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THE

FEBRUARY / ISSUE

NO.1

POTENTIAL POTENTIAL

Meet Joe Mucheru: Google’s Man in the Region

Unleash Your Full Potential In 2012 Cloud 9: Communication & Consumerism in Kenya The Economy &Africa: should the world follow our lead?

Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

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HPDA st   21 Century  Human  Capital  Solutions

WE Solve

HR Challenges

Recruitment & Selection -‐Psychometric Assessments -‐Assessment Centres

Organizational Effectiveness Consulting -‐Organizational Re-‐Structures -‐Organizational Audits & Culture Assess-‐ ments -‐Talent Management & Succession Planning Performance Management -‐Performance Management Systems & Processes -‐Coaching & Mentoring HR Capability Building -‐HR Business Partner Training -‐Interim HR Management Training & Development Interventions -‐ Team Building -‐Leadership Development -‐Advancing Women -‐Personal & Career Branding & -‐More

Human Performance Dynamics Africa 12

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THE

FEBRUARY / ISSUE

NO.1

WHAT’S INSIDE

LETTER FROM

THE EDITOR

7

Conversation with Joe Mucheru The Man who leads Google in the Region

9

Ideas and People

2012: Resolutions and Reflections

12

Modern Networking

I

t is a challenging and inspiring task to begin something new. Be it a new year, or a new career, a beginning asks us to face down the moments and memories of the past and summon the will to challenge ourselves to a new future. In so many ways Kenya is a country powered by the drive and passion and hopes of our people. That is why we are excited to introduce , a monthly magazine on Kenya’s contemporary career culture, to help us concentrate, connect and collaborate on Kenya’s greatest resource: our human capital. We have an energetic and dynamic population, we have an enormous metropolis of a capital city and a country filled with natural resources -our possibility for growth, change and opportunities is limitless. There is a word for this waiting energy, this store of possibility that has not yet been called to action – it is POTENTIAL.

Attract a following in Person and Online

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Technological Advances take Kenyans up, up and away

is here for those of you who won’t hold back your dreams, who work hard and want to work harder to make the best of what we each have inside, the potential we all hold somewhere between our head and our hands. Every month, including this one, we will bring you the stories of adventurous professionals, from HR leaders to CEOs to start-ups, innovators and entrepreneurs, and the advice and opportunities that will always challenge you to move onward and upward. In our first issue ever we have focused on one word we hope will inspire you to innovate and become great – potential. So turn the page and let yourself imagine anything and everything you want to achieve, and take inspiration from the words of those who have reached success doing just the same.

if you’re going to be

PASSIONAT E

something, be passionate about

about

those in need. if you’re going to

FIGH T

14

Swahili in Kenya

Defining a sense of identity as modern Kenyans

15

Future of Global Finance

An analytical look at Africa’s financial potential

16

Looking for Entrepreneurs We want the best and brightest!

18

Unleash your Potential in 2012 The principles behind becoming the best

20

Identifying Employees with Potential How do we objectively identify people’s potential?

21

Human Resources Leader Dr. Lawrence Ndombi of BPC

22

What’s on in the Workplace

The curse of bad bosses/How to interview

23 29

CAREER ANNOUNCEMENTS Branding and Manners

Those with know how tell you how...

30

Artsuccess Story

LEARNI NG .

you are going to fight something,

Cloud 9?

Poet Sitawa Namwalie speaks out

31

if

Straight to the Arts

for

What comes after success in Business?

32

Q UEST ION

Working out -­ the 15

something, question authority. if you’re going

Keep in shape for a stronger mind and body!

33

to lose something, lose your inhibitions. if

you’re going to gain something, gain and

CONFI DENCE .

Fiscal Fitness

What is a pension plan and when should we start?

RESP ECT

34

and if you’re going to hate

Twitter Feed: The world in 2012

something, hate the false idea that you are

We pick some of the best lines about 2012

36

not capable of your dreams - daniel golston

Real Freedom

More than words and actions...

37

The Edition Reviews...

Alexandra R.H.S, Editor

T H E TEAM Founder, Publisher,Editor in Chief Susan Wakhungu-Githuku

Editorial Director Alexandra Remsen Hickok Smith Publications Manager Lucy Mwangi Administrative Coordinator Lillian Nandwah

Edition Team Christine Njambi Steve Wakhungu George Muiruri Ruth Njuguna Sellah Nyongesa Zhanet Khazali

Director of Photography Bobby Pall

Movies, Books and Bitings!

38

Brain Pain

Use those grey cells! Head of Advertising Arnolda Shiundu

Design and Layout Kevin Mapesa and Max Ngari for Brand2D Sales Team Hannah Ichihashi Geff Mwai Michael Scott

all enquiries - info@theEDITION.co.ke THE EDITION is a COPYRIGHTED FOOTPRINTS PRESS PUBLICATION and HPDA INNOVATION. Issue 01. February 2012, Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. See us online at: WWW.theEDITION.co.ke PRINTED BY BLACKRAIN PRINTING All advertising enquiries to: ashiundu@theEDITION.co.ke All rights reserved. Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

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CONTRIBUTORS JOHN SIBI-OKUMU Actor, Teacher, Playwright John Sibi-Okumu is variously referred to as a leading actor, journalist, playwright, newscaster, columnist, linguist, producer, director, teacher and mentor. This noted thespian has appeared in Newsweek, and was recently featured in the book Life Journeys: Scaling Heights which featured Kenyan men of distinction and achievement.

JANET ADETU, Chief Executive Officer, JSK ETIQUETTE CONSORTIUM Janet, a Certified Professional Etiquette Consultant is the Founder and Director of JSK Etiquette Consortium Limited. Janet began her etiquette training in the U.S. She holds several professional memberships including the Association of Image Consultants International (AICI) and is a also fellow of the Association of Certified Chartered Accountants (ACCA).

DEREK BBANGA, Entrepreneur and Co-owner PUBLIC IMAGE AFRICA A soft skills consultant, image strategist and corporate speaker, Derek Bbanga is a graduate of Connecticut University in the USA and Helsinki School of Economics in Finland. He is also a member of the Nairobi Toastmaster and one of the Chapter Directors of the International Networking Organisation (BNI).

JOY ODERA, Writer, Senior Consultant, HPD AFRICA Joy is a Human Resources Management Specialist, a national of Kenya, but who was born & bred in Uganda. She is a published writer and is particularly keen on writing about Africa. Joy studied Economics at the University of Sussex and Human Resource Management at Westminster University, London.

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DON’T MISS OUT!!!

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The EDITION Team, bringing you news, ideas, professional advice and opportunities.

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Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE


CONVERSATIONS WITH A C.E.O

JOE MUCHERU

JOE MUCHERU

“Potential is believing in yourself, and committing to the vision of what you think is possible.”

Wearing wigs in the office of Google’s African hub, team asked Joe Mucheru, (co-founder of Wananchi.com, recipient of a Moran of the Burning Spear) presently Regional Lead ofis sub-Saharan Africain foryourself, Google, aboutand leadership, “Potential believing potential and what it is like to be a part of Africa’s technological future…

committing to the vision of what you

M

y job is to present Google to Africa and ensure that Google is part of the growth and opportunity that Africa presents. I am building and inspiring the best team from Africa, making dreams a reality through technology and working to change people’s lives. We create a kind of magic here, for our team and our consumers. Google Africa recently launched ‘Getting Kenya Businesses Online’ and the success and diversity of this initiative has been magical. One entrepreneur running a cake shop put her business online and has found herself so popular with the Kenyan diaspora that she is now receiving orders from the US. So, what are some of the most important decisions you make? There are so many challenges and problems to tackle in Africa. A leader must make the decision to give priority, and focus the team to tackle those problems for a greater growth trajectory for the company. What leadership characteristics have the best leaders you’ve worked for shared? The best leaders open and have to vision. They fight for what best foris their y job is toarepresent Google Africa and ensure that is Google part customers. I recall when fought the government liberalize the building internet of the growth andI opportunity that Africa to presents. I am sector. Athough wasteam a challenge it wasmaking worth the effort. A leader must and inspiring the itbest from Africa, dreams a reality through understand thatworking in business, in a country, in everything, people matter the technology and to change people’s lives. most.

think is possible.”

it is your own business and learn everything there is to learn, because when hard times come, you may be the one to lead to the top!” Name the three most inpirational books you have read. The Bible, ‘The Prophet’ (by Khalil Gibran) and ‘The Alchemist’ (by Paulo Coelho) were three books that allowed me to look inwards and find my own sense of potential and possibility. At the core, who is Joseph Mucheru? I am someone trying to make a difference in the world. I am a kid from Limuru who has had the chance to take risks and do what he loves. I want to leave a mark by changing people’s fortunes for the better. I believe I have been given a great chance and I want to make the best of it…

M

What is POTENTIAL? Potential is believing in yourself, and committing to the vision of what you think is possible. If you don’t challenge what is possible, you don’t have as much passion and drive to succeed. At Google we know we can change the world, one user at a time, and since we know Africa’s potential we work that much harder to make it happen.

We create a kind of magic here, for our team and our consumers. Google In 2011recently we hadlaunched some great ‘hits’. IKenya had the chance toOnline’ hire three who Africa ‘Getting Businesses andwomen the success were later named three of the top Forbes MostOne Influential Women Leadersa and diversity of this initiative has40 been magical. entrepreneur running in Africa, Ideos, which gives a real cake shopand put we herlaunched business the online anda product has found herself soAfrica popular with$100 the smartphone. Kenyan diaspora that she is now receiving orders from the US. What areare your Topof3 the business priorities for 2012?you make? So, what some most important decisions Focus are on so themany user. challenges Create theand bestproblems team andtoget results. Provide meaningful There tackle in Africa. A leader must returns fordecision the market. make the to give priority, and focus the team to tackle those problems for greater growth And personally? trajectory for our company and our continent. I just want to get more money into people’s pockets.leadership I do believe technology can the change What characteristics have best livelihoods. leaders you’ve worked for shared?

“Our international team has a 300 year mission to organize the world’s information and make internet universally accessible and useful, and I am doing my part to make this

The best leaders are open and have vision. They What is POTENTIAL? fight for what is best for their customers. I recall Potential is believing in yourself, to andliberalize committing when I fought the government the to the vision of Athough what you it think possible. If you internet sector. was aischallenge it was don’t is possible, you don’t have worthchallenge the effort.what A leader must understand that as much passion and drive succeed. At Google we know we can change the in business, in a country, into everything, people matter the most. world, one user at a time, and since we know Africa’s potential, we work that much harder to make happen. In 2011 we had some itgreat ‘hits’. I had the chance to hire three women who

were later named three of the top 40 Forbes Most Influential Women Leaders The potential of launched a company demonstrated by which the enthusiasm the in Africa, and we the isAndroid, a product gives Africaofa real employees and the dedication and direction of the leaders. When I look $100 smartphone. for employees, I seek those with potential. I look for an orientation towards results, independence, innovation and initiative. What are your Top 3 business priorities for 2012?

Focus on the user. Create the best team and get results. Provide meaningful What the the bestmarket. career advice you ever received? returnsis for My late father gave me the best advice, not only through his words but through his He started as a caddy, then became Kenya’s top golfer and educated my Andlife. personally? 5I just siblings abroad. Heinto toldpeople’s me that pockets. in any jobI you should technology “Work like wantand to myself get more money do believe can change livelihoods.

and initiative.

When you are born in Africa,it sometimes feels like the world and its ways are against you. But there are opportunities to build your assurance, your sense of capability. The potential of a company is demonstrated by the enthusiasm of the employees and the dedication and direction of the leaders. When I look for employees, I seek those with potential. I look for an orientation towards results, independence, innovation

What is the best career advice you ever received? My late father gave me the best advice, not only through his words but through his life. He started as a caddy, then became Kenya’s top golfer and educated my 5 siblings and myself abroad. He told me that in any job you should “Work like it is your own business and learn everything there is to learn, because when hard times come, you may be the one to lead to the top!” Name the three most inpirational books you have read. The Bible, ‘The Prophet’ (by Khalil Gibran) and ‘The Alchemist’ (by Paulo Coelho) were three books that allowed me to look inwards and find my own sense of potential and possibility. At the core, who is Joseph Mucheru?

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IDEAS & PEOPLE

RESOLUTIONS

&

REFLECTIONS

team spoke to some of Nairobi’s professionals about their reflections on 2011 and their hopes and perspectives on 2012.

LYDIA CHOGO 27, PHOTOGRAPHER

What goals did you achieve in 2011 and what are your goals for 2012? 2011 was a phenomenal year. We had notable and renowned Kenyans who came to our studio to have their pictures taken for the Footprints Press Life Journeys books. My goal for 2012 is to take my photography to the next level.

AMOS MZENGE 42,SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

How would you describe 2011 f rom a career perspective? Challenging. The Y-generation tends to question ever ything. You have to constantl y remind them to work hard.

NEWTON MTAMBA 26,IT SPECIALIST

What will give you the edge in your career in 2012? I am the youngest employee in the company, which gives me an edge because of my energ y. I will therefore work harder and longer to reach my targets.

SYLVIA KAUMBUTHU 24, BANKER

How was 2011, and what will you change in 2012? 2011 was not good. I am not growing in the industry I am in. So in 2012 I will get my masters degree and meet people who will channel and challenge me towards a new direction.

20 12 ZOHREEN ABDULLA 29, BANK MANAGER What one goal do you wish to achieve in 2012? To see my people grow on a different level. They will because they are sharp, career orientated, and they have the thirst to thrive.

SHAMIM EHSANI 30,GRP MARKETING DIRECTOR

How w ould you descr ibe 2011 f rom a career perspective? It was a rewarding year and Kenya had victories particularly in the hospitality industry. The challenges were terrific opportunities for personal and professional learning and growth. In 2012, I intend to develop our team and build on our reputation of excellent ser vice.

SHEENA ROUND-­TURNER 58,RETIRED AD EXECUTIVE

How will you accomplish your goals in 2012? Determination. Life is a challenge and you only get out what you put in. So, if you never put any effort, and try new things, you will never succeed. I don’t intend to sit back and wait for life, which is why I’ll prosper this year.

KALPA PADIA 41,ENTREPRENEUR

How w ould you descr ibe 2011 f rom a career perspective? 2011 was great for us! Increase in tourism and export meant our product was very successful. Also our collaboration with local farmers has been great, when we thrive, they thrive.

