selfless dedication to making Walker’s a better place. “Missy Geddes epitomizes the best in an Ethel Walker graduate. She is a marvelous wife, mother, and contributing member to her community. Missy was a diligent and informed President of our Board. She rallied her troops under some difficult circumstances and kept our school very much on track. We owe her a great deal of gratitude.” –Roberta “Bobbie” Gerstell Bennett ’53

Elizabeth “Sue” Cesare President of the Board 1996 –2000 It was a pleasure and a privilege to serve as President of the Board of Trustees of The Ethel Walker School. What I valued most was the dedication, generosity, and talent of my fellow Board members. Our decisions were made as one even though our viewpoints were many. The needs of the School during our time and a determined spirit of stewardship prompted us to have on our agenda the completing of the “One Vision, Many Voices Campaign,” appointing a new


Head of School, creating a new mission statement, and constructing the Beaver Brook Academic Center. Again, thanks to all who were a part of this watch.

Margot Treman Rose ‘80 President of the Board 2000 –2005 My tenure as Board President came at a challenging time in the School’s history. One year into my term, the events of September 11, 2001 were a game changer in every respect. The subsequent downturn in the economy negatively affected the endowment, and suddenly, the School found itself in a serious financial crisis. By 2003, our Identity Task Force had challenged all assumptions regarding the School, its mission and its future and we set a new course armed with financial, strategic and marketing plans, as well as a revised campus master plan. By April of 2005, 2½ years later, we had raised over $11 million in annual and capital gifts, achieved record enrollment, and increased tuition revenue. I was fortunate to serve with Head of School Susanna Jones, who worked tirelessly, along with her dedicated staff, to right the ship, and with such a supportive, disciplined and process-oriented Board of Trustees. It was a difficult journey, but I was rewarded with meaningful and lasting friendships.

My years on the Board of The Ethel Walker School were enormously rewarding, as we considered a number of critical decisions affecting the very future of the school. As examples of this process, we determined that we would remain an all-girls boarding school that welcomed a significant day school population; that we would significantly increase our Middle School in order to provide a steady influx into the Upper School; that we would continue to provide excellence in our Equestrian program, thereby distinguishing ourselves from other similar institutions; that we would optimize our inherited gift of the “Walker’s Woods,” in a way that would emphasize our board decision to turn Ethel Walker’s “green,” alongside our decision to house our Head in the middle of the campus in a “green” structure. Finally, and very importantly, we found Bessie Speers. I rest my case.” “It was an honor to serve on the board under Hugh’s tremendous leadership. He was the ship that kept the waters moving forward and the waves of his success are present at Walker’s today. His accomplishments were countless, and he positioned Walker’s to attract the finest Head of School — Bessie Speers. As we enter our Centennial year, Walker’s can be proud of our Board Chairs and their commitment to the School. Thank you, Hugh." –Sarah Gates Colley ’75

“My first Board meeting at Walker’s was in September 2001, just after the 9/11 attack in New York. As one can imagine it was a very difficult time for our country, and along with an economy that was struggling even before that, it presented a very challenging period for Walkers. Through it all Margot provided extraordinary leadership that allowed the school to not only weather the storm, but emerge on a path that greatly strengthened the School. She was a great fundraiser, helped establish The Middle School and worked tirelessly to help Walker’s succeed. Her dedication and loyalty to Walker’s is to be admired, and it was an honor to work with her on the Board.” –G. Munroe Cobey P’01, ’03 Winter 2011 37

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“A natural leader, Sue relates to people so easily and so well, you can almost hear the connection click. She has a Connecticut Yankee’s appreciation for practical priorities which she has worked into a unique skill set to successfully manage the mergers of a lifetime, including marriage, family, teams, schools, and Trustees. Guide and mentor to many, sailor and sage, with a coach’s optimism, and a player's energy Sue is all of these, yet I’m most grateful for her friendship, a special gift, our gift, from Walker’s.” –Susan S. Ford ’63

C. Hugh Hildesley P’85 President of the Board 2005 –2008


CENTENNIAL UPDATE

Celebrating Our Centennial Centennial Chapel Series: October 2010–October 2011 We began this year-long special Chapel Series with the inspiring Founder’s Day Chapel preceded by a presentation from Walker’s Richardson family describing their energetic work in Bawa. These meaningful Chapels focus on service, philanthropy and learning, both in our own backyards and throughout the world. Please check our Centennial website section for the most up-to-date information on this Series.

Mally Cox-Chapman ’69 — January 5, 2011 Known nationally for her work in philanthropy, Ms. Cox-Chapman will speak to our community about the importance of giving.

Sahra Ibrahimi ’13 and Sajia Darwish ’14 — January 19, 2011 Our Lives in Afghanistan

Nancy Sizer — January 26, 2011 Renowned educator and author of The Students are Watching: Schools and Moral Contract, and Keeping School.

Ashley Smith Washburn ’79 — March 30, 2011 Ms. Washburn is chair of Asante Sana for Education, an organization which helps educate teachers and students in Tanzania.

Paul Assaiante — April 6, 2011 Head Coach, Trinity College Squash Team, and author of Run to Roar; Coaching to Overcome Fear

Autism Spectrum Unplugged — May 4, 2011

Renowned Equestrian V. Courtland Smith The School welcomed V. Courtland Smith II of Indiana’s Culver Military Academy on October 27 as the third Centennial Chapel Series speaker. Mr. Smith has a long and distinguished career as a rider, polo player and teacher. Students and faculty alike were captivated by Mr. Smith’s message — that is, that working with horses can teach leadership skills that will serve us well in life. The concept of a young woman working in concert with a 1200-pound horse is indeed impressive and “the essence of leadership,” he shared. Smith concluded by saying that a rider can have dominance without physical superiority by learning skills and planning ahead — all necessary for a successful and rewarding life. “Remember,” he said, “Sit deep in the saddle, put your heels down, gather your reins, raise your chin, and move out!”

Mara Liasson, Political Correspondent On December 3, Mara Liasson, correspondent for NPR and Fox News, visited Walker’s. Liasson has extensive experience covering the political beat in Washington, DC, including several presidential elections, and served as a White House correspondent during the Clinton years. In her energetic presentation she shared her optimism about the very real possibility that there will be a woman President in the not-so-distant future; her disappointment in political partisanship and the dispiriting, uncivil tone of political discourse; and her hope that the recommendations of the Deficit Commission will be reviewed carefully and be adopted by Congress as a way to alleviate our economic dependence on China. 38 THE SUNDIAL


CENTENNIAL UPDATE “Ethel Walker” greets Governor Rell

Connecticut Governor M. Jodi Rell Kicks off Centennial at Founder’s Day Chapel Governor M. Jodi Rell was the keynote speaker at the Founder’s Day Chapel on

October 6, the official start to a year-long celebration of Walker’s Centennial. Students, faculty, parents, alumnae, and friends enjoyed remarks from Head of School Bessie Speers, a delightful surprise sketch featuring “Miss Ethel Walker” and her sister Evangeline, and an official State proclamation which declared the following day Mountain Day! The Chapel was organized by the School’s Beaver Brook Committee, which is comprised of faculty members and is led by senior faculty member and Math Chair Darrell Carrington. The Beaver Brook Committee is but one of the many committees involved in the Centennial. In her welcome address, Bessie Speers noted, “Walker’s does not belong to any of us. It is our School, yes, but its impact reaches far beyond any one of us, as Walker’s women have improved their communities all over the world. We have the vision of Ethel Walker to thank for this.”

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CENTENNIAL UPDATE

Following the introduction of former faculty and staff guests, Ms. Speers once again took to the podium, and as she began speaking, was “interrupted” by the “appearance” of Miss Ethel Walker herself (as portrayed by English teacher Gwen Couch), who was soon joined by her sister Evangeline Walker Andrews (history teacher Meg Mahoney). “Ms. Walker” and “Ms. Andrews” regaled the audience with a look back at their youth, quite a few of their hi jinks, and the early days at Walker’s. They were joined on stage by Bessie Speers, who had the opportunity to ask a question or two and answer some as well; Ethel and Evangeline were curious as to whether traditions cherished in the early 20th century, such as Dogswood Day, are still celebrated today, which, of course, they are! Following this brilliantly executed character sketch, the Grapes performed the School Song, and Student Body President Cody Patrina ’11 introduced Governor Rell. The Governor recounted her path to the Governor’s office, and her moments of indecision, at which time she drew upon her mother’s advice, which she shared with the audience: “If you think you can do it, if you think you can be good at it, if you will like it: then do it!” In keeping with Walker’s long-term commitment to service, Governor Rell talked about her commitment to helping others, and how this makes the office she holds so fulfilling Student body president Cody Patrina ’11 for her. Governor Rell then shared an Official Statement from the State of Connecticut, By Her Excellency M. Jodi Rell. Some excerpts: • Whereas, for nearly 100 years, The Ethel Walker School has enriched the lives of young women in grades six through twelve and prepared them to make a difference in our world; and

“Evangeline” and “Ethel Walker”

Darrell Carrington and Roger Cantello with former faculty Santiago Enrique and Mike Roy

• Whereas, The Ethel Walker School will celebrate its Centennial in the upcoming year with many noteworthy events; and I wish the supporters, faculty, alumnae, and students best wishes for 100 more years of success and excellence; and • Whereas, every fall, all faculty and students take the day off to participate in a wonderful tradition: “Mountain Day,” a community hike up to the Heublein Tower that gives the girls the chance to interact with each other in an outdoor setting;

Faculty past and present

Therefore, I, M. Jodi Rell, Governor of the State of Connecticut, do hereby officially proclaim October 7, 2010, as MOUNTAIN DAY FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE ETHEL WALKER COMMUNITY in the State of Connecticut. As cheers arose from the audience, speakers and guests departed the Chapel, followed by students and faculty. The event was a fitting and truly festive beginning to this meaningful year of celebration at Walker’s. Walker’s senior faculty 40 THE SUNDIAL


NATIONAL CENTENNIAL ENVIRONMENTAL SYMPOSIUM

Alumna Frances Beinecke

Elston ’67, President of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), and noted environmentalist and author Bill McKibben, will be the keynote speakers at this two-day event for the national independent school community in June 2011. Alumna Brooke Redmond ’90 is on the planning committee for the Symposium, which builds upon the success of Walker’s 2010 Environmental Think Tank and looks to combine the energy coming from initiatives around the world in environmental stewardship, service learning, theology, wellness, arts and science to enhance food system literacy in classrooms, cafeterias and communities. Faculty members Jill Harrington and Carol ClarkFlanagan are currently reviewing proposals for the conference, which will be held on campus, postcommencement, on June 16 and 17. The Symposium will incorporate the School’s local partnerships with Billings Forge Community Works and the Community Farm of Simsbury.

Centennial Weekend SEPTEMBER 30 – OCTOBER 2, 2011 Not only is this THE Centennial celebration that you do not want to miss, but it is Reunion Weekend for classes ending in 1, 2, 6, and 7, too! Some (but not all!) highlights of the Centennial Weekend Celebration: • Participate in Shakespeare, Economics, Equine Science, Chinese and a variety of other classes • Celebrate the work of classmates who are poets, painters, essayists, dancers, photographers, novelists, journalists, musicians and actors at our Authors & Artists Reception • Enjoy the night sky above Walker’s from the van Gemeren Observatory • Have breakfast in the barn and enjoy an equestrian exhibition • March with your classmates in the Centennial Parade • The Ba-na-na!! • Commemorate our first 100 years at Centennial Chapel • Enjoy peak fall foliage in Walker’s Woods • Revel in style at the Centennial Dinner Celebration There will be plenty on tap during this amazing weekend and you won’t want to miss it! We’ll keep you updated via our website, electronic communications, and mail! Sharing in this historic celebration with classmates, faculty and Walker’s generations past and present will create life-long memories.

Frances Beinecke Elston ’67

Bill McKibben

Stay Up-To-Date on Centennial Events: ethelwalker.org/centennial or call Alumnae Relations at 860.408.4259

The Celebration of the Century! Winter 2011 41

CENTENNIAL UPDATE

Food for Thought: Food Literacy in the Classroom, Cafeteria, and Community


CENTENNIAL UPDATE

Alumnae Authors & Artists Update Below, just a few of the published works we will be featuring in our Centennial exhibitions, and celebrating at our Centennial Weekend Authors & Artists Reception.

We look forward to hosting the online and on campus exhibitions of our Alumnae Authors & Artists. If you haven’t sent your writings or artwork in yet, please share with us! For artwork, please email Deborah_Altschwager@ethelwalker.org; for publications, please contact Priscilla_Jackson@ethelwalker.org. All entries can be mailed to either Deb or Priscilla at Walker’s, 230 Bushy Hill Road, Simsbury, CT 06070.

As Time Goes By, My Time, Crazy Time Abigail Trafford ’57

Artwork, from top:

Four Wives, Social Lives, Thanks Dad, Power Moms Wendy Walker ’85

“Granary” Barb McPherson Sanders ’68 “Tree 3” Leonarda (Narda) Boughton ’81 “Autograph Tree” Beryn Frank Harty ’72

The Uncommon Life of Common Objects Akiko Busch Johnston ’71

Chile Under Pinochet; A Nation of Enemies Pamela Constable ’70

Come Rain or Come Shine Linda Bucklin ’62 & Mary Keil

Afternoon of the Elves Janet Taylor Lisle ’65

Centennial Issue of Walker’s Literary Magazine in Production Daemon, Walker’s literary magazine, is in production now with a Centennial issue, which includes submissions from not only students and faculty, but our alumnae as well. We will unveil this special edition during Centennial Weekend. 42 THE SUNDIAL

“Lavender Blooming” Julie Darling Spahr ’61


More Centennial Celebration Fun

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On our website: The Ethel Walker School Timeline highlights important events at Walker’s throughout each decade of the School’s history. • Participate in our online Book Club to discuss our Centennial Book: Half the Sky, February 21. • How well do you know your School? Take part in the online Suns vs. Dials Tug o’ War! Answer trivia questions, identify photos, and earn points for your spirit club. The winning team will be announced on Centennial Weekend. • Be a part of Walker’s history by making a square for our Centennial Quilt, which will be on display Centennial Weekend and will forever be a testament to the School’s rich history. • Fishers Island Golf Tournament! Walker’s connection to Fishers Island remains strong. In 1933, the School moved to Fishers Island after fire destroyed Beaver Brook. We’ve been welcomed back to celebrate our Centennial on September 26, 2011. The Fishers Island course is consistently rated one of the ten best in the nation.

Are you looking for that special item to wear to celebrate Centennial? We are busily stocking an online store full of Centennial memorabilia and clothing, including custom designed scarves and ties. When we swing open the virtual doors, make sure you are at the front of the line! We’ll keep you posted!

Middle School Launches Centennial Book Club To complement the new independent reading curriculum in Middle School English, our seventh and eighth grade students designed the Centennial Book Club Challenge, and have proposed reading a total of 100 books written over the past 100 years. Each student chose books published in different decades. Though the girls enjoyed searching for books from particular decades, some decades proved more challenging than others! Popular titles have included To Kill A Mockingbird, Peter Pan, Lake Wobegon, The Secret Garden, Of Mice and Men, and The Harry Potter Series, to name a few. Every time a student finishes a book, she writes a short summary and adds it to the Centennial Book Club Challenge “Wall of Fame,” which is filling up quickly!

STAY UPDATED …on Centennial Events. Visit ethelwalker.org/centennial regularly!

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CENTENNIAL UPDATE

COMING SOON:


ALUMNAE NEWS

Walker’s Out and About

New York, NY The Harvard Club

Patrick Peterkin, Merill Collins ’81, Susan Knapp Thomas ’80, Brad Thomas, Bessie Speers

Wendy Wheeler Smith ’87, Lamonda Williams ’87

Alicia Kelly Benedetto ’97, Brooke Berescik-Johns ’98, Sumitra Daswani ’97

Selina Rano ’01, Kristen Allegue ’01, Holly Guzman ’02, faculty member John Groff, Cerra Cardwell, Sarah Heinenmann ’00

Barabara Atkatz ’81, Emily Eckelberry Johnson ’82, Caitlin N. Weissman ’82, Ann Marenakos ’81, Laura Whiteman ’81

Paulette Castillo ’73, Kevin Boyce, guest, Donna Williams ’71

44 THE SUNDIAL


Boston, MA The Harvard Club

ALUMNAE NEWS

Elizabeth Nadeau ’09, Molly Turro ’09, Lindsay Truglio ’09

Laura Whiteman ’81, Mary Beth Rettger ’81, Veronica Leger ’81

Past President of the Board Amey DeFriez ’45, Brooke Redmond ’90

Frannie Colburn ’54, Abbie Trafford ’57

Lili Sloane ’87, Ann Chambers ’83 and daughter Gwyneth; Mary Lotuff ’83, Wendy DeLorey ’83

Bessie Speers, Nan Flanagan ’93, faculty member Carol ClarkFlanagan P’93, P’97

Breanne Evans ’04, faculty member Roger Cantello, Naasia Abid ’03, Brooke Redmond ’90, Wendy DeLorey ’83, Sean Delmore ’95, Michele Naughton, guest, Nan Flanagan ’93

Barbara Nash P’05, Lindsay Flynn ’05, Patrick Flynn P’05

Winter 2011 45


Fishers Island, NY

Hosted by Penny Johnson Wartels ’62

Hosted by Margot Bogert ’60 and Jerry Bogert

ALUMNAE NEWS

Weekapaug, RI

Sally Goodrich, Alden Calmer Read ’48, Janet Taylor Lisle ’65, Betty Richards Tripp ’54

Chris Edwards P’11, Bessie Speers, Whitney Edwards ’11, Margot Bogert ’60, Trudi Edwards P’11

Elizabeth “Libbie” Cook ’44, Jean Leuchtenburg ’43, Kathy Parsons ’75

Catherine Terry Taylor ’79, Katherine Hypolite ’04, Pam Brewster ’74

Staley Sednaoui ’76, Dedo du Pont Kidd ’57

Marie Kelly P’12, Alden Calmer Read ’48, Ema Graham ’12, Catherine Terry Taylor ’79, Janet Lisle ’65, Penny Johnson Wartels ’62, Bessie Speers G. Carter Sednaoui, Tom Speers 46 THE SUNDIAL


FROM YOUR ALUMNAE BOARD PRESIDENT Friends,

ALUMNAE NEWS

That our Centennial year is upon us and that I have the privilege of sharing a history with nearly a century’s worth of Walker’s graduates inspires me. As Walker’s alumnae, we are privileged to have been the beneficiaries of a superb education, to have spent time learning and living on a magnificent campus surrounded by breathtaking vistas. We are privileged to know remarkable women. The Alumnae Board is honored and excited to help create a year’s worth of celebrations of our shared history. In preparation for the on-campus events the weekend of October 1, 2011, we are taking the festivities on the road. Throughout the year, we will be hosting events around the country, including tours of special art and garden exhibits, pizza parties in major cities for recent alumnae, and spectator sporting events. Please be on the lookout for emails from Walker’s with details. We believe that any opportunity for alumnae to get together and start celebrating our Centennial is not to be missed. As I meet and converse with alumnae, I find myself amazed by the quiet grace with which you display leadership and courage, pursue your interests, and indulge your curiosity. With relationships among alumnae that transcend the boundaries of friendship into the realm of sisterhood, our alumnae community is strong and vibrant. I look forward to celebrating with you.

Emma Simon ’89 PRESIDENT, ALUMNAE BOARD

From left to right: Nancy Flanagan ’93, Leander Altifois Dolphin ’95, Nancy Hathaway Steenburg ’68, Deborah Rush ’77, Emma Simon ’89, Mary Beth Rettger ’81, Mary Lotuff ’83 Winter 2011 47


TAKE NOTE

Alumnae Updates

TAKE NOTE

Alumnae Updates

Please stay in touch!

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1940s

We need your email address as well as any changes to your home address, and any other contact information, e.g. home phone number. Please send this information to alumnae@ethelwalker.org.

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1950s

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1960s

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1970s

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1980s

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1990s

Class Correspondents are listed by class year. These notes include news received between April 2010 and October 2010. All class notes must be submitted by April 15 for the Summer 2011 Sundial. Send submissions to alumnae@ethelwalker.org

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2000s

86

Births & Adoptions

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Engagements

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Marriages & Unions

Walker’s reserves the right to edit submissions where appropriate.

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In Memoriam

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In Sympathy

Thank You!

Join our Facebook Community! Walker’s official Facebook alumnae page, “Ethel Walker Alums,” is growing by the day. Keep up with photos and news about your friends, and reconnect with old classmates!

Walker’s is LinkedIn! Keep business connections flowing through Walker’s LinkedIn network! Join “Walker’s Suns and Dials” today at www.linkedin.com

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THE SUNDIAL

Weddings at Walker’s Walker’s offers special arrangements and discounted fees for alumnae and their families interested in wedding ceremonies in our beautiful Chapel. Many ancillary services and local referrals are provided. When it comes time to celebrate that very special day, please contact Alice Chrystal at weddings@ethelwalker.org, or at 860.408.4273 for details.


Class Correspondents & Class Agents: Vital Roles Alumnae involvement is essential to Walker’s. Two vitally important but very different roles alumnae can volunteer for are as Class Agents or Class Correspondents. Class Correspondents write, call, or E-mail all of her classmates twice a year to gather news about careers, marriages, births, moves, travel and get togethers with other alumnae. The Class Correspondent is also responsible for organizing and submitting her classmates’ news for the Take Note section of the School’s Sundial magazine. Class Agents fulfill the critical role of encouraging their classmates’ participation gifts to The Ethel Walker Annual Fund for Giving. In notes and follow-up calls twice a year, Class Agents’ generous volunteerism encourages classmates to tangibly demonstrate alumnae interest and support of Walker’s, helping to ensure quality education for future generations of young women. To learn more about becoming a Class Correspondent or Class Agent, contact us at alumnae@ethelwalker.org or at 860.408.4259.

