Page 11

Back in Taiyuan, one family’s refusal to move their relatives’ gravestones led to an impromptu high rise graveyard. Developers wanted to build an apartment block on the cemetery but one set of grave owners refused to move their dearly departed. Construction began on the site anyway, leaving the remaining graves stranded high up in the air as foundations were dug around them. The graves were eventually exhumed from the 10m high cemetery in December 2012 following an agreement with village officials.

Image: Reuters

A neglected car has failed to divert China’s rampant economic growth. It was left in a car park which was due to be demolished in the northern Chinese city of Taiyuan. Construction workers say they waited for the VW to be claimed but after 10 days they lost patience and worked around the vehicle. It is the latest in a series of stand-offs between state development and lone individuals. The most well known is probably that of Luo Baogen, whose house in Wenlin, east China, was encircled by a highway after his family refused the 220,000 yuan compensation package they were offered to move out. Baogen had just built the hosue at a cost of 600,000 yuan but eventually left the house in December 2012 after accepting a compensation package of 260,000 yuan. A village official suggested that he decided to move because his house was now in the middle of the road. Another property had a similar problem in the city of Taizhou. In this case, the homeowner agreed to sell the house to make way for the road, but then changed his mind. He is still there.

Image: Getty

Carry me home!

13

The Eccentrist  

A new quarterly magazine that offers a ‘meander away from the mainstream’ by documenting the more unusual and offbeat people, places and ide...

The Eccentrist  

A new quarterly magazine that offers a ‘meander away from the mainstream’ by documenting the more unusual and offbeat people, places and ide...

Advertisement