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HAPPY VALEN “Love  means  to  commit  oneself  with-­ out  guarantee,  to  give  oneself  com-­ pletely  in  the  hope  that  our  love  will   produce  love  in  the  loved  person.  Love   is  an  act  of  faith,  and  whoever  is  of   little  faith  is  also  of  little  love.”  Erich   Fromm  

“The  best  and  most  beautiful  things   in  the  world  cannot  be  seen  or  even   touched  -­  they  must  be  felt  with  the   heart.”  Helen  Keller   “The  soul  that  can  speak  with  its  eyes   can  also  kiss  with  a  gaze.“  Anon

“Love  is  a  fire.  But  whether  it  is  going   to  warm  your  heart  or  burn  down   your  house,  you  can  never  tell.”  Joan   Crawford   Love    distils  desire  upon  the  eyes,   love  brings  bewitching  grace  into  the   heart.”    Euripides  

“To  love  someone  deeply  gives  you   strength.  Being  loved  by  someone   deeply  gives  you  courage.”   Lao-­Tzu  

“Like  music  on  the  waters  is  thy  sweet   voice  to  me.”  Lord  Byron

“Love  is  like  a  friendship  caught  on   fire.  In  the  beginning  a  flame,  very   pretty,  often  hot  and  fierce,  but  still   only  light  and  flickering.  As  love  grows   older,  our  hearts  mature  and  our  love   becomes  as  coals,  deep-­burning  and   unquenchable.“  Bruce  Lee

“Love  is  but  the  discovery  of  ourselves   in  others,  and  the  delight  in  the  recog-­ nition.”  Alexander  Smith   “In  real  love  you  want  the  other   person’s  good.  In  romantic  love  you   want  the  other  person.”  Margaret   Anderson   “To  love  someone  deeply  gives  you   strength.  Being  loved  by  someone   deeply  gives  you  courage.”   Lao-­Tzu   “We  are  all  born  for  love.  It  is  the   principle  of  existence,  and  its  only   end.”  Benjamin  Disraeli  

“Your  words  are  my  food,  your  breath   my  wine.  You  are  everything  to  me.”   Sarah  Bernhardt  

“In  dreams  and  in  love  there  are  no   impossibilities”  Janos  Arnay  

“The  most  wonderful  of  all  things  in  life  is  the  discovery  of  another  human  being  with  whom  one’s   relationship  has  a  growing  depth,  beauty  and  joy  as  the  years  increase.  This  inner  progressiveness  of   love  between  two  human  beings  is  a  most  marvellous    thing;  it  cannot  be  found  by  looking  for  it  or   by  passionately  wishing  for  it.  It  is  a  sort  of  divine  accident,  and  the  most  wonderful  of  all  things  in   life.”  Sir  Hugh  Walpole   10

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NTINE’S DAY!!! Valentine’s Special Recipe

CHOCOLATE COVERED STRAWBERRIES Ingredients 1 pint fresh strawberries, washed and patted dry, stems intact, and thoroughly air-dried 8 ounces good-quality bittersweet chocolate, broken into chunks 1 tablespoon solid white vegetable shortening 1 ounce Grand Marnier liquor or fruited brandy Instructions Prepare ahead: Wrap pieces of styrofoam in plastic wrap for fruit to rest and drip on. You can also use any firm-fleshed fruit, such as cantelope or orange halves. Pour about 1 inch of water into bottom of a double-boiler and heat to hot but not simmering. Melt chocolate and shortening on top of double-boiler, stirring occasionally until completely melted and smooth. Remove top pot and place on a heat-safe tripod. Let cool for about 5 minutes. While chocolate cools a bit, carefully spear strawberries with toothpicks. Working quickly, swirl each strawberry gently in the chocolate about halfway up the fruit and place inverted on toothpicks into the styrofoam to cool and harden. When done, place in refrigerator to further set chocolate shell. When completely hardened, use a syringe to carefully inject a bit of the liquor into the center of each strawberry, being careful not to over-fill.

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MODERN. NETWORKING like wind to a fire

N

etworking is an ubiquitous term in the modern vocabulary, used in reference to life, the pursuit of love and, of course, business. Networking in business is like wind to a fire. As modern communications technologies race past the ‘old boys clubs’ on the information superhighway, the opportunity for global and local networking has never been so great. Each connection we make is an investment that can lead to greater knowledge or opportunity. We tell you the essential practices of networking in the modern world, in person and online…

Never forget a face… or a name. Whether you

are in a social gathering, reading the news or sitting in a boardroom, make sure to notice people who are important players or are coming up with big ideas. Should you get the chance to meet new people whom you think are interesting or powerful, save their contacts and always find a way to get in touch.

Virtual Virtue. Our presence on the Internet is constructed, meaning we have a certain degree of choice as to what people see of us online. It is possible to have a social Internet presence that does not intrude on your professional Internet presence, but be aware of your privacy and presentation. Your professional Internet presence is extremely important in today’s job market. Be visible. Have your own website and host your profile on multiple sites, then join groups and forums and get involved. Great networking is about attracting a following, in person and online.

The Art of a handshake. This is the delicate process

of ‘the introduction’ to a stranger who is important to your network. The key to introducing yourself is to be prepared and to be polite. Address people formally, and show your interest in what they do, while displaying the confidence you have in your own work.

Give a cent. And give some time.

Invest in your network to improve your net worth by joining associations, clubs, charitable causes and attending industry events to let people see your character and values.

Presenting…If you are straight out of university or have

worked for 40 years in the same industry, meeting people is still the same. Carry a card with your contacts and have an updated C.V or website. Make sure people can connect with you just as easily as you would like to connect with them.

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cloud nine? Our technological potential has Kenyans reaching for the sky and navigating through the clouds…

A

sk any Chief Information Officer (CIO), anywhere in the world what The drive of tech-potential keeps on growing and the current trend in Kenya comes to mind when they think of Kenya... Their response will be is cloud computing. In 2011, Kenyans, along with the rest of the world, were about technology: MPESA; Konza Technology City and, more recently, overwhelmed with news on cloud computing. But what exactly is cloud cloud computing. The MJ that used to run this town wasn’t Michael Jackson, computing, and what does it mean for Kenya? he could ‘Beat It’ as far as any teen, or technologically-savvy Kenyan cared: “Cloud computing is basically managed services, where your infrastructure Michael Joseph was it! MJ, as CEO of Safaricom, adopted the indigenous and applications are sitting on the cloud. You access your information via the ingenuity called MPESA in 2003 that helped steer this country away from internet, and pay for them based on use”, explains Siyabulela Mpahlwa, Business gerontocracy into a new dawn through technological advancements. Who’s Development Manager for the South African IT firm, Business Connexion, aboard? Well…Dr. Ndemo (P.S. ICT); Joseph Mucheru (Google); Njeri who opened their East African headquarters in Kenya in November 2010, Rionge (Ignite Consulting and Wananchi); Robert Mugo (Safaricom); Jyoti headed by Dr. Tony Githuku, the Regional Director. Cloud computing is just Mukherjee (Software Technologies Ltd.); iHub geeks and the myriad of big one of the many IT solutions that Business Connexion is offering their clients, business and start-up CIOs and CEOs across Kenya. However, their successes but without a doubt, it is the most exciting one. would not be possible without the adventurous nature of Kenyan consumers. In 2009, based on global trends by the ‘CIO religious text’ Gartner, cloud Why is everything reliant on the consumers? Under the business umbrella, computing came in at number 3 on the “Top 10 Technologies That You having a monopoly on a particular product or service can cause a company Can’t Afford to Ignore” list. In 2010, cloud computing was atop that list. It to dictate its prices, so that the service/product provider is the only one who seems like Kenya is warming up to the idea, and rather quickly. Safaricom benefits. But competent and innovative young minds are changing the game, have recently launched their cloud computing services, Business Connexion following those like Joseph Mucheru and Njeri Rionge whose 2000 starthas over eight years’ experience in this area, and Allied Technologies recently up, Wananchi, offered low-price internet to the common “mwananchi”, and acquired the long struggling KDN (Kenya Data Networks). became the leading and largest ISP, web host and host of domain names in Kenya. Other tech companies had two choices: compete or diminish. The e have the necessary expertise, but what former proved more feasible. are the challenges of introducing such Tech advances in Kenya, like MPESA, have a concept to companies, and the masses, in “cloud computing means shown us how adaptable and important the Kenya? “Globally, CIOs are tired of owning Kenyan consumer is. MPESA brought down the infrastructure, but in Kenya people still want to lower internet costs and cost of personal cellular devices and companies see their hardware. That is what comforts them, availability for Kenyans had to offer more affordable options. It also knowing that their information is right next without raised digital literacy and awareness, which is still to them. It is difficult for them to think of a I.T infrastructure” continuing to grow in Kenya, a huge ‘leap’ from third-party handling all their data,” Siyabulela the days of analog rotary phones. explains. But, more and more requests are From this came the ambition to learn more about pouring in, as tech symposiums are being held the potential of cellphones, which has brought us to the age of smartphones to elaborate and empower individuals on this new trends. It all comes down (phones with advanced computing and internet ability) a craze that runs to the consumers, as they determine the fate of this new idea…and that is all rampant amongst our youth, the first demographic to adapt to big tech it is right now, just an idea. What’s in it for everyone? With an abundance of changes in Kenya. clients, that means a thriving business for the providers. As for the consumers, They call it swag. Swag, as described by the Urban Dictionary, is an appearance, “It’s cost effective because it takes away your capital expenditure, as there is no style, or manner of self-representation. Today, in Nairobi, if you don’t have a need for data storage hardware-it’s flexible because uptime is guaranteed and smartphone, if, “You ain’t got no swag,” then something isn’t right. As colloquial you can access information from anywhere around the world. You only pay for as that double negative is, that’s what many young urbanites will tell you. Their what you use; you can store all your information in the cloud, with guaranteed daily affairs are posted up on Facebook; drama reigns in Twitter; creativity security, and as a disaster relief strategy your information can also be saved on abounds in their blog pages; they stalk – preferably not predatorily – each servers thousands of kilometres away,” says Siyabulela. Even for those who other on Foursquare; and they load-up their amateur and professional clips are not using these services…yet... there are advantages.The most notable on Google’s recently launched youtube.co.ke. If your company does not have being lower internet costs and the extension of internet availability to rural social media accounts, particularly Facebook and Twitter, then you are not in communities without infrastructure. ISPs who are not necessarily involved in the game. Safaricom is the most dominant telecom company on Twitter in cloud computing will partner with other providers to create an accessible tech Kenya, with over 29,000 followers; @ KTNKenya leads the way in news with utopia for everyone. over 38,000 followers, and @KoinangeJeff has the largest number of followers One thing is for sure, once Kenyans like something, they adopt it, run with for an individual, at over 47,000. it and create something new with it. Cloud computing will be the hottest Spotting this pattern of social media interest, companies are distributing all trend for the majority of 2012, because, as it stands, the tech development kinds of new smartphones. Thus far, according to unofficial estimates, the train in Kenya is proving unstoppable. And this means utter bliss for Kenyan Google IDEOS has sold over 400,000 handsets, making it the highest selling consumers. smartphone in Kenya. This means that individuals can keep-up with and create content on-the-go and use the lower internet prices available on mobile - GEORGE MUIRURI platforms.

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OPINION

SWAHILI. IN KENYA THE CASE FOR ‘SWA’ IN CONTEMPORARY KENYA

O

n 28th December 2011, while releasing the 2011 KCPE results, Professor Sam Ongeri, Minister for Education, decried the deterioration of the English and Kiswahili languages. Kiswahili Lugha had the least performance in the examinations, with a mean score of 41.46% compared to 52.76% in 2010. The minister attributed this drop to ‘Sheng’ and also blamed politicians for reaching out to the youth using this medium. The question is… who bears responsibility for this state of affairs?

However, while English is the official language for government, diplomatic, and international business, the indigenous Kiswahili is primarily used in government administration and casual inter-ethnic communication.

I am an African and a proud Kenyan … whenever I find myself in the presence of foreigners you would be tickled at the pride in my voice when stating that Kiswahili is my national language. However, deep within I crave the pride with which the approximately 250 tribes of Nigeria have embraced Pidgin English, or how Tanzania, with over 120 tribes, has set apart Kiswahili as the medium of instruction at the primary school level. The adoption of Creole by the 28 ethnic I doubt that many Kenyans can complete a sentence in Kiswahili without groups and descendants of early settlers in Liberia, is an example we could interjecting some English words. To further complicate the situation, there follow and I cannot forget the are currently several different Jamaican Patois popularized by types of Kiswahili spoken in the spread of Reggae music. I Kenya depending on your HOW MANY KENYANS envy their sense of identity and geographical location or social roots. relations. There’s the common CAN COMPLETE A SENTENCE IN KISWAHILI ‘Sheng’, the more authentic Whether we acknowledge it ‘coastal’, ‘urban’, ‘rural’ and even WITHOUT INTERJECTING SOME ENGLISH or not, Kiswahili is not only a ‘tourist’ Kiswahili. My claim part of our legacy but it also WORDS? to the dame wa mtaa title is shrouds our society from decay. long expired as my Swahili We must therefore nurture its is inevitably punctuated growth to encompass a substantial amount of our business aspects to avoid its with such phrases as, ‘by the way’, ‘you know’ or ‘like I said’. It is, therefore, stagnation. I relish the thought of our Jua Kali industry thriving in a Kiswahili not surprising that our children have such difficulty mastering ‘Wallah bin business climate - after all we are the only ones within Kenya who have the Wallah’s masterpieces in school. ‘moral’ and ‘innate’ authority to enhance Kiswahili’s growth. Surprisingly, until I began my formal education I’d had little prior encounter It was Chinua Achebe who once said, “...any language that has the cheek to with English though I had learnt Kiswahili at home and off the streets. Despite leave its primordial shores and encroach on the linguistic territory of other both languages being classroom taught, English continues to take the trophy people should learn to come to terms with the inevitable reality that it would as our education system is examined in the language. On the flip side, I have be domesticated”, in defense of his creative semantic and lexical contortions friends whose children attend local schools where students have the option to of the English language to express uniquely Nigerian socio-cultural thoughts study Kiswahili as a ‘foreign language’. with no equivalents in English. I cannot help but think that rather than the English languge becoming domesticated in Kenya, has Kiswahili become Kenya is your typical representation of a multilingual society with anything adapted towards English> between 42 to 63 dialects spoken within our borders. The constitution of Kenya identifies English, a non-indigenous language, and Kiswahili, as the If we continue to discard the language in which our culture is embedded then two official languages for purposes of nationalism. who are we? What is our IDENTITY amongst other communities.. unless we are English Africans!?!?! - WAGITHI MWANGI

Footprints P R E S S

Buy a Copy Inspire a Life Available in all major bookshops www.footprintspress.com 0716 424 932

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AFRICA’S. F I N A N CIAL F U TU R E

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ebruary 2012: The US economy is paralyzed, their population embroiled in debt and still reeling from the embittered sentiments behind the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protests. Europe, ever the home of the calculated cool politicians touting unity, is awash with political in-fighting, finger pointing, and home to two countries that have summarily dismissed the electoral process and handed the reins of government over to technocrats. The Chinese government is barely controlling it’s populace who are striking back with cries for political independence, all the while suffering under the threat of intense inflation. The developed countries who have so long positioned themselves as the powers that drive the global economy are stagnating, with growth rates at 1 to 2% and unemployment levels hitting record highs. By touting their stability and preaching their superiority, have the ‘developed’ countries pushed themselves into a corner? Economies are like ecosystems, they must change to survive. Has the ‘developed’ world become like the developed word, an ending, a full stop…are they developed and done?

Essential to our growth is the independence of the private sector within the free market economy. Though multi-national businesses have left a large mark on the African economy, it is the small to medium enterprises that hold the most potential for economic growth and opportunities to fight unemployment.