1940

1943

Elise Farley Higgins shares, “I am starting my fourth year at Drake Terrace retirement community in Marin County, CA. I have just moved to the assisted living area (ho hum) and they do everything but breathe for me. My oldest granddaughter, Claire Higgins, was married on June 5th to a wonderful young man named Bradley Hathaway. It was a beautiful, happy wedding. Next on the docket is her sister, Julie, who will be marrying another great guy, also named Bradley, on May 14th. That leaves two grandsons and two granddaughters unmarried. All of them are wonderful, employed, and keep in good touch with me. I see my daughter, Cindy Higgins Roby ’64, as often as possible. She is 90% recovered from the brain aneurysm she had four years ago. Please, please send your news. It is so great to hear from the remaining troops.” And finally, she adds, “We all remember those long gone days when the most pressing thing on our minds were chocolate-covered graham crackers!”

Caroline Berry Laporte Gypsy Trail Club Carmel, NY 10512-4241 845-225-4241

1941 Elizabeth “Betty” Vernlund Goodwin 70 Whitewood Road Torrington, CT 06790-4018 860-482-27074 bettygoodwin@snet.net Elizabeth “Betty” Carpenter Davis 745 Hollow Road Staatsburg, NY 12580-6327

1945 Martha “Molly” Darling Bell 363 East 76th Street Apartment 19C New York, NY 10021-2463 212-744-8264 molly@kirkpalmer.com Mollybell123@aol.com Molly Darling Bell sends the following along from her class:

Molly Darling Bell

Lone Girl Alum attends Class of 1945 65th Reunion. Yes it was I, but I was joined by two delightful ladies from 1941: Elizabeth Vernlund Goodwin and Elizabeth Carpenter Davis affectionately referred to as The Betties. They went everywhere and stayed later than I at the gala. I told them I expected to see them at the Centennial. Sadly, we lost two classmates this year. Ella Deming House will be remembered as a star athlete. She was on the Athletic Board, varsity hockey and basketball teams, as well as First Dial hockey, basketball, tennis and baseball teams. She must have been good in Latin because she was a member of the Virgil Club as well as the Dance Committee. She was also a pleasure to be with. Winter 2011 49


TAKE NOTE

Alumnae Updates

Jean Armour Spurr passed on in May 2010. She was the sister-in-law of our classmate Janice Tompkins Spurr. Jean came from Sparkhill, NY, and after Walker’s went on to Vassar. An excellent athlete, she was on the varsity hockey, basketball, and riding teams. A firstclass student, she was on the roll of Honor in Scholarship and a recipient of academic credit for 1944 and 1945. After college she pursued a business career in New York for a while, but gave it up for her passion for horses. For many years she rode steeplechase horses for a large racing stable in Maryland. Sadly, she developed aggressive facial cancer in the 1980s and after major surgery retreated to a quiet life at her home in Vermont. Meredith Pettit lost her husband Richard Barrueto in March 2010. A native of Guatemala City, Richard was educated in Boston where he received a masters in biochemistry and where he must have met Meredith. He is survived by Meredith as well as three children, Karen, David, and Kristin, and three grandchildren, Hannah, John, and Paul.

Janice Tompkins Spurr gladly reports she is rid of the Lyme disease and is looking to time in Maine visiting with her extended family. She was sorry to miss our 65th, which coincided with her oldest granddaughter’s college graduation. I had a nice note from Hope Griggs Turner who wrote of visiting friends in Wicasset, ME. She had great fun catching up with old friends and enjoyed a return visit to Orr’s Island where she has gone for so many years.

Margie Auger Kennerly spent the early summer in Southbury, CT, and in August traveled to Mason’s Island, CT, where she spent time with her daughters and granddaughter. Janice Tompkins Spurr joined her for a visit in September, which was great as Margie missed joining us in New York for the mini-reunion.

Bea Weeks Bast says she is keeping out of trouble with gardening, painting watercolors, tennis and is currently learning golf while wintering in Florida. Medical problems have been dealt with and she says she cannot recommend the Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia more highly.

Heloise Bacon Power would have liked to join us for the New York mini-reunion that just passed, but problems with her eyes (glaucoma) caused her to miss it.

Finally, nine of us gathered here in New York where we saw “A Little Night Music,” the ballet, as well as some museums. We all gathered chez moi for dinner on October 7th. Amy Amory DeFries, Payne Payson Middleton, Dottie Hirsch Loebl. Grace McGraw Parr, Sophie Chandler Consagra, Bea Weeks Bast, Sally Whitley, Janice Tompkins Spurr all came. I thought the group looked fantastic for a bunch of octogenarians. Great fun was had by all and it was good to see them again.

Jane Cole Graves has spent the last few months reading, jumping around the gym, losing weight and taking care of her husband who had a very bad fall in January, 2010. Jane and her daughters gave him a 90th birthday party with old friends and lots of fun. Their tenyear-old grandson played the violin; their sixteen-yearold played the keyboard; and son-in-law played the guitar. All was noisy and very happy. My sister, Sally Darling Wimmer, recently returned from a Bryn Mawr sponsored trip, “Discovering Eastern Europe” which included visits to Warsaw, Budapest, Vienna, Bratislava, and Prague. She also visited Krakow and Auschwitz. She said the latter was pretty tough, but interesting. She enjoyed the trip but suffered from vertigo a good part of the time. The tour celebrated her 83rd birthday with a cake and flowers and reminded her she would never be 38 again. Gracie McGraw Parr writes she has had a busy summer and has managed to do some pastels, which she is pleased to say she likes. 50

Payne Payson Middleton is still enjoying tutoring English at the English Speaking Union here in New York and is still active with the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation, which gives grants for bio-medical research. She spent March tending to the tree farm in South Carolina. She is looking forward to the time when the grandsons are old enough to take over. Payne then went to Italy for two weeks for sun and sea. There, her daughter is running the olive oil business. Daughter number two is in Arizona on a ranch feeding cattle on organic pastures.

THE SUNDIAL

1953 Susan “Susie” Kleinhans Gilbertson 18 Buttonwood Lane Rumson, NJ 07760-1008 732-842-0435 SWVG@comcast.net Susie Kleinhans Gilbertson sends on her class updates: Suzy Patterson visited her hometown of Dayton, OH for a few weeks followed by a trip to Santa Fe, NM for a mini-reunion with a few old Vassar friends. Suzy said Paris was agitating with demonstrations and a strike over putting the retirement age back to 62. She expects


there will be more. In the last edition of The Sundial we enjoyed Suzy’s commentary on one of our loveliest exports, Olivia de Havilland, and we have more. Suzy wrote, “I received a surprise invitation for a Legion d’Honneur celebration at the French Presidential Palace on the Faubourg St. Honore, The Élysée. I went with a few friends invited by Olivia de Havilland, who was awarded the title of Chevalier (knight) of the Legion, one of France’s highest honors. Olivia is a champion of the country, loves it, and has lived there for 50 years. (I have lived there 49!) What luck for we Americans to applaud Olivia! There were ten other notables getting various degrees of the Legion award — ballet dancer Sylvie Guillam, actress Jacqueline Bisset, some important other artists and government people. But 94 year-old Olivia was truly the star! President Nicolas Sarkozy (minus chic wife Carla Bruni Sarkozy — who was still on holiday) made the awards, and spoke with great animation, citing amusing things Olivia had said throughout the years — garnering many laughs.” Mary Schwerin Ritter is spending her birthday with her granddaughter, Britta, in Washington, DC. Britta is a freshman at Georgetown. I saw Mary in Bay Head in June for the garden tour and a wonderful lunch. We had such a nice time seeing beautiful gardens and many old friends. While in DC, Mary was hoping to see Betty Flanders Foster. Q. Bloch Cook writes that she had a great summer of friends, music, and golf; what could be better? The Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival arranges trips to various cities for concerts and Q. went to see Il Postino with Placido Domingo in L.A. The review I read lavished him with praise. In the small world department, Q.’s daughter-in-law’s daughter went on an adventure trip where Nancie Magee Bourne’s granddaughter was a counselor! Nancie Magee Bourne has also written to say what an outstanding job Carrie Queenan did as speaker at the service for Liz Anderson. She especially enjoyed her reference to shared experiences with Liz at EWS. Nancie and Jim loved their trip to the Dalmatian Coast and the magnificent scenery from the mountains down to the walled in cities on the Adriatic, reminders of the tragic wars they have endured throughout the centuries. Molly Goodyear Gurney is our fitness queen! She biked the four boroughs of NYC again. It took a while, as she had a flat en route, but she soldiered on and finished in fourteen hours! Meanwhile, her husband Pete is doing his own marathon of playwriting with Office Hours playing at the Flea Theater, and Black Tie set to open the end of January at Primary Stages. They usually have a six-week run. Molly plans to go to the

Washington Mall to support Jon Stewart in his Back to Sanity rally. This girl does not sit still and that goes for every one of you. Are we really headed for 80? They say it’s the new 65. Yes! Susie Gilbertson reports, “I had a busy summer with family and friends and it all passed much too fast. I went on a big, fat, wonderful trip to Greece with my daughter Wyckie and son-in-law John. John is Greek and has a huge family in Athens, so you can imagine the fun and food! It never stopped. We went to the islands for a rest! We missed the demonstrations in Greece, but the age of retirement is ridiculous-these people are all so talented and are so bored, and the young who have master’s degrees can’t find jobs. It’s a mess. Nancie Magee Bourne and I were practically waving at each other as she was there at the same time. The summer was dimmed by the passing of our dear classmate, Liz Radley Anderson.” Take Note would also like to apologize for a misprint in Susie’s last submission in the Summer 2010 issue. Susie writes, “Just for the record: A phantom paragraph appeared in the last Sundial issue about my grandson, who is not attending Green Mountain but attends Rumson Fairhaven High School in Rumson, NJ. He is also a good skier, but never skied in Chile but did ski in Argentina. His academics are strong and he will be attending Dartmouth next year abetted by his lacrosse skills.” Casie Neher Queenan writes, “I was honored to speak at Liz’s beautiful but sad funeral. She is missed terribly. On a happier note, we took the family on safari in Kenya and Tanzania in June. It was a sensational family experience — parents, siblings, spouses, and grandchildren marveling together — there’s nothing better.” Missy Kitchell Lickle reports that their son, Brett, is often mentioned in Susan Casey’s book The Wave, including his horrendous accident. The book is as of this writing #7 on The New York Times non-fiction best seller list. He is now training Google execs in the sport of kite surfing and having a ball. Missy and Dan now have eight grandchildren — six girls and two boys. Pam Price Houk reports, “We divide our time between Northern Michigan and Dayton and visiting two sons in Boston and Washington. I am involved in several visual arts and environmental projects and am a first reader for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, an international book award. My husband, George, has segued into writing biographies and institutional histories.”

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TAKE NOTE

Alumnae Updates

Betsy Rauch Rainoff writes, “In March, a group of Ethel Walker students came down to ride and compete in Southern Pines. I was privileged to not only watch them compete, but to have this energetic group come for dinner. It was a treat to hear all about their lives and their plans for the future. They were great ambassadors for the School. In June, a friend and I went riding in the Ethel Walker Woods. The School loaned me a horse and we had a lovely cross-country hack on this special land, which I took for granted when we were students.

game at Pebble Beach next March! Great family time swimming, boating, enjoying each other as well as my daughter and her husband and my two grandsons, five and seven! I never had a clue as to the plans in the works for several months! Awesome times! I am still living in Athens, GA. I retired three years ago and have taken courses on Antarctica, digital photography, the Gardens of New Zealand, EvidenceBased Medicine, and Strength Training through Osher Life Long Learning/University of Georgia. They’re such wonderful programs and people! I’m also keeping up with the stretching/weight program three times a week, plus walking other days, gardening, and playing golf! I am active and well and enjoying retirement!” Diana Waud Kruglick has bought a house in Lake Forrest, IL to spend more time with her family. Her daughter, Emily, has just presented her with a new grandson.

1955 Betsy Rainoff ’53 with Walker’s students at her home in Southern Pines, SC “During the past six months I have had a lot of family time and travel adventures. In late May, I took off on my own for a two week trip around the Four Corners, visiting many national parks and monuments and learning all about Native American Indian cultures. Visiting the cliff dwellings in Mesa Verde National Park, CO, was the highlight of the trip! July was perfect: a large beach house and all the children and grandchildren coming to visit in waves and some more than once. In August, I was invited to Mammoth Lakes, CA for a 10-day hiking trip in the Sierra Nevadas including two days in crowded Yosemite. Not only were the mountains and lakes extraordinarily beautiful, but cool temperatures and low humidity were a welcome relief from the East Coast. September found me on a junket to Ireland where, while it rained every day, the history was fascinating and landscapes gorgeous. I am already plotting next year’s trips.” Clover Morrissett Weller sends, “I know I have been very lax about info, so here goes a little in celebration of my 75th. Surprise, surprise! My son and daughter managed to coordinate the staggered arrival of my sister, nephew and his Swiss fiancée — all from Connecticut, my brother and sister-in-law from VA, and my son from California to our lake house for a special dinner and weekend in June! It also included a golf 52

THE SUNDIAL

Letitia “Tisha” McClure Potter 44 Rockwood Lane Greenwich, CT 06830 203-869-6069 203-253-5653 lmpotter@earthlink.com Class Correspondent Tisha Tisha McClure Potter McClure Potter adds a personal touch, “After a number of years it is wonderful to have a long catch-up from Sally Mason Ellison, who is still working as a charge nurse on the medical surgical unit on the 3:00 to 11:30 shift. Upon turning 70, she cut down to four days a week and will retire after 25 years of service in September 2011. “Sally and Dave have enjoyed many cruises with a group of friends to the Mediterranean, Scandinavia, Danube River, and Alaska. Feeling cruised out, now they are changing pace with a timeshare in Palm Desert, CA and look forward to playing golf there at least once a year. Thursdays find Sally at the Palo Alto golf course in a women’s group. She plays 18 holes, changes into her scrubs, and scoots up the freeway in time for her hospital shift. And to keep in shape, she goes to the local Curves studio three times a week. “Each summer all her children and grandchildren gather for a week in various spots, from the mountains of Utah to California beaches. The ultimate was the Montecito Family Camp in Kings National Park where activities of swimming, sailing, canoeing, rock climbing, mountain biking, horseback riding, riflery, archery, and


Family of Sally Mason Ellison ’55 and David Ellison with their children David, John, Emily, Sara, Anne, their spouses and 17 grandchildren arts and crafts are available for all ages.“ Sally’s husband Dave is very involved with the Sheriff’s Search and Rescue group in the area. Having taken several classes in search management, he is called to manage searches when someone is missing. Their children are also busy: David is working as a consultant in Wayland, MA; John is working in Carmel, CA as an ER doctor at Monterey Hospital; Emily in Utah is divorced, working as a headhunter; Sara is in Westlake Village, CA and plans to go back to law when her children are older; and Anne in nearby San Carlos, CA, is working as a nurse.

are different from her usual choices, and now is reading Finding Sanctuary, Monastic Steps for Everyday Life by Abbot Christopher Jamison. Suki comments, ‘If I pay attention to what Jamison is saying, it is very helpful especially in relationships with myself and others.’

“Sally keeps involved with them all. A few days ago she sat for Anne’s baby and then she taught her eldest grandson, a senior, to drive a stick shift. She commented she ‘felt snapped back and forth in time.’ “Sally added that she plans to come to Walker’s Centennial and meanwhile says ‘Hi’ to everyone. “In July, Suki Holmes Welch enjoyed a Welch family reunion in Oquossoc, ME, and the photo at right was taken of her five grandchildren then. Suki continues to sing and is trying to stay fit. More power to her. Because her two grandsons live nearby she can attend many of their sports activities. As part of a book club through her church, she has been reading books that

Grandchildren of Suki Holmes Welch ’55. From left, Will, Morgan, Jake; and Lindsey, daughter of Phoebe Welch Knight ’87 “I just caught Tanis Higgins Erdmann as she was about to leave for Paris for a riverboat cruise down the Rhone to Arles, then to Carcassone, and finally three Winter 2011 53


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days in Barcelona. Obviously, she and John are in great shape. At home, Tanis enjoys her retirement and is working on several boards. Her main interest is with Staying Put in New Canaan, a fine organization dedicated to helping seniors stay safely in their homes. There are seven grandchildren in her family whom she is able to see often, and they also have enjoyed spirited family reunions. “Elise Rosenberry Donohoe mentioned that she is showing her horse in reining classes. I was not sure what a reining class was, but I saw the National Championships on TV this fall. It is amazing. The rider and horse look to be one with loose reins while they execute figure eights, changing leads, gallop down the middle of the ring and then come to a screeching stop — hind legs skid, kicking up a lot of dust while the forelegs are making little stabs in the ground to stop instantly. The horse receives invisible signals by the rider who only touches its neck with the reins and changes her weight slightly. It is pretty impressive and I applaud Elise. Yes, it takes lots of practice and patience. “The first weekend in October, Jenny Stewart Chandler put on her party dress to attend the wedding of her niece to a ‘great, big, gorgeous Marine,’ as she put it. The bride’s brother gave her away and he will follow suit after having just announced his own engagement. “Jenny just finished re-reading James Mitchner’s Caravans, which profiles Afghanistan right after WWII. She read it in the 70s before visiting Afghanistan, and feels it is just as relevant today as it was in the 60s, recommending it to anyone interested in the politics of the country. And it is a wonderful romantic story. Thank you, Jenny. While the opera on the big screen is a mere 20-minute drive from Lake Forest, IL, she is willing to drive, one and one half hours in South Carolina to see the opera onstage. “I was fortunate to see the documentary about The Pentagon Papers, The Most Dangerous Man In America, which aired on Public Broadcasting in September. Our own Patricia “Patsy” Marx Ellsberg and her husband, David, exhibit great courage and determination in deciding to reveal the truth about the Pentagon’s activities during the Vietnam War. Remember, she gave us a talk about their experience at our 50th Reunion. Patricia also comments on the event that has affected her life. Try to see it; it may be available on a DVD now.”

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1956 Adrianne Massie Hill 2771 Peachtree Road N.E. #10 Atlanta, GA 30305 404-846-2321 404-790-6209 travelinghills@yahoo.com Adrianne Massie Hill writes, “You can’t imagine the great pleasure that I have had in speaking with many of you recently and receiving your good emails. Thanks so much for replying to my notes; life is busy, I know, and so I am grateful. In April 2010 Phoebe Haffner Andrew, her husband, Lucius, my husband, Mal, and I enjoyed a memorable cruise with six very good friends from Seattle. We cruised in the Grenadine Islands for ten days, enjoyed playful days every day, and ended the evenings with festive dinners together. As there were only 10 of us, we had plenty of time to catch up with each other. For the Atlanta Hills it was a special treat to see these good friends all together. Phoebe writes that all are well in the Kellogg/Andrew families. The Andrews look just fine, thank you! Pat Love Anderson wrote me a long email with updated information: your Class Correspondent goofed in failing to send Pat’s news along last year when she first sent it! Pat writes, ‘Derek and I sold our house in Mill Valley, CA, in June 2009 and moved up to Lake Almanor which is about 70 miles north of Chico, and 70 miles east of Red Bluff. We have owned a second home up here for more than ten years, but have come up mainly in the summers. We love to hike, and this area is next to both the Lassen National Forest and Plumas National Forest so there are lots of trails to explore. ‘Our house is right on the East shore of the lake — (Pat adds that she has recently taken up kayaking — old lady style — only on a sunny day with very calm water!) ‘We own the Almanor Bowling Center, in Chester, CA, the biggest town nearby; the winter population is about 3,000, but the summer population is about 50,000. The Center is the entertainment center of the town with a bar, snack bar, billiard tables, virtual golf machine and dance floor as well as bowling lanes and a pro shop! Luckily, we have an outstanding manager and a great staff.


‘I have two sons. One has been working at the Marriott Hotel in San Francisco since it opened in the late 1980s. The other son lives in New Jersey with his wife and three children and specializes in mergers and acquisitions. They come out to visit for several weeks every summer.’ Peg Peck Blosser, definitely one of our inveterate travelers, was very thoughtful in sending me some photographs of Rye, NY, that she took on a recent trip with her husband, Denver. Peg, Clarina Schwarzenbach Firmenich, and I grew up there, and it was great to see some new configurations (the one bank is now a restaurant!) and hear about the changes. Peg and Blosser have family spread throughout the country but still keep their passports up to date! Thanks again, Peg. Nancy Lanphier Chapin sent a very cheerful note with orthopedic news. Nancy broke her hip a year and a half ago, had some repair done on it, but very recently has received a new hip ‘...and life is wonderful again!’ As some others of our class are involved in some ‘bone and body’ events, it was great to hear that Nancy is doing well. Thanks for sharing that news, Nancy. Diana Forman Colgate and I exchanged some early morning emails recently! Diana and her husband, John, have just returned from spending three weeks in Sun Valley, UT, ‘where it was beautiful — saw a lot of Glenna Holleran Ottley ’55, and will be having dinner next week in New York with Missy Turnbull Geddes and Gail Sheppard Moloney.’ All of Diana’s family are well, a grandchild at Middlebury and the youngest in pre-kindergarten on Long Island. Mary Jo Laflin Field writes that she and her companion, John Simonds, are still based in Chicago ‘in our wonderful and very urban 100-year old brick and timber loft which hangs out over the Chicago River. We still summer in our house in Rockport, ME, and it is still on the market. As we sellers all know, there is no market. We love it but it’s a long way from Providence, RI where my two children and four grandchildren are based. Eventually, we would like to find a summer East Coast rental closer (but not too close) to Providence. In March, we head to San Miguel, Mexico, for a month or so. Those are our migratory habits and we would love to hear from anyone who is in any of those vicinities.’ Mary Jo, this is tempting! Clarina Schwarzenbach Firmenich and I are often in touch by email, and although she reports that she doesn’t have any exciting news to share with us, all are well in her family. One of her sons, Patrick, and his family are in Geneva, and Antoine and his family are

presently in Singapore. Clarina does write, ‘I feel my sons work much too hard and will be all used up by the time they finally retire, but that whole younger generation lives like that!’ I agree with you, Clarina. We have two just like that. Missy Turnbull Geddes and her husband, Max, have recently returned from a golfing trip to Scotland. As there are quite a few in our class who are golfers, I have wished that somehow, when and if we got together, that we might be able to play together. Sara Cavanaugh Schwartz first had this idea! We will keep thinking. Linen Miller Greenough has sent some very thoughtful notes from her porch in Sheridan, WY, where she and her husband, Doug, operate their cow/calf and hay ranch. ‘We bought a mid-sized RV and are traveling with our dogs to various places for fly fishing retreats and having a blast! We fished the Yellowstone last week, and I caught a 22-inch Brown trout that was my biggest ever. We love the freedom and spontaneity. ‘Our grandkids are a delight. There are nine of them and they range in age from 22 to 4. From college graduates to kindergartners, we have hockey players, football players, ropers, hunters, fishermen, figure skaters, ballerinas, divas and the whole nine yards. It’s been a journey, and I’m sure glad that we didn’t miss any of it.’ Rosanne Blair Kelly dropped me a note from her home in Asheville, NC, where she continues her ‘usual things,’ which I know include some golf, tennis and bridge, but also volunteer work with Meals on Wheels. Barbara Bidwell Manuel and I have been burning up the telephone wires lately, but what was great about our conversations was learning about what Barbara is doing as well as touching on some other contemplative subjects. Barbara is home-schooling a 17-year-old boy in French, and at the same time is doing a translation of a book on art and theology that is in French, but which has never before been translated. The fresco work in Barbara’s church, the Church of the Transfiguration in Orleans, MA, is near completion, and another of Barbara’s activities involves leading tours of the sanctuary. ‘The Church is celebrating the tenth anniversary of its dedication and people are coming in droves to see it.’ She sounds well and happy. Gail Sheppard Moloney and her husband, Phil, recently sold their home in Greenwich, CT, but have not yet found a new one as its replacement. They will be leaving shortly for their home in Vero Beach, FL, where they will spend the winter. Gail gracefully juggles visits with her three daughters and grandchildren, who are scattered. Winter 2011 55


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Just a quick note from Lorna Sargent Pfaelzer. There is a very good picture in the last issue of The Sundial, on page 51, of Lorna and her husband, Butch, with Betsy McNally Ravenel taken at a recent gathering in Lake Forest, hosted by Lorna and four other alums.

broke our 2-year old for us last year, and is now working him at Sheppard’s — we’re hoping he’ll race this fall. Sandy and I continue to publish The Horse of Delaware Valley which is doing well.’ Thanks, Sara, for an interesting note.

