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Snail House, China, image: Reuters

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nail House, China We’ve all been there: nightmare neighbours, late night sirens and terrible smells from the dodgy takeaway downstairs can all make you wish you could just pick up your home and move it elsewhere. Well that’s exactly what Liu Lingchao of Liuzhou in China did. The travelling salesman has created his own portable house using plastic sheeting and bamboo poles and carries the 130lb structure around on his back like a snail. He can move up to 12 miles a day with his mobile home, but with only a few metres of space there’s no room for guests. hark House, Mexico The houses of Mexican architect Javier Senosiain Aguilar are famous for their fantastical representations of organic forms, but his shark house in Mexico City has to be one of his most outlandish. Shaped, unsurprisingly, like a beached extra from Jaws, the house is perched atop a crested wave of grass with its mouth gaping and eyes wide with aggression. The inside replicates that of the fish itself, with a skeleton of steel bars covered in a ceramic coating which smooths out any distinction between wall and floor. Blood-orange mosaics sit on top of this, giving the whole thing a distinctly living, biological glow.

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inchester Mystery House, USA Located in sunny California, the home of arms heiress Sara Winchester grew continuously in both size and chaos from 1884 until her death in 1922. Legend has it that Sara believed she had to keep adding to the building to appease the spirits of those killed by Winchester guns. She held nightly séances where she supposedly received design instruction, resulting in a sprawling, 4-acre gothic pile with architectural quirks such as staircases leading into the ceiling, doors leading to nowhere, and four fireplaces in a single small room. bode of Chaos, France To describe the Abode of Chaos, located in a rural village near Lyon, as a collection of 2,500 artworks is to severely underestimate the total sum of its parts. A surreal creation of artist Thierry Ehrmann, the house is a living repository for everything dark that lurks in his imagination. His ultimate aim is to convert the 17th century farmhouse into a ‘war zone’, with murals of dictators and sculptures of famous scenes of destruction scattered around the property. The local Neighbourhood Association meetings must be a joy to behold.

The Eccentrist  

A new quarterly magazine that offers a ‘meander away from the mainstream’ by documenting the more unusual and offbeat people, places and ide...

The Eccentrist  

A new quarterly magazine that offers a ‘meander away from the mainstream’ by documenting the more unusual and offbeat people, places and ide...

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