President Kibaki, in his 2011 Madaraka Day speech, regretted the failure of the Kazi Kwa Vijaana project, when he mentioned that it was the responsibility of all Kenyans to combat unemployment, and that the government needed the support of the private sector in this cause. However, for all that the private sector can help combat unemployment the majority of Africa, on the other hand, has long SME’s suffer been considered, often pejoratively, as a heavy tax burdens, developing continent, made up of different “ECONOMIES ARE LIKE difficulties with and dynamic developing countries. It is licenses and just this difference that will make Africa ECOSYSTEMS, THEY MUST CHANGE regulations, the driving force behind global economic all costs that TO SURVIVE” growth in 2012 and beyond. Can we limit their staff realize our potential as the new frontier for intake and the finance? amount of risk investment The African continent has been steadily growing…our numbers are up in capital they are able to liberate. As Diamond says population, GDP, resource production and new industry. There are over a “Political leaders must ensure that businesses billion people in Africa today, with a combined GDP of $1.7 trillion, greater (especially small businesses) are freed from than that of Russia or India. These statistics are predicted to rise at a steady unnecessary regulations.” rate, continuing the continent’s growth rate that has maintained levels more than twice that of European and OPEC countries for more than a decade. The Though the European Union has not been a ringing continent averages a GDP growth rate of 6% per year, a significant marker of endorsement for currency and market consolidation, progress. opportunities like the East African Common Market (EAC); COMESA and other unified transAmidst the 54 countries (including South Sudan) that create our continent, national economic initiatives strengthen the financial Kenya stands out as a country with significant potential. We have averaged independence and future of African nations. 6% GDP growth per year, and though we suffer from extreme unemployment Efforts between governments to simplify levels (40% at last official count) we are growing and developing at a pace that custom forms and procedures, streamline duty has developed countries clamouring to be a part of our financial landscape. structures and harmonize standards enable enterprises and enterprising individuals to We are a young country, in population and in infrastructure. It is estimated make the most of our shared resources. that 65% of our population are under the age of 35 and, according to the Ministry of Youth and Sports, the majority of that age group are unemployed, a As Africa’s population continues a steady and situation that becomes increasingly acute as more of the populace enter higher extreme growth, we will have 20 million more education and the workforce with greater expectations. In 2011 Professor people taxing resources within the next Inonda Muanje, Executive Director of the Institute for Policy Analysis and decade alone. Africa needs to claim its Research (IPAR), warned that the high number of jobless youths could lead independence outside of the political arena to a people’s revolution if not tamed. Yet these protests have happened, not and create an autonomous and dynamic in our own troubled and potholed backyard, but in the supposedly stable private sector that capitalizes on Africa’s economies of the developed world. At last count, the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ unique paradigm, and distributes back protests occurred in over 1,000 cities worldwide. to Africa’s unique population. After all, with 20 million more people, tens of Africa, and Kenya, reconcile this anomaly of high unemployment rates, high thousands more university graduates poverty levels and unprecedented growth and high GDP production under and a culture of opportunity and risk, one single word: potential. Africa has potential. how many more ways can we realize our potential and continue developing? In the words of Bob Diamond, CEO of Barclays Bank, “ 2012 will be the year when the world has a golden opportunity to shift it’s perceptions about the role Africa can play in driving global economic growth.” As the world prepares to give us more ‘credit’ on the global financial market, it is also Africa’s chance to take a serious look at the ways we can develop our localized potential. - ARHS

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ENTREPRENEURSHiP. THE BEST SOLUTION for ECONOMIC GROWTH and JOB CREATION

“Most new jobs won’t come from our biggest employers. They will come from our smallest. We’ve got to do everything we can to make entrepreneurial dreams a reality.” Unknown

“Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage.” Niccolo Machiavelli

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o say the leaders of the free world, ‘The Economist’ magazine and almost every financial writer from one side of the ocean to the other. While the monolithic nations who credit themselves with inventing everything worthwhile since, and including, sliced bread, it is the smaller and braver nations who are taking the stage in Entrepreneurship. In 2011, Zablon Karingi Muthaka, a 26 year old from Nairobi, was named ‘Entrepreneur of the Year’ by Youth Business International. He set up a waste management company….a true example of the adage ‘want to create a big business, solve a big problem’. In this spirit, we will be featuring an Entrepreneur and their business every month, in an attempt to bring attention to the many unsung heroes who are creating jobs and opportunities and making the world a better place, one brave and bold step at a time.

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“I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.” Steve Jobs

Do you think you should be featured in this space or know someone who embodies the spirit of the entrepreneur?

Let us know by email at

entrepreneurs@theEDITION.co.ke


POTENTIAL.

manifesto.

LATENTEXCELLENCE. unlock. do not waste. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. HAVE A PLAN. DO NOT BE AFRAID. MONEY IS NOT THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. TRY HEALTH, HAPPINESS, FRIENDSHIP, FREEDOM. life is not a race. you cannot control it all. LISTEN. ask. BREATHE. LET GO. MOVE SLOW. LOOK YOUR POTENTIAL IN THE EYE. SEE IT. BELIEVE IT. SMILE. LAUGH. HAKUNA MATATA. DO SILLY THINGS. Pump Up the 517.. Kick stress in THE TEETH. HIYO NINI? STOP BEING AN E-­MAIL SLAVE. A TWITTER FREAK. FACEBOOK BLAH, BLAH, BLAH.... an addict of anything. live free. ODERATION. '$1&( 6,1* . DO UNTO OTHERS. be G EN ERO US. get OFF THAT ROLLER COASTER. drink  water. help another pilgrim. Harambee. THIS IS LIFE.not a rehearsal. SEE K E X C E L L E N C E. kawaida ni nini? BREATHE D E E P. ROUTINIZE. (FOCUS). simplify. A M P L I F Y . make MISTAKES. SO WHAT. CARVE A NICHE. C A R P E D I E M . PRACTICE KAIZEN & RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS. DO it NOW. FIND y o u r BLISS. ES C H EW procrastination. BEGIN ANYWHERE. LIVE H A P P I LY. STOP HUM DRUM. SEEK YOUR BEST. Give your all - EVERYDAY. CREATE YOUR STORY. be somebody. have   a BRAND. be Y O U R S E L F . WORK H A R D . L I V E F R E E . act, act, action is kila kitu. BREATHE DEEP. be SP O N T A N E O U S . FIGHT   FEAR. FAIL ONCE. FAIL TWICE. LEARN TO STAND UP AFTER EACH FALL. SYNCHRONIZE. LIVE   ANOTHER   DAY. HALLELUJAH. ON SLEEP IT. WACHA M A N E N O MBAYA. be bigger in spirit...MORE BOLD... LESS TIMID. THROW AWAY THE V I C T I M IN YOU. be in TOUCH. be in tune. step. be in YOUR UNLEASH GENIUS. haidhuru. TWENDELEE..

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POTENTIAL

Unleash Your Full T

he passing of Nobel Laureate Wangari Mathaai and technology guru Steve Jobs late last year, gives us cause to reflect on some interesting lessons. Whether by design or default, it is unarguable that they had delivered beneficial impact with their lives’ work, and while their transitions may, in some sense, be untimely, it is doubtless that both lived to their full potential. Not many of us will go to our next chapters with that satisfaction. This is a pity! As we look towards 2012, the lessons from the lives of these two titans should not go unused. Several years ago, I was invited to an international leadership symposium in Johannesburg, to share insights on how organisations could unleash their human potential. In the audience were CEOs, SME Leaders, Human Resources Directors and other senior corporate and public sector leaders who had convened from far and wide to discuss talent, leadership and organisational productivity. I was offered carte blanche to approach the subject in whatever manner I thought most fitting. However, there were some caveats, the presentation had to be cogent, informative and with practical take-aways. The option of approaching my presentation from a corporate perspective was not open to me. I thus could not discuss the meaning of potential from the organisational perspective. I could not touch on the importance of ensuring that a company’s most important jobs are filled with the best people. I could not discuss the role of resonating employee value propositions that ensure a meaningful psychological contract. I could not unleash venom on companies that served terrible leaders and managers on hapless employees. Another presenter had that mandate. My scope was squarely limited to speaking personally to the audience. As catalysts of change within their organisations, I was to appeal directly to them in the hope that they might make use of my ideas and experiences. At the time, I was the recently appointed head of Human Resources for Coca-Cola Africa. New in my role as chief talent manager, I too was keen to contribute to the formula that would enable and encourage our employees across the 54 countries and islands in Africa. After all, I dreamed, with all of us doing what we come to work to do, and doing it to the best of our ability, what could we as an organisation not achieve? “ Looking up, Looking Down” Maquette by Zadok Ben David Courtesy of www.sculpture.org.uk

While a blank canvas can intimidate, it enables one to create with random freedom. I reveled in the latitude and embarked on my pitch with a plethora of platitudes: “Good is the Enemy of Great”, I barked, reciting from the famous book by Jim Collins, Surviving is not Thriving. “Coasting along is not Driving”, I yelled as I moved into high gear, “The Status Quo will not get you far. Don’t Survive, Thrive!” The banalities served their purpose as they motivated the audience to prick their ears with amusement.

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I had made it my life’s mission to explore how I could better support individuals in unlocking their potential and, with more to say than time allowed, I shared the formula that I termed the 8-Point Potential Principle with the acronym – O.D.I.A.S.D.E.M

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Potential in 2012 O-D-I-A-S-D-E-M

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wn your Journey: Take accountability for your career if you wish to fulfil your personal potential. This means that you must jump into the driving seat and engage the gears. No one can do this better than you. In this instance, W.E Henley’s poem, Invictus, rings true, “I am the master of my fate. I am the captain of my soul.� Once you determine to take accountability you dispense with the excuses. Who once said that, “If it is to be, it is up to me�?

D

efine Your Destination: Envision the success you seek. Stephen Covey’s counsel in the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People advises, in Habit Number 2, to ‘Begin with the End in Mind’. All things are created twice. They must first begin in your head as you envision the picture of success that you wish to achieve. You must have a clear view of what that success looks like so that you know it when you get there. Personal mission and vision statement exercises are useful in enabling one to identify his/ her purpose.

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dentify Your Unique Value Proposition: This means you must know your strengths. Like DNA, we all have skills and capabilities that are unique to us and that, when well honed and leveraged, can deliver differentiated relative worth. We are not created equal. If you were a product on a shelf in a supermarket why would anyone pick you? If you are a leader or a manager, why would anyone want to be led by you? If you are embarking on a job search, why would the panel select you? Unpack and understand your unique worth or value proposition. Define it. Assign a Value. Package it. Offer it. Continue to polish it to perfection.

A

ssess Your Arsenal: It is critical to take a long look at oneself and weigh your capabilities. I call it The Look in the Mirror. This means engaging in self-assessments that may at times humble, humiliate, delight and encourage. Subject yourself to some well selected psychometric exercises that will reveal elements of your personality or cognitive abilities that may be hidden. Undertake an objective personal SWOT Analysis in which you scrutinise your relative strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities within the context of the potential you seek to fulfil. Another useful avenue is to seek honest feedback from managers, colleagues and friends. It has been noted that individuals who demonstrate high potential make it a routine to ask for honest feedback.

S

et SMART Goals and Objectives: This is your strategy. Begin with a Goal or Goals. Goals provide a compass. They give focus. They are the intentions you seek. Goals are supported by clear objectives. Borrowing from well-known performance management frameworks, it is critical that the objectives you set be: R5*#ŀ575&,5(51&&5ŀ(85 R5 -/,&5751#."5*,#-5')/(.-5(5.-5) 5&#0,385 R5..#(&5@53.5().5.))5-3653)/5(().5,)--55"-'51#."535-.*-8 R5&0(.5@5,&.&5.)5."5#,.#)(5) 53)/,5&# 5(5,,85 R5#'7)/(5@5#."5&#(-5.".5(&53)/5.)5%*53)/5")(-.5(5 allow you to take stock.

D

efine your Tactics: This is where more strategic choices enter the stage, as not every road will take you to your goals and you cannot try to do everything. Tactics are the specific ‘do-ables’ or actionable tasks that will help you fulfil your goals.

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xecute with a Maniacal Focus: The word maniacal should be underlined.... as it separates the men from the boys. It speaks to that manic obsession to deliver on the tactics; to start and finish; to deliver on the promise you make, even to yourself. There are many of us who plan beautifully and never execute what we have planned. The devil is in the details.

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easure your Progress as you take time to Enjoy: This is tantamount to taking a postcard on the journey. Take mental or written notes of how you are progressing and do not forget to enjoy the process. Always celebrate the achievement of milestones. When you operate at your peak and utilize your potential, it becomes evident in your overall behaviour. People will notice and be inspired. The famed CEO of CEOs, Jack Welch, said he always looked for leaders with EDGE, who could ENERGIZE, EXECUTE and had ENERGY. No doubt, he was describing individuals who were fulfilling their potential.

“ You don’t have to be great to start... but you have to start to be great� - Zig Ziglar

SUSAN WAKHUNGU-GITHUKU is the Editor in Chief of She consults, counsels and trains widely on human and organizational performance. Reach her at sgithuku@hpdafrica.com

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POTENTIAL

HOW DO YOU IDENTIFY EMPLOYEES WITH HIGH POTENTIAL? There is no debate. High impact employees deliver more output, and more returns pound for pound. These are those heavy hitters who consistently deliver outstanding performance and have potential to do even more. They are energetic, enthusiastic and focused. To be successful, every organization requires a number of these stars. So just how do we identify such individuals? I once had the opportunity to listen to the work that the Corporate Leadership Council (CLC) had done in regard to unpacking potential. While performance was relatively easier to measure, potential was always slightly fuzzy and given to subjective perspectives such as “ I like so and so. I think so and so can do well... etc.

HIGH ABILITY NA TIO ES QU BL E

LOW AMBITION

HIGH COMMITMENT

What I learned from the CLC lecture stood me well in my talent management activities years hence and I shall try in this article to relay the message I derived from the discussion on how we objectively identify an employee of high potential. 1. PERFORMANCE Assess the employee’s track record of performance. Does the individual perform comparatively better than their peer group year on year? Some individuals present chequered performance track records. In a given year they may be outstanding. In the following year, they may seem to have been abducted by aliens and do not perform. High potential employees consistently, year on year, deliver outstanding performance.

2. ABILITY

Assess the Skills and Knowledge of the Employee – individuals with high potential have the capacity and the capability to do more. They have functional skills and knowledge that can be utilized at the next level within the organization. They have a keen absorptive capacity to manage more and higher level work. They demonstrate a keen desire to learn and you can count on them to lead and coach others on tasks.

ER

3. AMBITION

EN

GA

GE

DD

RE

AM

Gauge the levels of Ambition of the individuals- high potential employees have the desire to be given more work and to rise higher within the organization. They understand the trade-offs of what promotions entail and are ready to work the longer hours or commit to more deliverables. They have the drive, energy and determination.

LOW ABILITY

4. COMMITMENT

Scrutinize their commitment to the organisation and its goalsHigh potential employees are committed to the mission and vision of the organisation and robustly exemplify the values the organization espouses. They typically will be regarded as the role models a company is proud of.

A Final Word It is interesting to note that, 71% of high performers have limited potential for success at the next level as they may fall short in one of the three performance and potential drivers.

HIGH ABILITY

D

GE

GA

-­EN

DIS

LOW COMMITMENT

HIGH AMBITION

Engaged Dreamers are individuals who have High Commitment, High Ambition but Low Ability. While they enjoy the organization and their work they may simply not have the requisite capability to perform at a higher level. Secondly, while they may seek further advancement, their chances of success at the next level of responsibility are low. Dis-engaged Stars are individuals who have High Ambition, High Ability but Low Commitment. For a variety of reasons, they may no longer care for their role, their work or for the objectives of the organization. They may have lost trust in the organization or the psychological contract may be broken. Although they have requisite capability and have the drive, they have disengaged and may actively be looking for a new opportunity elsewhere. Questionable or Mis-aligned Stars are individuals who have High Ability, High Commitment but Low Ambition. Such individuals lack the drive for success at the next level. Despite their strong capability and commitment to the organization, they may simply not have the hunger for additional responsibility or advancement.