Moving seems to be a topic among those of our age. Mary Laird Silvia and her husband, Peter, have moved to a retirement community in Pennsylvania after more than a year of preparation. Mary says, ‘The house itself is roomy and comfortable, and the views outside are lovely. (Pete says it’s like being at anchor off the Chesapeake without the water!) Despite the wrenching change after 50 years in metropolitan DC, the Silvias feel they have gone to the right place at the right time.’ Thanks, Mary, for writing when I know that you are particularly busy getting settled.

We (Adrianne Massie) Hills have had a great six months since I last wrote. Our activities seem to fall in a school year pattern, both of us singing in the Cathedral Choir at the Episcopal Cathedral of St. Philip, and I in an additional choir of 20 voices, Schola, whose responsibility is to sing evensong every Sunday afternoon from September through May. (May I quickly add that we do have twelve paid singers and the eight or nine of us who are volunteers have some license to be away, but not a lot! That’s fine with me.) Mal and I are both very grateful and lucky that at our respective ages, our voices have held up. We do have to pass annual auditions; so far, so good. We have continued our recording for the Georgia Radio Reading Service, a public service part of PBS, of recordings and live programs for those who are blind or print-impaired. The programs are on the internet so that they can be heard around the world. We are continuing to record classic books, which is a real thrill!

My only piece of very sad news is that Liz Radley Anderson ’53, Edie Radley’s beloved sister, died at the end of July. Those of us who started as freshmen remember Liz very well; I think of her in her raccoon coat, always with a warm greeting. Edie and I talked on the phone, and she told me that she is spending as much time as she can with Liz’s daughter, Katy, and her two children, Ellie who is six and Lulu who is four. Katy and her family live in Greenwich, CT and as Edie keeps an apartment there as well, she is able to see them easily. Edie plans to spend her nieces’ spring break in Florida with them. She loves her house on the Vineyard where she is on the Board of the Vineyard Nursing Association on which she has served for many years. It is a home/health agency on the Island, the only one of its kind. Very sorry for your loss, Edie. Sara Cavanaugh Schwartz has just sent an email that I want to include with our other notes. I know that we were all sorry to learn of Cookie Schutt Brown’s death this past summer from cancer. Sara and Cookie were both roommates and best friends. From Sara: ‘Sandy and I go to Scotland every year, usually in June, to play golf. Sandy’s a member of Gleneagles, and we rent a flat there every year and play Gleneagles and some nearby courses that we have grown to love. Sandy’s son, Tim, an anthropologist, spent years in Haiti after graduation and has written a book about Haiti called Travesty in Haiti which drew the attention of Hillary Clinton. Tim then went to Haiti during the problems following the earthquake and is, in fact, there now, and he is now writing another book about Haiti. ‘I have two sons, both of whom live nearby. Larry has his own business, Rent A Farmer, and Frank works for Hall of Fame equestrian trainer Jonathan Sheppard, and 56

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Our older son, Mal, his wife, Margaret, and daughter, Caroline, now two and a half, live around the corner from us, and as I write these notes they are expecting their second child, a boy, within the next few weeks. Our younger son, Gordon, is a lawyer in Denver and will join us all for Christmas. We spent almost a month in Seattle and other parts of Washington in July, seeing many friends, and enjoyed being in the beautiful northwest once again. We miss it. And in late August, we had a delightful weekend with Serena Stewart in her stunning apartment in New York while attending the wedding of a close friend. The three of us never lack for conversation! Serena continues to be a dedicated volunteer at Hope Lodge, working at whatever is needed, and made some short trips over the summer. Serena and I are definitely planning to go to the Centennial celebration at School on September 30, October 1 and 2, 2011 when our class and the Class of 1957 will be celebrating reunions (instead of May 2011) combined with the Centennial. Can we believe it has been 55 years? I hope that some of us will be able to be there; it would just be great fun to get together again. Until the next, I send you my best.”


1957 Sandra “Sandy” Lipson Ryon PO Box 378 6684 Phillips Mill Road Solebury, PA 18963 215-862-9307 slryon@aol.com Sandy Lipson Ryon reports: Joanie Garver Anderson is living in New York. She serves as treasurer of the board of a daycare center in Harlem where she has been a long-time volunteer. Joanie and I have our annual birthday phone call, so we’ve been able to stay in touch. She talks to Marnie Gaynor McLaughlin and Kenny King Howe and she is on a special fund raising committee for Walker’s. Marnie Gaynor McLaughlin moved to New York City several years ago from Florida and is enjoying the many cultural opportunities the city has to offer. She loves having her two daughters visit her with their families. She stays in contact with Susan Getz. When I spoke to Sandy Barnes Gillespie, she had just returned from volunteering as a docent at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens. She and her husband, John, moved to Boothbay Harbor, ME ten years ago from Hanover, NH, where John was the Director of the Parent’s Fund at Dartmouth. Their daughter and her family are living in Hanover. Their son is in Bethesda, MD. Sandy enjoys gardening and she remains in touch with Glee Browne Deodhar. Janet Hill Johnson told us that she has moved back from New Jersey to her old house in Annapolis. She is a supply priest for the Episcopal Church. She says that she loves living in Annapolis. She runs into Lisa Dobbin Sherwood who also lives in Annapolis. Sunny Rodormer Kaiser sounded great. She and her husband, Fred, are living in Yarmouth, ME. Their daughter and her family live nearby with two sons. Their older daughter is in Bozeman, MT. She has two girls, eleven and eighteen. Sunny works at an animal shelter and drives people to doctor’s appointments. She was at Lake Skaneateles, NY, this summer for a memorial service for her sister, Murph. This was where the Rodormer family spent their summers when Sunny was at Walker’s. Holly McKallor Page says that she is fine. She has four grandchildren. She hopes to move from Savannah back to Long Island to be near her daughter and her family. When we talked she had just finished playing tennis.

Angie Varick Pell went to Carmel Valley, CA this summer for her mother-in-law’s 89th birthday and to spend time with her late husband Jeff’s family. She says that Jeff was “a fabulous comet,” who came into her life, lit it up, and died of a brain tumor last year — all within the space of two and a half years. She spent three weeks this fall working at the World Equestrian Games in Lexington, KY. She loves living in Virginia where she hunts three times a week with Deep Run, often with her granddaughter. She has gone back to ‘s in liberal arts with a concentration in history from the University of Richmond. She keeps a kayak at Carol Davis Manol’s house on Lake Muskoka in Canada. This gives them a perfect excuse to get together every summer. She had a very nice visit with Abbie Trafford this spring just before Abbie moved to Boston. The day after we talked, Betsy Ferris Rainoff ’53 was coming up for a visit to fox hunt with her. It was wonderful to hear that Mimi Gibbs Piper is in remission from her kidney disease. Her oldest granddaughter is a freshman at Washington and Lee. Her son, Tommy, lives in Baltimore. Her younger son, Dixon, is in Denver. She and Jimmy recently went on a terrific tour of Ireland. Randy Furlong Street continues to enjoy her travels to exotic places. She went to the Canadian Rockies in the spring. She plans to go to the Holy Land in March and the Falkland Islands next fall. She has fun playing golf. Sadly Buck’s brother Billy, who she was very close to, died recently. Angie Pell also knew him and attended his service. Nancy “Kenny” King Howe and her husband Nat are hoping to move from Greenwich into New York City. She saw a lot of Dedo du Pont Kidd and Michele du Pont Goss at Fishers Island this summer, as well as Lynn Sheppard Manger ’58. She attended a baby shower for Tisha McClure Potter’s ’55 daughter, Lissa, where she saw Gail Sheppard Moloney ’56. She also runs into Marnie Linen Carr ’58, who recently lost her very nice husband, Jim. Carol Davis Manol says that life is great. She’s living in a house that has been in her family since 1889 on Lake Muskoka, north of Toronto. She has two children and her husband has one. They have six grandchildren, three of whom are in college. They enjoy playing golf, but have given up curling — a sport made famous during the most recent Winter Olympics. She stays in touch with Margaret “Rusty” Hawkins Quaintance and, of course, Angie Pell, when she comes up to use her kayak.

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Trudy Beebe Miller lives about an hour northeast of Baltimore near the Susquehanna River. Her husband David is retired as the Director of the Harford County Land Trust, which he helped found. Trudy is working part-time at the local community college as a student advisor. The Millers have three daughters and five grandchildren — three girls and two boys. I’m sad to report that Trudy’s older sister, Stephanie, died a year ago. Pat Day Ridgely sounds like her usual, upbeat self. In February, she was married to Howard Storm. They are living in Beverly Hills where Howard is a movie director. Karen and Victor Earle were at the wedding and, of course, Pat’s sister Dinah Day ’62. Pat and Howard recently acquired a second horse and named her Mindy — Howard directed the very successful TV show “Mork & Mindy.” In September they had great trip to Russia with the Earles. I had a nice chat with Carlotta Marshall after many years. She lived in London from 1964 until 1997 when she moved to New York. She sees Dedo and is the godmother of her daughter. She also remains close to Barbara Bidwell Manuel ’56 and Serena Stewart ’56. Her son, Jamie, is living in London. She says that she misses all of us but her MS prevents her from traveling. Mary Fentress Grumhaus says that she has much to be grateful for. She and David now have 16 grandchildren — she wonders if this is a class record. I’m sure it is! Their house in Lake Forest makes a great gathering place. They spend the winter in Naples, FL, and they enjoy traveling to wonderful places. Two years ago, Mort and I spent a glorious week with them in Venice. Tory Kitchell stays busy with her grandchildren. She spends time playing golf, bridge and tennis. She had very successful back surgery in January after being out of commission for a year. She’s excited that her daughter, Shawn and her four children will soon be moving back to this country from Malaysia. We talked about the possibility of our class getting together in Wilmington, maybe this spring. Stay tuned... Karen Peterson Earle’s husband, Victor, retired two years ago from his law practice. They’re very happy to be living in Amagansett, Long Island in the house that Karen's parents bought when she was five years old. Her son is living near-by. Her daughter lives in Brooklyn and has a boy and a girl. Victor has three daughters; together they have seven grandchildren. Everyone loves coming to visit the house in Amagansett! Karen plays golf and recently started a book club. Her brother, Aubrey, who we all remember fondly, died three years ago. His three sons all live near Karen.

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I spoke to Dedo du Pont Kidd just after she had her family for Sunday lunch. All of her children are married and she has eleven grandchildren. One of her daughters lives in New York, one is in Wilmington, DE, and the other is nearby in Dallas, TX. Her son, Barron, is a scriptwriter. She was involved with a Rails to Trails project in Dallas. She recently made a contribution to Walker’s to help strengthen the science and math curriculum. When Laurie Mack McBride and I talked, she was very excited to have just sold three large watercolors that she had painted. She is on the board of the Brandywine Museum in Chadds Ford, PA. She and John live on a cattle ranch in Snowmass, CO. Two of their children and their families are there with them. Their other son, Peter, works for National Geographic and has just come out with a book about the Colorado River; he also had a recent article in the Smithsonian Magazine. Her son, John, is the long time coach for Olympic skier Bode Miller. Laurie says she spends her time playing tennis, riding, rounding up cows and, of course, skiing. Carolyn Stein Shohet says that she and her husband are retired but busy. They live on a farm in Carlisle, MA where they raise organic beef cattle. The Shohet’s have three daughters. Their eldest is a professor in the English Department at Villanova. She has just published a textbook; she has two daughters and is on a one year sabbatical in Germany. Their middle child is a writer for the Boston Globe and lives next door with her two children. Their youngest is in Washington, DC. Her husband teaches at the law school at Georgetown where she has just gotten a job. They also have two children. Carolyn does volunteer work in prisons with a wonderful program called Alternatives to Violence. Lisa Dobbin Sherwood had just returned from babysitting for her daughter’s six-month-old son in Montana. Her daughter is a freelance photographer and knows Laurie’s son, Peter McBride. Her son is in Wilton, CT with two daughters, ages 8 and 6. He designs software for financial institutions. Lisa has been very involved with historic St. Ann’s Church in Annapolis, MD, where she sings in the choir. She also sings in the Annapolis Chorale and Chamber Chorus. She serves as President of the Board of Live Arts Maryland, an organization that oversees these two singing groups as well as a chamber orchestra and youth chorus. This is a major time commitment but she thoroughly enjoys it. The Sherwoods spend time in Nantucket in a house within walking distance of her sister Anne Dobbin Bailliere ’59. Their children and grandchildren all have a lovely time together.


Abbie Trafford writes, “This is a period of transition. I am moving from Washington to Boston. The old family house in DC where we’ve been for almost 40 years has been sold. Every room, plus the attic and basement, was full of stuff and memories. The sort-out, clean-out project took a year; my adult daughters came to help with the task and we all went through a kind of life review as we tossed the junk and divided up the rest. The grandchildren left notes for the new owners and their children, pointing out all the good hiding places. Pulling up a whole lifetime of work and community was more complicated than the physical move. The friends are keepers and I plan to visit Washington regularly. “The apartment in Boston, which belonged to my parents, is getting an update. I hope to be settled by December. Meanwhile, I’m staying on in the (winterized) house on an island in Maine — a time of spectacular fall colors, long walks to the lighthouse and contemplation. I continue to write a column for The Washington Post every month or so, As Time Goes By, about relationships in our stage is out in paperback. I’m involved in the “longevity movement” — and give speeches and workshops on the impact of longer, healthier lives on individuals and society. “But my focus is much broader than work or place. A main reason to move is to be closer to grandchildren (two girls, 10, 8; a boy, 11). For the last decade, grandparenthood has been a priority. The children stay with me in the summer, ‘Granny Camp’, and now I will see them more often during the year. “In my personal life, I am single. An important part of my life is serving on the Board of Trustees for Walker’s. The years at EWS were not a happy time for me and I had had little contact with the School after graduation. How life can change! Getting back into the EWS orbit has been very exciting and meaningful to me. The School is so different, so wonderfully different — yet it carries on the original mission to prepare young women to make a difference as adults. Bessie Speers takes a holistic approach to education, combining academic excellence with community support, leadership training and nurturance of the individual. There is a role for single sex institutions to give women that extra confidence and skill needed in adult life. Dedo’s gift to enhance math and science is part of the new face of Walker’s. “Another bonus is reconnecting with old friends and making new ones from the later classes; there are some common traits across generations — warmth, humor, and a bold intelligence. I look forward to our Reunion.”

Sandy Lipson Ryon shares, “Mort and I are living in Bucks County, PA, about an hour north of Philadelphia and not far from Princeton. We each have four children; I have 10 grandchildren and he has one. They all occupy a lot of our time. This seems to be the pattern for most of us. It is certainly a wonderful reward for all the efforts of the early years of parenthood! We have just put our house on the market. We plan to move near-by to a place with a master bedroom on the first floor and no yard to take care of. I’m going to have a hip replacement early in November. In closing, I would like to remember our classmates who are no longer with us: Vickie Cleveland Willett, Judy Ollison McKean, Penny Parker, Julie Shaw, Carol O’Brien Sobieski, and Joanne Wright Taylor.”

1958 Barbara “Barbie” Welles Bartlett 4853 Congress Street Fairfield, CT 06430-1751 203-259-2346 barbiebartlett@aol.com

1959 Lynn Sheppard Manger 8 East 81st Street New York, NY 10028-0201 212-772-3068 nathypertension@aol.com Lynn Sheppard Manger reminds her class, “Next Lynn Sheppard Manger September, 2011, The Ethel Walker School will celebrate its Centennial. The School has already many activities planned to lead up to the big weekend. I really hope some of our classmates will decide to come back to the School, so we can have a mini-reunion. It is always fun to get together, and for those of you that have not come before please plan to come for this milestone event. You can see how fabulous the School has become under the extraordinary leadership of Bessie Speers, as well as get together with old friends.” Martyn Smith Belmont writes from California, “Life in Pasadena goes on. I see Elena Miller Shoch all the time. I am expecting my eighth grandchild (a girl) in November. I still sell a few houses, am president of La Casita Foundation, am on several boards, take bridge lessons, and try to perfect my tennis game. After reading the The Outliers and realizing that it takes 10,000 hours to become proficient at anything, I still Winter 2011 59


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have many hours to go. Hope you are all well.” Martyn, I think you get the record for the most grandchildren. If anyone has more, please let me know. From New York City, Priscilla Tilt Pochna scribes, “I would love to catch up with you and also catch up with classmates. I am not always so good at that, as you know!! I’ve had a busy and happy summer in Quogue, NY, and am now looking forward to my time in NYC.” Nancy Winship Rathborne says she has just had a three-week, delightful trip to be mother-of-the-groom in Devon, England. The groom was her eldest son, Henry Schniewind, and the bride was Ginny from Devon, England. The wedding was wonderful and the UK gave them a gorgeous wedding day. From there, her youngest, Neddy, his wife, Michelle, and their two-yearold “Chunnelled” to Paris for a three day visit. After their departure, Nancy did some serious sightseeing including two day trips to WWI Sommes and another to WWII Normandy; both very humbling with such tragic, unnecessary loss of life. After the UK wedding and France visit, Nancy came home for a few days. Knowing that her 92-year-old aunt had declined the wedding invite, Nancy hustled up to Washington, DC to see Janie Sullivan Reese, with her delightful husband, David, came to dinner, as Janie had assumed the wonderful role in being my aunt’s surrogate Nancy. Nancy also wanted me to include news of her wonderful trip to Nepal where she trekked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp and beyond with the famous Tenzing Norgay’s son, Jamling. She writes, “It was a monumental accomplishment that I’m most proud of.” Lynn Sheppard Manger adds: “Bill and I, with our son, William, rented a boat in Montauk last August and went to Fishers Island for lunch to see Michele du Pont Goss and Richard. Michele adds, “It was such a relaxing day and so good to have a chance to catch up! Thank you so much for making all that effort and enduring a difficult trip!” The Sound was a bit choppy, but when we got there, Michele had kindly invited her sister, Jane “Dedo” du Pont Kidd ’57 with her husband Barron and Kenny King Howe ’57 with her husband, Nate. We had the most wonderful time. Michele continues, “No more news from here. We just keep on plodding along. I am heavily involved in the Antiques Show here which is currently taking up all my time! Maybe I will know something of more interest to your readers next time!” Pichy Alfaro writes from Florida, “I am so happy that you sent your email. I enjoyed the summer issue of the Sundial and loved reading news from the ’faithful’ ones. The pictures look great! The heat was really bad in Miami this summer and we had steady rain 60

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(unbelievable), but it cooled us some, and we have not reached 90 or above since then! So far this year has been very hectic for me because my sister arrived end of March with her husband for treatment for Hodgkin’s Disease. Conveniently, they were able to rent a studio apartment where I live and we have been sharing my car. On Thursday, he received the good news that he is out of the woods but has to come back for a checkup in January; but you can imagine that my lifestyle (very simple and quiet) has been shaken up somewhat. My kids are well. Carla was unemployed from May to just recently. Rafael (42 years old and a very available bachelor), who is an engineer has work coming out of his ears. The soil-consulting firm he works for is involved in the construction of the tunnel from MacArthur Causeway (Miami to Miami Beach) to Port of Miami. This tunnel is meant for cargo trailer trucks to avoid having to get into the city traffic. I, like all of us, am older, heavier and feel slower…healthy though! I am working, which keeps my brain active and preserves my sanity. In October, I took my customary trip to Charlotte, NC to visit a friend and enjoy the pleasure of the fall colors. One of the things I enjoyed the most of Walker’s was the experience of the change of seasons.” Adds Lynn Manger, “I received a very nice email from Meg Lindsay who said she had the chance to call Judith ‘Judy’ Lange Bizot in France, since Judy is such a terrible communicator. It was great to talk with her; she made a big point of asking how everyone is and to say hello. Judy and a Vassar friend visited Ann Woods Metalli in Italy, I think around the time of the Icelandic volcano eruptions although I don’t know the details. Not much news to offer about which I am thrilled. One year ago this week I fell and broke my wrist and it has taken forever to recover. No news is good news in my case this year.” Elena Miller Shoch will be visiting New York City with her husband, Jamie, after a trip to Europe. Too late for Take Note this time, but I do know Elena was planning on seeing Ann Wood Metalli while in Italy. Perhaps Elena will fill us in on the building that Ann is working so hard to restore. Then Elena will get to Paris and hopes to see Judy Lange Bizot. Finally, Elena will arrive in England and then back to the States. Lynn adds, “I keep up with Kitty McNally Cote and everyone who looks at our comments knows that we go mystery book shopping several times a year, but they don’t know about our excursions to see and hear Henning Mankell and Ken Follett, who were great fun and most interesting. Now Kitty adds, “I could say that I spent the summer basking in Carl Schurz Park trying to plow through all the books that have stacked up.


Also, my long weekend with Katie, her daughter, and the boys in New Hampshire at Camp Tecumseh where Katie and Pete live in the summer and Jack, now 7 years old, ran yet another mini-marathon (4.2 miles) while his father, Pete, was peddling his way around Massachusetts in the Pan Mass Challenge — approximately 200 miles (to raise money for the Jimmy Fund). The boys, Jack and Xander, are enjoying second grade and pre-school respectively, and love their soccer practices and scrimmages. Both are also gearing up for ice hockey, which begins in a few weeks and then lacrosse in the spring. I’m exhausted just thinking about it! This will probably put some to sleep, but it’s the best I can do.” From Sally Chapin Levin comes news of the arrival of a granddaughter, Susannah, born on July 15, 2010. Sally writes, “She is precious and we are ecstatic!” Sally sends her best to all. And Sally, we are all thrilled for you. And Sally Harrison Foster writes that they are still living in Colorado and loving their tiny house on the Eagle River. They can fish from their deck! Polly, their daughter, has remarried to a wonderful guy and they live twenty minutes away, with her three children and his two. Their family ranges from 4 to 16 years!!! Trip is now living in Greenwich, with one dear little daughter, age 20 months, and number two on the way in January. Sally and her husband, Crosby, are involved in a wonderful life in Colorado and in Arizona for a few winter months. Golf is on the menu, as is a little skiing, biking, hiking, tennis, and snowshoe-ing. Sounds like a lot to me, Sally. Sally is involved only minimally in design now. Her husband is Mr. Fix-it, playing piano, researching investments, and always “inventing stuff.” “Life is good,” she says, “For us and our best friend, eleven-year-old Jack Russell ’puppy,’ Fleury. Cherish every moment.” Lynn concludes, “So, that is the news for now. I am sorry that I did not hear from more of you this time, but I hope it means you all will show up for the big Centennial Celebration at the school. Have a good winter wherever you might be, and send me a note to keep in touch. Love to hear from all of you.”

1960 Phyllis Richard Fritts 910 Ladybug Lane Vero Beach, FL 32963 772-234-7096 prfritts@earthlink.net Phyllis Richard Fritts sends on her class updates:

From the Class of ’60, after a spectacular Reunion...We had a ball! Lots of catching up, hugs, perfect weather, a bonding dinner at the head’s lovely new house, inspiring Chapel talk by Mimi Gardner Gates, etc. The School is in a positive place led by Bessie Speers. We were 20 strong and to those who could not be there... you were missed and missed something special! From a postcard from Marilyn Hodges Wilmerding, “I loved seeing everyone at our 50th Reunion. The School seems good and I’ve always appreciated the friends, then and still now at 50 years later.” An email from Susan Shierling Riegel Harding, “I have successfully left my smoking habit at EWS so am proud of that.” (Note: She started a ‘stop smoking’ campaign for herself over our Reunion weekend. Keep it up, Susan!) Ellen Corroon Petersen writes that, “I ran into Abra Wilkin at a garden club meeting in Wisconsin this past summer. It was wonderful to see her. I’m so sorry to have missed Reunion.” Margot Campbell Bogert says, “I am really enjoying being on the Board of Walker’s and getting to know Bessie and the School better. Abra and I are having a ball. Our reunion was such fun and it was great to see so many old friends. I am also looking for a new director of the Frick Collection so if you know anyone who might be good, besides our own Mimi Gates, let me know. Jerry and I are off to Myanmar for Christmas to see our daughter and son-in-law.” From Beatrice “Bea” Vander Poel Banker, “I had a ball at Reunion and loved seeing everyone! Missed all who could not make it. I am the one who stole the class poster standing in the lobby of our hotel. I have it in my kitchen and enjoy seeing you all as I drink my morning cup of tea...Very little news, but on a sad note my godmother Barbara Donahue Ross ’37 passed away. She was a wonder — another fabulous member of the class of ’37. She was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in Washington, DC in April 2010 for her flying for the WASP during WWII. Her rank was Commander and she was based in Michigan. “WASP” stands for Women’s Airforce Service Pilots. Aunt Donnie will be missed. Another fabulous Walker’s alumna!” For more on Barbara Donahue Ross, see page 82. Christy Hoffman Brown emails, “I loved every minute of Reunion and was thrilled that so many members of our class came back. And I am hoping to work on the Centennial effort to encourage even more of us to make the trip for the September 2011 celebration. My Winter 2011 61


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big news is the sale of my house in South Carolina, which in this market is a miracle. My New York City life involves playing golf as often as possible, volunteering on the Membership/Information desk at the Morgan Library and Museum, serving as an associate board member of Gould Farm in Monterey, MA. This is a 100year-old community for young adults with varying levels of mental issues, which is designed as a supportive, structured environment to facilitate their assimilation into the mainstream. In March, 2011, I will be traveling all over Italy by train.” From Abra Prentice Wilkin, “Recent travels (in September ’10) began with a boat trip down the Rideau Canal from Ottawa, Canada to Clayton, NY in an old Chris Craft launch, and ended in a family reunion with my three kids and six grandchildren on Lake Mohonk in upstate New York, a magical spot which four generations of my family have enjoyed. It was amazing to return and find little has changed except some modern fluffing. What an extraordinary class we are and continue to be. I now joke about something being in the Simsbury water to make EWS graduates the way we are, but there was something special at that school which ignited leadership, curiosity, and loyalty among our classmates. With our reunion come and gone, I have agreed to help co-chair the School’s Centennial weekend on October 1, 2011. Do save the date, return to help celebrate our 100th birthday and email or call with any terrific ideas you might have to make it more fun. Meanwhile, I live mostly in Chicago, IL. “Jim and I summer in Lake Geneva, WI where he putters and fixes beloved old wooden boats and passionately helps a camp for inner-city kids, while I find room to buy, place, and document that one coveted but not needed piece of Majolica for my collection. Perhaps next summer I will organize or pitch the last 20 years of family photos in boxes in the basement. Winters are in Hobe Sound, FL where we do not play golf or bridge, but manage to find a few likeminded friends to laugh, travel,and enjoy life with. Turning 70 is our next hurdle and probably time to fess up to some truths, at least in my life. I hate every new pound, wrinkle, ache, sag, and bag which I’m learning to accept despite pledges to eat less, exercise more and to never visit the plastic docs. I’m not a terrific granny and question the way my children are raising their children. Perhaps it’s a generational thing and our parents felt the same way, but after 48 hours with the ‘little people’ I’m more often than not: angry, disappointed, and exhausted. I need a month or two to gear up and hope for better times. I’ve had cancer, heartbreak and two children with severe depression problems, proving once again we are only as well as our sickest family member. Today the future looks very 62

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bright. I cry more easily over a beautiful song or the memory of a friend long gone. I’m nicer than I used to be but more selfish with my time and selective about those with whom I truly want to spend it. An amazing majority of these people have EWS ties, and many are you, my dear classmates.” From Caryl Van Ranst Dearing, “At the present time Jim and I are on Martha’s Vineyard, enjoying this wonderful fall weather. I know this will soon pass, but just wanted to catch up with all of you, as it was such a treat to see everyone. Quite a bit has changed in my life since the 50th. Jim is retiring from long employment at MSKDT & Associates, Inc. (architectural and engineering with the Department of the Interior) after 30 years. As a result we are busy combining two houses into one on Martha’s Vineyard where we will be living. Two of our three children live in Massachusetts, so it only seems logical that we move here, which will enable us to travel and see our grandchildren more often. Combining two houses is challenging, and disposing of family treasures is a mental test. I am leaving my hometown of 68 years, but know I will go back and see friends. I have always said, ‘I live in Ft. Wayne, IN, but my soul is on the Vineyard.’ I am so lucky that my husband is willing to make this move. This will also make it easier for me to come to Walker’s and see many of you who reside on the East Coast as not many of you live in the Midwest, especially Indiana. As you can imagine my life will be topsy-turvy for the next couple of months with packing, house showings, saying goodbye to friends and then finally leaving knowing that we are coming to a place where we have a home and many friends. While all of this is going on, I will have my knitting projects going (to keep my sanity) and stitching, tennis and mahjong. It’s better than a psychiatrist! It was so much fun to see all of you and I do think we have traveled through our years with good works, wonderful memories, healthy bodies and minds and peace to face the future into our 70s. We were and are the wonderful class of 1960.”

1961 Class Agents Julie Darling Spahr and Alice Kerr Moorhead write: “Class of 1961! News Flash! At long last we have class agents again. Alice Kerr Moorhead and I, Julie Darling Spahr, have agreed to serve in this capacity and we are also heading up our 50th Class Reunion, which is coming up in October 2011…less than a year from now! The date, in case you haven’t heard, has been moved to the fall to coincide with the Centennial celebration of EWS. The Class of 1962 will also celebrate their 50th Reunion then.


“I know that I have missed news from all of you, and really am eager to see as many of us as possible at the Reunion. My sister and husband have recently had theirs, at their respective schools, and their enthusiasm about celebrating this big milestone has rubbed off on me. I’m hoping that updated class news will energize you, too! “I am well and am now landscape painting as much as possible, and taking lots of painting workshops. I’ve had a couple of small shows and am immersing in the ‘artist life.’ It’s been as much a surprise to me as it probably is to you. You can visit my website at juliespahr.com for a little preview. Also, kids and grandkids are all around, especially in the summer in Maine. We are at eleven grandchildren, but I’m pretty sure that that is the end; though we do have seven girls and four boys. Whew! “So please send in your news when you get the next reminder for the summer Sundial magazine. Think seriously about coming to our Reunion. It would be such a gift to see you again. Alice or I will be trying to call all of you who we can and we thought maybe some of us could gather in New York City at her apartment next spring.”

1964 Cynthia Higgins Roby 40 Cable Roadway Sausalito, CT 94965-2302 415-332-6556 croby@earthlink.net Wendy Frey Textor reports that her “[f]amily continues to grow with the arrival of William Ross Farmer on September 7, 2010.” She and George were celebrating their 40th anniversary with a trip to Switzerland and Italy. Her son Clinton and his wife Helen are living in Los Altos, CA; and her youngest son, Andrew, is in San Francisco. Alice Simkins says, “I’m still active with museums here in San Antonio and Houston. Looks like those classes we had with Miss B and her art history filmstrips really took with me as I’ve been in art history and museums ever since. My new hip is wonderful — two years on and just great. Its age reduces my total average age, so that part is highly recommended!” Suzy Sivage Borland has six grandchildren! She recounts that she sees them every weekend in Oconomowoc, WI, where she and her husband are lucky enough to have her parents’ house. In the past

year, they have enjoyed some travel, including trips to India and Norway. Laurie Wilson Ferris writes, “I’m still married to Herb Ferris, who’s a sculptor. I live one-third of the year in Portland, OR, as I am affiliated with the Arbor School of Arts and Sciences, where I helped found a teacher training program. Our son is a jazz musician in San Francisco and our daughter lives outside of D.C. with her husband and two children. I knit socks on an antique circular sock machine and sell them. And we have 10 chickens and one Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.” Carla Meyer writes that, “After three years of working on the highly acclaimed movie, Avatar, I am ready to slow down and stay at home more. This means time to volunteer with New Leash on Life Animal Rescue, on whose board on serve. I also compete in NRHA (Reining) events on my fabulous quarter horse JoeJoe. Who’d have thunk it? The only time I rode at Walker’s was on the non-riders day.” (Think that was called the Buckaroo, Carla!) Tina Gardner Locke reports that her husband, Peter, continues to battle back after undergoing a bone marrow transplant for leukemia a few years ago. Their two daughters live in San Francisco; Bailey works in public relations for Bloomingdale’s and Christie is with a venture capital firm. Tina has started painting watercolors, a passion she has discovered recently. Suzi Chapin Berl reports, “I serve on two conservation boards, one national and one regional. Between us, my husband Ennalls and I have eight kids and 10 grandchildren, so our vacations are usually spent visiting them.” Nancy West Hannah and her husband, Donald, have lived in Phoenix, AZ, for 11 years. Nancy has been involved in Internet marketing and will eventually do an e-book on simple methods of art restoration. Their daughter Sheba lives in The Hague, doing freelance editing. She has a Dutch husband and two sons, ages 7 and 4. Their daughter Jessica lives in San Francisco where she works for Pixar, while their son Blair lives in Nashville where he does software training. Nancy and Donald’s youngest daughter, Brett, still lives nearby in Phoenix. Jean Beebe Carter writes, “Jim (husband of sooo many years) and I just retired from teaching in June and immediately hit the road and the airways. I think that’s the thing all retired people do so they don’t have to think about what to do next! Anyway, we are back now for a bit having done a month in Turkey and various Winter 2011 63


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other road trips. We see Wendy and George every summer now in the 1000 Islands.” Cindy Higgins Roby writes, “I am still living in Sausalito, CA and after many years of working, am quite enjoying the retired life. I volunteer several days a week at the visitor kiosk in Sausalito, greeting the many tourists that come to town and guiding them toward good restaurants, stores, and photo-worthy vistas. I also serve as the communications liaison for the Sausalito Library Foundation. My sons, Jay and Nick, are both living and working in the San Francisco area after many years on the East Coast. And my favorite Walker’s ’girl,’ my mother Elise Farley Higgins ’40, lives at a retirement community nearby.” And Cynthia adds, “I recently read that a UCLA study concluded that women who have the most friends over a nine-year period reduced their chances of death by 60%. I think we should be almost immortal. We have been friends for almost fifty years!”

1965 Shelley Rea Gilbert 216 East 61st Street New York, NY 10065-8506 212-759-0211 srg02@aol.com

1966 Stephanie Burns 72 Campground Road Lee, NH 03824-9801 603-659-7030 603-969-9929 stephanieburns@comcast.net

1967 Caroline Adams Muller 14 East 75th Street Apartment 6E New York, NY 10021 301-580-5459 muller.caroline@gmail.com

1969 Katharine “Katy” Murphy Ingle 918 Windsor Road Glenview, IL 60025 847-724-8560 katymi@ameritech.net 64

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Cate Lord 30363 Hilltop Drive Everygreen, CO 80439-8753 303-674-7419 catelord@yahoo.com Katy Murphy Ingle writes: “Here is the news from both now and last Spring, which, due to a glitch, didn’t make it into the last Sundial. Thanks again to all of you who sent in something — you make Cate’s and my job as class correspondents a real joy! I don’t have much news except that my son Daniel is marrying his darling girlfriend Luci Gilbert on November 6th in San Diego! It should be a really fun event with our Swiss and American families all getting together. Luci has two small boys from a previous marriage, so I am looking forward to being a step-grandmother.” Cate Lord sends, “I am back in Evergreen, CO and working at the VA hospital in Denver as a float pool nurse working rehab, cardiology, and oncology. I find I really enjoy working with this unique population as do the other nurses and aids on the units. Despite all of the inconveniences of medical care at the VA (waiting for procedures, three and four patients to a room and one communal bathroom for 14 patients), the veterans are respectful and refreshingly grateful for the medical care they receive. They eat what they are served without complaining and support each other in the healing process. Because the VA is a teaching hospital, and the interns and residents come and go, often forgetting to follow up on orders or neglecting to change orders that are no longer necessary, the role of nurses as patient advocates is strong; we are truly the gatekeepers to ensure competent medical care and make sure that patients and symptoms don’t slip through the cracks. The working relationship with the docs and especially the ‘baby docs’ is a wonderful change from working with the rather arrogant group of doctors in Pueblo, CO. It is truly and synergistic relationship of mutual respect and I love it. The nurses are encouraged to participate in rounds and the VA performs bedside procedures that are done in specialty units at other hospitals, which means that nurses get to assist with procedures normally reserved for a specialist. So I am learning a lot and loving it. The biggest challenge is convincing the vets that ‘sucking it up’ and refusing medication for pain inhibits the healing process. “Meanwhile, I continue to work on a master’s in public health, one course at a time, and am slowly working on raising money for a medical mission to Myanmar with a Boulder international aid company that focuses on sustainable health care as well as emergency medical response. As a float pool nurse I have the flexibility to


decide my own schedule, which is a real luxury after my experience in Pueblo. It’s a joy to be closer to my children, who I see regularly, and a relief to have nearly two years of nursing under my belt. Katy and I both wish everyone a joyous holiday season. Hard to believe it is upon us once more. Love to all.” Andrea Marshall Scheyhing writes, “Despite these difficult economic times, I have been so lucky to be busy with a steady flow of house portrait commissions and a one person show of plein air oil landscapes, which was a very productive and energizing project (Thank you, Anne!). I love the constant challenge and rewards of being a painter. Peter’s gardening reached new levels this summer and we continue to enjoy and laugh about the ‘free exercise’ of gardening on a hillside!” (Note from Katy: her paintings are really wonderful!) And we received this note from Jean Moore Edwards: “We are patiently waiting the ripening of our Cabernet. The summer has been unbelievably cool and we may be picking grapes on Halloween. The economy has really hit the high end wine industry and we are hoping that premium wine is not going to be a permanent victim of the recession. I am still showing my wonderful horse Merlin. I seem to be the grand dame of the show ring these days, but I am still competitive and still in one piece. My mother turns 90 this year and is still as sharp and feisty as ever. Bob is well and continues to commute to San Francisco for his work at Selectquote. Mark, Claire, Bob and I did manage to get two weeks together this summer to do a quick but wonderful trip to Italy and Croatia. Mark is doing very well at Electronic Arts in Redwood City, CA and Claire is teaching therapeutic riding while waiting to enter a physician assistant program this spring.” And here is someone we haven’t heard from before: Liz Paine! She emailed this: “Just to up-date your mailing list, my current name is Elizabeth Paine McMullan. On the news front, I married Kaveh Haghkerdar in July of 2006. Kaveh is a professor of engineering at Maine Maritime Academy in Castine, ME. I recently obtained a 200 Mate/100 Masters license from the U.S. Coast Guard after attending Maine Maritime’s two-degree program in Small Vessel Operations. I have spent this tourist season captaining/crewing on various boats owned by the Bar Harbor Whale Watch Company. The view from my office window is unbelievable! I have lived in the Bar Harbor, ME area full time since 1995 and have a nice home right on the shore overlooking Acadia National Park and Bar Harbor. Would love any visitors to the area.”

A belated update from Spring 2010, Cate Lord says, “Hello to all. Thank you to everyone who wrote with news and encouraging words for my profession. I don’t have any updates since the letter I sent out. Spring is finally in the air after a record setting long and cold winter. I am definitely tired of scraping snow from my windshield when I leave the house at 5:30 a.m. Many of us are reveling in the joys of grandchildren, all the fun without the responsibility. And many are grieving the passing of parents. These are so often bittersweet years, and in the decades that have passed since we all graduated together, we have all had our own private renditions of ‘bittersweet.’ So here is to all of you — and I now turn you over to the news you’ve been waiting for. Again, many thanks to all who responded. “ And your co-class secretary from Spring 2010, Katy Murphy Ingle writes, “I am doing well and enjoying a new line of work, recreating family homes from old photos and working with the client to paint a memento of their ancestors’ home. Bill and the kids are fine; Gina is getting into acting and will visit China with her troupe (gets credit for her master’s) right after we visit her this June — we’re going over to Switzerland to celebrate our 5th anniversary. Daniel, who is now an ’interactive media’ guy, is putting together a new website for me, so check it out at www.ingledesign.com. I’m off to Evansville, IN soon to paint the dogwoods in full bloom! Laurie Cherbonnier Nielsen wrote in Spring 2010, “I am about to become an empty nester, as we are awaiting news of which college Genevieve will attend. Emily is a junior and French literature major at Sewanee. I am really lucky to live near enough to Katy Ingle (in Winnetka, IL, near my husband Chris Nielsen’s family, where we moved after Hurricane Katrina) to get together fairly often for lunch, and I did make it to the reunion last year, which I loved, especially the wonderful dinner Mally and Ruth gave at Ruth’s house. It was so great to see everyone that I actually came away glad to have gone to Walkers! Home-schooled Emily was fascinated to get an inside look at a ‘real’ school.” Jill Reighley Christiansen writes, “My two big pieces of news since [Reunion] are the birth of my second grandchild and the engagement of my second son. Henry Kilvert Brooks was born on September 25th, and he is the sweetest baby I’ve ever known. His big sister Eliza, (who turned 2 in December) adores him, and Chris and Emily are wonderful parents. I am so lucky that they live nearby because I get to see them all the time. Pure joy! Rob became engaged in January to Lexie Kuser, a fabulous girl. We are all crazy about her, and look forward to a beautiful wedding in October. The rest of us are doing well. No big changes — just getting Winter 2011 65


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older along with everyone else. I am still playing lots of tennis and working part time with Wes (running the business side of his counseling practice), but mostly I enjoy time with my children and grandchildren. They are a constant delight.” Evie Carter Cowles wrote that she and family moved to a ‘downsized’ farm down the road from their former home, and are now only responsible for their personal horses. At the time of writing, their former home was under contract and we all hope that in “these times” the contract goes through without a hitch. Her husband, Reynolds, is still practicing veterinary medicine, and also fox hunting, fly fishing, and bird hunting. They also have a place in Montana where they hike and fish together. Evie is painting oil portraits of dogs, horses and kids, and they have four grandchildren. “Life is good.” Evie is class secretary for her college class of 750! Wow! That’s a commitment. Susan Nichols Ferriere lost her father last April after a long hospitalization. And she has spent the last year “trying to comfort and help my mother adjust after losing her soul-mate of well over 60 years. It has been a long and difficult journey for her and one that continues though she is bravely beginning to emerge from her cocoon.” Susan continues to work and is finding her banking experience invaluable as she ties up all the details on her father’s estate. She also writes that she is making more time to see friends and saw Mary Fairchild Busch when she was last in the New York City and has recently seen Lisa Pagliaro Selz. Her beloved niece Lizzie just celebrated her 30th birthday, which Susan and Patrick organized, and she is working for Peacock Productions, a subsidiary of NBC. Though life events are keeping them close to home for now, both Susan and Patrick look forward to the day when they can travel and for now are living vicariously through their niece and nephew who travel to all areas of the globe. Mary Whitt Fishel is in touch and it has been so heartwarming to connect with my former roommate. She writes, “We lead a pretty quiet life right now. Ken, my husband, who is a geologist, had a hip replacement in October, and it has made a miraculous difference in his daily life. We are living mostly in the house that I grew up in, but have kept our own small house for when we downsize (hopefully soon). We have no children, only a big Poodle, who is spoiled rotten. We are thinking of renting for a short stay in Nantucket this summer. We sold our house there, and I have not been back since 1997, so I would love to reconnect with old friends and hope that I am still recognizable after so many years! We are at last enjoying a beautiful spring with all of the flowering trees in full bloom.” Sounds 66

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like heaven. I think Lexington, MA, might be the place to be. Sarah Wood Lewis spent Easter weekend skiing with her family. And she writes, “Most of my vacation time these days is spent traveling to California to visit my mother who is 94 and living in a facility in Oakland near my sister. I regret not having made it to the reunion, and loved the photos and emails sent from classmates. I did get a chance to visit with Ruth Harrison Grobe, Susan Nichols Ferriere, and Lisa Pagliaro Selz a couple of years ago on a trip to NYC. It was so nice to get a chance to catch up!” Ginger Bevis Littleton is still in Colorado Springs, CO, which I can hardly believe. We are practically neighbors. She writes that she is in her “sixteenth year of teaching K-6 music in Widefield, just south of the Springs. I just finished doing a musical that I wrote in 1979 in Oakland with a fifth grade teacher there. It’s still timely and a blast to see these young kids hit the stage for the first time. I will retire from public school teaching next year.” We all know she has a wonderful new man in her life who was kind enough to update us all on all of her wonderful activities. Meanwhile she has two daughters ages 20 and 23. “My oldest daughter is working in Washington D.C. after graduating from American University. My younger daughter is a junior at Denver University majoring in economics. She spent the fall semester in Uganda doing economics internships. She also got to go white water rafting on the Nile! My dogs and I are competing in dog agility and having a blast. All their mistakes now are my fault! I am playing soccer on a women’s Sunday team. I am the grandma on the team, but my philosophy is that if I guard my man well, she will never get the ball and no one will know how much younger and faster she is than I am! Miss Scarles would be proud. I also helping to coach a 7th grade lacrosse team.” Go Ginger! And thank you for keeping in touch. Marion Biersworth Woolam is living in Albuquerque, NM, and teaching kindergarten. “I love to teach reading and just submitted my ‘box’ for National Board Certification in reading — it takes forever to find out if you pass or not. I have to take a written test (via computer) in June and then wait until December for results. I, too, have a grandchild to play with (4 years old). What fun! Lisa Pagliaro Selz writes, “We are all healthy and happy — the boys are 11 and 15, so I am still a full-time mother.”