True Stars

The highest potential employees are those with High Ability, High Commitment and High Ambition. Engage them. Challenge them. Reward them and never lose them- especially not to a competitor. SUSAN WAKHUNGU-GITHUKU

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HUMAN RESOURCES

DR.

LAWRENCE. NDOMBI

A LEADING HR PRACTIONER IN KENYA FOR OVER 20 YEARS, DR . NDOMBI SITS DOWN TO TELL US ABOUT HIS PASSION FOR HR MANAGEMENT

“I

work towards success in everything I undertake, be it big or small. In the world of business I am a leader, and I use HR as the niche to create success. The human element in business excites me-it is the active resource that makes the difference in business. I have a passion to make things work, and I mobilise others to achieve goals. In my career I can claim some success, from the creation of the Salary Club when I was Vice President of Unilever Africa, to the HIV/AIDS private sector business council. I have always worked to mobilise businesses in Africa to embrace the HR transformation, to make HR and Talent Management key aspects of achievement. At present I am CEO and Chief Talent Manager of Business Partner Consulting (BPC), a regional organisation in East and Southern Africa specialising in STRATEGY, ORGANISATION and PEOPLE. Our vision is to deliver the best solutions through an innovative approach, creating niche partnerships with businesses and meaningful networks. The expected deliverables of BPC are about ‘Value Addition’, which means growth and profitability for businesses. It is sometimes said that HR does not have a seat at the table, but HR sets the seats for others on the table. HR in Africa has transformed and started doing the right things and trying to do the things right. I partner with business leaders to create real value by unlocking opportunities through their people. The greatest challenge to any business is to find talent with competency and experience. We help find those people. Innovation is a common word in my calling! Though the HR department is sometimes vilified, every department in an organisation is important and I do not allow any weak link to exist- just as we create team cohesion, so must we create departmental cohesion!” What are the 5 (five) core competencies any HR Leader ought to have? An HR Leader should be a Visionary, a Strategy Architect, a Culture & Change Steward, a Business Ally, a Talent Manager and an Organisation Designer! What is the best HR book you have ever read and how did it influence you as an HR Practitioner? You want a true answer? It is my father’s unwritten book …. The high targets and expectations he set, the teachings, the inspirational leadership, the blending of task and people skills. He influenced me as a role model…and as an HR practitioner. I have always wanted to be a role model in my profession. There are many HR leaders I look up to.William Gitobu was my mentor, but I look up to so many in this ever growing industry…Susan Githuku, Alban Mwendar, Lyn Mengich, Tony Nasirembe, Tim Mwai, Susan Kiama, Salome Gitoho and all my fellows at the IHRM. Interestingly, I also look up to colleagues I have developed and are great HR practitioners like David Ssegawa and Edward Mungatana, just to mention a few! What advice would you give to those who wish to move into the field of HR? It is the best place to be….but please be a BUSINESS PLAYER, not the traditional HR manager!”

HR LEADER

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BAD interview s. BOSSES. do’s and don’ts Are bad for business... The jury is out. The research is robust. People typically join wonderful companies. However when they resign, it is seldom because of the frequently expressed excuse of inadequate compensation. Oftentimes, the decision to quit is in many instances fuelled by a determination to divorce a bad manager.

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nterviews are an opportunity for you to present your skills, experience and knowledge to a prospective employer. Here are a few Dos and Donts that will help you along the way:

Bad managers are expensive to organizations as the costs of employee turnover are mind boggling. Bad managers are injurious to an organization’s internal and external brand because they do not typically drive productivity - although they mistakenly think so - they should be dealt swift deft blows. So what do bad managers look like? Five Behavioural Tendencies 1. They Do not Know the Work and Are Ineffective: These managers may be glorious human beings, who love to be loved, but they do not deliver to the desired goals. They may not even know what they do not know and are nonchalant about outcomes. They may be indolent; not have the skills to deliver; disorganized or simply do not hold themselves accountable to perform. That is someone else’s work is their motto. They do not align employee work with organizational goals; clarify performance expectations and will simply prefer to coast as if they lived on another planet. Their over-riding motivation is to show up at work and be paid. Deliverables - What are those, they may ask?

do’s

2. They Do Not Know How to Lead: Not all people are born to manage or lead others. Some employees are best as individual contributors who are responsible for their own work. Such managers may be brilliant with excellent skills but when it comes to stewarding a team, they have insufficient emotional intelligence or people management techniques. When promoted to positions where they have jurisdiction over others, they arrive at their own level of incompetence and cannot inspire followership. They may be physically and emotionally unavailable. They may abdicate responsibility or not know how to delegate. They may be micromanagers with control or perfectionist tendencies. Leadership Skills - What does that mean?

Research: Research the company and the industry it operates within to align your skills and experience with their demands.

3. They Do Not Care About their Employees: Good managers support and care for their employees. They appropriately challenge, coach and mentor. They provide feedback and resources. They want their employees to succeed and realize that when employees are motivated and encouraged, work gets done. Bad managers believe in the stick. They are allergic to carrots that can sometimes work miracles. They are unrealistic or unfair in their expectations. Sometimes they are plainly evil or unjust in their treatment of employees. They make promises they do not keep and when push comes to shove, an employee knows in the bottom of their hearts that they cannot count on their manager to back them. Human Beings - What are those?

Be specific and clear: Refer to measurable results and actual experiences. Provide examples and state facts. This shows the interviewer that you aren’t just talking the talk.

4. They Can Be Mean –These managers are what one would call atmosphere ‘hoovers’. When they arrive at the office they seemingly sap the energy of the place. As soon as they are sighted silence reigns, all goes still; eyes drop down, heart beats accelerate, fear reigns as all seek to disappear into the floors. Such managers are known to intimidate, to bully. They may be inconsistent in their behaviours, volatile and seemingly not given to self regulated behaviour. Given to extreme emotions whether high or low, they rule by fear. The Boss is Always Right.

Bad mouthing your former workmates: Never speak ill of your former boss or colleagues as it reflects negatively on you and shows that in future you may also talk badly about people in their organisation.

5.They Do Not Set a Good Example- Bad managers do not serve as good role models. They do not exemplify the values of the organization and may be the first to break codes of ethics while subjecting employees to mortal silence. They do not instil confidence and may not understand right from wrong. Hard Work, Integrity- What is that?

Practice: Practice answering interview questions, the tricky ones centre on your strengths and weaknesses so develop positive ways to answer these questions. Know your values and beliefs: Articulate your beliefs as they determine your character, some organisations pursue candidates who will gel with their organisational culture. Practice effective communication skills: Arrive early, practice a firm handshake, maintain eye contact, be positive and strive to maintain good posture.

Follow up: Send a thank you note to the interviewer then follow up with an email, call or visit later. This may place you ahead of the pack as it shows initiative and an eagerness for the job.

don’ts

Interrupting the interviewer: This is not only rude but may also suggest that you’re not a good listener and an individual who doesn’t respect other people’s opinions. Try too hard: Avoid sounding like you have rehearsed all the ‘right’ answers. Provide genuine answers that provide insight into your personality Answer your phone during an interview: This may seem like an obvious one but surprisingly many people continue to make this mistake. Come unprepared: Provide extra copies of your resume and cover letter in case you are interviewed by more than one person. Lose focus: Tackle tough questions without going off topic to avoid losing the interviewer. Give specific and concise answers. -Zhanet Khazali

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HR HOW TO

Career Announcements

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CAREERS

Editorial  Assistant   -RE5HI'0($ $KLJKTXDOLW\VRSKLVWLFDWHG PRQWKO\PDJD]LQHGHVLJQHGWRVKRZFDVHWKHEHVWRI(DVW$IULFDWUDYHO spots,   is   looking   for   an   assistant   to   write,   proofread   and   research,   a   ZLOOLQJQHVVWRWUDYHORQVKRUWQRWLFHLVDOVRUHTXLUHG ‡ )RUPDO TXDOL¿FDWLRQ LQ -RXUQDOLVP:ULWLQJ(QJOLVK RU (QJOLVK Literature ‡ Excellent  computer  skills Warehouse   Manager -RE 5HI %$:0  $ VWDUWXS FRPSDQ\ UHYROXWLRQLVLQJHGXFDWLRQDFURVV$IULFDLVORRNLQJIRUDQLQGHSHQGHQW LQGLYLGXDO WR PDQDJH GDLO\ ZDUHKRXVH DFWLYLWLHV DQG FRRUGLQDWH ZLWK KHDGVRIGHSDUWPHQWVWRHQVXUHWLPHO\LVVXDQFHRIUHTXLUHGLWHPV0XVW KDYHZLOOLQJQHVVWRWUDYHOWRUHPRWHORFDWLRQV ‡ %DFKHORUœVGHJUHHLQDSSURSULDWHGLVFLSOLQH ‡ 0LQLPXP\HDUVH[SHULHQFH Construction  Manager -RE5HI+3&0 $UHDOHVWDWHGHYHORSPHQW FRPSDQ\WKDWGHYHORSVH[FOXVLYH UHVLGHQWLDO UHDOHVWDWHLVVHDUFKLQJ IRU D PDQDJHU WR VXSHUYLVH DQG RYHUVHH FRQVWUXFWLRQ RI D OX[XU\ UHVLGHQWLDO PDULQH UHVRUWLQ.LOL¿.HQ\D ‡ %DFKHORUœV GHJUHH SRVW JUDGXDWH GLSORPD LQ FRQVWUXFWLRQ PDQDJHPHQWDQDGYDQWDJH

CLIMATE  CHANGE  PROGRAM  MANAGER The   African   Wildlife   Foundation   (AWF)   currently   seeks   to   hire   a   Climate  Change  Program  Manager.  S/he  will  lead  AWF’s  climate  change   program  and  manage  the  technical  design,  funding  and  implementation   of  a  portfolio  of  climate  change  monitoring,  mitigation  and  adaptation   projects   across   Africa   and   will   participate   in   strategic,   national   and   international   climate   change   policy   processes   and   prepare   written   technical  reports  for  internal  and  external  audiences.     ‡3RVWJUDGXDWHTXDOL¿FDWLRQ 0%$06FRU3K' LQUHOHYDQW¿HOGIURP reputable  institution. ‡$WOHDVW\HDUVH[SHULHQFHZRUNLQJDWDUHVSRQVLEOHOHYHORQFOLPDWH change  issues ,I \RXU EDFNJURXQG H[SHULHQFH DQG FRPSHWHQFLHV PDWFK WKH DERYH VSHFL¿FDWLRQV SOHDVH VHQG D FRYHU OHWWHU \RXU GHWDLOHG &9 LQGLFDWLQJ daytime   telephone   numbers,   address   and   names   of   three   referees   to   Human   Resources   Manager   at   Humanresources@awfke.org.   Only   shortlisted  candidates  shall  be  contacted. )RUIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQRQWKHSRVLWLRQDQG$:)SOHDVHYLVLWZZZDZI org

‡ 0LQLPXP\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQSURMHFWPDQDJHPHQW ‡ 4XDQWLW\VXUYHU\LQJDQGOHJDONQRZOHGJH

If interested in any of these positions, send your CV and application letter in word format to info@byappointmentafrica. com. ONLY short listed candidates will be contacted.

 

The Africa Leadership Training and Capacity-Building Program (AFRICA LEAD) is a component of the global hunger and food security initiative. It directly addresses item number three in the Africa Bureau’s FY 2010 Action List: “ Build a cadre of African Leader’s to design and implement food security strategies and investment plans.� Accountant. Africa Lead is looking for an accountant, responsible for executing financial related activities to support the implementation of the Africa lead project. R5 University degree or equivalent in accounting or relevant discipline R5 3 to 5 years work experience in operational and financial management field. Agribusiness Internship Coordinator: Africa Lead is seeking a professional to identify private sector companies working in agribusiness and agri industry from ‘farm to fork’ in eastern Africa to serve as hosts for interns from the EA region. R5 Minimum university degree R5 2 to 5 years practical experience

If your career aspirations match this opportunity, please forward your application letter and CV giving details of your qualifications and experience to DASrecruit@kpmg.co.ke

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Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

Email a C.V and cover letter to Humanresources@awfke.org

KPMG is a leading provider of professional services, which include audit, tax and advisory management services for the Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund (the AECF or the Fund) through a competitive tender process. KPMG is presently looking for individuals to assist in the management of the AECF’s portfolio of investments/projects. Junior Grant Associates - 3 positions ( DAS-01/2012/AECF ) R5 Graduate qualifications in Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Business Admin/Accounting R5 At least CPA (K) R5 Minimum of 2 years work experience, preferably in Grants Management Senior Accountant ( DAS-02/2012/AECF) R5 CPA (K), preferably a registered member of ICPAK. R5 Minimum of 3 years work experience R5 Graduate qualifications in Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Business Admin/Accounting R5 A good grasp of Quickbooks and Microsoft Office Software Senior Grant Associate ( DAS-03/2012/AECF ) R5 CPA (K), preferably a registered member of ICPAK R5 Minimum of 5 years work experience in grants management R5 Graduate qualifications in Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Business If you meet the above requirements and are interested in this position, send your CV in word format and an application letter to Ruth_Ndegwa@africaleadftf.org.


CAREERS Achievers  Consulting   Achievers  Consulting   PO  Box  76504-­‐00508   PO  Box  76504-­‐00508   NAIROBI  

NAIROBI  

Cell:  0716  054416   Email:        jobs@achievers.co.ke      

Cell:  0716  054416  

Email:        jobs@achievers.co.ke       Web:            www.achievers.co.ke   R  e  f f  o  t t  h  S S  t  e  a  a  c  c  h  h            o  r  r            h  e  e            t  a  a  r  r  s  s      

Web:            www.achievers.co.ke   R  e t  h S  t  e  a  a  c  c  h  h            ff  o  o  r  r            t  h  e  e            S  t  a  a  r  r  s  s  

  CAD Operator Recruiting individual for   an engineering and consultancy to convert sketches and specs of projects into CAD drawings. R5 Certification in CAD operations R5 At least five years experience

Head of Mechanical Engineering Recruiting individual for an engineering consultance company to work in liaison with departmental heads to ensure all are performing as planned, are aligned to Corporate Strategy in terms of securing and completing projects to client expectations. R5 Bachelors degree in Mechanical Engineering; MBA or equivalent R5 Registered with ERB Kenya, Corporate Member of IEK R5 At least 5 years experience in senior management position in building services industry

Finance and Administration Officer Our client, a nut processing firm, is looking for a Finance and Administration Officer to facilitate the establishment and implementation of sound financial management and internal controls systems to support the overall strategy of its mills and manage the general administrative functions. R5 University degree in business, commerce or finance R5 CPA, CIMA, ACCA or equivalent R5 5 years experience in managing finances or audit, preferably in a commercial environment R5 MBA is an added advantage

Sales and Marketing Manager. Recruiting individual for up and coming IT management solutions company to be responsible for all sales and marketing concerns and lead team. R5 Bachelor’s degree in Marketing or Business Information Technology At least 2 years experience in a busy IT company environment

Email jobs@achievers.co.ke with a single page application letter and C.V

Project Assistant. ICRISAT is a non-profit, apolitical, international organization for science-based agricultural research for development. ICRISAT regional office for Eastern and Southern Africa is located in Nairobi, Kenya and is currently seeking a qualified candidate to fill the locally recruited position of a Project Assistant. R5 Bachelor ‘s degree in Agriculture, Management or IT or a relevant degree R5 A post graduate diploma in project management will be an added advantage R5 At least 3 years’ experience in project administration R5 Experience in an NGO or international organization environment will be an added avantage R5 Must be a Kenyan citizen. Research Technician. The individual will work in the ICRISAT Grain Legumes Research Programme on groundnut rosette disease resistance, involving QTL mapping and marker-assisted trait introgression using SSR markers and will be responsible for providing technical support to the laboratory operations of the Regional Office (ESA). R5 Bachelor of science in biotechnology or a related field R5 At least 2 years relevant technical experience R5 Experience in a research environment, specifically in molecular sciences, including PCR, sequencing, genotyping, and genomics R5 Knowledge of laboratory health and safety procedures. R5 Must be a Kenyan citizen

Please contact jobs@corporatestaffing.co.ke with a C.V and one page cover letter if you are interested.