1970

1972

Gail Chandler Gaston 202 East 75th Street New York, NY 10021 212-744-0070 GCGaston@aol.com

Joanna Betts Virkler 15826 Lake Ridge Road Charlotte, NC 28278-7903 704-588-1959 joannav2000@aol.com

Kathleen McCombe Turnbole vacationed in Baltimore, MD, Gail Chandler Gaston and Richmond, VA, with her family, where she visited the National Aquarium, enjoyed waterfront dining, and spent precious time catching up with extended family. She is singing with the Cantata Singers, which spearheads the Women in the Arts Festival.

Susie Churchill Bowman writes, “I’m catching up on a year lost with moderate-to-severe disability from autoimmune arthritis, which gives me severe tendonitis in all my major joints. I researched reasons why my body might be attacking itself and in January, 2010, I stopped what little work I was still doing, began an extremely restricted anti-inflammatory diet, increased my rest and intensified my ‘inner work.’ Improvement was noticeable within weeks and by the end of the summer, I was about 90% back to normal. It has been very painful and challenging (and I’m still on that diet), but I am so grateful for this experience — I am much healthier on all fronts now. Jane Hadden Geisse visited in October ’09 and we had a great four days together. Woody and I celebrated our 35th wedding anniversary in May ’10. Our 23-year-old son is now a freshman at New York University as part of Gallatin School of Individualized Study where he’s crafting a major of writing, literature, music and philosophy. David had spent the past two years in Boston working at a restaurant by day and playing in Irish sessions by night. We have fun playing together when he’s home.”

Cornelia Guest says, “I spent the summer touring the country looking at colleges with my kids, who are now all seniors. Trying to see all the colleges on the tentative lists of the triplets was quite a challenge, but I planned the visits so we could see friends and relatives. The highlight of the summer included visiting my cousin’s family in North Haven, ME, and watching my children compete in the island’s annual ‘Codfish Relay Race’ — running up and down the main street dressed in wet-weather gear and carrying a huge dead codfish. “I’m still involved with my Scrabble® activities, teaching students in five different after-school programs, running tournaments, and publishing my monthly e-newsletter for Scrabblers: The Last Word (TheLastWordNewsletter.com). Anyone interested in learning about tournament Scrabble — for all ages — should get in touch!” Gail Chandler Gaston reports that Frances recently returned after seven months in Hong Kong, where she studied and interned for ORBIS. She is now finishing college at Marymount Manhattan. Jamey graduated from Colorado University Boulder, and this summer completed his second cross-country bike trip, this time with “Bike and Build” which organizes volunteer days with Habitat for Humanity en route.

1971 Jean Hamilton 661 Bering Drive #201 Houston, TX 77057-2137 713-785-6817 JLHamilton@marathonoil.com

From Elvira Cash Pecora: “I am well, working at Talbots now — I love leaving my job at my job as one never does as a teacher. I also enjoy the lovely clothes and my short commute of six miles round trip. I stopped teaching preschoolers in 2008 after five years in the More @ 4 program which identifies learning difficulties (academic, emotional, and physical) in ‘at risk’ four-year-old children in order to get their services in place before entering kindergarten. My last year with the program was a Head Start program, which gave me many challenges, to say the least. After getting my birth to kindergarten certification and my K–6 certification, it was a bit disappointing to leave the field of education, but I still tutor preschoolers in basics and the older students in French. As for my family, my husband, Chip had emergency detached-retina surgery in June. What an experience; thank goodness the doctors were able to save his sight, and he has regained almost all his vision except for the peripheral aspect. Hopefully, that will return as he adjusts to his new lenses. Greg (25) is bartending, coaching soccer, and applying for full time jobs. Since he graduated from Denison in 2008 with a major in history, there have not been many openings, but he keeps his spirits up. Kent (22) will graduate in May from Dickinson College with a Winter 2011 67


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degree in Physics. He spent last semester in Australia and loved it. He and Greg were able to travel together for about three weeks before returning Stateside, a wonderful experience for them both.” From Class Correspondent Joanna Betts Virkler: “My daughter, Justine, got married this summer. Very Frank Capra — and I was afraid it might be Martin Scorcese... Four out of six children now married — phew! All are doing well, the seven grandchildren, too. Still can’t get over that my husband is 70, but he continues to live life to the fullest, probably because he has such a young wife. My healthy food delivery business is growing out of my home, and I’m thinking of working under the auspices of a very successful caterer/ restaurant owner in Charlotte. She, like me, is focused on being ‘green,’ and ‘local,’ and organic when possible. Scary but exciting to take this next step — life is good. Best to all of you!” Jane Hadden Geisse writes, “I can’t remember when I last updated, so at the risk of repeating myself… My younger daughter, Boo, graduated from the University of Melbourne, Australia and is now home (like so many kids!) She is working at our local therapeutic riding center and training to get her NARHA certification, which is required to teach. She also is writing for a local magazine, getting a few extra bucks waitressing, and riding two horses in her spare time. She is busy! Ali is still teaching at Aspen Academy in Denver, CO, but really dislikes the headmistress, who is truly a dictator. So she is thinking of making a big shift and going to Europe to teach English. And what do we do with the house she just bought and the cat that goes with it? Inquiring minds want to know! “I am still volunteering at our Humane Society and torturing my violin in the Solon Philharmonic Orchestra. They recently hired two new conductors; one is a cellist for the Cleveland Orchestra. They are getting very serious about making us a very fine group of musicians, which is fun, but I fear that some day soon I will be found out to be the impostor that I am and will be demoted to kazoo! “I am also still bike racing and in fact just got recruited to a new team and now have real sponsorship. Yikes! I will be in Houston, TX, next June for the National Senior (ouch!!) Olympics, in case anyone reading this lives here and can tell me anything about Houston. Other than that I am truly grateful for all the good health we enjoy. With parents getting very old and us on the downward slide to 60, every good day is no small thing. My best to all and I hope everyone makes a serious effort to get to the next Reunion!!”

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Beryn Frank Harty ’72 and husband Rick Beryn Frank Harty went to Alaska for a family reunion cruise with 16 Hartys — four generations of one family! And from Karen Brooks: “Recently finished a year in Greenwich, CT, last year cleaning, selling, and emptying my mom’s house since 1958 (she passed away at home January of 2009 after turning 90 and watching every bit of the inauguration on the television). The neighbors who bought it to keep as a guesthouse for their children (or so they said) decided to tear it down this year. For any of you who saw that house, you’ll know how devastating that has been, particularly since I lost my house to a fire in 2004 — such waste and lack of conscience! I miss my mom, but am glad to not have to go to Greenwich any more. “Anyway, I’ve really loved being home more this year, doing farming on a larger scale, three hoophouses full of tomatoes and basil and hot peppers, and all the harvesting and selling and food processing that goes with it. Jill Englund came up for a visit this spring, as she was attending a cheese-making class nearby, and we both had to chuckle about our good educations — she’s keeping bees and making cheese and I’m hatching chicks, raising sheep, and growing vegetables. “I’m still doing gigs with my singing partner, Melissa, and watching all of us musicians getting older as well. Pete Seeger continues to amaze me, and he is an example for all of us who think we’re getting old, still coming up with new songs and ideas that he brings to fruition. I was lucky to be a part of a recent recording project with him and was on the last album as well, just one of many, but an honor none the less. “My kids are spread out. Liza’s in Boston doing research at Brigham and Women’s (she’s the one that did a post-grad year at Walker’s) and hoping to get into


her choice for a doctorate in clinical psych. Sarah is finishing up her bachelors at UMass Amherst in Anthropology. My son, Loren, is doing art at the local community college and playing music. My youngest, Patrick, joined the Navy in May and is now in Virginia Beach in school for IS (Intelligence Specialist) — kinda freaky, but what can you do but hope and pray that your kid stays out of harm’s way and makes the right choices when it comes to it? I hope you’re all well, and, like Jane, I am grateful for my health.”

“So, I got to spend something like an hour with Clint Eastwood and Matt Damon in a little room in a little hotel in Toronto, sitting around a table and chatting. They were both super-nice (I had met Damon before, but never Eastwood…Never dreamed I would). Both were charming, relaxed, and funny. They were nice enough to let me take their picture afterwards. This was on September 12, 2010. A couple of nice guys, a couple of generations apart (Eastwood is 80, Damon is 40).”

Reggie Scruggs adds, “Hope everyone else is doing great. (By the way, Jane asked if anyone lives in Houston… that would be me; so get in touch when you’re here next summer!)

From Roberta Roll: “I continue to live in the beautiful Hudson Valley and be amazed at the beauty and wealth of talent here. I still conduct my private practice in bodywork and movement therapy, as well as teach yoga classes. Even though my work is physically demanding, and I think about giving it up every so often, I keep learning so much from my clients and really do enjoy it. It’s also very rewarding to help people discover themselves in a new way and feel stronger and healthier. Singing and gardening are my other passions. I am so lucky to be singing with the fabulous choral group, Crescendo.

“I’m still toiling as the Senior Film Critic at KUHF Radio in Houston, TX, which is the National Public Radio affiliate. I am also the host of the weekly soundtrack show Music From The Movies, which is heard locally on 88.7 FM, Saturday nights at 7 p.m. Central, or via online stream at kuhf.org. “I just returned from a really great time at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It’s my big trip of the year, and I always end up talking to some interesting actor or director. I got to see Robert Redford again (but didn’t get to talk to him, sadly). He was on stage introducing his new movie The Conspirator, which deals with the Lincoln assassination. I missed his press conference because I was at a last-minute pressonly screening of Hereafter which is Clint Eastwood’s new movie with Matt Damon. “The next day I was supposed to go to Woody Allen’s press conference about his new movie, You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger. Well, I missed that because I got a last-minute opportunity to meet with Eastwood and Damon. This was after the press had been told that Eastwood was at the festival but wasn’t doing any interviews. He’s notoriously press-shy. It turned out that Mr. Eastwood was persuaded to do one sit-down interview with a few members of the Canadian press (be nice to the host country, I always say), and then he [Eastwood] said to the Warner Bros. marketing folks, ’How about including one American (reporter)?’ “Eastwood was given the list of reporters who had seen the movie and had made a comment about it. When he saw my name, where I was from, and my comment, he said, ‘Find this Regina Scruggs’ (or some such). This was two hours before the scheduled interview. Phone calls were made and someone tracked me down. Fortunately, I was in my hotel room, not at a screening or something; it would have killed me to miss this!

“I also decided to start a farmers market in Copake, NY, this summer. It was a huge undertaking, but so much fun to see people at the market, buying, talking, getting together, and adding something vital to the community. “My son took a year off after high school and went to Portland, OR. After a year of being pretty much at loose ends, he is back closer to home this year at Hartwick College studying philosophy and music. I’m hoping he can keep himself focused on the books as well as practicing! “My dad died almost a year ago very suddenly, which was a shock for us all. My siblings and I are still involved in settling everything, including selling his house in Santa Fe, NM, although we had fantasies about keeping it! I’m hoping my mom keeps going strong for a few more years! All in all, I feel so blessed to have beautiful surroundings, good friends and my health. Please come visit!”

1974 Vanessa Guerrini-Miraldi Wilcox 580 West End Avenue New York, NY 10024-1723 212-877-3413 vgmwilcox@nyc.rr.com

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1975

1979

Doris “Veda” Pendleton McClain PO Box 1722 Louisville, KY 40203 502-384-7041 veda_mcclain@yahoo.com

Karen Polcer Bdera 24-03 86th Street East Elmhurst, NY 11369 718-429-7594 pinkwalk@gmail.com

Veda Pendleton McClain writes, “It’s been great Veda Pendleton McClain reconnecting with classmates via email and on Facebook. I’ve received messages over the past few months from Cyndi Donn Tessler, Meg McKee ’76, and Jody Agerton. I spoke with Robin Ross Greathouse during the summer. She lives in Charleston, WV, and is doing well. I recently visited with Nyoka Browno Woods in Orangeburg, SC, and her granddaughter Zariah, who is in kindergarten. Nyoka teaches mathematics to middle school students.”

Karen Polcer Bdera sends, “After a brief hiatus from the Class Correspondent role, I’m back again. So much is happening at Walker’s with the upcoming Centennial celebrations that I felt I just had to. As most of our class members will be turning 50 the year that Walker’s will be turning 100, there are just too many synergies — we need to start having a presence again. So, without further ado, here are some notes from our fellow classmates.”

Cyndi Donn Tessler writes, “I’m living in Virginia Beach, VA. My husband Jacob and I have two wonderful sons. Our oldest, Aaron, is a freshman at Johns Hopkins University, and my baby, David, is a sophomore in high school. Where did the years fly? Seems like yesterday I was running around Walker’s planning a Livingston Taylor concert. It really does seem like another lifetime. I am taking a break from my work as a fundraiser, not many funds out there to raise. I talk to Carol Hoffman Jason who lives close by. She has three great boys.”

1976 C. Elizabeth Connery Mitchell 9 Pearl Street Marblehead, MA 01945-3417 781-631-2860

1977 Michelle Turner 94 Saint Anns Court Somerset, NJ 088763-4407 732-214-9816

1978 Kimberly Brown Morrow 106 Summers Run Annapolis, MD 21401 410-757-1060 kabmorrow@comcast.net

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Eve Chilton Martirano writes, “I have moved to Rye, NY, after 25 years in Manhattan, with my new husband Sal and my now five children and three dogs. So happy that my dear childhood friend Bessie Speers is taking EWS into its Centennial. Bessie’s commitment to EWS is a gift to our School. Happy 50th birthday to all my ’79 classmates!” Lela Schaus Philip writes, “It’s a little more than my last report when the children were still in elementary school and I was whipping up peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. I am teaching art to preschool boys at Brunswick School in Greenwich, CT, as well as preschool girls and fourth graders at Greenwich Academy. I love it so much and am always thinking of new projects that are fun and exciting for them. My oldest son, Nick, is a junior at Denison University and spent his fall semester in London. Sam is a freshman at Bucknell University, and Lily is in fifth grade at Greenwich Academy. My husband, Tom, is Headmaster at Brunswick School for boys. I see a lot of Lisa Danforth Hurst and some of Ellen Gerry Breed and Kelly O’Connor Pascuicco. Over spring break it was fun to catch up with Trina Jones Stillwell and her family. She lives in Dedham, MA.” Angie Heughan writes that she is finally getting used to her new position as Director of New Technology Development Engineering at AT&T. She joined the company last year and has finally gotten her Software Integration and Test Team fully staffed and humming along. She just finished a huge remodeling project at home (kitchen and two baths). Thanks again to her best friend and Walker’s alumna, Linda Loteczka Gilbert ’80, for recommending the contractor who agreed to come to Maryland from Connecticut to complete the job. Linda just got home to Connecticut after a trip to Maryland to inspect the work and attend the kids’ (Erik,


14, and Callie, 13) martial arts tournament. A great time was had by all. Angie is seriously considering returning for the Centennial Reunion. Leslie Timko writes, “I thought there might not be too many other Walkerites who have lived in Cambodia, Papua New Guinea, and India and who have worked in humanitarian affairs!” Leslie has worked with the United Nations, the International Organization for Migration, and a few NGOs, including HIAS where she currently works in immigration and humanitarian affairs.

Leslie Timko ’79, right, with Mia Farrow (above) and in Chad.

“As for yours truly, Karen Polcer Bdera, I continue to work at God’s Love We Deliver: an amazing nonsectarian not-for-profit that cooks and delivers highquality nutritious meals to people in the midst of lifealtering illnesses, who are too sick to shop and cook for themselves. I work in Development, so every dollar raised helps pay for these meals. I also am still walking and fund-raising for the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer — 12 walks and over $157,000 raised. I will be doing my 20th ING New York City Marathon this year as well. My husband Nick had bilateral hip resurfacing this year, so he’s not walking so much — next year! In January, I went on a Seven Sisters trip to Bangladesh and India, themed around caste and poverty and women’s issues — had an amazing time. Next year, I’ll be going to Egypt; can’t wait! I’ll tell you all about it on September 30–October 2, 2011, when we ALL COME BACK FOR THE CENTENNIAL!!!!”

1980 Deana Washburn 12 Craig Place Cranford, NJ 07016-4229 908-272-4229 deanadw@aol.com

1981 Ann Marenakos PO Box 1771 Darien, CT 06820 203-662-0116 203-722-9628 marenakos@gmail.com

Anne Ritter Michel ’81, Laura Whiteman ’81, and Narda Boughton ’81 Anne Ritter Michel flew to Boston to meet up with Narda Boughton and Laura Whiteman for a very happy reunion in September. Narda is living in the North End and is a exceptional artist who is working hard on a number of commissions for portraits. Laura is back at Walker’s as Director of Alumnae Relations and she is thrilled to meet up with Walker’s alums from every class. Now that Anne’s daughter, Julia, is working for Elie Tahari in New York, Anne just has to keep up with her husband and fourth grade son under the sun in Bellaire Beach, FL. Betsy S. Davis writes, “I started working at Princeton Day School on a more regular basis. I was substituting for the past six years, but now I am the permanent substitute and homework club supervisor, plus I do some administrative work, as well as tutoring on the side. In addition, I am the master scheduler/administrator for the Stars travel hockey program. In a nutshell, I’m very busy. Megan, my 18 year-old went off to college at Oberlin College in Ohio, so I am experiencing some empty nester sadness. Grahame is a sophomore at Princeton Day School. Tom has just started a new job with Merck, who he has been with for 19 years, in West Point, PA, so we may have a move in our future, hopefully to the farm of my dreams.” Mary Beth Rettger says, “I’m shocked that I now have one kid in double-digits! Daniel turned 10 in October, and Emma is 7. We are learning about doing doubledrop-off and pick-up as they are in different Montessori schools (this basically means we’re all a little confused Winter 2011 71


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about who is driving who where and when). Our really exciting family news was that my husband Roy became a US citizen in early September with about 5,000 other new Americans in a swearingin ceremony at Fenway Park (the largest ever naturalization ceremony). It was an inspiring and very patriotic day.” Mary Beth Regetter ’81 and husband Roy

Tricia Kelly shares, “I’m living in Los Angeles with my husband, an actor, and son Nicholas, who just started kindergarten. I worked in feature film production and development for many years, and now work in media market research for the movie studios. And now I get to work from home quite a bit, which I love. I still ride when I can, but not enough! We make several trips back east every year to the New York City area to get my East Coast fix, and last time visited Ann Marenakos, and her beautiful art gallery in downtown New Canaan. I’ve been terrible about keeping in touch with fellow Walker’s, but have started to be better with Facebook. Life is good in sunny LA!” McCall Watson Eng will be moving back to Louisville in June where she and her (favorite) husband have purchased a second home. Her younger son Bennett will be a middle-schooler in Kentucky, and her older son, Weston, will be off to college. She is not hanging up her spurs permanently however as she will be commuting thanks to hubby’s airline, American Airlines, to visit and play tennis with her chicas. She also visited with former teacher Diana Dunn, who coaches her niece in tennis, while on her tour of Kentucky Country Day. Veronica “Roni” Leger still lives in her cute condo in Cambridge, MA, and works for Fidelity Investments in Boston. She is traveling a ton for work and managed to see Shelley Marks in San Francisco in June. She also did some traveling on vacation to Prague, Vienna, and then Toronto during the fall. Life is good!