Management Consultant AfriBusiness Development Limited is looking to hire a consultant who will work on various projects in Business Management, Marketing, Human Resource Management, Public Relations and Finance and Accounting. R5 University degree in a business related field from a reputable institution R5 At least 2 years relevant working experience Email us your resume, an application outlining ‘Why You’, and contact details of three professional referees to CVS@ afribusinessdevelopment.com

If you are interested please send a CV and detailed cover letter to icrafhru@cgiar.org

Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

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CAREERS

GENERAL  MANAGER Our  Client  is  a  large  reputable  non-­governmental  organisation  which  is  swiftly  moving  into   commercial   operations   and   desires   to   continue   consolidating   its   leadership   bench   with   a   cadre  of  high  performing  and  high  potential  career  professionals.   This  senior  position  is  an  integral  member  of  the  senior  management  team.  Reporting  to  the  chief   H[HFXWLYHWKH*0KDVUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUHQGWRHQGYDOXHFKDLQDFFRXQWDELOLW\IRURSHUDWLRQVRID UHODWLYHO\QHZDQGJURZLQJOLQHRIEXVLQHVVZLWKODUJHXSVLGHSRWHQWLDO   6SHFL¿F5HVSRQVLELOLWLHV    include  but  are  not  limited  to:  Business  Development ‡ 6SHDUKHDGLQJ WKH GHYHORSPHQW FRPPXQLFDWLRQ DQG LPSOHPHQWDWLRQ RI HIIHFWLYH JURZWK strategies  and  processes. ‡ 'ULYLQJWKHFRPSDQ\WRDFKLHYHDQGVXUSDVVVDOHVSUR¿WDELOLW\FDVKÀRZJRDOVREMHFWLYHV Operations  Management ‡ 2YHUVHHLQJDQGHQVXULQJWKDWWKHRSHUDWLRQDOLQIUDVWUXFWXUHRIV\VWHPVDQGSURFHVVHVDUHZHOO designed  and  managed. ‡ 0DQDJLQJWKHSHUIRUPDQFHRIVWDIIWRHQVXUHWKHPHHWLQJRIREMHFWLYHVDQGGHWHUPLQLQJDUHDV RIJUHDWHUHI¿FLHQF\DQGHIIHFWLYHQHVV Financial  Management ‡ 5HVSRQVLEOHIRURYHUDOOSUR¿WDELOLW\RIWKHFRPSDQ\ People  Leadership ‡ 2YHUVHHLQJ WKH DWWUDFWLQJ UHFUXLWLQJ GHSOR\PHQW DQG UHWHQWLRQ RI µ$¶ SOD\HUV DFURVV WKH entire  business.     Desired  Skills  &  Abilities ‡ To  be  successful  in  the  role,  you  must: ‡ %HDVWURQJVDOHVPDUNHWLQJSURIHVVLRQDOZLWKWKHDELOLW\WROHDGDQRSHUDWLRQVWHDP ‡ %HDQLQGLYLGXDOZKRLVVWURQJDWEXLOGLQJUHODWLRQVKLSVZLWKNH\VWDNHKROGHUVDQGXWLOL]LQJ networks  inside  and  outside  the  company. Education  &  Experience ‡ %DFKHORU¶VGHJUHH ‡ +DYH WUDFN UHFRUG RI VXFFHVV ZLWK D PLQLPXP RI  \HDUV H[SHULHQFH LQ D OHDGHUVKLS RU management  position.

DIRECTOR-­  FINANCE   Our  Client  is  a  large  reputable  non-­governmental  organisation  which  is  swiftly  moving  into   commercial   operations   and   desires   to   continue   consolidating   its   leadership   bench   with   a   cadre  of  high  performing  and  high  potential  career  professionals  . 7KLV UROH VHUYHV DV WKH )LQDQFH PDQDJHPHQW VXEMHFW PDWWHU H[SHUW $V WKH YHULWDEOH EXVLQHVV SDUWQHUWRWKHFKLHIH[HFXWLYHWKHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOOEHUHVSRQVLEOHIRUSURYLGLQJ¿QDQFLDO PDQDJHPHQWVWHZDUGVKLSDQG¿QDQFLDOPDQDJHPHQWDGYLFHWRWKH&RPSDQ\WRHQVXUHRQJRLQJ SUR¿WDELOLW\JURZWKDQGVXVWDLQDELOLW\RIRSHUDWLRQV 6SHFL¿F5HVSRQVLELOLWLHV ‡ 6HUYHVXEVWDQWLYHO\DVDPHPEHURIWKHH[HFXWLYHOHDGHUVKLSWHDP ‡ 'HYHORSWRROVDQGV\VWHPVWRSURYLGHFULWLFDO¿QDQFLDODQGRSHUDWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQWRWKH FKLHIH[HFXWLYHDQGPDNHDFWLRQDEOHUHFRPPHQGDWLRQVRQERWKVWUDWHJ\DQGRSHUDWLRQV ‡ (QJDJH WKH %RDUG ¿QDQFH DXGLW DQG LQYHVWPHQW FRPPLWWHHV DURXQG LVVXHV WUHQGV DQG FKDQJHVLQWKHRSHUDWLQJPRGHO V DQGRSHUDWLRQDOGHOLYHU\ ‡ 2YHUVHH ORQJWHUP EXGJHWDU\ SODQQLQJ DQG FRVW PDQDJHPHQW LQ DOLJQPHQW ZLWK WKH company’s  strategic  plan. ‡ 3UHSDUH DQG PDLQWDLQ UHJXODU ¿QDQFLDO SODQQLQJ UHSRUWV 0RQWKO\ SUR¿W DQG ORVV IRUHFDVW YV EXGJHW  PRQWKO\ FDVK ÀRZ IRUHFDVW FRPSOHWH DQDO\VLV RI ¿QDQFLDO UHVXOWV 'HYHORS recommendations  (strategic  and  tactical). ‡ 5HSUHVHQWWKHFRPSDQ\LQHIIRUWVZLWKLQYHVWPHQWEDQNHUVVWDWXWRU\ERGLHVVXFKDVWKH.HQ\D 5HYHQXH$XWKRULW\&DSLWDOPDUNHWV$XWKRULW\DQGSRWHQWLDOLQYHVWRUVDQGVWDNHKROGHUV ‡ (QVXUHPDLQWHQDQFHRIDSSURSULDWHLQWHUQDOFRQWUROVDQG¿QDQFLDOSURFHGXUHV ‡ (QVXUHWLPHOLQHVVDFFXUDF\DQGXVHIXOQHVVRI¿QDQFLDODQGPDQDJHPHQWUHSRUWLQJIRUWKH %RDUGRIGLUHFWRUVRYHUVHHWKHSUHSDUDWLRQDQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQUHTXLVLWHPRQWKO\DQGDQQXDO ¿QDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV Desired  Skills  &  Abilities 7REHVXFFHVVIXOLQWKHUROH\RXPXVWKDYH ‡ 3URYHQDGPLQLVWUDWLYHOHDGHUVKLSDQGPDQDJHPHQWDELOLW\LQWKHDUHDVRIVWUDWHJLFSODQQLQJ DQGRUJDQLVDWLRQDOGHYHORSPHQW ‡ 8SWRGDWHNQRZOHGJHRIFXUUHQW¿QDQFLDODQGDFFRXQWLQJFRPSXWHUDSSOLFDWLRQV ‡ ([FHOOHQWYHUEDODQDO\WLFDORUJDQLVDWLRQDODQGZULWWHQVNLOOV Education  &  Experience ‡ $Q XQGHUJUDGXDWH GHJUHH LQ DFFRXQWLQJ &3$ .  RU LWV HTXLYDOHQW DQG EH D PHPEHU RI ICPAK. ‡ ,GHDOO\ D PLQLPXP RI  \HDUV UHOHYDQW H[SHULHQFH UXQQLQJ D PHGLXP WR ODUJH ¿QDQFH department.

If you are interested in this role, please submit your application to info@hpdafrica.com

If you are interested in this role, please submit your application to info@hpdafrica.com

with the reference HPDA 001. The closing date in March 7, 2012.

with the reference HPDA 002. The closing date in March 7, 2012.  

DIRECTOR  -­  HUMAN  RESOURCES  Our  Client  is  a  large  reputable  non-­governmental  organisation  which  is  swiftly  moving  into   commercial   operations   and   desires   to   continue   consolidating   its   leadership   bench   with   a   cadre  of  high  performing  and  high  potential  career  professionals. 7KLVUROHLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRUGHYHORSLQJDQGVWUXFWXULQJDSURDFWLYHUHVSRQVLYHDQGHIIHFWLYH+5 IXQFWLRQDVZHOODVSURYLGLQJVXEMHFWPDWWHUH[SHUWLVHLQWKHDUHDVRI+5OHDGHUVKLSRUJDQLVDWLRQ HIIHFWLYHQHVV RUJDQLVDWLRQ DUFKLWHFWXUH EXLOGLQJ RUJDQLVDWLRQDO FDSDELOLW\ DQG KXPDQ FDSLWDO processes.   6SHFL¿FUHVSRQVLELOLWLHVLQFOXGH ‡ )RUPXODWLQJFRPSUHKHQVLYH+XPDQ&DSLWDO6WUDWHJLF3ODQVDQGOHDGLQJWKHLPSOHPHQWDWLRQ ‡ :RUNLQJ FORVHO\ ZLWK PDQDJHPHQW DQG HPSOR\HHV WR EXLOG D SRVLWLYH FXOWXUH DQG HQVXUH employee  engagement. ‡ 'HYHORSLQJVWUDWHJLFZRUNIRUFHGHPDQGDQGVXSSO\SODQVWKDWHQVXUHDFRQWLQXRXVVXSSO\ RIDKLJKTXDOLW\ZRUNIRUFHLQFOXGLQJVXFFHVVLRQSODQVIRUDOOEXVLQHVVFULWLFDOSRVLWLRQV ‡ 3URYLGLQJ SROLF\ JXLGDQFH DQG HGXFDWLQJ PDQDJHUV RQ +5 SROLFLHV SODQV SURJUDPV practices,      processes,  and  tools. ‡ Ensuring  that  the  necessary  performance  management  policies,  systems  and  processes  are   DYDLOHGDQGLPSOHPHQWHGDFURVVDOOHPSOR\HHSRSXODWLRQV ‡ 0DLQWDLQLQJ LQGHSWK NQRZOHGJH RI OHJDO UHTXLUHPHQWV UHODWHG WR GD\WRGD\ PDQDJHPHQW of  employees,  reducing  legal  risks  and  ensuring  regulatory  compliance.  Partners  with  legal     GHSDUWPHQWDVUHTXLUHG ‡ Through  best  in  class  talent  management  systems  and  processes,  coordinating  the  employee   life        cycle  processes  from  newly  hired  staff  to  employee  exits. Education  &  Experience ‡ $%6%$GHJUHHIURPDQDFFUHGLWHGXQLYHUVLW\0%$0$ZLWKDIRFXVRQ+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV is  ideal. ‡ Experienced  HR  profession  with  a  minimum  of  7  years  of  HR  experience  gained  in  a  blue   chip  FMCG  with  unionized  employee  group. Experience  &  Skills   ‡ 6ROLGNQRZOHGJHRIDOOWHFKQLFDO+5SUR¿FLHQF\DUHDVLQFOXGLQJRUJDQLVDWLRQDOGLDJQRVLVDQG HIIHFWLYHQHVV FKDQJH PDQDJHPHQW HPSOR\HHLQGXVWULDO UHODWLRQV UHZDUG SUDFWLFHV WDOHQW PDQDJHPHQWSHUIRUPDQFHDQGSURGXFWLYLW\PDQDJHPHQW ‡ 3URYHQUHFRUGRIKDQGOLQJFRPSOH[HPSOR\HHUHODWLRQVLVVXHV

26

DIRECTOR  -­  COMMUNICATIONS  &  RESOURCE  MOBILIZATION Our  Client  is  a  large  reputable  non-­governmental  organisation  which  is  swiftly  moving  into   commercial   operations   and   desires   to   continue   consolidating   its   leadership   bench   with   a   cadre  of  high  performing  and  high  potential  career  professionals  . This   fundraising   post   is   new   to   the   organisation   and   represents   an   exciting   opportunity   to   the   ULJKWFDQGLGDWH5HSRUWLQJWRWKHFKLHIH[HFXWLYHLWLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRUJHQHUDWLQJQHZIXQGVIURP FRUSRUDWLRQV IRXQGDWLRQV LQGLYLGXDOV JRYHUQPHQW DQG PXOWLODWHUDO IXQGLQJ DJHQFLHV DQG IRU GHYHORSLQJDQGPDQDJLQJH[LVWLQJDQGQHZSDUWQHUVKLSV 6SHFL¿F5HVSRQVLELOLWLHVLQFOXGH ‡ 'HYHORSLQJDQGWUDFNLQJSURSRVDOVDQGUHSRUWVIRUDOOIRXQGDWLRQDQGFRUSRUDWHIXQGUDLVLQJ ‡ 'HYHORSLQJ DQG H[HFXWLQJ WKH FRPSDQ\¶V LQVWLWXWLRQDO IXQGUDLVLQJ VWUDWHJ\ DQG REMHFWLYHV and  ensuring  that  goals  set  are  met. ‡ Spearheading  all  grant  application  and  submission  efforts.   ‡ /HDGLQJWKH&RPSDQ\¶VFDUHIXOWUDFNLQJRIDQGUHVSRQVHWRUHTXHVWVIRUSURSRVDOV 5)3V  IURPLQVWLWXWLRQVJRYHUQPHQWDQGPXOWLODWHUDODJHQFLHV ‡ Researching  and  applying  for  new  funding  opportunities  from  institutional  funders. ‡ Identifying  and  securing  opportunities. ‡ 6HFXULQJ¿QDQFLDOVXSSRUWIURPLQGLYLGXDOVIRXQGDWLRQVDQGFRUSRUDWLRQV ‡ 2YHUVHHLQJRUJDQLVDWLRQRIVSHFLDOHYHQWV ‡ ,QLWLDWLQJDQGPDLQWDLQLQJVWURQJRQJRLQJSDUWQHUVKLSVZLWKUHOHYDQWVWDNHKROGHUV Education  &  Experience ‡ %DFKHORU¶VGHJUHHUHTXLUHG0DVWHU¶VGHJUHHSUHIHUUHG ‡ .QRZOHGJHRILQWHUQDWLRQDOGHYHORSPHQW Experience  &  Skills ‡ $GULYHWRFXOWLYDWHDQGFORVHQHZDQGH[LVWLQJUHYHQXHRSSRUWXQLWLHV ‡ 'HPRQVWUDWHGH[FHOOHQFHLQRUJDQLVDWLRQDOPDQDJHULDODQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV ‡ 6LJQL¿FDQW IXQGUDLVLQJ H[SHULHQFH LQFOXGLQJ DW OHDVW WKUHH \HDUV LQ D VHQLRU IXQGUDLVLQJ role    with  direct  liaison  with  institutional  funders,  bilateral  donors    and  multilateral  funding   agencies.

If you are interested in this role, please submit your application to info@hpdafrica.com

If you are interested in this role, please submit your application to info@hpdafrica.com

with the reference HPDA 003. The closing date in March 7, 2012.

with the reference HPDA 004. The closing date in March 7, 2012.

 

 

Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE


CAREERS

INTERIM  HR  MANAGER

RECRUITMENT  DIRECTOR/TALENT  ACQUISITION

Our   client   is   a   renowned   international   non-­governmental   organisation   with   operations   DFURVV.HQ\DZKLFKVHHNVWRWUDQVIRUPLWVLQWHUQDORSHUDWLRQVIRUDPRUHHI¿FLHQWHIIHFWLYH and  impactful  organisation. 7KH  FOLHQW VHHNV DQ ,QWHULP +5 0DQDJHU WR SURYLGH VWUDWHJLF +XPDQ 5HVRXUFH 0DQDJHPHQW VHUYLFHV +DYLQJ UHFHQWO\ GHWHUPLQHG WR XSJUDGH LWV +5 0DQDJHPHQW V\VWHPV DQG SURFHVVHV WKHRUJDQLVDWLRQZLOOUHTXLUHWKHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHWRWDNHRZQHUVKLSIRUWKHGHOLYHU\RI+5 IXQFWLRQDOLW\IRUPRQWKVEHJLQQLQJ0DUFK±6HSWHPEHUZLWKWKHRSWLRQWRVWD\RQDV Head  of  the  HR  function.   Core  Expectations  will  include: ‡ 7DNLQJUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUDPL[HGFOLHQWJURXSRIERWK+HDG2I¿FHIXQFWLRQVDVZHOODVVRPH RIWKHVWDIIEDVHGLQWKH¿HOGDFURVV.HQ\D ‡ 6XSSRUWLQJWKHGHYHORSPHQWRIDVROLG+5VWUDWHJ\ZKLOVWDOVRVXSSRUWLQJWKHRSHUDWLRQDOQHHGV ‡ $QDO\VLQJEXVLQHVVLVVXHVQHHGVDQGULVNVDQGSURYLGLQJUHFRPPHQGDWLRQVIRUUHVROXWLRQ ‡ 'HYHORSLQJDQGGHOLYHULQJDEHVWLQFODVVWDOHQWPDQDJHPHQWSODQ ‡ 0DQDJLQJGLVFLSOLQHDQGJULHYDQFHLVVXHV Education  &  Experience ‡ %DFKHORUVGHJUHHLQ+5%XVLQHVV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ0%$0$SUHIHUUHG ‡ $VHDVRQHG+5SURIHVVLRQDOZLWKDPLQLPXPRI\HDUVRI+5H[SHULHQFHJDLQHGLQDIDVW SDFHG RUJDQLVDWLRQ 7KH H[SHULHQFH VKRXOG FRYHU FRUH +5 DUHDV LQFOXGLQJ RUJDQLVDWLRQDO GLDJQRVLV  HIIHFWLYHQHVV FKDQJH PDQDJHPHQW HPSOR\HHLQGXVWULDO UHODWLRQV  UHZDUG SUDFWLFHVWDOHQWPDQDJHPHQWSHUIRUPDQFHDQGSURGXFWLYLW\PDQDJHPHQW ‡ 3URYHQUHFRUGRIKDQGOLQJFRPSOH[HPSOR\HHUHODWLRQVLVVXHV Experience  &  Skills   ‡ $ELOLW\WRDFWLQGHSHQGHQWO\LPSDUWLDOO\DQGREMHFWLYHO\ ‡ Results  focused.   ‡ $ELOLW\WRDGDSWTXLFNO\WRGLIIHUHQWZRUNLQJHQYLURQPHQWVDQGFXOWXUHVDQGKDYHDÀH[LEOH attitude  to  where,  how  and  when  they  work. ‡ :LOOLQJQHVVWRDGGYDOXHE\WUDQVIHUULQJNQRZOHGJHDQGH[SHUWLVH

Our   client   is   a   rapidly   growing     organisation   which   is   determinedly   spreading   its   wings   across  the  country  with  objectives  of  further  expanding  across  the  continent.The  purpose  of   WKHUROHLVWRSURYLGHFRPSUHKHQVLYHEHVWSUDFWLFHUHFUXLWPHQWDGYLFHJXLGDQFHDQGFRDFKLQJ DQGWRGHVLJQUHVRXUFLQJQHHGVDFURVVDVSHFWUXPRIZRUNHUW\SHV VWDIIYROXQWHHUVLQWHUQV and  agency  temps/contractors).     6SHFL¿F5HVSRQVLELOLWLHVZLOOLQFOXGH ‡ %XLOGH[HFXWLYHVHDUFKDQGVHOHFWLRQFDSDELOLWLHV ‡ 6WUDWHJLFDOO\RYHUVHHKLJKYROXPHUHFUXLWPHQWFDPSDLJQV ‡ &UHDWH DQG PDQDJH UHVRXUFLQJ WRROV IRU OLQH PDQDJHUV LPSOHPHQW .3,¶V DQG GHYHORS D function  in  line  with  global  best  practice.   ‡ ,GHQWLI\DQGDWWUDFWWKHEHVWWDOHQWLQWKHPDUNHWLQWKHTXLFNHVWWLPHSRVVLEOHIRUWKHOHDVWFRVW ZKLOVWQRWFRPSURPLVLQJTXDOLW\ ‡ 3URYLGHSURIHVVLRQDOVXSSRUWDQGDGYLFHRQUHFUXLWPHQWWROLQHDQGGHSDUWPHQWDOPDQDJHUV DQGDGYLVHPDQDJHUVRQEHVWSUDFWLFHUHFUXLWPHQWDQGVHOHFWLRQ ‡ 3UHSDUHMREGHVFULSWLRQVDQGSHUVRQQHOVSHFL¿FDWLRQVZULWHMREDGYHUWLVHPHQWVDQGGHFLGH KRZDQGZKHUHMREVZLOOEHDGYHUWLVHG ‡ 6FUHHQ DSSOLFDWLRQ IRUPV VKRUWOLVW DSSOLFDQWV GHYLVH DQG LPSOHPHQW VHOHFWLRQ SURFHVVHV FRQGXFW  LQWHUYLHZV SV\FKRPHWULF WHVWV DQG SHUVRQDOLW\ TXHVWLRQQDLUHV DQG YDULRXV JURXS DFWLYLWLHV ‡ 7UDLQVWDIILQLQWHUYLHZLQJWHFKQLTXHV Education ‡ %DFKHORU¶VGHJUHHLQ+5SV\FKRORJ\RUUHODWHGEXVLQHVVDUHD ‡ 3RUWIROLRRISV\FKRPHWULFTXDOL¿FDWLRQV   Experience  &  Skills   ‡ Strong  resource/workforce  planning  skills. ‡ 6WURQJQHWZRUNLQJDQGLQÀXHQFLQJVNLOOV ‡ Excellent  communication  skills. ‡ Good  interpersonal  and  presentation  skills  . ‡ Results  Orientation.

If you are interested in this role, please submit your application to info@hpdafrica.com

If you are interested in this role, please submit your application to info@hpdafrica.com

with the reference HPDA 005. The closing date in March 7, 2012.

with the reference HPDA 006. The closing date in March 7, 2012.

 

 

Nairobi  Women’s  Hospital  is  trusted  with  the  healthcare  of  Women  in   $IULFDDQGGHOLYHUZLWKSDVVLRQ7KH\DUHUHFUXLWLQJIRUWKHIROORZLQJ KLJKFDOLEUHLQGLYLGXDOVWRMRLQWKHLUWHDPRIKHDOWKFDUHSURIHVVLRQDOV PROGRAMMES  MANAGER   5HSRUWLQJ WR WKH ([HFXWLYH 'LUHFWRU *95& WKLV SRVLWLRQ ZLOO EH UHVSRQVLEOH IRU SURJUDPPH GHYHORSPHQW DQG OHDGHUVKLS LQFOXGLQJ SODQQLQJ UHVRXUFH PRELOL]DWLRQ LPSOHPHQWDWLRQ FRRUGLQDWLRQDQGHYDOXDWLRQRIDOO*95&SURJUDPPHV 4XDOL¿FDWLRQVDQG6NLOOV%DFKHORU¶VGHJUHHLQVRFLDOVFLHQFHVRULWVHTXLYDOHQWDWOHDVW\HDUV UHOHYDQWZRUNH[SHULHQFHDVD3URJUDP2I¿FHULQDQ1*2SURJUDPVGHYHORSPHQWFRXUVHZLOOEH DQDGGHGDGYDQWDJHFRPSXWHUOLWHUDWHVWURQJFRPPXQLFDWLRQDQGHIIHFWLYHLQWHUSHUVRQDOVNLOOV UHOHYDQWPDVWHUVGHJUHHZLOOEHDQDGGHGDGYDQWDJH PROJECTS  OFFICER Reporting  to  the  Project’s  Manager,  this  position  is  key  in  supporting  project  implementation  for   the  hospital’s  expansion  projects. 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV DQG 6NLOOV %DFKHORU GHJUHH LQ EXVLQHVV RU HTXLYDOHQW 'LSORPD LQ SURMHFW PDQDJHPHQWLVDQDGGHGDGYDQWDJH HOTEL  SERVICES  SUPERVISOR 5HSRUWLQJ WR WKH *0 8QLW WKLV SRVLWLRQ LV NH\ LQ 3ODQQLQJ FRRUGLQDWLQJ DQG VXSHUYLVLQJ DOO housekeeping  and  catering  staff  in  the  hospital. 4XDOL¿FDWLRQVDQG6NLOOV+1''HJUHHLQ+RWHO0DQDJHPHQWDQGRU,QVWLWXWLRQDOPDQDJHPHQW RADIOGRAPHER  (4  positions) 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV DQG 6NLOOV 'LSORPD KROGHU LQ 0HGLFDO ,PDJLQJ 6FLHQFHV IURP D UHFRJQLVHG LQVWLWXWLRQ0XVWEHDPHPEHURI5DGLRORJ\%RDUGRI.HQ\D PHARMACY  TECHNOLOGIST 4XDOL¿FDWLRQVDQG6NLOOV'LSORPDLQ3KDUPDFHXWLFDO7HFKQRORJ\9DOLGUHJLVWUDWLRQOLFHQVHE\ WKH3KDUPDF\DQG3RLVRQV%RDUG STAFF  NURSES  (2  Positions) 4XDOL¿FDWLRQVDQG6NLOOV.5&+1ZLWKEDVLFWUDLQLQJLQVSHFLDOLVHGDUHD SDHGLDWULFWKHDWUH,&8 RU0DWHUQLW\ %61RULWVHTXLYDOHQWLVDQDGGHGDGYDQWDJH0HPEHUVKLSWRDSURIHVVLRQDOERG\ ENTRY  NURSES  (6  positions) 4XDOL¿FDWLRQVDQG6NLOOV.5&+1RUHTXLYDOHQW0HPEHUVKLSWRDSURIHVVLRQDOERG\

IOM  International  Organization  for  Migration 9DFDQF\ 1RWLFH 1R 91 ,20 3RVLWLRQ 7LWOH (QJLQHHULQJ $VVLVWDQW 6KHOWHU  'XW\ 6WDWLRQ 1DLUREL .HQ\D &ODVVL¿FDWLRQ * EDVHG RQ 81 6DODU\ 6FDOH IRU HPSOR\HHV LQ .HQ\D  7\SH RI $SSRLQWPHQW  PRQWKV ZLWK SRVVLELOLW\ RI H[WHQVLRQ 5HSRUW +HDG RI 6XE2I¿FH +62 'DGDDEDQGWKH6KHOWHU3URJUDP0DQDJHU'DGDDE Responsibility: Responsible   and   accountable   for   the   Construction   of   the   IOM   Accommodation  including  other  infrastructure  project  in  accordance  with   the  Organization’s  regulations  and  procedures: 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV ‡ 0LQLPXP &ROOHJH 'LSORPD DQGRU  \HDUV¶ H[SHULHQFH LQ DFWLYH VKHOWHUFRQVWUXFWLRQDQGRUFLYLO(QJLQHHULQJ ‡ Able   to   work   independently,   ability   to   work   under   stress   and   in   GLI¿FXOWFRQGLWLRQVLQGHSHQGHQWDQGLQLWLDWLYH ‡ &RPSXWHUOLWHUDWHLQFOXGLQJNQRZOHGJHRI$XWR&$'DQG0V2I¿FH Suite  Software. Languages:  Thorough  knowledge  of  English  and  Kiswahili.  Knowledge   RI6RPDOLLVDQDGYDQWDJH

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ASSISTANT  LEGAL  REDRESS  AND  TRAINING  OFFICER 7KH,QGHSHQGHQW0HGLFR/HJDO8QLW ,0/8 LVDQ1*2WKDWVHHNVD-XVW :RUOGIUHHIURP7RUWXUH6WDWLRQ1DLURELZLWKVRPHWUDYHO3HULRG year  based  on  performance. Responsibility  (in  brief): 7RDVVLVWLQSURYLVLRQRIOHJDOVHUYLFHVWRFOLHQWVPDQDJHPHQWRIWUDLQLQJV SROLF\DQGOHJLVODWLYHGHYHORSPHQWDQGFRPPXQLW\RXWUHDFKLQLWLDWLYHV 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV LQEULHI  ‡ $Q//%'HJUHHRUD'LSORPDLQ/DZZLWKDWOHDVW\UVH[SHULHQFH in  Human  Rights ‡ Understanding   and   commitment   to   human   rights,   social   justice   and ��  change ‡ &DQ FRQGXFW HIIHFWLYH OHJDO LQYHVWLJDWLRQV DQG GRFXPHQW +XPDQ 5LJKWVYLRODWLRQV ‡ :RUNHIIHFWLYHO\ZLWKFRPPXQLWLHVDQGDJRRGFRPPDQGRI(QJOLVK and  Kiswahili  languages  

Email  your  appliFDWLRQOHWWHUDQG&9LQFOXGLQJ\RXUFXUUHQWVDODU\H[SHFWHGUHPXQHUDWLRQ three   professional   referees   and   day   time   telephone   contacts   to   jobs@imlu.org   with   the   subject  matter  ASSISTANT  LEGAL  REDRESS  AND  TRAINING  OFFICER

REPORTS  ANALYST  (Grade  7)  REF.  CODE:  HR  -­  05/2012 &KXUFK :RUOG 6HUYLFH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO 5HIXJHH 3URJUDP &:6,53  administers  Resettlement  Support  Center  (RSC)  in  Kenya.   Responsibility  (in  brief): To   ensure   the   timely   and   accurate   preparation   of   standard   and   ad   hoc   statistical  and  operations  reports. 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV LQEULHI  ‡ 0LQLPXP³2´/HYHOHGXFDWLRQRUHTXLYDOHQW ‡ $GYDQFHG NQRZOHGJH LQ 75$16$&7 64/ DQG 0LFURVRIW 64/ 6HUYHUGDWDEDVHGHVLJQVWRUHGSURFHGXUHVYLHZVDQGIXQFWLRQV ‡ 06%XVLQHVV,QWHOOLJHQFH'HYHORSPHQW6WXGLR %,'6  ‡ 'DWDEDVHVDQGDGYDQFHGFRPSXWHUNQRZOHGJH ‡ $QDO\WLFDOVNLOOVDQGH[FHOOHQWUHSRUWJHQHUDWLRQVNLOOVDPRQJRWKHUV

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28

Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

PROGRAMME  ASSISTANT   (REF:   UNSOM/2012/002)   -­   UNICEF   SOMALIA   &DWHJRU\ DQG *UDGH /HYHO *6 7\SH RI &RQWUDFW )L[HG 7HUP $SSRLQWPHQW &DVH 1XPEHU  /HQJWK RI &RQWUDFW 2QH \HDU 2UJDQL]DWLRQ 8QLW 1XWULWLRQ ± &DVK 7UDQVIHUV 'XW\ 6WDWLRQ 866& Nairobi   5HVSRQVLELOLW\ LQEULHI WRSHUIRUPDYDULHW\RILQIRUPDWLRQJDWKHULQJ PRQLWRULQJWHFKQLFDODQGDGPLQLVWUDWLYHVHUYLFHVRIPRGHUDWHVFRSHDQG GLI¿FXOW\LQVXSSRUWRIWKHFDVK3URJUDPDFWLYLWLHV 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV LQEULHI  ‡ Completion   of   secondary   education,   preferably   supplemented   by   WHFKQLFDO RU XQLYHUVLW\ FRXUVHV LQ D ¿HOG UHODWHG WR WKH ZRUN RI WKH organization ‡ 6L[\HDUVRIDGPLQLVWUDWLYHZRUN ‡ Excellent  interpersonal  and  communication  skills ‡ &RPPLWPHQWDQGGULYHZULWWHQDQGVSRNHQ(QJOLVKORFDOODQJXDJH an  asset.