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Veronica Leger ’81

1982 Eve Agush 617-216-6062 617-216-1643 AdamAnt_Eve@hotmail.com Eve Agush, writes, “My family and I moved in June to a beautiful new home that we bought in Natick, MA. We have settled in nicely and have a great new home, great new neighborhood and fabulous welcoming neighbors. Anthony is attending third grade and has dreams of becoming an inventor. Life in Natick Eve Agush ’82, husband Rob, son is a bit more rural that Anthony, two neighbors, Jordan we are used to, but we and Jake Landgrebe have big plans for a vegetable garden, perennials and fruit trees. And I do believe a puppy is in our future. I am still teaching flamenco, tap, and yoga and am finding the Metro-west area is full of opportunities.” Emily Eckleberry Johnson had a fun visit with Ashley Bourne Dewey in VT, and also had a great time (also with her family) at the EWS group seating at the US Open. Leila Howland Wetmore came with her girls and husband, and Laura Whiteman ’81, who works at Walker’s, was there. Lucinda Atkins Sheffield wrote and said, “It doesn’t seem that long ago that I started as a freshman at Walker’s, which makes it hard to believe that we just sent our oldest son, Charlie, off to boarding school as a freshman at Holderness in New Hampshire. I’m still busy at home in Lake Bluff with Henry (12), Sam (9), and Pippa (7). Looking forward to coming out East for Charlie’s parents’ weekend and hope to maybe reconnect with some long-lost classmates! “Another four year Walker-ite, Sarah Murphy Davies, and I had a great time catching up. She lives in Bozeman, MT with her awesome dog, Chace. This summer she was attending a sermon being led by her mother, who is now an Episcopal priest, at a small church in Maine. When she entered the church, Bob Richardson, former EWS art teacher and advisor to both of us, was sitting in the church! We both loved Mr. Richardson and reminisced on his positive impact on


our time at Walker’s and in our lives. It was truly great to catch up with Sarah.”

1983 Leontina “Tina” Marcotulli moved with her husband and two daughters, nearly six-year-old Lidia Rose and three-and-a-half-year-old Adriana Isabella to London in early July. After a few moving mishaps have, the family has finally settled in and Tina is back working for Deutsche Bank.

1984 Caroline O’Brien Thomas 30 Joy Place Cohasset, MA 02025 781-383-2385 781-248-0863 carrieandbobthomas@comcast.net

1985 Elizabeth “Betsy” Potter Giddings 6 Wellington Heights Road Avon, CT 06001 860-679-9593 860-841-5625 dearepg@aol.com Betsy Potter Giddings writes, “Dear Classmates and friends of Walker’s, there is no better time than Sundial time: an opportunity to share in the lives of others, as if true time stands still. Reunion has come and that time has passed, however, for those who attended, Walker’s relations remained deeply rooted. For those who were unable to travel and parade around Beaver Brook, your welcome cheers were felt from afar. Like the mighty oak planted right outside Cluett for Allison Bradley Agee, Walker’s provided us with an established root system for which to grow. I am happy to report that her tree branches are strong, her leaves are complying with New England seasonal changes and her connections remain intact. With this edition of The Sundial, I wish you similar strength, support and health, as we all branch out and then return back to the roots!” Lacy Frazer says, “I am still living in Chapel Hill, NC, employed with the federal government as a criminal psychologist — only six-and-a-half years until I can retire. We are in the second year of homeschooling our children (ages 10, 9, and 6), which continues to be a wonderful fit for our family. I have attached a photo taken last summer on Oak Island, off the coast of North

Lacy Frazer ’85 and family Carolina. We have a tiny beach cottage there and love the ability to swim in the ocean whenever the spirit moves us. I was sad to miss Reunion this past May, and hope that those who attended had a wonderful time!” Wendy Walker writes, “After 13 years of raising kids and writing books, I have resumed practicing law at Connecticut Legal Services. I am also working on my third novel and getting ready to promote the paperback of Social Lives, which will be released in December. It was so great to see everyone last May at our Reunion!”

1986 Micaela “Miki” Porta 204 Park Street #16 New Canaan, CT 06840 203-594-7288 enginebooks@yahoo.com Tahra Makinson-Sanders sends, “Hi everyone! I live in San Francisco and love it. Had a chance to take an awesome job last month in Philadelphia but couldn’t bring myself to leave San Francisco. I work for a national wedding photography company as Vice President of Photography after leaving my photojournalism career three years ago. “I finished my first Ironman in Canada on August 29! After six months of training, hundreds and hundreds of Winter 2011 73


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miles running, biking and swimming, the 14.37 hours and 140 miles was actually doable. And yes, I likely will do another, but not next year. I want some of my life back! If you are ever in San Francisco please look me up!”

quite good. However, she is also a fantastic photographer and artist (featured recently in school). I think she will be able to do anything she sets her mind to. In the future, I would love to send her to Walker’s, but as she is only 6, the future can be anything!”

Amy Turner Fraterelli writes, “For the last two months, I have been chairing a school fundraiser for my kids’ school and we have raised over $50,000. I am exhausted but it is worth it!”

Sarah Baker McConnell sends “Greetings from Texas!” She shares the following update. “Here’s the short version: We went through seven years of fertility treatments, gave up, adopted a baby, and found out I was pregnant at the same time. The girls are fiveand-a-half months apart. The blonde is Sarah Leeson McConnell (biological), while the brown-haired beauty is our adopted daughter Margaret Waters McConnell. We have a very close relationship with her birth mother. So close that Sarah gets jealous Sarah Leeson (l) and Margaret Waters (r), daughters of Sarah Baker and claims that McConnell ’87 Waters’ birth mother is her ‘tummy mummy,’ too.

Miki Porta sends, “Our family moved to New Canaan, CT, last year and we are very happy here. My husband Victor, sons Aurelio Victor (10) and Lucas (4), and I had a wonderful summer, splitting time between goofing off in New Canaan; hiking in Vermont; beach bumming on the Jersey shore; and boating and relaxing at Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire. I saw Page Bauer Patterson recently for dinner in New York, when she was passing through on a brief trip and working on getting her pilot’s license.” Heather Monchik Carey is living in Fairfield, CT and has a business called Green Palette, which provides nutrition and culinary services that teach people, handson, how to improve their health through food. Join Green Palette on Facebook — trust me, you won’t be sorry. The information is fascinating, and Heather’s recipes are mouthwatering and totally manageable.

1987 Lori Stewart PO Box 330774 West Hartford, CT 06133-0774 860-205-9920 ews1987@gmail.com Heather Cullis Spence writes, “It has been too long. All is well on my end, although the economy has hit the horse industry hard (in Maryland), so things have been slower than 10 years ago. I teach fewer lessons as [riding] is a luxury, but it gives me more time with my family. My husband, Dannie, also works with the horses, thoroughbreds, at a farm in Delaware. They breed and foal, then prepare them for the sales. The farm is one of the top selling farms on the East Coast. I work at a farm nearby, fooling with the horses; it is only part time and it gives me the freedom to come and go. Afterwards, I head to my parents’ so I can take care of my seven horses/ponies then make it home for the [school] bus by four! My daughter, Sydney, is the light of our lives: our miracle. We never thought we would be able to have children, but found the right doctor and succeeded. Yay!! Sydney, 6, loves the horses and is

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“I hope all is well with you and yours. Last summer Wendy Smith and Julia “Julie” Wilcox and I got together in the city at The Ritz Carlton bar. My, how things never change! It was a delicious reunion, so comfortable and reassuring. I am still in constant touch with Emma Pilkington. She had her beautiful son, Otto, a couple months ago, and is tremendously happy. Jill Ferguson just gave birth to a baby girl and is happily and crunchily living in Denver. I was also able to reconnect with Melissa McCormick through Facebook. She too, is happy and well with a darling son, and is living in Avon, CT. That’s all the news that’s fit to print. I hope to see everyone at the next reunion, unless I happen to have another baby weeks beforehand. All my love and laughs, Baker.” Cindy Sebrell writes, “After spending more than a year traveling and working in Egypt, I am now the owner of a creative advertising, public relations, and design firm with clients between Boston and New York. (itemcreative.com). I underestimated how much work is involved in running a business, but I love it. And we’re growing! My husband, Jeffrey, and I divide our time between Connecticut and New York, where he works as an engineering consultant. Somehow I still find time


to do volunteer work for Opera New England of Northeast Connecticut and the YMCA. If any classmates are in New York City, I’d love to meet for a sip!” Karyn Mandell Lehmann is loving life:“living in the foothills of southern California with my husband, three daughters, four dogs, and two cats.” Tara Harris is contemplating retirement. “I [Lori Stewart], spent time with Wendy Martin at my birthday celebration in October. She is as stunning and fashionable as ever, and I was blessed to have her present at my special event. Kelly Schmidt and I will be participating as teammates in a Community Spelling Bee in October. It’s an annual fundraising event for schools in Hartford County. Hopefully the Latin classes we took at Walker’s will give us a competitive advantage. We will let you know the outcome. “Last, but not least, an update on my goddaughter, Cheyenne Watts ’17. In our last Take Note, we were left with a cliffhanger: would she choose the Suns or the Dials? Well, it is official: Chey is a Legacy Sun. She is most definitely a Sun, proudly radiant in hues of yellow, orange and red!”

1988 Melissa Jackson Loree 3055 East Pine Valley Road NW Atlanta, GA 30305 404-816-9463 678-429-9884 melissaloree@caninieassistants.org

Beth McGuinness ’88

Beth McGuinness sends, “I moved to Denver, CO, and started a new job as a National Sales Director at The Trizetto Group. The company is headquartered in Colorado. I moved for the job opportunity, but also to make a change in my personal life. I’m enjoying the lifestyle out here. I’m able to hike, bike, go to the mountains, and ski this winter.”

Margaret “Dolly” Meinert Eschbach writes, “I spent the Saint Francis Day weekend, October 2-3, with an animal rescue organization: Connecticut Cat

Connection’s Cat Haven group. We had many rescues and three adoptions. Each and every forever home is a blessing. If you know of anyone looking for a great companion cat, please let me know, as there are so many kitties looking for a home. They are from several states... some having come in on a ‘last chance’ truck from Georgia. Many have heart-wrenching stories. (Example: There is the sweetest cat with a crooked smile. Turns out he had been beaten so badly that his teeth were all smashed.) They are abandoned, dropped off on doorsteps, left by roadsides, etc., yet they find it in their hearts to forgive. For more information, please visit ctcatconnection.org.”

1989 Fiona Cox 7757 35th Avenue, NE Seattle, WA 98115-4812 206-568-2390 206-605-5355 fionaccox@aol.com

1990 Tatyana “Tanya” Bradford Ouhrabka 160 Rumstick Road Barrington, RI 02806 401-247-9839 tatyana@cox.net

1991 Gabriela “Gabby” Porta Beecher 363 Main Street New Canaan, CT 06840 203-972-2121 646-702-6666 gbeecher1@yahoo.com Gabby Porta Beecher writes, “I hope everyone is doing well and looking forward to our 20-year Reunion this year. It is hard to believe that it has been so long since we were all back in Simsbury together. I hope that everyone can make it back for our reunion, which by the way will be held on the weekend of September 30th–October 2nd to coincide with the school’s Centennial celebration. “So far I have heard that Paola Rainieri will be coming back from the Dominican Republic to attend and that Ally Wainer is hoping to make the trip from whichever far-off nation she is posted to next! So please mark your calendars and make the trip back.”

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Melissa Daglio Burns writes, “My family and I relocated to Atlanta, GA, over the summer. In the first month I was here, I ran into Angela Schmidt Lindsay ’90 at the gym, which was great, and her children are adorable. I also had a play date a few weeks ago with Lynette deVries Baker and her girls. “I am busy producing a documentary about life after breast cancer which should be released by next October and being the mother to two adorable girls, Riley, 6, and Kaylie, 4." Lisa Dery-Gardner Dower sends, “We have been living in London for the past two years and have really enjoyed traveling around Europe while here. We are excited to be returning to the U.S. in nine months and looking forward to attending our reunion in October. When I am home for holidays, Gaby Porta Beecher and I still manage to get our girls together for reunions of their own!”

Nan Flanagan writes, “My husband and I bought a house and relocated from Boston to Marshfield, MA in July. Gone are the days of apartment living — we are on an acre of land that backs up to miles and miles of conservation forest, and is a quick ten-minute drive away from the ocean. Needless to say, we love our new home. Shortly after our move, we also adopted a dog. He’s a whopping 117-pound black lab/golden retriever mix and he’s settling nicely into his new digs. Hope to see everyone at the big Centennial celebration next October!”

1994 Alexandra Flood Alcoff 115 4th Avenue Apartment 8G New York, NY 10003 212-358-0687 646-413-8622 alexalcoff@gmail.com Carryll Hua got married this year and moved back to Taiwan from Orange County, CA. Her new address is: 9F, #6, Lane 557 Ming Shui Road Taipei (104), Taiwan Sofie Taurel Warren lives in Barbados and is married with two boys (5 and 6 years old). She started her own photography business two years ago. She says, "I enjoy the island life and am happy to be doing what I love." You can check out her work at sofiewarrenphotography.com.

(L) Lisa Dery-Gardener Dower ’91 with daughter, Grace. (R) Grace Dower, Lili Beecher and Charlotte Beecher.

1992 Marie Mahmouzian Compton 580 Animas View Drive #3 Durango, CO 81301 970-759-3501

1993 Toan Huynh 7 Cavalier Drive Hamilton, NJ 08619 609-588-6807 toanmah75@yahoo.com

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Alexandra Flood Alcoff is still living in New York City with her husband, Sam. She is currently a stay at home mom, taking care of their 15-month-old daughter, Emma.

1995 Nicole Lewenson Shargel 103 Willow Avenue Unit 2 Somerville, MA 02144 617-960-6136 nicky@shargellawoffice.com Alexandra Townson 666 West Ferry Street Apartment #4 Buffalo, NY 14222-1625 716-308-6697 alexandratownson@hotmail.com


1996 Drusilla Carter 308 South Cedar Street Pageland, SC 29728 843-672-3339 jdrusillacarter@gmail.com Allison Hulbert Potts married her partner of nearly 10 years in an English garden on 24th July 2010. She and Simon are happily settled near Reading, UK where she works for the Government’s Nature Conservation Advisor. They live with their two dogs and are looking forward to the arrival of a new Siberian husky puppy in September. Allison is hoping to make next year’s Reunion and welcomes other Walker’s ’96 alumnae to get in touch via Facebook if you are visiting the UK.

Leslie Davies Huguenin ’96, husband Scott, and her parents at their wedding. dance for the guests who could not make it to California; the line dancing, live music, and BBQ were much enjoyed by all! After taking time there be with her family and to explore Massachusetts, Scott and Leslie left from Boston and headed to Jade Mountain in St. Lucia. Jade is truly a top pick for a romantic destination of pampering, eating, and fun! Amanda Outerbridge Kellogg had a daughter, Somers, on September 30th. Amanda Newman Pushkas had a daughter, Emese, in May.

Allison Hubert Potts ’96 and husband Simon at their wedding. Leslie Davies Huguenin recounts how Scott Huguenin asked her to marry him on February 14, 2010 at The Wishing Well in Disneyland. They spent the next day with her parents scouting out the perfect place for the upcoming ceremony. They all fell in love with Rancho Las Lomas in Orange County, CA. The location only had one Saturday open for the next ten months so they jumped on the opportunity and the ensuing four-month engagement! Leslie’s mother, Sharon, was the best person to have take charge with Leslie’s father, John, standing strong beside her. They pulled off the wedding with very few glitches! Scott and Leslie exchanged vows in front of 250 guests on a sunny evening surrounded by friends. The Mariachi Divas sang throughout the ceremony and party, clearly showing why they won a Grammy. The newlyweds left three days later to begin their twoweek honeymoon. Their first stop was Westfield, MA, at the Davies’ Farm. Leslie’s parents threw a barn

Gwendolyn Wood Wisely was fortunate enough to get to spend lots of time with her Walker’s classmates over the summer! She was a guest at Leslie Davies Huguenin’s beautiful wedding at Rancho Las Lomas in Silverado, CA and got to spend time with Leslie’s family, including her sister, Sarah Davies Murad ’98, on Balboa Island, CA. She got to be with Amanda Outerbridge Kellogg in Back Bay, Boston to celebrate a mutual friend’s upcoming wedding and later in the summer, Gwendolyn attended a lovely baby shower thrown by Ashley Kaye Bernon in Amanda’s honor! Gwendolyn continues to be active in volunteer work in her hometown of Rumson, NJ, and is currently serving on the Board of Directors as Nominating Placement Chair for the Junior League of Monmouth County. She keeps very busy raising, taxiing, chasing after, cleaning up in the wake of, and, in general, loving her children Timothy Hamilton (6) and Lillian Holiday Wisely (4). Class Correspondent, Drusilla Carter, is in the midst of packing up and moving to Virginia for a new job as director of the Blue Ridge Regional Library.

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1997

1998

Alicia Kelly Benedetto 6 Little Bear Drive Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 917-622-9946 aliciacassandra@hotmail.com

Brooke Berescik-Johns 118 West 75th Street New York, NY 10023 646-483-9383 212-868-7052 BrookeBJohns@gmail.com

Melissa Bryant reports, “The past year has been great for me, crazy, but great. I became engaged, finished a master’s degree in Neuroscience, moved to Houston, TX, and started a new job as a researcher at the University of Texas Health Science Center. My fiancé, Ted Hartman, was a classmate of mine at Gettysburg College and is now an attorney in Houston. We are planning an August 2011 wedding in Connecticut. I am beginning to settle into life in a huge southern city. I’m having fun exploring a new place and meeting lots of great people, including our classmate Kristen Culotta Hanson. However, I still think nothing compares to rural New England, and I come back to visit as often as I can. Hope to see everyone at our 15-year Reunion!” Nina Fuchs Vollmann writes, “In Berlin and everything is great. As you might have heard, we had a baby on the 2nd of July. Luca Kito was born and he’s a real cutie! He sleeps well, smiles a lot, and is a very happy baby. It was quite a change from working a lot to becoming a mum, but I’m really enjoying it at the moment. Moreover we’re currently rebuilding an old house in the centre of Berlin, so we’ll have loads of space for all of you to come and visit as of next summer!”

1999 Vivienne Felix 434 McCartney Street Apartment 1F Easton, PA 18042 484-597-0633 vivienne_felix@yahoo.com Rebecca Grayson Ocque graduated from the University of Buffalo Medical School in May 2009. Now a second year pathology resident, she gave birth to daughter Isabelle Mya Ocque in Pittsburgh, PA on September 11, 2010. Mother and baby are doing well and father/husband, Andrew Jacob Ocque, is quite proud. Lizzy Heurtematte also has baby news to share: “Hi there!! Everything in Panama is great. My husband and I are expecting our second child in early December. Her name will be Dahlia Allegra. In March, I was a bridesmaid in the wedding of Cynara Lloyd. She has a lovely little boy named Weston and is living in Orlando, FL, with her husband and son. Hope all is well!! Un abrazo…” Meaghan Kate Boisfeuillet wrote, “Nothing much is going on except remodeling the kitchen and living in limbo until it is done. I also just completed two years of marriage with my husband.” Nikki Dunson McAllister writes, “Everything is well. The only thing different is I am married now. I got married on June 19, 2010, and am still working as a consumer bankruptcy lawyer.”

Nina Vollmann ’97 and son Luca Cilla Denham Pozzo says, “Jack turned 2 in July and I am working in the human resources department for a human services agency.”

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Shannon Lenz writes, “Things are going well here. I got married on October 8, 2010, at Walker’s, which is my biggest news. Even though Erin Grimshaw ’00 moved to Taipei that day and couldn’t come, Miss Perillo did join us for the ceremony. My sister Erin Lenz ’05, my maid of honor, is also an alumna.” Like Shannon, Sara Esthus also married in the lovely Walker’s Chapel. She says, “This past year has been busy but great. On September 25th, Mike Festi and I were married at the Ethel Walker Chapel, and earlier


2001 Alicia Little Hodge 142 Hampton Avenue West Hartford, CT 06110 860-573-5136 alittlehodge@gmail.com

2002 Stephanie Caviglia 41 Turtle Rock Court New Paltz, NY 12561 914-456-5199 sc284@aol.com

TWITTER For instant news updates from campus, follow us on Twitter at ethelwalker sch.

Shannon Lenz ’99 with her husband and their wedding party. this year we bought a place in East Granby, CT, where we live with our awesome yet trouble-making dog, Ferris. I am the Marketing Analyst for Coupons Inc. TV and also teach riding lessons on the weekends. I see Jess Katz and Liz Herbert all the time; Liz and I actually just went down to the World Equestrian Games where we met up with Sarah Hansel. I hope things are going well for everyone else!” Nicole Khunke moved to California. She says, “I recently relocated to Mammoth Lakes, CA where I am planning on doing an immense amount of snowboarding this winter! When the powder is not fresh, I will be working as a freelance writer. I welcome any visitors!” Class Correspondent, Vivienne Felix, writes, “This fall has kept me extremely busy as always. I still work in Development and College Relations for Lafayette College. In my free time, I keep busy with my new hobby, ice-skating, and facilitate College Skills 101 for GED graduates. Recently, I visited New York City to help Sheng H. Davis celebrate her birthday. She is married and still works at the Patent Office in Alexandria, VA.”

Terri M. Booker writes, “Hello Walker’s! I am happy to report that I graduated from Pace University School of Law on May 16, 2010. While attending Pace, I was privileged to go to my first prom-like event, The Barrister’s Ball; it was an evening of drinking, food, dancing, and fun with my colleagues. During my time at Pace I was involved with the Innocence Project, which inspired me to pursue my passion in the legal system, that had been brewing since I first started law school. (The Innocence Project is committed to exonerating prisoners who are believed to have been falsely convicted. The project is responsible for the release of hundreds of falsely convicted prisoners through DNA and other evidence that was not available during the time of their trial. To learn more or to donate, please visit innocenceproject.org). I am going into criminal law to help prevent such injustices, but I will keep you updated on my future plans New York for the next few years. I took the New York and New Jersey Bars in July and I am happily awaiting my results at home in Philadelphia, PA. GO DIALS!”