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POLICY  ADVISOR  BASED  IN  NAIROBI ,QQRYDWLRQV IRU 3RYHUW\ $FWLRQ ,3$  LV D JOREDO RUJDQL]DWLRQ ZLWK RSHUDWLRQV LQ RYHU  FRXQWULHV ,3$.HQ\D ,3$.  LV ,3$¶V ROGHVW DQG ODUJHVW FRXQWU\ RI¿FH DQG WKH VLWH RI WZR RI ,3$¶V VFDOHXS LQLWLDWLYHV .HQ\D¶V 1DWLRQDO 6FKRRO %DVHG 'HZRUPLQJ 3URJUDPPH DQG WKH 6DIH Water  Programme. Responsibilities: ‡ To  lead  key  elements  of  major  planned  expansion  efforts. ‡ 6XSSRUWWKHGULYHIRUVFDOHDQGVXVWDLQDELOLW\RIWKHSURJUDPPHV ‡ 6WUHQJWKHQLQVWLWXWLRQDOFDSDFLW\IRUORQJWHUPLPSOHPHQWDWLRQ ‡ Help  maintain  current  funding  and  identify  mechanisms  for  additional   ORQJWHUPSURJUDPPH¿QDQFLQJ 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV ‡ %DFKHORU¶V GHJUHH LQ 'HYHORSPHQW6RFLDO 6WXGLHV RU +XPDQLWDULDQ 6WXGLHVSUHIHUDEO\ZLWKVLJQL¿FDQWUHOHYDQFHWRSXEOLFKHDOWK ‡ 6RXQGNQRZOHGJHRI*RYHUQPHQWRI.HQ\DRSHUDWLRQVDQGGHFLVLRQ PDNLQJSURFHVVHVDWWKH1DWLRQDOOHYHO ‡ Knowledge  of  the  working  systems  and  structures  of  the  Ministries   of   Education   and   Public   Health   and   Sanitation   will   be   an   added   DGYDQWDJH 6HQG&9WR([HFXWLYH6HOHFWLRQ6WUDWHJLF'LPHQVLRQV/LPLWHG0DQDJHPHQWDQG 'HYHORSPHQW&RQVXOWDQWV(PDLOLQIR#VWUDWHJLFGOFRP


PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATION

EXECUTIVE

WHY

he idea of mastering manners in today’s business world is fast becoming essential. Businesses are now aware that one’s ability to develop and manage soft skills is as important as technical skills.

personal MATTERS

W

e live in a hyper competitive world, and standing out in today’s crowded market place is essential. Despite constantly competing for attention, the one thing that can make you stand out is the same thing that your competitors will find impossible to duplicate - your personal brand.

Use personal branding to distinguish yourself in our era of extreme visibility and ubiquitous ego – your competitors can’t copy the essence of who you are. How you present yourself online, write an email, your business etiquette, networking savvy, public speaking and interviewing skills - all these communicate your personal brand and reputation. Think of some of the greatest personal brands in business, politics, entertainment and athletics, from Nelson Mandela to Kipchoge Keino, the one thing they have in common is that they are seen, heard and remembered for the right reasons. So look to create a powerful personal brand that exudes influence, confidence, credibility and persuasive power. Three hallmarks of a great personal brand are authenticity, consistency and packaging. An authentic personal brand must be unique but it must also match with your core message and resonate with your target market. Be who you are, but be the best that you can be. The best brands are consistent and this should be no different from your personal brand. Be consistent in the way you carry yourself at all times, from your language to your behaviour. You cannot display the best etiquette and image at work and then make offensive comments once alcohol loosens your mouth at your local pub in the evening – your brand will be undermined. I’m not saying you cannot have fun and let go but be aware that your personal brand is always on display even when you think you are not being watched. Finally, package yourself (literally, the clothes you wear) to engage your market – you can subtly and silently influence your audience visually through interesting and appropriate dressing. Use the psychology of colour to enhance your speech and wear clothes that flatter your body shape.

with Janet Adetu

Your personal brand is the influence and attention you command. It is the image you portray, how you look and how you present yourself. It is what is unique and valuable about you. Have you ever asked yourself what you want people to remember when they think of you? Just like any of the best products in the market, everyone should develop a personal brand strategy to engage our target market or audience and build brand loyalty. It’s really about becoming the CEO of your own image and creating a map to lead people to what you want them to think of you.

Executive Manners

branding

T

MANNERS.

Becoming a leader of repute, respect and recognition involves learning the rules of the game. Though unwritten, people expect you to understand the rules. Executive manners will guide your business and social behaviour and set the necessary framework for building your moral IQ. Executive manners are learnt daily and practiced regularly to outclass your competitors. They become a part of you and your daily demeanour. Ultimately, executive manners will be your route to success in your professional and personal life. RPresent yourself positively RCommunicate carefully RNetwork and build rapport and relationships RPersonal conduct and body language RGain social interacting skills First Impression You only get one chance to make a good first impression so put your best image forward. It will ensure a good reputation and propel you to the top. Your appearance, clothes, gestures, words and actions should be congruent with your life goals and values. Feeling Good When on-point, your executive manners display a spring or bounce in your step and boost your self-esteem while exuding an air of confidence. They also enable you to navigate any awkward situation. Leader skills You can spot a leader from a mile away as they have that exceptional attribute. Mastering your soft skills will exhibit leadership abilities that make others want to know you better and benefit from your experience. Interpersonal Rapport Networking skills allow you to work a room with confidence, comfort and ease. Know the tricks of small talk and public speaking. Respect Respect is earned and comes to whom it is due. A perfect gentleman or elegant lady never goes unnoticed. Carrying yourself with grace and calm garners the epitome of respect. Develop your executive manners and see how much respect you are able to earn. Individuals with impeccable manners are an invaluable asset to any organisation, you will lead and achieve results - the ultimate objective of every organisation.

Assess your personal brand in 2012 and discover what is missing in your professional and personal life, then work on it – whether it is upgrading your wardrobe, joining an organisation like Toastmasters (http://www. toastmasters.org/) to improve your public speaking or taking a business etiquette course.

R

emember, the moment you step out in public you are selling yourself, consciously or subconsciously you are being judged by others, so project a level of personal impact and presence appropriate for your personal brand. “ YOUR COMPETITORS CAN’T COPY THE ESSENCE OF WHO YOU ARE”

THank You

DEREK BBANGA

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SITAWA NAMWALIE. A POET, A VOICE, AN INSPIRATION Describe Betty Muragori aka Sitawa Namwalie: I eat life with a big spoon. The world of ideas seduces me. I am often described by others as bold and fearless, but I am only human.

Where does your motivation come from? My poetry is an enquiry of the human condition. What is it that we all have in common? I read literature in search of answers. And then I have a desire to tell stories. Just start listening to people around you and you will hear the highly evolved Kenyan story telling technique, not only traditional but new updated forms. It is in the way we use language. It is in the way we interact with each other. There are visual stories as well as spoken ones. We have a diversity in this country that is our gift. It creates a juxtaposition that generates a unique energy. If you develop the ability to see these intangibles you will find multiple lodes of gold to mine.

What inspired your latest career transition? I tired of the false promise of ‘Development Aid’. I saw it just extinguished African initiative and created dependency. I felt I was helping to hold the continent down. I know that the mind creates reality. We see how we are. We create what we are. And so I set out to generate a new way of thinking and a new way of seeing for the whole of Africa. I am after your mind!

What advice would you offer budding Poets in Kenya today? First you must read and read dangerously. Through reading you will be inspired and learn your craft. You must develop self-knowledge and knowledge of your country. Who are you? Where do you come from? Getting a good grounding in the history of your country and continent is critical.

ART SUCCESS

.

STORY

You are an Environmental Scientist, a Thespian, a former Sportswoman of National acclaim, a consultant in development and a noted Poet. You have had several careers and lived many lives. Which career energized you the most? In the moment, each career energized me. I bring a whole lot of passion to living life. Being a poet has a special place in my soul. Just thinking about being a poet completes me. As a poet, I love being on stage - it just feels like home. Writing poetry comes extremely easily to me, there is no struggle. It is the one thing I can do regardless of how I am feeling.

Describe the experience you have had thus far as a Poet... I have had an almost miraculous experience with poetry. I can capture feelings, paint pictures, capture the whole history of this country and continent in a few words. I am still amazed. And through my poetry I can connect with people. I write and they hear their lives and experiences. I am telling a country’s stories. What have your biggest challenges been thus far? I have several challenges, primarily financial and time related. I need to balance work with my artistic vision. Then there is the challenge of audiences. Nairobi operates in discrete pockets or bubbles. You need strategies that allow you to penetrate these bubbles. On an artistic level I wish I spoke several African languages. My poetry is beginning to ask for it. I want to create more texture, nuance and understanding. What have been your greatest successes? My first show on June 27th 2008 was a magical experience. From nowhere, and with nothing except the powers of persuasion, I created myself as a poet and performer. It has been a great success to perform to such diverse audiences, from Muthaiga Club to the Langata Women’s Prison. Seeing these very different audiences respond to the unfolding performance, sometimes in the same way and sometimes in completely different ways, was humbling. I felt a common humanity. Of all the poems you have written, which one has had the greatest impact on an audience? My signature piece is called “Say my Name”. After I wrote it I could not write anything else for three months. And I am not sure I wrote it. It felt like it just passed through me effortlessly. In the Langata Women’s Prison show, women whispered their real names as they

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passed back to their cells. Just the one name, “Wanjiru, Atieno, Njeri, Nafula, Kamene …” it was magical.

Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

Most importantly, find your own voice. Don’t imitate anyone, but learn from others. When I read or listen to other poets I expand my repertoire, I see new things, I am stretched, but I remain me. One of the saddest experiences is watching African spoken word poets imitating African-Americans. It confuses me and I can’t hear what they are saying... Speak yourself, don’t speak someone else.

Our abandoned lives Can no longer straddle the world We are forsaken, In one place, lost, Another recently found, Who are we then? Our abandoned lives, Beg attention, There is no response, Inimitable sounds go untended, Find no reason for being, They lose shape, Softly fade away, Become buoyant memories of unfathomable sorrow I am indolent in my new life, trying to find a fit. I notice nothing.


STR

AIG

I

HT

TO TAT TH ED A E A GEN R DA” TS

“A S

t’s a privilege to have been given carte blanche to wax lyrical from month to month on a subject very close to my heart. It’s a privilege which I wish to embrace and to exploit to the utmost. Let me, in this initial offering, declare an interest:

This is first and foremost a business magazine, destined to the business community. I ask you, however: After the business meetings have been concluded, after the business lunches have been enjoyed, after the business cocktail parties have been attended, after the rounds of business golf have been played, after the business deals have been sealed and after handsome profits have, hopefully, been made, what next? I would like to suggest that next is a life nurtured and sustained by the creative arts. And I would like to suggest further that the business world should feel an obligation, whenever possible, to help nurture and sustain the creative world. How often have I heard someone declare: I am just too busy to read novels; I have no time to go to the theatre; why should I spend so much money on a painting or a picture; watching films is a waste of time; poetry? Not for me. And then, there are dismissive claims such as Kenya is a literary desert – this one has been around for about thirty yearsKenyans don’t write original plays; there’s no such thing as Kenyan cinema… and so on. Such sentiments may be put down to lack of exposure or to insufficient knowledge but every effort should be made to dispel them. For the truth is that a society’s cultural dimension informs its social and political dimensions, and an investment must be made to create citizens who are cultured, cultivated and refined in their tastes and conduct. Citizens who are less likely to splash their pedestrian fellows with muddy rain water as they drive along at break neck speed. Citizens who are less

“ The business world should feel an obligation, whenever possible, to help nurture and sustain the creative world”

“ A society’s cultural dimension informs its social and political dimensions”

likely to drive through a red light when there is no policeman in sight. Citizens who are less likely to race ahead on the side walk and cut in on other drivers in the midst of a mega traffic jam. Citizens who appreciate the efficacy of awaiting one’s turn in a queue. Citizens who are less inclined to offer bribes. Because after the flyovers and eight lane carriageways have been completed and the cyber cities have been built, Kenyans will need to have citizens worthy of Vision 2030. And I would wager that such ideal citizens will be lovers of literature, art, music and poetry. So where does the business person fit into this train of thought? I think by replacing the king or queen, prince or princess, of times past, as a patron of the arts. It would be easy to leave all to Government, with a capital “G,” but Government has enough on its hands and Government needs help from others aware of and committed to the communal cause toward a cultured citizenry. I have deliberately avoided describing the citizenry as ‘civilised’, lest I open up centuriesold wounds on the skin of self-perception. We might look to our business world to help rehabilitate and expand the Kenya National Theatre, for example. To help in building more theatres and libraries across the country, to offer significant prizes to allow our creative artists to work in solitude without fear of starvation for stretches of time. And so in this column, I shall have the stated agenda of highlighting events and personalities, developments and debates linked to all things creative and cultural, of which the business community ought to be aware. I look forward to our association.