2000 Emily B. Cole-Chu 12 West Street #21 Keene, NH 03431 860-941-7443 emilycolechu@gmail.com

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2003 Thara K. Mathews 7305 Quarry Chase Trails Plano, TX 75025 972-618-0741 thara_mathews@hotmail.com Windy Black Jansen writes, “I have been quite busy since the last issue of The Sundial. I returned to the Cobb School, Montessori in June and assumed the role of Director of Admissions. It is wonderful to be with so many young children; so wonderful, in fact, that I decided it was time for Dustin and me to add to the mix. After a very long and hot summer of being pregnant, Dustin and I were thrilled to welcome a baby boy, Flynn Black Jansen born on August 7, 2010, 6 pounds, 10 ounces. The picture is our first family photo on the day we left the hospital. We are beyond in love with Flynn who is such an amazing baby. I can’t wait to introduce him to all of you, hopefully at the Centennial celebration next fall!”

Alexandra B. Tapley 58 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 617-441-0625 Christina Ball is still teaching math and English at Montfort College in Chiang Mai, Thailand where she will be until April 2011 when she will return to the U.S. for graduate school. Until then, she is traveling to Kerala, India, and Myanmar and sincerely hopes that Walker’s grads will visit if they have the chance!

2006 Ebony Moses 303 Chadwick Avenue 2nd Floor Newark, NJ 07018 973-273-0456 mosese@bc.edu Alle S. Colen 9609 Mockingbird Trail Jupiter, FL 33478 561-744-7747 alleshane@hotmail.com

2007 Carter E. Margison 24 Cider Brook Road Avon, CT 06001 860-677-4282 860-839-0770 carter.margison@gmail.com

Windy Black Jansen ’03, husband Dustin and son Flynn

2005 Meredythe Goethe 155 Ayrshire Lane Avon, CT 06001 860-803-9320 righteousrubabe@aol.com Nicole E. Rougeot 2787 Torringford Street Torrington, CT 06790 860-489-7153 860-309-6443 Nicole.rougeot@gmail.com

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Emily Casey 446 Cedar Lane New Hartford, CT 06057 860-489-4700 860-573-6646 Emily.casey@colorado.edu

2008 Lauren E. Milka 10 Woods Lane Simsbury, CT 06070 860-651-4217 860-882-7071


Kathleen A. Kirby 425 Coppermill Road Wethersfield, CT 06109 860-257-9725 860-882-2195 Alicia Mohanie Ramhareck attends Fairfield University where she studies Finance & Accounting. Alicia interned at UTC–Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., in Stratford, CT, this past summer as an INROADS Intern. She writes, “I was a finance intern for the Canadian Maritime Helicopter Program. I plan on returning in the winter and continuing next summer on another challenging program. They offer a rotational program for finance graduates, which I am looking forward to being a part of to begin a career with United Technologies. I have become a proud sister of Epsilon Sigma Phi Sorority, Inc. as of Fall 2009; it is a multicultural, community service based organization founded at Stony Brook University in 1995. I continue to engage in diversity recruiting and awareness activities.” Lia Chafee says, “I’m on the equestrian team at Texas A&M and we have been back-to-back National Champions my freshman and sophomore years! I ran into Miss Sam Silver this summer at a horse show in New York. I hadn’t seen her since graduation! I have a new major: international communication and media. I’m currently working on plans for a study abroad trip to France this summer, which I’m super excited about! Basically, I love it here and although Texas has brought a bit of a culture shock, I’ve embraced it. I’ve even learned how to two-step!” Karen Santana sends, “I’m a history major and political science minor. I’m still in New Jersey and I love it. I’m a sister in Gamma Phi Beta sorority and I plan to go to law school, hopefully back home in good ol’ Connecticut. I love and miss Walker’s very much. And yes, I tell my friends about it all the time and sometimes I still want to be there.” Kathleen Kirby reports, “I’m double-majoring in English and Spanish and am currently living and studying in Madrid, Spain for the year. So far, it has been incredible. While I’m here in Spain, I have plans on meeting up with Silvia Manent, who is lives in Barcelona, and also with Codie Kane, who is studying in Seville in the spring! In other news it’s been almost a year since I last dated an Avon boy, so knock on wood!”

2010 Elizabeth “Betta” Greenberg 26 Latimer Lane Simsbury, CT 06070 860-217-1494 egreenberg@elon.edu Katherine Charov, an East Haddam resident who graduated June 6, 2010 from Walker’s with High Honors, has been awarded a four-year Navy League Foundation Scholarship to study at Johns Hopkins University. Chosen from more than 350 students for the Captain Ernest G. “Scotty” Campbell, USN (Ret.) and Renee Campbell Katherine Charov ’10 Scholarship, Katherine earned the $2,500 award based on academic and extracurricular activities in her application, deemed “among the very best we reviewed,” by the Navy League Foundation. The daughter of Helen and the late Alexander Charov, who served on the USS Andrew Jackson out of Groton, Katherine plans to study materials sciences and engineering at Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering, and compete in NCAA women’s volleyball for the Blue Jays.

OK FACEBO

UPDATE

munities cebook com Fa ’s er k al Our W o pages: . We have tw w ro ge g to e u r general pa contin School is ou er k al W el The E th missions ates and ad for news upd ker School d E thel Wal an , nae n io at inform filled alum n and newsfu r ou is s Alum everyone is page where your well. Point welcomed as nae in our fellow alum direction!

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M E M O R I A M

Barbara Donahue Ross ’37 The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest Ferrying Squadron (WAFS). civilian award given in the United States. As one of Nancy Love’s “Originals,” Each medal, specifically designed and cast Donnie was paid $250 a month and became for the honor, is awarded by an act of one of the first women ever to fly U.S. Congress, which is then signed into law by military aircraft. Immediately, she began the President of the United States. Barbara flying ferrying missions. She was given a Donahue Ross ’37, who died at her home on canvas bag containing her flying suit and August 21, 2010, was one of our nation’s navigational equipment which, when fully treasured Congressional Gold Medal recipients. packed, weighed 90 pounds. Loaded down with The path to receiving such an honor was her “kit,” Donnie paid her own way to the probably clear to all who knew Donnie during her factory and then flew the plane to an Army Air years at Walker’s. Her larger-than-life personality, her Force base. Once on the base, no accommodations were loyalty, her overflowing enthusiasm and contagious sense of made for any of these female pilots, so she had to find her humor made Donnie many lifelong friends during her three own place to sleep before finding her way back to the WAFS years at the School. Donnie wasn’t great at everything she did base at New Castle Army Air Force Base in Wilmington, DE at Walker’s, but she was a great person who got things done. for the next mission. According to her daughter Patricia, “At Walker’s, my mom In July of 1943, Donnie and the other WAFS joined with never started for a varsity team, but she had so much Jacqueline Cochran (the first female pilot to break the sound enthusiasm that she was named President of the Athletic barrier) and the Women’s Flying Training Detachment unit Board and was a member of almost every team sport at the to become the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) and School. But when it was time to sing in Chapel, the teachers Donnie was transferred to Romulus Air Force Base in ordered Mom to just mouth the words. I never heard my Michigan. mother sing a note in my life.” For someone who appeared By the time the WASP was disbanded at the end of 1944 to have no limits on what she could do, Donnie chose her when World War II appeared to near its end, more than challenges with care. 25,000 women had applied to join the WASP. Nineteen After Walker’s, Donnie spent a year at Vassar, hundred women had been accepted, 1114 had served, and where she roomed with some of her Walker’s 79 were killed or injured while in training or classmates. She then left for Texas where she on active duty. The WASP flew a total of 60 learned to fly planes. Despite a crash that million miles in every aircraft in the Air Force broke a good many bones and landed her in inventory, a total of 77 different types of the hospital for an extended stay, Donnie planes. Donnie crisscrossed the country in never lost her taste for fun, her exceptional PT-19 Cornells and BT-13 Valiants, which spirit, or her enthusiasm for flying. are training aircraft, UC-78 Bobcats and CWhen World War II was declared in 47 Dakotas, both transporters, as well as B-24 Europe in 1940, Nancy Love, the renowned Liberators, which were bombers. test pilot, had submitted several proposals to When the WASP was disbanded, Donnie the Army Air Forces for the creation of a unit returned to New York and in 1946 married of experienced women pilots who would Capt. Howard Ross, whom she met while in deliver planes from factories to airbases, thus service. By 1950 they purchased and moved freeing up enlisted male pilots for forward to Acorn Farm in Warrenton, VA, where they combat missions. Her criteria were strict: each ran a dairy operation and raised their four candidate had to have a high school diploma, children. to have logged 500 hours of flying time, None of the WASP members had military possess a Civil Aeronautics Administration status (the right to a flag on their coffins or at 200 horsepower aircraft rating and provide their tombstones) or benefits while serving on Barbara Donahue Ross and two letters of recommendation. Barbara active duty. The military was not even Marie Powers Cummings '37, Donahue’s name was on Nancy’s list of 28 required to pay for funeral costs or costs for bridesmaids at classmate women when, in 1942, she was given the go- Catherine McIntire’s remains to be shipped back to the families of ahead to create the Women’s Auxiliary a WASP killed during service; many of her wedding in 1940 82

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fellow WASP passed the hat around to get that job done. It wasn’t until 1976, after the Air Force mistakenly announced in a communiqué that the recent admission of women to their flying program was “the first time that the Air Force has allowed women to fly their aircraft,” that an organized effort was mounted to put pressure on the House and Senate to ratify a bill giving WASP military status. President Carter signed the bill in November 1977, but it gave the WASP military status without full benefits. Finally, 66 years after Donnie left military service, she and the 200 surviving WASP went to Washington to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor. In what is said to have been the largest number of patrons to fill the Capital building for a single event, the Women’s Air Service Pilots accepted on March 11, 2009 the gold medal for their service during World War II. In thanking them for their contribution and sacrifice to the nation, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, “Women Air Force Service Pilots, we are all your daughters; you taught us how to fly.” Donnie and the other WASP each received a slightly smaller bronze version of the gold medal; the gold medal was donated to the Smithsonian Institution for the “Women in Aviation” display at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA. Other recipients of a Congressional Gold Medal include the Navajo Code Talkers in 2000 and the Tuskegee Airmen in 2006. For Donnie, it was just as much her love of flying as her desire to serve her country that led her to join the WASP, which in turn changed the course of her life. Donnie proved

Donnie receives the Congressional Medal of Honor in March, 2009

to all that with their abundant energy, generosity and determination, any woman could do what she set her mind to. She was one of a little more than a thousand women who overcame persistent criticism and discrimination to create opportunities for women to serve their country. Her daughters Patricia “Pann” Drunagel and Helen Ford, and her son Charles Ross, as well as seven grandchildren and six godchildren, including Tanis Higgins Erdmann ’55 and Beverly Vander Poel Banker ’60, survive Barbara Donahue Ross.

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Jane Blaffer Owen ’33 Individualist who brought new life to New Harmony and championed the arts in Houston

One of the only pictures we have ever seen of Jane Blaffer Owen where she wasn’t wearing a hat is her Ethel Walker Class of 1933 Pepperpot photo. Much lauded for her life of charitable work on behalf of the arts, social activism and preservation, the press photos of Jane in a straw hat always made her a ‘stand out.’ But it was her energy and fearless vision for every project she undertook that earned her worldwide respect and honors. The last press photo of Jane, in a straw hat, was published only a few months before her death in Houston on June 21, 2010 at the age of 95. Born on April 18, 1915, Jane Blaffer was the daughter of Robert Lee Blaffer, a founder of Humble Oil Company (now Exxon) and granddaughter of William T. Campbell, a founder of Texaco. Jane attended The Kincaid School in Houston before coming east to Walker’s, and then attended Bryn Mawr and the Washington School of Diplomacy. In 1941 she married Kenneth Dale Owen, and on their wedding trip he brought Jane to his birthplace of New Harmony, IN, where his forefather Robert Dale Owen had founded a Utopian society in 1825. The fading town appealed to Jane’s spirituality and idealism, and she envisioned a renewed center of culture and belief as she set about preserving the town’s history, restoring its homes and bringing great minds and artists to live and work on the banks of the Wabash River.

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She commissioned Philip Johnson to build The Roofless Church; Jacques Lipchitz fashioned the bronze Madonna and Child; she planned and had built a park for theologian Paul Tillich and commissioned a replica of the labyrinth from Chartres Cathedral. For her work, Jane received the Louise du Pont Crowninshield Award, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s highest accolade. In Houston, the home she never really left, Jane was a major patron of the University of Houston’s Blaffer Art Museum (named for Jane’s mother) and the G. Hines College of Architecture with which she collaborated to realize “The Grotto for Meditation,” now standing on the University’s campus. In addition, Jane founded the English Speaking Union, was the first president of the Allied Arts Council, a founder of the International Seaman’s Center of Houston, a Trustee of C.G. Jung Educational Center, a Sustaining Trustee of the University of Houston Moores School of Music, and served on the boards of The Houston Symphony and The Contemporary Arts Association. Jane Blaffer Owen is one of two Texans to have received the Royal Honor of Commander of The British Empire, bestowed by her majesty, Queen Elizabeth II. A young Jane left Walker’s in 1933 and her classmates remembered her in the Pepperpot as “unusual and intellectual. The one quality that is pre-eminent and recognizable is her earnestness and sincerity. Everything she does she puts her whole heart and soul into…Truly she is well called the class individualist.” Jane Blaffer Owen was an individualist who used her gifts of intelligence, grace, wit and aestheticism for the service of all.

M E M O R I A M

Boynton (Buzz) Hussey Boynton (Buzz) Hussey, former trustee of The Ethel Walker School, passed away on August 27, 2010 at his home in Nashville, TN. Born on May 13, 1935 in Presque Isle, ME, Buzz began his career in finance at Merrill Lynch in Chicago, was Managing Director at Rotan Mosle in Houston, Senior Vice-President at Smith Barney in Cleveland and retired as Director of Research at Dain Rauscher in Dallas in 1999. Buzz graduated from Williston Academy in 1954, Dartmouth College (Economics) in 1958, and Northwestern University Kellogg School (MBA) in 1963, and served in the U.S. Army from 1958-1960.

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In addition to his service to the Board of Trustees at Walker’s from 1984 to 1990, Buzz also served on the board of the Linden Waldorf School in Nashville, was a member of the Rotary Club and was active in the Bellevue United Methodist Church as a Sunday School teacher and board member. He had a lifelong passion for antique cars, particularly Packards. His wife Diane, daughters Kathy Hussey Mater and Kim Hussey Ross ’84, two grandchildren, as well as brothers Gorham and Charles Hussey, survive Buzz.


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M E M O R I A M

Judith Walker Peabody ‘47 “Judith Walker Dunnington Peabody had beautiful priorities; going to church on Sunday wasn’t one of them,” said Rev. Brenda Husson, Rector of St. James Church in New York, during her “Thanksgiving for the Life of Judith D. Peabody” homily. But almost everyone who knew her counted Judy, who passed away on July 25, 2010, among saints, for much of her life’s work involved going to the poorest sections of New York City and tending to those who had been cast aside by society in order to share with them her courage, friendship, hope, and dignity. Judy loved and was very active in the arts all her life. At Walker’s, Judy was in the Choir, Glee Club and Recital Club. After attending Bryn Mawr College and her subsequent marriage to Samuel P. Peabody in 1950, Judy was involved in the entertainment industry until her daughter Elizabeth was born in 1956. She re-entered the theatre world as a producer, among other roles, in the early ’60s. Through her work as a longtime board member of the New York Shakespeare Festival, a patron of the American Ballet Theatre and chairwoman of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, Judy made firm friendships that were threatened when AIDS/HIV began to take its toll. Judith Peabody will be best remembered for her tireless work with and on behalf of AIDS patients. Starting in 1985, she volunteered at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis after a friend contracted AIDS/HIV. Judy said that her motivation to help was because her friends “kept getting sick.” Her roles were varied and her influence was far reaching, like points of light from a very bright star. Judy served every other Friday as co-leader of an AIDS/HIV Care-Partners support group, fought for improved services for people with AIDS/HIV, and spent hours on the telephone giving advice and sharing contacts with families, caregivers and people who had been diagnosed with AIDS/HIV. She served as the only non-scientist on the National Institute of Health’s AIDS/HIV subcommittee, and helped solicit funds to expand the Gay Men’s Health Crisis building, for an

AIDS/HIV research laboratory at New York Hospital, for a supportive care program at St. Vincent’s Hospital and for the People with AIDS/HIV Coalition. She also persuaded others to volunteer for the cause, notably Pat Buckley and Bill Blass. In 1988, Ladies Home Journal listed Judith Peabody as one of America’s 100 Most Important Women. “Some people are more comfortable with a little distance and that is okay,” Judy told the New York Times in 1987, referring to those who would rather give money than time. “But I function best if I am personally involved.” Her hands-on volunteerism was forged in the late 1960s when she and her husband Sam helped found Reality House in Harlem, where she worked counseling heroin users to confront their addiction. Later, Judy channeled her energies towards helping the Renegades Housing Movement, a Hispanic youth gang who wanted to rehabilitate a disused building in East Harlem. When Judith was honored in 1995 for her work with the Gay Men’s Health Crisis, the celebratory luncheon in the Rainbow Room at Rockefeller Center drew luminaries such as Nan Kempner, Bianca Jagger and Gloria Steinem. In 1999, the Harvard AIDS Institute honored Judy for her committed volunteer service to people living with AIDS/HIV and organizations that work on their behalf. In an interview for a 2003 Sundial article, Judy described her work. “I feel lucky that I found what I want to do. This work, even with its sorrow, is very meaningful to me. I am extremely fortunate that I know excellent doctors in the AIDS field — especially Dr. Jonathan Jacobs at the AIDS Care Center at New York Hospital. If I can help someone through this terrible affliction or if my contact helps those who are suffering, then I am blessed.” Dr. Jacobs returned the compliment at Judith Walker Dunnington Peabody’s memorial when he told fellow mourners of her effect on his life and work, “I was converted to Judy-ism”.

Winter 2011 85


TAKE NOTE

Alumnae Updates

If your class does not have a Class Correspondent listed, please consider joining a great group of correspondents who help compile Take Note. If interested, please contact alumnae@ethelwalker.org. We’d love to have you join the team!

Submit your Class Notes Online!

Births & Adoptions

Marriages & Unions

1996 Amanda Outerbridge Kellogg Somers September 30, 2010

1957 Patricia Day To Howard Storm

1996 Amanda Newman Pushkas Emese May, 2010 1997 Nina Fuchs Vollmann Luca Kito July 2, 2010 1999 Rebecca Grayson Ocque Isabelle Mya September 11, 2010 2003 Winton “Windy” Black Jansen Flynn Jansen August 7, 2010

Faculty/Staff Births & Adoptions Carolina Artacho Guerra, Science faculty Sofia Grace Knox Artacho September 15, 2010 Kristin Nicolle, Athletic trainer Logan Elizabeth Nicolle August 27, 2010

Visit ethelwalker.org, and click on Alumnae link at bottom right; there, you will find a link to the Take Note section. An easy-to-use form will allow you to submit your news directly from that page. If you have a longer submission, or photos to send (we hope you do!), all the information you need appears on that page.