Reach John at www.johnsisbiokumu.com Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

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WORKING OUT

W

Shake Away Malaise! Do the 15

hatever your spiritual or scientific beliefs may be, one thing is for certain: Human bodies were neither made for, nor have they adapted to, the urban modern city environment.As Gareth Roriston,Coach for the internationally acclaimed and Kenya based Fitness Company,Wildfitness,says,“Exercise is not just good for you, it is the default human state of being. Not exercising or moving is bad and causes degradation and disease of both body and mind over time.” How can we remedy the situation without abandoning our synthetic city environment? Should we take off our shoes and head back into the bundu to live as our forebears once did? No need to be so drastic, just make sure to move, however lightly, every day to combat the deterioration caused by a sedentary office lifestyle.

Reach Gareth through www.worldfitness.com

Take 15 minutes during your lunch break… do these 15 exercises 15 times each

2

Side leg lifts. With one hand supporting you on the wall. Lift your left leg up as high as it will go, directly in front of you and then behind you. Repeat and alternate leg.

3 4 5 32

11

1

Office chair tricep dips. Place your hands directly alongside your body on a chair, extend your legs out straight, take the weight of your body onto your hands then lift up and lower down.

6 7

Pencil skirt squats. Place your feet hip width apart, or a comfortable stance so that if you jump up and down you feel balanced, then drift your hips backwards and drop as low as you can into a squat, bum to calves.

12

13

Office scuttle. Start at one edge of your office and criss-cross your legs as you walk sideways to the other side. So left foot moves ahead and right leg crosses behind, use opposite side on return.

14

Ab squeezes. While paying close attention to your breathing, tighten your abs as you breathe out and release as you breathe in. Speed up for more intensity

15

The umbrella shoulder stretch. Grab an umbrella, or a coat and grasp it firmly your hands just over shoulder width apart. Start with it in front of you with arms straight and locked and slowly try to bring it all the way to your back with your arms straightened.

Brittney crunches. Stand straight with feet apart and raise your arms, then rock your upper body to the left and the right keeping your abs tight.

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Laptop tricep extensions. Grab something relatively heavy and hold it in both hands, then lift it above your head and lower until your elbows are bent, then straighten.

Knee Raises. Lift your knee as high and close to your body as possible and alternate legs.

Office chair bum squeezes. Exactly what it sounds like. Squeeze and release…

9

Squat jumps. Jump and put your feet out and drop your hips into a squat, then jump and bring your feet in.

Jump. I hope this doesn’t need explaining. Jump up and down!!!

Shadow punches. Face forward and square your shoulders, make a fist and punch as hard as you can with a full extension of your arm. Four punches count as one movement.

8

Wall press ups. Place your palms against the wall and straighten your body out at an angle, so that your weight rests on your hands, bend your arms, bring your head and chest as close to the wall as you can and then straighten.

The lunge. Place your left leg in front of you, bent at a 90 degree angle and drop your right leg as far to the ground as it will go, switch sides.


FISCAL FITNESS

FISCALFITNESS. investing vs saving After the past two recessions (or was it the same downturn, the effects of which came in two waves?) the question of what you do with the money you make became not just a matter of personal preference, but an important economic evaluation. Essentially it boils down to whether you will commit your funds to investments or savings. Are you a risk-taker or will you play it safe in this volatile and adventurous market? takes a look at the forecast for the best options in 2012, come rain or shine…

SAVE WITH

INVEST IN

Gold and metals

Yourself

Residential properties

Transport Initiatives

Agricultural Land

Agro-business

Pension plans

Education initiatives

Currency diversification

Eco-solutions businesses

Saving accounts with interest

Smart property developments

IT’S NEVER TOO EARLY TO START A PENSION PLAN spoke to Fred Waswa, MD of Octagon Pension Services Limited on the prudence of investing in retirement at any age.

First, tell us about Octagon Pension Services Ltd. Octagon Pension Services is a limited liability company that provides retirement benefits services. Our core business is the provision of Pension Scheme Administration, Accounting, Trustee Support Services, and Settlement Trust Administration and Management Services. Our philosophy encourages long term relationships and working in partnership with our clients in providing a “Service Beyond Expectation”. Our offices are located at Mirage Plaza, 1st Floor, Mombasa Road. We are opening a branch office in Kisumu to cater for the Western Region. What is a Personal Pension Plan? This is an individual based investment and savings medium for retirement. Members of a group can join and make collective contributions. Why is it important to have a Pension Plan? It provides a source of income at retirement. It is also beneficial since one enjoys tax relief on the contributions remitted and interest earned. An individual is also able to secure a mortgage with the benefits as collateral. What are the Pension Plans options available on the market? Occupational schemes and Individual/Personal/Umbrella schemes.

pension

What are the Current Trends on Pension Plans - Globally and Locally? Locally, many people are being encouraged to save for retirement to decrease the dependency levels at retirement. The government is also insisting that employers have a pension plan for their staff and discouraging the provision of gratuity after exit of service. All Government and Parastatal schemes are also to change from what we call a Defined Benefit structure to Defined Contribution schemes. At what age should one begin this investment? There is no defined age to start making contributions for retirement but it is encouraged that individuals should start saving early in life. Anyone over 18 years of age can join the personal pension plan. What if I change employers quite often- what happens? Since it is a personal arrangement, change of employer does not affect the plan arrangement.No matter how many times you change employers, an individual does not lose out on the accumulated benefits. The member can consolidate and continue saving in the individual pension plan. What if I am unemployed? If one is unemployed, he or she can save through an Individual Pension Plan since saving for retirement is not meant only for those in employment. The contributions can be remitted directly into the scheme account. Remittances are typically made monthly, quarterly, half-yearly or annually depending on the financial circumstance of the member. If I am ready to start a plan today, what are the next steps? One is required to fill in a membership application form and provide a copy of his/her National ID, where a Deed of Adherence is prepared for the member once he or she starts making contributions. The Deed of Adherence is signed by the members and the Trustees to formalize the contract between the member and the scheme. The member can hence make his/her contributions by direct deposit to the bank or by standing order. It is as simple as that.

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PROMOTIONS

THE BUNDU BAG CANvas weight training equipment

#

WHAT WILL THE WORLD LOOK LIKE IN

20

12

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# of communication and transparency across # 2012:Acceleration cultures and generations through devices in the palm of our

hands @kevin. Kevin Systrom (CEO & Co-Founder of Instagram, a photo sharing service)

2012 it’s an election year. The same non-issue based # Prediction politics but this time around the voters will be wiser. PEV was a lesson@_RamzZy_Rama

# Big Banks fear Google, ignore underserved> India epicentre of

Banking 2.0 Entrepreneurship goes global vi smartphone, women participate@carolrealini. Carol Realini (CEO & Founder of Obopay mobile-banking service)

# Praying for Kenyan Leadership, Kenyan People and the future of the country@kenya2012. Jamhuri ya Kenya

# The Mayans were right: Bieber and Carlos Santana performing “Let it Be� can only mean the collpase of civilization@jbj. JBJ (Founding editor at ProfHack)

is a year of action. It seems a lot more hopeful than last year. # 2012 Lots of lessons were learned@suebuku is all about handmade projects existing beside & in enormous, # 12 complicated productions. Big, small, fast, slow, all at once! @ nicomulhy. Nico Mulhy (avvaClassical Music Composer)

1. Kenya will vote foolishly & complain afterwards. # Predictions: 2. More Kenyans will appreciate the arts an ever before@SalivaVic Hate...More Love is what I dream for in 2012. @ # Less seankingston. Sean Kingston (International Pop star) for the increase of importance in social media and watch #Watch also for the new VAT Act. Very Annoying Tax likely to become even more annoying@Nikhil_Hira.

the threat of the world ending will bring us all together... #Perhaps or it will just make the birth rates in Europe go up@arhseven World in 2012 will be mostly skint@DrenShaman. Anthony #The Houghton Follow us! @theEDITIONEA

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Green  Park  Golf  &  Country  Complex  :(050)  50048  ,        (050)  50049  Heritage  Hotels  :+254  (020)  4446651,  Fax:  +254  (020)  4446600  /  4446533, Email  :  sales@heritagehotels.co.ke,  Website  :  www.heritage-­‐eastafrica.com Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

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MUSINGS WITH JOY ODERA

REAL FREEDOM. ...is the liberation of the mind to take responsibility and accountability.

I

n my heady days at university, I was one of those impassioned activists easily excited by the mere mention of the word FREEDOM in a sentence and quickly bought into anything with the word ‘Free’. I signed petitions. I marched, picketed, sat-in, boycotted, and even carried the placards- ‘Free Mandela!’ ‘Free Mugabe!’ ‘Free the Hostages!’ ‘Free Lunches!’, ‘A Free Constitution’ and a dozen more! Half the time, I did not fully comprehend the essence of those rallying calls-to-action…but the gratification of belonging to a purpose, that sense of doing something momentous, was inimitable. At one point, I revelled in the whole revolutionary look and abandoned my chemically straightened hair for a more natural look - the Afro. My bespoke clothes were packed away and traded for faded jeans, flowered shirts and fringed waistcoats. I gave up meat and took to wholesome grains and legumes. I stopped attending Sunday Mass and took up Eastern Meditation. Most significantly though, I disparaged anyone who did not subscribe to my newfound ideals and spurned old friends who had the courage to critique my new way of life. My not-so-conventional parents indulged their only daughter’s metamorphosis. Father said it was good to express myself and that my free spirit had finally been set loose. Mother said that I was just going through a phase that would soon end. But, six months into my second year of ‘it’, as they termed my

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transformation, Father decided to have a word with me. Under the shade of a tree in the garden he said, “Daughter, it is upright and courageous to champion freedom for all humanity, but have you ever sat down to contemplate the meaning of real freedom?” Rolling my eyes to the sky, I asked, “What is real freedom Dad?” “Real freedom is NOT the wanton liberty to do whatever you want, whenever you want my child! It is the liberation of the mind to take responsibility and accept accountability. It starts in the mind and spreads to every aspect of your life. When you have achieved that, only then are you free, not before. You could be free behind bars and yet a prisoner right there on the street chanting freedom songs! Real freedom is not demanded, but gained. It does not impinge on another person’s right nor is it your signature on a piece of paper. It is the respect for that piece of paper. The totality of real freedom can be overwhelming!” I did not understand my father fully, but by the end of the year, I began to eschew some of my new firmly held beliefs and to seek father’s counsel a little more keenly.


REVIEWS. FILM:

SEARCHING FOR BOBBY FISCHER Paramount Studios; DVD Release Date: July 11, 2000; Run Time: 109 minutes; Language: English; Actors: Joe Mantegna, Ben Kingsley, Max Pomeranc, Joan Allen, Laurence Fishburne, Laura Linney

“Fresh African

A well written and researched film for the whole family, Searching for Bobby Fischer inspires humour, outrage and deep-seeded disappointment. The title refers to the search for a successor to Bobby Fischer (the American Chess Grandmaster and the 11th World Chess Champion) after his disappearance from competitive chess. It is the story of real life Josh Waitzkin, a child who possesses an intuitive grasp of chess.

BOOK:

QUEST: DISCOVERING YOUR HUMAN POTENTIAL

Authors: Deepak Chopra, Steven Covey, Thomas Moore, Bernie Siegel, David Whyte and Marianne Williamson One of the best collections on how to discover your potential, six influential leaders share their insights on personal growth and the quest for spiritual harmony. They offer vivid hope and an unsurpassed clarity of vision through practical ideas and new perspectives that are disarmingly simple yet strikingly profound. The audio format is a fine compliment and in some cases provides nuances, insights, and clarifications not possible in the printed form.

www.blancos.co.ke

RESTAURANT:

BLANCO’S LOUNGE AND GRILL

R T S

P

O

L

S

Blancos specialises in African cuisine with a modern twist. The menu is in Kiswahili with an English translation. My friend opted for vegetarian, Rojo la Mboga (mixed vegetables with cashew nuts in curry sauce) while I went for Matumbo na kunde (entrails and spinach in milk). Our accompaniment was an intriguing assortment of deep fried arrow roots, sweet potatoes and potato chips with delicious bean and sweet potato balls coated with bread crumbs.

I L G R

Our food took longer than we expected, though service was attentive. The entrails smelled and tasted good and were served in a traditional earthen pot. The mixed vegetables were sublime, tasted great and were presented fresh and full of colour. OVERALL: A great place for authentic and exciting Kenyan food for the modern Kenyan businessman/ woman. RATING * * * * *

or Fresh Sporty”

Location: Timau Plaza and at the Sports Grill in Galleria Mall Issue 01. February 2012 I WWW.theEDITION.CO.KE

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BRAIN PAIN PAGE

SUDOKU .

ANAGRAMS .

900100035416  (key  #  1)

4 7 8 3 9

1 5

6 7

COUNTRIES

ULTRA ASIA (9)

2 4

Medium

WORDWISE . OPUSCULE [oh-PUHS-kyool] Noun A small or minor work; A literary or musical work of small size. Origin: Latin roots, with opus meaning ‘work’ and cule which is a suffix that implies a diminutive version, as in molecule and fascicle

BIG MULE (7)

COLD ANTS (8) NEAR GYM (7) NICE LAD (7)

SLENDER :THAN (11) ANY ROW (6) A SNIP (5)

NEAR GIANT (9) LIZARDS WENT (11)

ANSWERS: Australia/ Belgium/ Scotland/ Germany/ Iceland/ Netherlands/ Norway/ Spain/ Argentina/Switzerland

2 5 9 3 7 9 8 6 3 2 8 4 1 4 8 3 6

ASTRONOMY RADIO SET (8) TRY MOLASSES (5, 6) REMOTE (6) VENUS IRE (8) A SLURP (6) LATEST LIE (9) EXIT RARER STARLET (5, 11) NASA TUTOR (9) GET RAY VIZOR (4, 7) HELLO BACK (5, 4) ANSWERS: asteroid/ solar system/meteor /universe/pulsar/satellite/extra terrestrial/ astronaut/zero gravity/ black hole

Each box, column and row holds numbers 1 through 9. Fill in the Name Date gaps without repeating Sudoku  Puzzle any numbers in the Fill  in  the  grid  so  that  every  row,  every  column,  and  every  3x3  box  contains  the  numbers  1  through  to  9. There  is  only  one  solution  to  the  puzzle. sequence.

MITIGATE [MIT-i-geyt] - Verb To lessen in force or intensity, as wrath, grief, harshness, or pain; moderate; To make less severe: to mitigate a punishment; To make (a person, one’s state of mind, disposition, etc.) milder or more gentle; mollify; appease; To become milder; lessen in severity. Origin: Latin roots with mit (soft) and agere (to cause).

Find these words in our wordpuzzle...

INUNDATE [in-uh n-deyt, -uhn-, in-uhn-deyt] - Verb To flood; cover or overspread with water; deluge; To overwhelm: inundated with letters of protest. Origin: Latin inundātus, past participle of inundāre to flood, overflow

KENYA

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BRAVE

CAREER CHIC

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE EDITION FREE

NAIROBI

POTENTIAL


Next month... In L’ORÉAL COMES TO TOWN! MEET PATRICIA ITHAU FORMER MISS KENYA & NOW CEO OF L’ORÉAL

SUSAN MAINGI on BEING A WOMAN in HUMAN RESOURCES

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

COMBATING MIDDLE CLASS MATERIALISM THE IMPORTANCE of STANDING APART from THE CROWD in ‘BRANDING YOU’!

... CONNECT WITH OUR COLUMNISTS... JT ADETU DEREK BBANGA

HOW TO: THE PERFECT C.V

JOHN SIBI-OKUMU JOY ODERA and SO MUCH MORE!


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The Edition