1996 Leslie Davies To Scott Huguenin 1996 Allison Hulbert To Simon Potts July, 2010 1999 Nicole Dunson To Calvin McAllister June 19, 2010 1999 Sara Esthus To Mike Festi September 25, 2010 1999 Shannon Lenz To Chris Guidotti October 8, 2010 2001 Ariana Rockefeller To Matthew Bucklin September, 2010

In Memoriam 1927 FRANCES CARUTHERS CASSEBAUM 1927 EMILY FREW OLIVER

86

Engagements

1930 ELIZABETH PILLSBURY PRINGLE

1997 Melissa Bryant To Ted Hartmann

1933 JANE BLAFFER OWEN, sister of †Cecil Blaff von Furstenberg ’38 and grandmother of Ingrid Arneberg ’82

THE SUNDIAL


1937 MARIE POWERS CUMMINGS, sister of †Marjorie Powers White ’43 1937 BARBARA DONAHUE ROSS, aunt of Tanis Higgins Erdmann ’55, great-aunt of Julia Newlin Higgins ’83 and godmother of Beverly Vander Poel Banker ’60, P ’82 1937 ANN WITTER 1938 DOROTHY BURNS BURKE

In Sympathy JOANNA HANCOCK AEBISCHER P’60, ’61, mother of two Walker’s graduates: Jane Shierling Walsh ’61 and Susan Shierling Harding ’60 JUSTINE ALBANESE, nephew of Alice Chrystal, a member of the EWS Staff GAYLE LaROCQUE BARKER P’05, mother of Kellie Barker ’05, sister of Ken LaRocque P’01, headmaster of Avon Old Farms and aunt of Alexandrea Lent ’01

1938 GERTRUDE NELSON WALDRON

RICHARD BARRUETO, husband of Meredith Petit Barrueto ’45

1940 JOAN BROWN WINTER, sister of †Carolyn Brown Negley ’37

ROSEMARY PERRY BUDLONG P’87, mother of Stephanie Budlong Paul ’87

1941 MARGERY MONTGOMERY POPE, mother of Sara Pope, former EWS employee

EDWARD P. CARROLL, grandfather of Marguerite Kelly ’93 and Alicia Kelly Benedetto ’97

1942 JOAN RALSTON COCHRAN, sister-in-law of Nancy Cochran Cudahy ’42 1945 JEAN SPURR, sister-in-law of Janice Tompkins Spurr ’45 1947 JUDITH ANNE WALKER PEABODY, godmother of Whitney de Roulet Bullock ’70 1950 RUTH DUNBAR CUSHING

STEPHANIE CRISPINELLI, daughter of Linda Murphey Crispinelli ’79 JEREMY GORDON, husband of Sara Jane Auchincloss Gordon ’50 JANET HOLMGREN HARRINGTON P’72, mother of Lisa Harrington Foote ’72 MURIEL HOWARD-SORRELL, mother of Iain HowardSorrell, Trustee and grandmother of Lisa HowardSorrell ’09 GARY JASKULSKI, former faculty

1950 JOSEPHINE FOX REED, sister of Millicent Fox Mailliard ’46 and Dorothy Fox Elicker ’51, and aunt of Julia Malliard Nelson ’76

JANE BROWN LEIDAL, cousin of Elizabeth Nash Muench ’55

1953 ELIZABETH RADLEY ANDERSON, sister of Edith Radley ’56

PHILIP RISING PETERS, JR., brother of Mary Peters Bolton ’33

1954 SARAH DONOHO GRIFFEN

DOUGLAS REMINGTON NICHOLS, JR. P’69, father of Susan Nichols Ferriere ’69

BEVERLY S. MAY, stepmother of Drusilla Carter ’06

1954 LESLIE VAN VLACK WAITE

ROBERT SPILMAN P’76, father of Virginia Spilman Perrin ’76

1955 SUSAN FINDLAY CATHEY, mother of Dina Cathey Millard ’79

ANSLEY M. STARR, mother of Drusilla Carter ’96

1956 CAROLINE SCHUTT BROWN, sister of Sarah Schutt Harrison ’55 and †Katherine Schutt Streitwieser ’59 1966 SARAH WARREN CASSAR, sister of Deborah Warren ’64 and cousin of Frances Aldrich Maher ’60, Abigail Aldrich Record ’62 and Rosalie Aldrich West ‘67

MICHAEL THOMAS, grandfather of Rebecca Castellani ’09 and father-in-law of David Castellani, P’90, Trustee ROBERT WATSON P’90, father of Carol Watson ’90, Trustee PHOEBE COOK WELSH P’74, mother of Phoebe Welsh Muzzy ’74

†deceased

Winter 2011 87


SUPPORTING WALKER’S

FROM YOUR PARENTS ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT

A

s parent of a day student at Walker’s, sometimes the nearly 50 miles I drive each day can be daunting. Then, there are the rejuvenating days like today, when the splendor of autumn is mirrored in Simsbury’s ponds and the campus is ablaze with color. As I savor this picturesque respite, the Wildcats score and Walker’s is ahead in the soccer game 1-0. Go Wildcats! Yes, it’s days like this that remind me that a Walker’s education is more than worth the drive and the sacrifices we make as parents. From the level of academic rigor to the commitment of teachers and the forging of relationships with girls from around the world, our daughters’ lives are enriched in ways that will only be truly measured as their futures unfold. It’s not only our daughters’ lives that are being enriched. As parents who are passionate about Walker’s, we have the opportunity to band together as The Ethel Walker School Parents Association (EWSPA) and to connect through memorable events. Whether sharing a scary hayride, setting up Auction displays, spinning bowls in the studio, or serving fried dough at Dogswood Day, we share many a laugh and we, too, are developing friendships to last a lifetime. Sure, there are times when being a volunteer is exhausting, and every event has its anxious moments, but in the end, we’re a team; we’re Walker’s parents. It is an honor and privilege to serve as President of the EWSPA in this Centennial year. As we remember and pay tribute to those that paved the way, I want to thank Carla Gregory for the strong foundation she laid for the EWSPA this 2010-11 school year. While her time as President was far too short, Carla’s impact as a dedicated Walker’s parent was tremendous. She made her mark as Treasurer, Vice President, President, and as the “Excel Wizard” for our True Colors Auction. Although Carla and her family are now living in Australia, as coordinator of our 2011 Online Auction she’s still an EWSPA volunteer! Passion, community, and global connections are what Walker’s is all about. As I reflect on Ethel Walker’s goal of instilling girls with a lifetime love of learning, I am keenly aware of our role as parents in supporting her vision. With so many exciting moments left in the year, I hope I will meet even more of you as active members of our Association. Every level of participation is welcome and needed. Even the simplest of gestures — a smile — can make all the difference. That’s all it took for me to get involved: two welcoming smiles from parents under the Middle School tree on Kelsey’s first day of sixth grade. The memory still makes me smile! Thank you for all you do.

THE ETHEL WALKER SCHOOL PARENTS ASSOCIATION 2010 – 2011 The EWSPA Board Gail Shelton P’12 (December-June) PRESIDENT

Maureen Margolis P’11 TREASURER

Kirsten Fuchs P’17 SECRETARY

René Daguerre-Bradford P’13 CHAIR, UPPER SCHOOL ACTIVITY COMMITTEE

Sophia Clarke P’12, ’17 CHAIR, MIDDLE SCHOOL ACTIVITY COMMITTEE

Christina Febbroriello P’14 Cindy Vaccaro P’12 CO-CHAIRS, AUCTION

Renee Alexander P’13 UPPER SCHOOL MEMBER-AT-LARGE

Loida Nicholson P’14, ‘16 MIDDLE SCHOOL MEMBER-AT-LARGE

Sarah Lloyd P’11 UPPER SCHOOL VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

Pat Olesh P’15 MIDDLE SCHOOL VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

Carla Gregory P’13 Terry Crescimanno P’13 PRESIDENT EMERITUS

Anne Mainolfi P ‘12, Laura Patrina P’11, ’13, Susie Vanaria P’14 ALL-SCHOOL COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Upper School Class Representatives Gina Ballard P’11, Sarah Lloyd P’11, Dave Truglio P’08, ‘09, ‘11 CLASS OF 2011 – PARENT REPRESENTATIVES

Sophia Clarke P’12, ’17

Gail M. Shelton P’12 PRESIDENT, EWSPA

CLASS OF 2012 – PARENT REPRESENTATIVE

Rene Daguerre-Bradford P’13, Melissa Regan P’13 CLASS OF 2013 – PARENT REPRESENTATIVES

Katrina Turner P’14 CLASS OF 2014 – PARENT REPRESENTATIVE

Kerri Crowe P’13, Beth WoodLeidt P’13, Bill Leidt P’13 BOARDING PARENT REPRESENTATIVES

88 THE SUNDIAL


!ATURDAY, "EBRUARY 19, 2011 "ROM 7:00 P.M. Imagine being on safari in Africa, watching the sun setting over the plains, seeing the elephants coming to quench their thirst at the lake before you, then retiring in a luxury tent at your lodge. Turn this imagery into reality by being a winning bidder at Walker’s upcoming True Colors Anniversary Auction. Bid to win your daughter a special dinner with her favorite teacher, a summer internship, or the opportunity to be “Head of School for a Day.” These are only a few of the exciting items that will be available at the Auction, which will of course include the ever-popular silent auction tables brimming with gift baskets, jewelry, and luxury items! There are many ways in which you can support this important annual event. Become a sponsor, purchase an ad for your business, place a testimonial ad congratulating your daughter or thanking a teacher, bid online (beginning in January 2011). Join hardworking Auction Co-Chairs Christina Febbroriello P’14 and Cindy Vaccaro P’12 for an evening of great food and entertainment, with lively bidding once again led by former Walker’s Board Chair C. Hugh Hildesley P’85, Executive Vice President of Sotheby’s for North and South America.

Walker’s 100 True Colors Anniversary Auction

Our goal this year is to raise $65,000 to fund School programs, including financial aid, teachers’ salaries and more. Feel free to bring along friends and family and do not miss out on this wonderful evening. Invitations will be sent out in January; if you have any questions in the meantime, or would like to donate an item or items, please contact Genie Lomba at 860.408.4252 or at genie_lomba@ethel walker.org. We look forward once again to heated bidding on a cold winter’s night, and thank you for your participation!

Winter 2011 89

SUPPORTING WALKER’S

Join us!


SUPPORTING WALKER’S

The Senior Parent Gift

I

n June 2010, the Parents and Grandparents of the Class of 2010 directed their parting gift toward two funds. First, they honored Walker’s faculty by donating half of their gift to the Professional Development Fund to support our talented and dedicated faculty with opportunities to attend seminars, courses or conferences in their particular fields of study. The second half of their gift was generously donated to The Walker’s Fund for Annual Giving, supplying unrestricted dollars to our School. Wendy Allerton, Dean of the Faculty, reported on how the Professional Development Fund has benefitted our faculty: • Pilar del Cacho and Brooke Sheldon participated in a language learning and literature workshop. • John Monagan began classes in athletic administration and coaching.

90 THE SUNDIAL

• Ali Puffer started graduate work in learning styles and neuropsychology. • Several teachers participated in workshops focused on student life. • Dr. Suzanne Piela is studying anatomy and physiology with the goal of adding this course to the curriculum. • Tom Deeds is developing a new elective course, and attended a conference titled “Classrooms with a Conscience.” Once again, the Parents and Grandparents of the Class of 2011, led by Marie and Jeff Baker P’11, will direct a portion of all contributions to the Professional Development Fund so that our faculty members can continue to build on their knowledge base while sharing these experiences with our students in the classroom.


MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

Women are giving more than ever. In fact, a

recent study done by Indiana University showed that women control nearly twice the giving power that men do, across every income bracket. Why? They hold the power of household decisionmakers. They are earning more (the same study found that 26% of women earn more than their male partners). Women are also inheriting family wealth, and teaching their children that with financial power comes social responsibility. What makes women give? It boils down to the “6 Cs:” Change. Women give if they believe it will make circumstances for others better. Create. The act of creation is something we all feel inside us, regardless of age, income, or background.

Collaborate. Being part of a larger effort with other women tells us that we have greater strength when we pull together. Celebrate. Okay, yes, we love a good party, especially to celebrate achievements with our peers. So, with our annual fund under way in our Centennial year, I thought I’d remind us all of the reasons why we respond when a worthy cause comes to our attention. Please enjoy the stories, conversations, wisdom and keen insights about women’s philanthropy in this Sundial Magazine. I thank you in advance for your philanthropy to Walker’s, in whatever way is meaningful to you. Warm Regards,

Commit. We see value in long-term relationships and give to continue a commitment. Connect. A personal connection to a cause is always a strong reason to give.

Pamela Churchill DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

The Power of Your Annual Fund Gift In this Centennial year, we honor the dynamic vision of our founder, who redefined prevalent educational traditions of 1911. Ethel Walker’s bold venture, opening a college preparatory school for young women, was a concept formulated by one individual, but its impact has touched the lives of thousands of women worldwide. Today, Ethel Walker’s legacy continues through your generous support of The Walker’s Fund for Annual Giving. As a donor, your gift contributes to 11% of our operating revenue, providing essential funding for faculty and staff salaries, athletics, technology, curriculum and financial aid. Here are just a few examples of your annual fund dollars at work: • • • • • •

Annual lease for computers Annual book budget for the Library Electronic keypads to enhance security Transportation cost for athletic teams Incubator for the Science Department Curtains for Ferguson Theater

Our annual fund goal of $1,500,000 is achievable through the power of your gift, which illustrates your appreciation for Walker’s and secures its future for succeeding generations of young women.

Winter 2011 91

SUPPORTING WALKER’S

Why We Give – The Six Cs


SUPPORTING WALKER’S

The Development Office The Development Office is always interested in knowing how we can best serve the alumnae, parents and friends of The Ethel Walker School. To help us keep our records up-todate, please contact the Office with address or email changes so that you continue to receive news about the School. We will continue to send our electronic alumnae newsletter to keep everyone informed of the most current news and events. If you are not currently subscribed to receive this communication, please email alumnae@ethelwalker.org and we will add you to the list. If you have questions about making a donation to the School, please contact any of the staff listed below.

Pamela Churchill, DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 860.408.4256 | Pamela_Churchill@ethelwalker.org Sandy Baker, DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT SERVICES 860.408.4257 | Sandy_Baker@ethelwalker.org Eleanor Barnes, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 860.408.4254 | Eleanor_Barnes@ethelwalker.org Kate Coleman-Burns, CAPITAL CAMPAIGN ASSOCIATE 860.408.4258 | Kate_Colemanburns@ethelwalker.org Kitty Friedman, DIRECTOR OF GIFT PLANNING 860.408.4253 | Kitty_Friedman@ethelwalker.org Lee-Ann Harris, CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN MANAGER 860.408.4331 | Lee-Ann_Harris@ethelwalker.org Courtney King, MANAGER, DEVELOPMENT EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS 860.408.4260 | Courtney_King@ethelwalker.org Heidi McCann, DIRECTOR OF CENTENNIAL AND REUNION GIVING 860.408.4250 | Heidi_McCann@ethelwalker.org Diane Thomas, DIRECTOR OF THE ANNUAL FUND 860.408.4255 | Diane_Thomas@ethelwalker.org

Ways to Support Walker’s Cash, Check or Credit Card Many gifts are cash contributions that are made by check or credit card. These gifts are tax deductible as allowed by law and provide immediate funding for the School. Securities and Property Gifts of stock, other securities, or property benefit the institution and provide the donor with a tax deduction for the fair market value of the gift when it is made. Additionally, the donor does not have to pay capital gains tax on the appreciated value of the stock or property. Matching Gifts Many companies provide their employees with the benefit of increasing their gifts to certain organizations by matching those gifts. Please check with your employer about their matching gifts program. Planned Giving Gifts made through estate planning provide for the future growth of the School as these gifts, unless otherwise specified, are directed to the School’s endowment. The Ethel Walker Heritage Society honors those who have made provisions for Walker’s in their estate plans. Gifts-in-Kind Walker’s welcomes gifts in kind, including donations of goods and services that meet the educational and programmatic needs of the School. Special and Restricted Gifts Walker’s has a number of funds that have been established by donors for special purposes such as the support of educational programs, scholarships or endowment.

For further information about making a gift, please contact Pamela Churchill, Director of Development, at 860.408.4256

Laura Whiteman ’81, DIRECTOR OF ALUMNAE RELATIONS 860.408.4259 | Laura_Whiteman@ethelwalker.org Michele Harris, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT 860.408.4269 | Michele_Harris@ethelwalker.org Genie Lomba, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT & PARENT RELATIONS 860.408.4252 | Genie_Lomba@ethelwalker.org Dawn Zumbroski, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT 860.408.4251 | Dawn_Zumbroski@ethelwalker.org

92 THE SUNDIAL

Give online at ethelwalker.org/annualfund


The Ethel Walker Heritage Society

S AV E T H E D AT E S 2 0 1 1 January 26, 2011 Centennial Cocktail Reception, Newport Beach, CA February 19, 2011 Junior Family Weekend February 19, 2011 EWSPA Walker’s 100 True Colors Anniversary Auction February 21, 2011 Centennial Book Club Head’s Day – It’s a Surprise! March 6-12, 2011 Habitat for Humanity Build, Columbus, GA

June 16 and 17, 2011 Walker’s Environmental Symposium September 8, 2011 Classes Begin September 26, 2011 Centennial Fishers Island Golf Classic September 30 – October 2, 2011 Centennial and Reunion Weekend Reunion Weekend for Classes ending in1 and 6, 2 and 7 will be celebrated during Centennial Weekend October 28-29, 2011 Family Weekend

The Ethel Walker School 230 Bushy Hill Road, Simsbury, CT 06070 860.658.4467 | www.ethelwalker.org HEAD OF SCHOOL

Bessie Speers

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

See page 38 for additional Centennial event dates.

Dogswood Day – It’s a Surprise!

In addition to attendance at almost all of the above events, Bessie Speers has travel planned to the areas below to visit with alumnae and friends.

June 3, 2011 Middle School Promotion Ceremony

February 2011 – Hobe Sound, FL and Charleston, SC

June 4, 2011 – Prize Night

March 2011 – Denver, CO

April 20, 2011 – Shakespeare Festival

PUBLISHED BY

Vivian K. Elba,

March 7-13, 2011 ServCorps Trip, Nashville, TN April 8, 2011 – Grandparents’ Day

Winter 2011

June 5, 2011 – Commencement

April 2011 – Washington, DC

June 5-11, 2011 Alumnae Habitat for Humanity Build, Cape Cod, MA

May 2011 – Philadelphia, PA

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

vivian_elba@ethelwalker.org CONTRIBUTORS

Wendy Allerton, Sandra Baker, Eleanor Barnes, Kathleen Battiston, Kim Blanchard, Pamela Churchill, Kate Coleman-Burns, Abigail Burbank, Margy Foulk, Kitty Friedman, Lee-Ann Harris, Michele Harris, Alyssa Jahn, Courtney King, Genie Lomba, Chris O’Connor, Ken Poppe, Joan Skelley, Tom Speers, Diane Thomas, Laura Whiteman TAKE NOTE

Courtney King COPY EDITOR

John Groff PHOTOGRAPHY

Bethany Altschwager, Richard Bergen Photography, Kim Blanchard, Vivian Elba, Jill Harrington, John Johnson, Genie Lomba, Dr. Sheri Schmidt, Joan Skelley, Tom Speers

2010-2011 BOARD OF TRUSTEES

ADDRESS CLASS NOTES TO:

David J. Castellani P’09

Harriet Blees Dewey ’60, P’86

Gail Shelton P’12

PRESIDENT AVON, CT

RIDGEFIELD, CT

EX-OFFICIO, PRESIDENT, PARENTS ASSOCIATION ENFIELD, CT

The Development Office The Ethel Walker School 230 Bushy Hill Road, Simsbury, CT 06070 Or submit via email to: alumnae@ethelwalker.org

Glenn A. Sieber P’09

SEND ADDRESS AND EMAIL CHANGES TO:

SIMSBURY, CT

alumnae@ethelwalker.org

Margot Campbell Bogert ’60 VICE PRESIDENT BEDFORD HILLS, NY

Richard W. Maine P’09 TREASURER AVON, CT

Christopher L. Brigham, Esq. SECRETARY NEW HAVEN, CT

Elizabeth Rockwell Cesare TRUSTEE EMERITA SOUTH NORWALK, CT

Sarah Gates Colley ’75 CROSS RIVER, NY

E. Kaye Cowan ACTON, MA

Clive DuVal III P’09 SHARON, CT

Kathanne Fowler P’12 WEST HARTFORD, CT

Iain Howard-Sorrell P’09 SECRETARY AVON, CT

Deborah Williams MacKenzie ’55

Emma Simon ’89,

EX-OFFICIO

PRESIDENT, ALUMNAE BOARD AVON, CT

Elizabeth Cromwell Speers P’16

LAKE FOREST, IL

HEAD OF SCHOOL SIMSBURY, CT

Letitia McClure Potter ’55, P’85

Abigail Trafford ’57

TRUSTEE EMERITA GREENWICH, CT

WASHINGTON, DC

Brooke Gaffney Redmond ’90

PLAINVILLE, CT

CONCORD, MA

Donya Nagib Sabet ’90

PRESIDENT

Amanda Pitman ’90 VICE PRESIDENT

Nancy Hathaway Steenburg ’68 SECRETARY

Kelsey Ballard ’11 STUDENT ALUMNAE BOARD REPRESENTATIVE

In 1994, Leslie Newman ’66 and Lane Morrison P’93 chaired our “One Vision, Many Voices” campaign committee. Leslie wanted to support the campaign but was not in a position to make a large gift at the time. The School helped her to structure a charitable remainder trust, where she transferred funds into a trust and received an immediate income tax deduction for a portion of her contribution to the trust. She paid no capital gains tax on appreciated assets she donated. She receives income for a term of years and when the trust ends, the principal passes to The Ethel Walker School. Leslie says, “A charitable remainder trust is a great way to give a significant gift to the School and at the same, benefit Arthur Hailand P’66, Hailand “Hale” Brown, Whittney Brown, yourself. The income I receive from the trust is wonderful and reminds me regularly that I am also helping the School!” Les Brown, Leslie Newman ’66 with Henry Brown.

Lithographics, Inc.

It is important for a donor to consult with his or her personal financial advisor, attorney, or accountant regarding the form, structure, and documentation of a planned gift. Planned gift donors also are asked to notify the school so that their commitments can be appropriately credited and acknowledged.

Abra Prentice Wilkin ’60

Both outright and deferred planned gifts may be used, upon receipt, to create named funds. Or, if the donor prefers, the gifts may be anonymous.

CHICAGO, IL

Molly Love ’64 Celeste Royall Niarchos ’64 Deborah N. Rush ’77 Mary Beth Rettger ’81 Catherine Terry Taylor ’79

PROFILES IN GIVING

PRINTING

NEW YORK, NY

Jennie Abt ’89 Elizabeth Borland Blodgett ’91 Leander Altifois Dolphin ’96 Mary Lotuff Feeny ’83 Nancy W. Flanagan ’93 Katherine Hypolite ’04

s The Ethel Walker School looks forward to its Centennial in 2011, alumnae, parents, and grandparents, committed to the School’s mission and vision, are invited to consult with the development staff to make a planned gift. Through endowment fundraising, Walker’s will honor the ideals that have shaped the School since its founding, and that are necessary to fulfill its promise of an exemplary education today and in future years. A planned gift helps both the donor and the School. The donor increases her or his support and, at the same time, receives tax and other personal financial benefits. The School receives a significant gift. Donors to the Ethel Walker School who make all or a portion of their gifts through their financial or estate plans (bequest, trust, gift of life insurance, real estate, retirement account, or life income agreement) are recognized as members of The Ethel Walker Heritage Society. The Society honors the School’s founder who set the example for philanthropy by naming the School as beneficiary in three separate trusts. Her gifts are truly gifts that continue to support the institution long after her lifetime.

John Johnson Art Direction & Design

Carol Watson, M.D. ’90

ALUMNAE BOARD 2010-2011 Emma Simon ’89

DESIGN

A

230 Bushy Hill Road Simsbury, Connecticut 06070 p 860 658 4467 f 860 658 6763 www.ethelwalker.org The Ethel Walker School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origins in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other Schooladministered programs.

If you are interested in making a planned gift to The Ethel Walker School, please contact Kitty Northrop Friedman, Director of Gift Planning at 860-408-4253, or email kitty_friedman@ethelwalker.org.


THE

230 Bushy Hill Road Simsbury, CT 06070

NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID SIMSBURY, CT PERMIT NO. 21

SUN DIAL Winter 2011

The Magazine of The Ethel Walker School

Walker’s & Philanthropy

CELEBRATING OUR CENTENNIAL YEAR

Campus News • Alumnae in Philanthropy • Centennial Update • Out & About • Take Note

Profile for The Ethel Walker School

Sundial Magazine Winter 2011  

The magazine of The Ethel Walker School

Sundial Magazine Winter 2011  

The magazine of The Ethel Walker School